Saturday, November 17, 2012

Crook Foiled By Technology On Board Police Chopper

KMPH FOX 26 | Central San Joaquin Valley News Source  


FRESNO, Calif. (KMPH) -  A crook thought he could hide from Fresno Police in the dark, but he could not hide from the high-tech camera in a helicopter circling above that could see his body heat.

Officers say they found a broken window and fence outside Marshall's Auto Body off Belmont and Palm near the Tower District late Thursday night.

Until the business owner got there to let them in, a police chopper circled above them.

The crew on board used a camera with Forward Looking Infrared technology. It finds a heat source, even if you can't see it.

Once the business owner arrived, officers went straight to the heat source, found the man and arrested him.

He couldn't get inside the business before officers arrived so he's charged with attempted burglary.

Police say he was also a parolee on the run.

http://www.kmph-kfre.com

Bell OH-58 Kiowa, Pasadena Police Department, N911FA and Bell OH-58A Kiowa, Pasadena Police Department, N96BM: Accident occurred November 17, 2012 in Altadena, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N911FA  

http://registry.faa.gov/N96BM

http://www.airport-data.com/aircraft/N911FA

http://www.airport-data.com/aircraft/N96BM


NTSB Identification: WPR13GA044A 
14 CFR Public Use
Accident occurred Saturday, November 17, 2012 in Altadena, CA
Aircraft: BELL OH-58, registration: N911FA
Injuries: 5 Minor.


This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. : NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this public aircraft accident report.

On November 17, 2012, at 1558 Pacific standard time, a Pasadena Police Department (PD) helicopter struck another stationary Pasadena PD helicopter while maneuvering to park at the Pasadena Police Benedict Heliport, Altadena, California. N911FA, a Bell OH-58, was attempting to park on Pad 2 at the Pasadena PD heliport, and N96BM, a Bell OH-58A, was standing adjacent to Pad 1 with its main rotor blades turning when the collision occurred. Pasadena PD operated both helicopters under the provision of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, as public-use flights. Both helicopters sustained substantial damage. The commercial pilot and two passengers of N911FA received minor injuries. The commercial pilot and tactical flight officer (TFO) of N96BM (parked helicopter) received minor injuries. Also, one person on the ground received minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plans had been filed.

According to the Pasadena PD, N911FA departed the heliport toward the Rose Bowl to provide traffic support for a football game. About 3 minutes later, N96BM was moved out of the hangar and parked immediately adjacent to the west side of Pad 1 placing it in between Pad 1 and Pad 2. The parked helicopter’s engine was started and the main rotor blades were turning. A short time later, the Lieutenant on duty walked out of the office and toward the parked helicopter. The left side door of the parked helicopter was open, and the Lieutenant was standing on the landing gear skids when the accident occurred. About 3 minutes later, N911FA was observed approaching from the west on a right pattern for landing to the south on the main landing pad. Once over the main landing pad the helicopter was observed turning left, and then hover-taxied toward Pad 2. Once the helicopter reached Pad 2 it turned to the right, and as it settled to the ground, the main rotor blades contacted the main rotor blades of the standing helicopter.



NTSB Identification: WPR13GA044B
14 CFR Public Use
Accident occurred Saturday, November 17, 2012 in Altadena, CA
Aircraft: BELL OH-58A, registration: N96BM
Injuries: 5 Minor.


This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. : NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this public aircraft accident report.

On November 17, 2012, at 1558 Pacific standard time, a Pasadena Police Department (PD) helicopter struck another stationary Pasadena PD helicopter while maneuvering to park at the Pasadena Police Benedict Heliport, Altadena, California. N911FA, a Bell OH-58, was attempting to park on Pad 2 at the Pasadena PD heliport, and N96BM, a Bell OH-58A, was standing adjacent to Pad 1 with its main rotor blades turning when the collision occurred. Pasadena PD operated both helicopters under the provision of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, as public-use flights. Both helicopters sustained substantial damage. The commercial pilot and two passengers of N911FA received minor injuries. The commercial pilot and tactical flight officer (TFO) of N96BM (parked helicopter) received minor injuries. Also, one person on the ground received minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plans had been filed.

According to the Pasadena PD, N911FA departed the heliport toward the Rose Bowl to provide traffic support for a football game. About 3 minutes later, N96BM was moved out of the hangar and parked immediately adjacent to the west side of Pad 1, placing it in between Pad 1 and Pad 2. The parked helicopter’s engine was started and the main rotor blades were turning. A short time later, the Lieutenant on duty walked out of the office and toward the parked helicopter. The left side door of the parked helicopter was open, and the Lieutenant was standing on the landing gear skids when the accident occurred. About 3 minutes later, N911FA was observed approaching from the west on a right pattern for landing to the south on the main landing pad. Once over the main landing pad the helicopter was observed turning left, and then hover-taxied toward Pad 2. Once the helicopter reached Pad 2 it turned to the right, and as it settled to the ground, the main rotor blades contacted the main rotor blades of the standing helicopter toward Pad 2.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 911FA        Make/Model: OH58      Description: BELL OH-58
  Date: 11/18/2012     Time: 0000

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Minor     Mid Air: Y    Missing: 
  Damage: Substantial

LOCATION
  City: ALTADENA   State: CA   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  N968BM BELL OH-58A ROTORCRAFT AND N911FA BELL OH-58 ROTORCRAFT COLLIDED AT 
  THE POLICE HELIPAD, THE 3 PERSONS ON N968BM AND THE 3 PERSONS ON N911FA 
  SUSTAINED MINOR INJURIES, ALTADENA, CA

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   1     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   2     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   2     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: Other


  FAA FSDO: VAN NUYS, CA  (WP01)                  Entry date: 11/19/2012 



IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 968BM        Make/Model: OH58      Description: BELL OH-58A 
  Date: 11/18/2012     Time: 0000

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Minor     Mid Air: Y    Missing: N
  Damage: Substantial

LOCATION
  City: ALTADENA   State: CA   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  N968BM BELL OH-58A ROTORCRAFT AND N911FA BELL OH-58 ROTORCRAFT COLLIDED AT 
  THE POLICE HELIPAD, THE 3 PERSONS ON N968BM AND THE 3 PERSONS ON N911FA 
  SUSTAINED MINOR INJURIES, ALTADENA, CA

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   1     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   2     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   2     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: VAN NUYS, CA  (WP01)                  Entry date: 11/19/2012 


 


Federal investigators arrived in Pasadena on Sunday to examine the wreckage of two police helicopters that collided.  

Agents from the National Transportation Safety Board spent the morning inspecting the damaged helicopters, which crashed about 4 p.m. Saturday at the Pasadena Police Department's helipad in Altadena.

Six people were injured - five officers and one civilian observer. All were taken to area hospitals to be treated for minor injuries.

Officials say the helicopters' rotary blades may have touched during a maneuver. One helicopter was taking off while the other was landing at the time of the incident.

The NTSB has not confirmed what may have caused the accident. They said they plan to watch any available surveillance video and question the Pasadena police officers involved in the incident.

Pasadena Police Chief Phillip Sanchez said his department is cooperating fully.

"There are some lessons learned," Sanchez said. "So, we're going to look at this. I think that's the value of the NTSB."

Each Bell OH-58 helicopter was extensively damaged. One helicopter was on routine assignment to calls for service and the other was assigned to the USC-UCLA game at the Rose Bowl. Each helicopter had a pilot and an observer. Two of the injured were not on board.

The helicopters monitor not only Pasadena, but also Altadena, Glendale and Monrovia. Some residents were concerned that the damaged helicopters could affect police patrol coverage. Authorities say there's nothing to worry about.

Related Content
Story: 2 Pasadena helicopters crash; 6 injured

"Having two helicopters down is a major problem for us," said Lt. Phlunte Riddle with Pasadena police, "but because we have six, four of which are still completely operational, we will be able to patrol our area as well as provide our mutual aid service to other areas in our partnerships and our taskforce."


http://abclocal.go.com

Five people were injured when two Pasadena police helicopters collided late Saturday afternoon, according to Pasadena police.

At around 4 p.m., one chopper was arriving at the Pasadena Police Department's airfield in Altadena and the other was preparing to take off, according to Pasadena Police Lt. Phlunte Riddle. The two craft somehow collided and both ended up on the ground with damage. Rain was falling at the time of the accident.

Each helicopter was carrying a pilot and one passenger. An observer on the ground was also involved in the accident, Riddle said.

One helicopter was assisting traffic officers as tens of thousands of fans departed the Rose Bowl after the UCLA-USC football game, Riddle said. The other was on routine patrol above Pasadena and other San Gabriel Valley cities.

All five people were taken to a local hospital as a "precautionary measure," Riddle said. Their injuries did not appear to be serious.

"We were real lucky," Riddle said.

The exact cause of the accident remains unclear, Riddle said. Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board were on route to the site, Riddle said. She said NTSB would determine whether the Federal Aviation Administration would conduct an inquiry.
 


Russian airline to begin non-stop service to Jamaica

KINGSTON, Jamaica (JIS) -- On January 1, 2013, Russian airline, Transaero, will begin nonstop service from Moscow to Montego Bay, using a Boeing 777 with 300 seats.
 

This was announced by Minister of Tourism and Entertainment, Dr Wykeham McNeill, at a press briefing held on Thursday.

He noted that the flights are being organized by Russian tour operator, Biblio Globus, in association with Transaero.

“The flights will run for three months initially; however, we are in discussions with them to continue into the summer and to provide the service for the entire year. We are also formalizing plans to fly in a group of Russian media representatives to help promote destination Jamaica in Russia,” McNeill said.

He added that the ministry is optimistic that the Russian market will provide significant returns, as the minimum stay by visitors from that market is 10 nights, which is twice the average stay of visitors from traditional markets, such as the United States.

For his part, Russian ambassador to Jamaica, Vladimir Polenov, noted, "There is a lot to be discovered here in Jamaica and I am sure the coming Russian invasion will bring a wave of very engaged people."

“The direct flights to Montego Bay mean not only Russian tourists will come to Jamaica, but we hope that our Jamaican friends will use this opportunity to come to Russia,” Polenov added.

Transaero is the second largest airline out of Russia, which flies to 40 countries on 130 routes and has hubs in Moscow, St Petersburg and Yekaterinburg. They operate flights between Moscow and Belorussia, Ukraine and Uzbekistan.

Meanwhile, confirmation has also been received for service out of the Czech Republic for this winter. Exim Tours, which is owned by German tour operator, Meir’s Velt Reisen, will operate a charter from Prague starting December 28, 2012. The flight is to be shared with Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic, with 100 seats designated for Jamaica with 10 rotations.

Also in support of this flight, 100 travel agents will be coming from Europe for a week, to tour the entire island in the last week of November.

The tourism minister also stated that for this winter, there will be nonstop service out of Paris, France, which will be operated by French tour operator, Look Voyages (Voy-aje), providing 350 seats.

“Prior to this year, we shared this flight with the Dominican Republic. However, it is now a direct flight to Jamaica and we will benefit from the full complement of 350 seats, bringing 100 additional seats to Jamaica,” McNeill said.

He also confirmed that following discussions with TUI, there will be flights out of Scandinavia for winter 2013/14, from Stockholm, Sweden, to Montego Bay, using their new 787 Dream-liner. Potentially, this flight will provide an additional 28,000-room night on a fortnightly basis.

In addition, Thomas Cook Nordic has started a Jamaican program, using the Condor flight via Frankfurt.

“It has sold well and they have now indicated that they will offer service from Stockholm on a fortnightly basis with their own aircraft, an Airbus 330 for winter 2013-2014, which will further open up the Scandinavian market. This is in keeping with our strategy to open new frontiers,” McNeill said.

British Airways will also maintain its three flights to Kingston and Virgin Atlantic Airways its two flights to Montego Bay, but a third flight will commence on November 16. Additionally, TUI will add a second flight from Gatwick to Montego Bay this summer.

TUI has also added a flight for the upcoming winter season fortnightly out of Gatwick, taking the total number of flights to Jamaica to four. This fortnightly flight will become a weekly service in May 2013.


Source:   http://www.caribbeannewsnow.com

Fastjet takes EasyJet low-cost model into African airspace: Sir Stelios Haji-Ioannou's low-cost African airline is ready for takeoff in Tanzania

The low-cost model pioneered by Sir Stelios Haji-Ioannou that rocked Europe's traditional airlines is spreading across Africa. Tickets went on sale last week for the first flights on Fastjet, the latest brainchild of the Greek entrepreneur, which will start flying from Dar es Salaam in Tanzania at the end of the month for prices starting at 32,000 Tanzanian shillings (£13) – plus the inevitable baggage charges and taxes.

While Fastjet has yet to secure the final paperwork for its transnational routes, it expects to be selling Kenyan and Ugandan destinations alongside its regional service within weeks, and ultimately aims to grow into a pan-African low-cost airline.

Fastjet's chief executive, Ed Winter, a former director of easyJet under Haji-Ioannou, said: "It takes a long time in Africa to work beyond the bureaucracy and the politics, but the vision is a network across Africa."

The business has merged with Fly540, an airline that will gradually disappear as Fastjet grows, but gives it assets in Angola and Ghana as well as east Africa. Broader expansion will mean working with other airlines, to circumvent red tape, although consumers will fly in aircraft branded with Fastjet's African grey parrot logo and book through the same website.

Africa is ripe for aviation investment, with huge distances between cities and poor road and rail infrastructure. However, a poor safety record has blighted African airlines, with many carriers barred from European airspace by safety regulators.

Winter said: "At the moment, getting around is incredibly difficult. Put in a reliable service and people will want it. We'll be bringing travel to people who don't even dream of flying." He promised safety would be "everyone's number one priority" with pilot training consistent and centralized.

He said the cost of flying in Africa averaged four times that of Europe and that savings were clearly possible: "It's the standard low-cost model. You utilize assets, plan properly, get smart people to be efficient and drive lower costs.

"Fast turnarounds will be a challenge – some airports in Africa are not equipped to deal with that. But the lessons we've learned around the world from low-cost airlines will be imported into Africa."

Haji-Ioannou, who first got the business plan under way in partnership with Lonrho, retains a 5% shareholding and a consultancy agreement. He will join Fastjet's board but will not,Winter said, be "hands-on".

Winter hopes the African grey parrot is an apposite logo: "It's smart, and lives the longest of them all."


Source:   http://www.guardian.co.uk

UK News: Hello, It's Your Pilot Speaking. I Am About To Go Unconscious....

Sunday November 18,2012
By Ted Jeory
 

Two weeks ago Captain Tristan Loraine, a former British Airways pilot who retired on medical grounds in 2006, sat at his computer to type the email he had been hoping to send for years. He and fellow medically-retired air crew he had spent the past few years trying to expose what they believe is one of the great ­global scandals of our times: that the air on passenger jets is not always safe.

Then last month Professor Clement Furlong, an expert in biochemistry and organophosphates at the University of Washington in Seattle, gave them their Eureka moment. His research showed there are more potentially dangerous toxins in jet engine oil than previously thought, poisons which can contribute to nausea, dizziness and long-term physiological damage.

For Mr Loraine and the Global Cabin Air Quality Executive, a coalition he assembled from crew unions, the findings are “exceedingly significant” because oil leaks can contaminate cabin air.

Mr Loraine, a former official in British Airline Pilots’ Association, which he accuses of cowardly keeping quiet on the matter, said: “On May 1, 2001, I got a call that changed my life. A colleague told me he had been exposed to contaminated air and collapsed, would lose his job and asked me to investigate. I was a union rep and so I did.

“With the support of many unions and individuals, today, 11 years after my telephone call, here we have a new major victory.”

The issue is one of the most controversial but least publicised in the airline industry, which dismisses Mr Loraine and others as conspiracy theorists. Largely unknown to ­passengers, pilots don oxygen masks mid-flight at least once a month after being affected by fumes entering the cockpit and cabin. In some cases, Mayday calls have been sent, emergency landings made and crews ­ferried to hospital.

The episodes, recorded by the Civil Aviation Authority as “fume events”, are caused by what many believe is a fundamental design flaw . In almost all jets, unfiltered air is circulated via a “bleed” system . Air is sucked in through the engines, into a compressor unit then into a pipe to the cabin.

That air is recycled every few minutes but problems occur when small amounts of oil leak during the bleeding process. Worn or faulty bearing seals can make the leaks worse. To withstand the high temperatures of jet engines, lubricants are made of synthetic compounds such as the organophosphate TCP . At high temperatures and pressures, the chemical make-up can change to produce potentially dangerous toxins.

Professor Furlong has found more harmful toxins in the oil than previously thought .

Mr Loraine and Dr Susan Michaelis, a former pilot who researched her PhD on the issue after having to retire on medical grounds, say it further validates Aerotoxic Syndrome, a chronic condition resulting from exposure to “fume events” which is not yet recognised by doctors.

They say pilots and cabin crew are more vulnerable than passengers because they fly far more but even single exposures can be harmful depending on the genetic make-up of the individual.

The Sunday Express has seen footage of one episode during a flight in the US, while two years ago, American television filmed a pilot being stretchered off a plane. Both he and his co-pilot lost their medical licences to fly and four of the cabin crew have still not returned to work.

Airlines insist they comply with air quality standards but two settlements have been secured by former cabin crew in the US and Australia. In both cases airlines and manufacturers refused to admit general ­liability. Such an admission could see exceedingly expensive litigation. Boeing’s new 787 Dreamliner, however, does not use a bleed air ­system.

Professor Furlong said : “Airlines never let the passengers know they have been exposed to anything, so if they experience symptoms following a flight, their doctors would not have a clue what might be wrong.” However, Professor Michael Bagshaw, a former head of health at BA, highlights a study by Cranfield University in Buckinghamshire last year . It found no dangers.

Professor Bagshaw, listed as an adviser to Airbus, has his own theory about why pilots often rely on oxygen masks. He says in many cases they are exhibiting the “classic” symptoms of hyperventilation due to stress. They smell the fumes, they become fearful and panic.

Mr Loraine said: “When I had my emergency landings in Heathrow and stood and watched passengers getting off, some coughing, some with paper up their noses due to the fumes, were they all mass hyperventilating ?” He hopes the airlines will move away from bleed air systems but for now wants them to use safer lubricants.

When the Sunday Express asked Virgin and BA for written assurances that inhaling heated jet engine oil fumes is totally safe, neither would answer directly.

Virgin replied: “The health, safety and wellbeing of our passengers and crew is our top priority. As with all British airlines we operate to the strict regulations and standards set out by the CAA and the European Aviation Safety Industry.”

BA said: “We would not operate an aircraft if we believed it posed a health or safety risk to our customers or crew.

“The cockpit/cabin is the normal place of work of more than 13,000 cabin crew members and 3,000 pilots employed by British ­Airways and we see no trends in sickness rates which would indicate a link with cabin air issues.”

Dr Rob Hunter, a former pilot and head of safety and security at Balpa, said: “The cabin is vulnerable to engine fume contamination because there is no filter. It is a problem [but] it is a problem of how the argument is presented.

“It is a very odd thing about this debate how much is put forward by people other than ­toxicologists.”

A CAA spokesman said: “We will continue to work closely with the airline industry to maintain safety standards on board UK aircraft.”

Source:  http://www.express.co.uk

Aviation officials look to ensure that ice won’t ground more planes: Minot International Airport (KMOT), North Dakota

November 17, 2012

By JILL SCHRAMM, Minot Daily News

 

Minot airport officials want changes in ground-handling operations to avoid another de-icing snafu like the one that grounded planes last weekend.

A spokesman for the company that handles de-icing at Minot International Airport reports that changes are on the way, and that could be good news for some other North Dakota airports as well.

Problems occurred over the Veterans Day weekend when the Delta-owned ground-handling company, DGS, had both its primary de-icing truck and backup truck break down, leaving airlines without a way to de-ice and many out-going passengers stranded. Planes couldn't get in the air Saturday and Sunday, and some flights didn't resume until Monday afternoon.

Jim Hatlelid, chairman of the Minot City Council's Airport Committee, said he plans to ask the manager of DGS to address the committee Nov. 26 to discuss the breakdown and explain how future problems will be prevented.

"They have to understand what kind of name this gives the Minot airport," he said. "We have to see that the passengers are taken care of."

Russell Cason, spokesman for Delta in Altanta, said the company has approved stationing a third de-icing truck in Minot that can be transported as needed to any North Dakota airport served by Delta. That extra backup offers additional security, although Cason called last weekend's situation rare.

"We just had the very unusual circumstance where both of the trucks were out of commission at the same time as a major storm moved in," he said.

Daryl Rench of Kennesaw, Ga., who attempted to fly out of the airport Saturday after hunting in North Dakota, said he spent more than six hours on a Delta jet before learning that his flight would not be leaving.

In keeping with federal limits on on-plane hold times, the pilot taxied to the terminal after three hours to offer passengers the opportunity to exit the plane. Rench said passengers were led to believe the delay would be short so most either did not leave or left to visit the snack bar and then returned. Eventually, the pilot announced the flight was canceled.

"It was just very frustrating, sitting in the plane six to seven hours and then when we go into the wait area, they don't tell us what to do," he said, noting that upset passengers were crying and yelling as they congregated in the terminal.

Delta representatives who arrived paid for overnight lodging while transferring passengers to Sunday flights, which also ended up canceled. Rench said he rented a car and drove to Bismarck to board a flight Sunday evening.

Airport director Andrew Solsvig said DGS had one of its two de-icing trucks experience mechanical problems just days before the weekend storm. That left one truck available to serve the airport's four commercial airlines.

When the storm required DGS to use its lone truck, that equipment also broke down. DGS brought in mechanics from Salt Lake City, but due to lack of parts and other reasons, they were unable to immediately get a truck working.

"They made the decision to bring up a truck from Minneapolis," Solsvig said. That truck arrived Monday morning and by 3 p.m., four hold-over flights again were airborne.

Minot Aero Center, the airport's fixed-base operator, has a tow-behind de-icing unit. However, the unit is capable of only providing a type of de-icer that removes ice since that is adequate for its general aviation customers. Commercial planes require both ice removal and a second type of de-icer that prevents ice buildup.


Article:  http://www.minotdailynews.com

http://www.airnav.com/airport/MOT

Man Gets 120 Days for Running Over Boy at Minneapolis-St Paul International Airport (KMSP), Minnesota

A St. Paul man was sentenced Friday, November 16, after pleading guilty to running over a boy who was going to greet his soldier father at Minneapolis-St. Paul Airport last December.

Tommy Rodriguez, 61, hit 6-year-old Zachary Drew of Coon Rapids with his sport utility vehicle in the airport parking ramp on December 16.

Zachary was walking hand-in-hand with his mother and three younger siblings as they made their way to a reunion with Zachary's father, Richard Drew, who had recently moved with them from Oklahoma to Coon Rapids.

The SUV hit and dragged Zachary 15 feet before crashing into a wall. The boy suffered a broken leg and facial injuries.

Rodriguez pleaded guilty to one felony count of criminal vehicular operation. He was sentenced to three years probation, 120 days in the Hennepin County Workhouse, 120 hours of community service and restitution to be determined for the boy's injuries, according to the Hennepin County Attorney's Office.

Source:   http://www.twincities.com

Timberview Helicopters makes case to county officials

 

 By MATT ALGARIN / Destin Log

 Published: Saturday, November 17, 2012 at 16:51 PM.
 

DESTIN — With proposed changes to Okaloosa County’s land development code in the works, Timberview Helicopters might be forced to operate solely from Destin Airport.

“It’s not, in my view, the government’s job to pick winners and losers, and unfortunately that’s just what would happen if the county adopts this amendment,” said attorney David Powell, who represents the helicopter tour company. “Whether it’s intended or not, that’s the practical effect.”

County commissioners held the first of two public hearings recently to address proposed amendments to the land development code, which in part would limit the operation of sightseeing helicopter tours, gliders and hot air balloon rides.

Helicopter tours and other aerial operations now are allowed in the general commercial zoning district. If the amendments are approved, they would be restricted to the airport industrial park district.

Elliot Kampert, the county’s growth management director, told commissioners that the changes would be made to reflect what has happened in the state Legislature.

“We’re amending our code to be consistent with the statutes,” he said.

The debate over tourism helicopter flights in Destin has been on the front burner for months. Residents, city leaders and county officials worry about safety risks and noise associated with two helicopter businesses.

In June, the county imposed a 180-day moratorium on helicopter sightseeing companies. That prohibition expires in December.

Timberview had been operating out of Destin Commons’ parking lot for about a year, but was shut down by the county because it didn’t have the appropriate permits. Since then, Timberview has been spotted operating from a barge in Choctawhatchee Bay and in Destin Harbor, raising the ire of city leaders.

Timberview now is working out of Destin Airport, which has little to no visibility, owner Justin Johnson said. He said his company has lost about 70 percent of its revenue since it was forced to relocate.

If the proposed amendments are adopted, Timberview could not move to a more desirable location because it didn’t have a development order prior to the moratorium. Johnson says county representatives told him that a development order wasn’t necessary because the business already was operating.

“Our competitor (Beach Helicopter) did file for a development order and they were granted that, and now they are grandfathered in,” Powell told commissioners at the public hearing. “It’s a little inverse in that the competitor, that I understand caused the uproar, is now going to be able to operate and my client, who has operated, is going to be shut down and forced out of business.”

Beach Helicopter isn’t flying yet, but its development order to build a 6,000-square foot helipad between Longhorn Steakhouse and BankTrust was approved by county commissioners before the moratorium was enacted.

Beach Helicopter also has gotten its share of complaints because of its location near the Kelly Plantation subdivision. However, commissioners determined that they could not reject the development order because it met county regulations.

Powell asked commissioners to grandfather in Timberview as they did Beach Helicopter.

“I would encourage you to rather than enact a blanket prohibition like this, to look to other counties and other methods of regulating this type of business,” he said.

County Commissioner Wayne Harris was on the same page as Powell.

“I’m inclined to agree. In my opinion they should be grandfathered in because they were there,” he said. “That’s my opinion, but I’m only one vote.”

County commissioners will host a second public hearing Tuesday.



Story:   http://www.nwfdailynews.com

Exclusive Photo of Crash Site: Lockheed Martin F-22A Raptor - Tyndall Air Force Base, near Panama City, Florida

The incident happened on Tyndall Air Force Base east of the drone runway forcing the pilot to eject from the aircraft.
 

The picture obtained from a source was taken just feet away showing the crumbled stealth fighter hours after the incident.

Due to safety and security concerns, no one is being allowed to access the site.

Tyndall says the pilot was performing a routine training mission when first responders were alerted of a problem via an inflight emergency call. He received medical treatment after the incident.

The 325th Fighter Wing Commander Colonel David Graff says first responders were on scene within minutes of the crash.

Footage taken Monday from the News13 Tower Cam shows a large plume of smoke the crash created. You can also see what appears to be another aircraft landing nearby.

The Air Force does not believe the crash was the result of oxygen deprivation that has been cited in previous incidents.

The base is continuing to gather evidence to present to the official safety investigation board.
 

Photo:  http://www.wmbb.com

 F-22 crash not related to oxygen 

 HAMPTON, Va. (WAVY) - The Air Force says there is no indication Thursday's F-22 Raptor crash in Texas is related to the recent oxygen supply incidents. 

 The pilot ejected safely. Investigators say the pilot was on a routine training mission when he sent an in-flight emergency call before crashing a quarter mile east of the runway at Tyndall Air Force Base.

10 On Your Side was one of the first to report the problems with the F-22 Raptors. Many are based at LangleyAir Force Base in Hampton. The oxygen system causes some pilots to get dizzy or black out, although the exact cause has not been determined. The Air Force grounded the fleet for four months last year.

Cessna 550 Citation II, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, N6763L: Accident occurred November 17, 2012 in Greenwood, South Carolina

http://registry.faa.gov/N6763L

NTSB Identification: ERA13LA061 

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, November 17, 2012 in Greenwood, SC
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/13/2014
Aircraft: CESSNA 550, registration: N6763L
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

About 5 seconds after the airplane touched down, a deer ran out of the nearby woods into the path of the airplane. The deer struck the airplane at the leading edge of the left wing above the left main landing gear and ruptured an adjacent fuel cell. The pilot was able to maintain directional control and stopped the airplane on the runway; however, the airplane was spilling fuel and on fire. The pilots performed an emergency shutdown of the airplane and egressed without injury. The airplane was subsequently consumed by the postcrash fire.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
Collision with a deer during the landing roll, which resulted in a compromised fuel tank and a postimpact fire.


HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On November 17, 2012, about 1145 eastern standard time, a Cessna 550, N6763L, registered to the United States Customs Service, and operated by Stevens Aviation, Inc., was substantially damaged during collision with a deer after landing on Runway 9 at Greenwood County Airport (GRD), Greenwood, South Carolina. The airplane was subsequently consumed by postcrash fire. The two certificated airline transport pilots were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the maintenance test flight, which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, the purpose of the flight was to conduct a test of the autopilot and flight director systems on board the airplane, following a "cockpit modernization" their company had performed. The airplane completed the NDB/GPS RWY 27 instrument approach procedure and then circled to land on Runway 9. About 5 seconds into the landing rollout, a deer appeared from the wood line and ran into the path of the airplane. The deer struck the airplane at the leading edge of the left wing above the left main landing gear, and ruptured an adjacent fuel cell.

The pilot was able to maintain directional control, and the airplane was stopped on the runway, spilling fuel and on fire. The crew performed an emergency shutdown of the airplane and egressed without injury.Greenwood County Airport did not have a fire station co-located on the airport facility. The fixed base operator called 911 at the time of the accident, and the fire trucks arrived approximately 10 minutes after notification.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, multiengine land, and instrument airplane. His most recent Federal AviationAdministartion (FAA) first-class medical certificate was issued on March 12, 2012. The pilot reported 11,592 total hours of flight experience, of which 903 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.

The copilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, multiengine land, and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on June 11, 2012. The pilot reported 4,501 total hours of flight experience, of which 13 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was manufactured in 1991, and its most recent Approved Aircraft Inspection Program (AAIP) inspection was completed November 16, 2012, at 8,611 total aircraft hours.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1156, the weather reported at GRD included clear skies, 10 miles of visibility, and winds from 030 degrees at 10 knots. The temperature was 13 degrees C and the dew point was -3 degrees C.

WRECKAGE INFORMATION

Following the accident, the crew provided photographs of the intact airplane spilling fuel and on fire, the fire-consumed airplane wreckage after the fire was extinguished, and the remains of the deer.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

In a telephone interview, the manager of the Greenwood County Airport explained that Greenwood was not an FAR Part 139 Airport, and while there was no published Wildlife Management Program for the airport, she had been very proactive about eradicating wildlife that could pose a hazard to safety on the airport property, primarily deer and wild turkey. She contacted the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) for guidance and advice and she attended a wildlife management course. Among the suggestions offered by the USDA, was to remove the deer habitat. The manager proposed adding the area between the runway and taxiway to an approach clearing project in order to reduce the habitat. The manager worked with a local charity and local hunters with depredation permits to take deer on the airport property, and their efforts averaged 50 deer a year. The hunts were conducted in stands away from runways and on property not aviation related. The nearest deer stand was 1 mile from the runway, and the hunters fired only shotguns. The hunts were conducted between the hours of 0700 and 1000. On the morning of the accident, the last shot was fired at 0930.When asked why the hunters were still on the property at the time of the accident, the manager said they had stayed to eat lunch, and repeated that the hunt was long over and that the last shot was fired hours before the accident. She offered that the deer struck by the airplane was probably flushed from the woods by another deer or a coyote, whose population has also grown in recent years.After the accident, the Federal Aviation Administration contacted the state and had the Greenwood County Airport added to a list of airports where funding for improvements had been allotted. A second 10-foot perimeter fence was added around the existing 6-foot fence, and since its construction only 4 deer have been taken inside the perimeter, and no wild turkeys have been sighted.


NTSB Identification: ERA13LA061
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, November 17, 2012 in Greenwood, SC
Aircraft: CESSNA 550, registration: N6763L
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 17, 2012, about 1145 eastern standard time, a Cessna 550, N6763L, registered to the United States Customs Service, and operated by Stevens Aviation, Inc., was substantially damaged during collision with a deer after landing on Runway 9 at Greenwood County Airport (GRD), Greenwood, South Carolina. The airplane was subsequently consumed by post-crash fire. The 2 certificated airline transport pilots were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the maintenance test flight which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, the purpose of the flight was to conduct a test of the autopilot and flight director systems on board the airplane following a "cockpit modernization" their company had performed. The airplane completed the NDB/GPS RWY 27 instrument approach procedure and then circled to land on Runway 9. About 5 seconds into the landing rollout, a deer appeared from the wood line and ran into the path of the airplane. The deer struck the airplane at the leading edge of the left wing above the left main landing gear, and ruptured an adjacent fuel cell.

The pilot was able to maintain directional control, and the airplane was stopped on the runway, spilling fuel and on fire. The crew performed an emergency shutdown of the airplane and egressed without injury.

The airplane was manufactured in 1991, and its most recent Approved Aircraft Inspection Program (AAIP) inspection was completed November 16, 2012, at 8,611 total aircraft hours.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 6763L        Make/Model: C550      Description: 550, S550, 552 Citation 2/S2/Bravo (T-47
  Date: 11/17/2012     Time: 1645

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: GREENWOOD   State: SC   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT ON LANDING STRUCK A DEER AND CAUGHT FIRE, GREENWOOD, SC

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   2     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Other      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: COLUMBIA, SC  (SO13)                  Entry date: 11/19/2012 
 


 
Credit: Photo taken by Alfred Langley


 
Credit: Photo taken by Alfred Langley

 
Credit: Photo taken by Alfred Langley

 
Credit: Photo taken by Alfred Langley

Credit: Photo taken by Alfred Langley

Credit: Photo taken by Alfred Langley

Credit: Photo taken by Alfred Langley

Credit: Photo taken by Alfred Langley

Credit: Photo taken by Alfred Langley

GREENWOOD COUNTY, S.C. -- 

 A small plane burst into flames at the Greenwood County Airport, after it hit a deer while landing.

Airport officials say the deer hit the left wing of the aircraft, causing the fuel in the tank to shoot into the engine, which caused the jet to catch fire. The two pilots inside were able to get out unharmed.

The Greenwood Sheriff’s Office says the incident occurred just before noon on Saturday.

The jet fire along with a small patch of grass was put out by multiple fire trucks.

The nose of the aircraft is the only thing left of the plane.


WYFF News 4 (With Photo):   http://www.wyff4.com

WSPA 7 News (With Video and Photos):  http://www2.wspa.com

Fox Carolina Article:  http://www.foxcarolina.com

 




GREENWOOD, S.C. —  A deer ran into the path of a plane that was landing, causing the plane to crash and burn at the Greenwood County Airport late Saturday morning.

Greenwood County Sheriff Tom Davis told WYFF News 4 that the crash happened at about  11:30 a.m.

"Early into the landing, the deer ran across the runway," Davis said.  "The pilot said he felt a bump, looked behind and saw the plane on fire."

Greenwood County Volunteer Fire Chief Woody Owensby said the pilot and a passenger escaped without injury.  The deer was killed.

Davis could not identify the type of plane or where it came from, but said that it carried sophisticated surveillance equipment that can be used in a variety of operations -- including border control and marijuana eradication operations.

"It's a big loss," Davis said.  "You can just see a big pile of ash where a plane once sit.  I'm told it had a full tank of fuel and every bit of it was burned up."

Davis said the plane traveled several hundred yards after bursting into flames.  After coming to a stop, Davis said the people on board exited quickly.

"They're very lucky," Davis said.


http://www.wyff4.com

A jet has crashed and burst into flames at the Greenwood Airport. 

 A Cessna Citation II was attempting to land after a training flight when a deer jumped out in front of the jet.

Airport officials say the deer impacted the left wing of the aircraft causing the fuel in the tank to shoot into the engine, which caused the jet to catch fire. The two pilots inside were able to get out unharmed before the jet burst into flames.

The Greenwood Sheriff’s Office says the incident occurred just before noon on Saturday.

The jet fire along with a small patch of grass was put out by multiple fire trucks.

The nose of the air craft is the only thing left of the plane.

7 On Your Side will bring you more information as soon as it is available.


 GREENWOOD, SC (FOX Carolina) -  Authorities said two people escaped a fiery plane crash without injuries in Greenwood on Saturday morning.

A captain with the Greenwood County Sheriff's Office said a Border Patrol plane was landing about 11:50 a.m. at the Greenwood County Airport off of Airport Road when it struck a deer. He said the deer ruptured the fuel tank, sparking a large fire and completely destroying the plane. 

The fire caused a large grass and woods fire, and firefighters were working to get the fire under control, deputies said.

No injuries were reported in the crash.

Federal Aviation Administration officials will investigate the crash. They said the plane was a Cessna C550.

How to Preflight a Cirrus SR20

 

Published on November 16, 2012 by Thomas Van Howe 

 The step-by-step checklist preflight to a Cirrus SR20

Beechcraft 35-B33 Debonair, Westchester Flying Club, N8519M: Accident occurred November 17, 2012 in White Plains, New York

http://registry.faa.gov/N8519M

NTSB Identification: ERA13LA060 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, November 17, 2012 in White Plains, NY
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/23/2013
Aircraft: BEECH 35B33, registration: N8519M
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On final approach for landing, the pilot observed that the airplane was high, and he performed a slip in order to lose altitude. During the maneuver, the engine lost power, and the pilot performed a forced landing to a parking lot. Postaccident examination revealed the fuel selector switch was in the off position; however, the pilot said that, after the accident, he turned the fuel selector from an unknown position to OFF and that he could not recall the prior position. The examination also found that the right wing fuel tank contained about 14 gallons of fuel, and the left tank was empty. Although the left wing tank was ruptured during impact, no evidence of fuel leakage or odor was found at the site. The airplane was equipped with a non-standard engine and propeller and did not have a Supplemental Type Certificate for the installation. Further, the pilot did not have fuel consumption information for the current engine-propeller installation; thus, the pilot likely misjudged the fuel consumption for the flight. It is likely that the fuel selector was positioned to the left tank, which had become very low on fuel. The slip maneuver aggravated the low fuel condition of the left wing fuel tank, and the airplane was starved of fuel, which resulted in the loss of engine power. Additionally, the pilot's failure to utilize the auxiliary fuel pump per the pilot operating handbook during air start most likely prevented the engine from restarting. Postaccident examination revealed no anomalies that would have precluded the normal operation of the airplane or engine components.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's improper fuel management and his excessive slip maneuver, which led to fuel starvation and a total loss of engine power, and his failure to activate the electric boost pump during the attempted engine restart.

On November 17, 2012, about 0005 eastern standard time, a Beechcraft B33, N8519M, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a total loss of engine power while on approach to Westchester County Airport (HPN), White Plains, New York. The private pilot incurred minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Rock Airport (9G1), Tarentum, Pennsylvania at about 2150. The business flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot conducted a flight from HPN to 9G1 prior to the accident flight, after which he did not refuel the airplane. The pilot stated that he departed 9G1 for HPN with approximately 47 gallons of fuel.

As the airplane was on final approach to runway 34 at HPN, at an altitude of 1,000-1,500 feet mean sea level, the pilot noticed that he was above the glide path for a normal landing and "performed a brief slip to lose altitude quicker" During the slip, the pilot decreased propeller pitch, and the engine made an unusual "roaring" sound. The pilot declared an emergency on the airport’s common traffic advisory frequency, switched the fuel selector from the left fuel tank to the right fuel tank, and performed the emergency checklist for an engine failure by memory before attempting to restart the engine. The pilot maneuvered the airplane towards a lighted parking lot and executed a forced landing about one-half of a nautical mile short of runway 34. After egress from the airplane, the pilot stated that he returned back inside the cockpit to turn the fuel selector off. During postaccident interviews, the pilot could not remember from what position he turned the fuel selector to the off position. The pilot did not report any preflight mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane.

Examination of the airplane revealed damage to the firewall, left wing root and wing spar. Flight control cable continuity was established from the cockpit controls to all the control surfaces. Although the left fuel tank was ruptured during impact with a tree, no fuel pooling, leakage, or odor were present at the accident site. Examination of the cockpit indicators, controls, and switches revealed the fuel selector switch was in the off position, the throttle was in the full power position, the fuel mixture control lever was in the full rich position, and the propeller control lever was in the full out position. The auxiliary fuel boost pump switch was in the off position.


The 2256 recorded weather at HPN included wind from 360 degrees at 8 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear skies, temperature 3 degrees C, dew point 5 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.41 inches of mercury.

The low-wing, retractable-gear airplane was powered by a Continental IO-520-BB, 285- horsepower engine, which was equipped with a 3-bladed McCauley propeller. Review of maintenance records revealed that an annual inspection was completed on June 6, 2012, at a total time of 11,298.5 hours. At the time of the accident, the engine total time was 2865.3 hours, with 809.8 hours since last major overhaul.

Examination of the fuel system was performed by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors. The main fuel screen was removed, and residual fuel was found in the screen. The fuel line from the firewall to the engine-driven fuel pump was removed, and no residual fuel was found in the line. The engine-driven fuel pump was removed, and the drive coupler was inspected and found intact. The fuel control unit, fuel flow transducer, fuel manifold valve, and all associated fuel lines were removed and exhibited no residual fuel. Approximately 14 gallons of fuel was drained from the right wing.

Data extracted from the airplane’s fuel totalizer by the NTSB vehicle recorder laboratory indicated that the airplane consumed 54.2 gallons of fuel during the accident flight and the flight prior, and had 19.8 gallons of total fuel remaining on board at the time of the accident, three gallons of which was unusable.

According to FAA records, the engine-propeller combination installed on the accident airplane was not authorized in the type certificate data sheet for a Beechcraft B-33, and the airplane did not have a Supplemental Type Certificate or Flight Manual Supplement for the installation. The pilots operating handbook (POH) for the accident airplane did not include any information, including fuel consumption, for this engine and propeller combination. According to the POH, the maximum duration for a slip maneuver is 20 seconds for an airplane with unbaffled main fuel cells, with which the accident airplane was equipped. The POH also stated that, during an air start procedure, the auxiliary fuel pump must be turned to the on position until power is regained.


NTSB Identification: ERA13LA060
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, November 17, 2012 in White Plains, NY
Aircraft: BEECH 35-B33, registration: N8519M
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 17, 2012, about 0005 eastern standard time, a Beechcraft B33, N8519M, operated by a private individual, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following loss of engine power while on approach to Westchester County Airport (HPN), White Plains, New York. The private pilot incurred minor injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Rock Airport (9G1), Tarentum, Pennsylvania.

The pilot stated that while turning on to final for the instrument landing system approach to runway 34 at HPN, and while at 1000-1500 feet mean sea level, he noticed that he was above the glide path for a normal landing. The pilot said that he "performed a brief slip to lose altitude quicker." It was then that he pushed the propeller control forward and the engine made an unusual noise; a "roaring", as he described. The pilot declared an emergency on the common traffic advisory frequency. The pilot switched from the left fuel tank feed to the right fuel tank feed and deduced that he was not going to be able make a safe landing on the runway and performed the emergency checklist for an engine failure by memory; as he stated. The pilot lined up on a lighted parking lot and executed an emergency landing about one half of a nautical mile short of runway 34.

Examination of the airplane by Federal Aviation Administration inspectors revealed damage to the firewall, left wing root and wing spar. Although the left wing tank was punctured, no fuel pooling, and no leakage or fumes were present at the accident site. FAA inspectors were also able to drain 14 gallons of fuel from the right wing tank.

The airplane is equipped with a J. P. Instruments Fuel Scan 450, designed to record various parameters with the fuel system onboard the airplane. The FAA inspectors recovered the instrument from the airplane and forwarded it to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory, Washington, DC, for data download.




IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 8519M        Make/Model: BE33      Description: 33 Debonair, Bonanza (E-24)
  Date: 11/17/2012     Time: 0451

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Substantial

LOCATION
  City: WHITE PLAINS   State: NY   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A PARKING LOT, 2 MILES FROM WHITE PLAINS, NY

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: GARDEN CITY, NY  (EA15)               Entry date: 11/19/2012 

  
 


Beechcraft 35-B33 Debonair (N8519M) in a parking lot off King Street in Rye Brook around midnight Friday. / Courtesy Irwin Gary Marks


Judah Holstein did not see his life flash before his eyes late Friday when he realized his plane couldn’t make it to the Westchester County Airport

 Rather, the 43-year-old father of three, vice president of the Westchester Flying Club in Purchase, said his sole focus was landing his single-engine aircraft without taking out himself or any people or property on the ground.

“Once I recognized I was not going to be able to land safely at the airport, the parking lot was the safest option I found at the time,” Holstein said Monday. “That’s where I attempted to land. If not for that tree, it would have turned out a little better.”

Holstein, who has hundreds of hours of flight experience, radioed ahead to declare an emergency in the air.

After clipping a tree, the Beechcraft landed hard on its belly — with one wheel lying on the hardtop near the nose — in a corporate park’s lot on King Street, less than a mile south of the airport.

“The tree wasn’t real tall, probably 15 to 20 feet tall,” Holstein said Monday. “I didn’t see it until there wasn’t much I could do about it.”

He cut his eyebrow on the airplane’s sun visor and also suffered a minor back injury.

He was treated at Westchester Medical Center in Valhalla. Monday, he returned to work as president of Miracom Computer Corp. in Eastchester.

His employees showered him with attention, amazed he escaped without much more than a scratch.

Holstein, who was interviewed by representatives for the Federal Aviation Administration, said he couldn’t share more specifics of the crash because the investigation is open.

The pilot was returning from a round-trip flight between Westchester County Airport and Rock Airport in Pittsburgh, a 560-nautical-mile trip.

He arrived at Rock at 6:22 p.m. and took off on the return flight at 9:53 p.m., according to FlightAware, a plane-tracking website.

He said he’d taken the route before, and had flown twice before that in the past week, to Washington, D.C. and Norwood, Mass.

“I just followed my training,” he said of the emergency landing. “My number one priority was making sure no one got hurt, or too hurt. A little cut in the eyebrow isn’t too bad, all things considered.”

Brian McCloskey, president of the Westchester Flying Club, said Holstein left a voice mail message with him immediately after landing.

“He was still in the parking lot and he sounded a little shaken up,” McCloskey said. “He said he had a cut on his forehead and that his back was a little sore.”

Holstein said he feels lucky. He expects he’ll fly again.

“I’m pretty pragmatic generally,” he said. “I’ve dealt with plenty of things in my life, so I’ll deal with this too.“


http://www.lohud.com

RYE BROOK — A small plane that crash-landed less than a mile south of Westchester County Airport around midnight was hauled to the airport this morning while authorities investigated.

The aircraft, which is registered to the Westchester Flying Club in Purchase, appeared to have clipped trees bordering the Reckson Executive Park on International Drive, off King Street, and landed hard on its belly.

The pilot, an Eastchester man whom police have not named, was alone in the plane and suffered head lacerations but was conscious when he landed, police said. He called Harrison Police for help since his GPS did not give him a precise location, and Harrison Police forwarded the call to Rye Brook Police, who were sent out to 1100 King St. at 12:03 a.m. The plane was in the center of the industrial park’s parking lot.

Rye Brook Police Lt. Eugene Matthews said the pilot had taken off from Rock Airport in Pittsburgh and was on his way to Westchester County Airport.

“He called into the airport distress and stated to whoever was there that he wasn’t going to make it,” Matthews said.

The single-engine aircraft, a Beechcraft, was flat on its belly, with one wheel laying on the hardtop near the nose early this morning. Debris from the trees could be seen on the pavement.

The parking lot is less than a mile from the main airstrip at the airport. It appears that if the aircraft hadn’t set down in the parking lot and couldn’t make it to the airport, it could have crashed into a large subdivision between the two. The development has more than 100 homes.

At the scene were police from Rye Brook, Harrison and Westchester County. There were firefighters from Purchase and an ambulance corps from Harrison. The area straddles the Connecticut state line.
Matthews said the pilot was shaken up from the crash, but conscious. He was taken to Westchester Medical Center.

Police remained at the crash site for hours Saturday, guarding the plane, which was roped off with yellow police tape. Investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration were on the scene in the early part of the morning but allowed the plane to be towed away after they finished their on-site work. The FAA investigation into the accident’s cause was expected to take longer.

The flying club’s website says it has 65 members. The aircraft involved in the incident, built in 1963, was available for rent at a rate of $197 an hour.

Staff writer Thane Grauel contributed to this report.


 http://www.wfc-hpn.org


Date: 11/16/2012
Time: 2385hrs (11:58pm)
Location: Behind 6 International Dr (Building # 3) X King St
Frequency: 46.26, 33.96 (Dispatches), 46.06 (PCFD), Fire 19, Fire 15, EMS 19, 155.895 (HPD), 155.625 (RBPD), 453.150 (PCRRBEMS), 155.310 (WCPD), ATC
Units Operating: [Purchase FD: 2412, E240, R30], [Port Chester FD: 2393, E59], [Harrison EMS: 61A4], [PCRRBEMS: 77A2], [Harrison PD: Cars 1, 3, 5], [Rye Brook PD: Cars 47, 48], County PD, Airport Operations, FAA, NTSB
Weather Conditions: Clear, 37 Degrees
Description Of Incident: Aircraft Down, 1 Patient with Minor injuries, negative extrication, negative fluid spill
Reporters: firedude, fdny41, x4093k, EmsFirePolice

Aircraft Info:
Tail Number: N8519M
Aircraft Type: 1963 Beechcraft Bonanza 33 (Single Engine, 4 Seats)
Aircraft Owner: Westchester Flying Club
Flight info: Pittsburgh, PA (Rock Airport - 9G1) to Westchester (HPN) with 1 Pilot and 0 Passengers
Arriving Weather: Winds 340 Degrees at 7 knotts, 37 Degrees F, Clear Skies, 10+miles visability
Airport note: Air Traffic Control Tower was not in operation, Runway 34 in use

2358hrs: Purchase FD + Harrison EMS dispatched 700 Anderson Hill Rd (@ Pepsico) for a reported Plane down in the rear
0000hrs: E240 responding
0000hrs: Bat 19 dispatched to landline
0000hrs: R30, 2412 responding
0004hrs: 61A4 on the PepsiCo property
0008hrs: 61A4 reports aircraft down possibly closer to King St, per HPD officer in woods searching
0009hrs: 2412 reports will hold with PFD units for now
0010hrs: Rye Brook PD dispatches cars 47 & 48 to IAO International Drive Business Park for plane down
0012hrs: RBPD Car 48 on scene with plane down behind building 3 on International Drive
0013hrs: RBPD requesting EMS to scene for minor injuries
0014hrs: 2412 on scene, requesting PCFD notification, Port Chester Chief dispatched to landline
0015hrs: E240 on scene
0017hrs: 61A4 on scene, reporting 1 patient, minor injury, will handle
0018hrs: R30 on scene
0029hrs: E59 dispatched to scene
0030hrs: 2393 responding
0031hrs: 61A4 transporting 1 patient BLS to White Plains Hospital (WPH)
0035hrs: 2393 on scene
0040hrs: E59 on scene
0044hrs: 2412 reports all Purchase units are in service, turned over to Port Chester FD
0049hrs: 2393 reports they have been released by RBPD, all PCFD units back in service
0049hrs: 61A4 out at WPH

LoHud Article (With Photos): http://www.lohud.com...&nclick_check=1
Rye Patch Article: http://rye.patch.com...ng-in-rye-brook
News 12 Video: http://www.news12.co...&region_name=WC
Armonk Daily Voice Article: http://armonk.dailyv...chester-airport

http://www.emtbravo.net

Beech P35, N8589M: Aircraft landed gear up - Rome, Georgia

IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 8589M        Make/Model: BE35      Description: 35 Bonanza
  Date: 11/16/2012     Time: 2000

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: ROME   State: GA   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, ROME, GA

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: COLLEGE PARK, GA  (SO11)              Entry date: 11/19/2012 

http://registry.faa.gov/N8589M 
 
  Workers attempt to move a plane registered to Charles Green after it landed at Richard B. Russel Airport without landing gear on November 16, 2012. Airport manager Mike Matthews said an investigation by the Russel Airport and the Federal Aviation Administration will be conducted to determine why the landing gear failed. 


A local pilot’s landing gear failed as he was touching down at Richard B. Russell Airport on Friday afternoon, and while the plane was damaged, the pilot wasn’t hurt, airport officials said. 

 Airport Manager Mike Mathews declined to name the pilot but said he was doing some “touch and gos” — a maneuver where a pilot lands the plane and takes off again without stopping — and on the final landing the landing gear failed. The propeller was damaged, he said. 

 “I don’t know if it’s mechanical or if he forgot to put (the gear) down,” Mathews said.

 “He walked away from it.”

 The plane is registered to Charles Green of Armu­chee, but it is not known if he was the one flying the plane. 

 Matthews did say the pilot had a hangar at the airport for about 30 years.

 A report was filed with the Federal Aviation Administration, Matthews said.

Mount Snow (4V8), West Dover, Vermont: Airport may be expanded

WEST DOVER (AP) -- A southern Vermont entrepreneur is considering a plan to buy and renovate the defunct Mount Snow Airport and expand it so it would be accessible to private jets.

But noise and traffic has some local residents cautious about the plan by Jim Barnes, the owner of the Hermitage Club and Inn.

"Some were opposed to the airport," Dover Town Clerk Andy McLean told the Brattleboro Reformer.

Reopening and expanding the airport, located next to the Mount Snow Golf Course, would require to re-surface the area as well as renovations of a building, aircraft hangers and renovations to the lighting system.

A committee is being formed to review information and discuss long-term and short-term impacts the airport may have on the area. The board will then decide whether to support the proposal.

"We will look at decibel levels, impact on the economy, pollution and lighting," said select board chair Nona Monis. "Then we will present the data to the select board."

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