Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Beech B-19 Sport, N9252S: Landed very hard before lip of asphalt runway















AIRCRAFT:   1975 Beech B-19 Sport; S/N MB780; N9252S

ENGINE – Lycoming O-320-E3D; S/N L-40648-27A

PROPELLER – Sensenich 74DDM6S5-0-54; Hub /N A40546

APPROXIMATE TOTAL TIME AIRFRAME: 2,399.67

ENGINE:   765.5 SMOH  (1981 OH)

PROPELLER:    2,399.67 SNEW          

AIRFRAME:  2,399.67 SNEW                    

OTHER EQUIPMENT: KX170B; AT150; CDI     

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  Landed very hard before lip of asphalt runway. Nose gear bent. Both MLG bent. Both wings bent at wing root and leading edge. No prop strike.

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:    Nose gear canted right. Both MLG bent. Wings compression damage at leading edge. One flap up, one flap down.         NO prop strike!

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT: Enterprise, AL (KEDU)            

REMARKS: Airplane is tied down on ramp.  

Read more here:     http://www.avclaims.com/N9252S.htm

Cessna 208, Cape Air, N188SF: Incident occurred October 17, 2016 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

http://registry.faa.gov/N188SF

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19

N188SF CAPE AIR FLIGHT KAP72 CESSNA 208 AIRCRAFT, LANDED WITH GEAR RETRACTED, FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA.  

Date: 17-OCT-16
Time: 13:27:00Z
Regis#: N188SF
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 208
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Other
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: FORT LAUDERDALE
State: Florida

Stolp SA-300 Starduster Too, Miller Biplane LLC, N32JM: Incident occurred October 17, 2016 at Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Daytona Beach, Volusia County, Florida

MILLER BIPLANE LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N32JM

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Orlando FSDO-15

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, GROUND LOOPED, SPRUCE CREEK, DAYTONA BEACH, FLORIDA.  

Date: 17-OCT-16
Time: 22:10:00Z
Regis#: N32JM
Aircraft Make: STOLP STARDUSTER
Aircraft Model: SA300
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: DAYTONA BEACH
State: Florida

Cessna 152, R & E Airways Corp., N46953: Accident occurred October 17, 2016 in Miami, Miami-Dade County • Incident occurred September 11, 2016 in Homestead , Miami-Dade County, Florida • Incident occurred February 16, 2016 in Pembroke Pines, Broward County, Florida

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA042
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, October 17, 2016 in Miami, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 152, registration: N46953
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The solo student pilot reported that after a normal taxi and run-up, he aligned the airplane on the runway centerline and started the takeoff roll. He further reported that he attempted to rotate the airplane at 50 knots and then again at 65 knots, but the airplane “couldn’t takeoff.” The student pilot subsequently reduced the power to idle and applied the brakes to abort the takeoff. During the aborted takeoff, the airplane veered off the runway to the left and encountered high grass and a water retention lake about 635 feet from the runway centerline. 

The student pilot reported that the airplane “wouldn’t respond” to his control inputs during the aborted takeoff. 

The left wing sustained substantial damage.

The operator reported in the National Transportation Safety Board Pilot/ Operator Aircraft Accident Report that the student pilot “rotated too early and got fixated on the airspeed indicator. Then the left brake was touched causing the airplane to veer to the left.” 

The Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Safety Inspector reported that he completed a postaccident examination of the airplane and found that the brakes were functional and confirmed flight control continuity.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the aborted takeoff, which resulted in a runway excursion.

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

R & E AIRWAYS CORP: http://registry.faa.gov/N46953 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA042
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, October 17, 2016 in Miami, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 152, registration: N46953
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The solo student pilot reported that after a normal taxi and run-up, he aligned the airplane on the runway centerline and started the takeoff roll. He further reported that he attempted to rotate the airplane at 50 knots and then again at 65 knots, but the airplane "couldn't takeoff." The student pilot subsequently reduced the power to idle and applied the brakes to abort the takeoff. During the aborted takeoff, the airplane veered off the runway to the left and encountered high grass and a water retention lake about 635 feet from the runway centerline.

The student pilot reported that the airplane "wouldn't respond" to his control inputs during the aborted takeoff. 

The left wing sustained substantial damage.

The operator reported in the National Transportation Safety Board Pilot/ Operator Aircraft Accident Report that the student pilot "rotated too early and got fixated on the airspeed indicator. Then the left brake was touched causing the airplane to veer to the left." 

The Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Safety Inspector reported that he completed a postaccident examination of the airplane and found that the brakes were functional and confirmed flight control continuity.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A CANAL, NEAR MIAMI, FLORIDA.

Date: 17-OCT-16
Time: 12:10:00Z
Regis#: N46953
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 152
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MIAMI
State: Florida

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19

AIRCRAFT LANDED AND THE NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED, HOMESTEAD, FLORIDA.  

Date: 11-SEP-16
Time: 20:28:00Z
Regis#: N46953
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 152
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: HOMESTEAD
State: Florida

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Miami FSDO-19

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED ON A HIGHWAY, NEAR PEMBROOK PINES, FL

Date: 17-FEB-16 
Time:  02:34:00Z
Regis#:  N46953
Aircraft Make:  CESSNA
Aircraft Model:  152
Event Type:  Incident
Highest Injury:  None
Damage:  Unknown
Flight Phase:  LANDING (LDG)
City:  PEMBROOKE PINES
State:  Florida




PEMBROKE PINES, Fla. (WSVN) -- Police are investigating after a small plane made an emergency landing in Pembroke Pines.

The plane was forced to land on US Highway 27 just before 10 p.m. on Tuesday due to a currently unidentified issue. The two passengers that were onboard the plane both walked off without any injuries.

There was a slight fuel spill during the landing, so firefighters have placed foam down as a precaution. Traffic in the southbound lane is moving however, only one lane is open at this time.

Story and video:  http://www.wsvn.com



A small plane made an emergency landing on U.S. 27 in Pembroke Pines Tuesday evening.

It happened near the 1000 block in the southbound lanes near Pembroke Boulevard. The pilot called in engine trouble and made the landing. No injuries were reported.

Pembroke Pines Police said there was no damage to the plane or to any surrounding roads or homes. They said the plane was occupied by the pilot and one passenger.

The plane is a single-engine propeller, fixed-wing aircraft. The FAA was called to the scene to investigate.

Pembroke Pines Fire crews responded to plug a fuel leak from the plane.

U.S. 27 was closed for a short time but has since been reopened. The plane is expected to be towed from the area on Wednesday.

Story and photo:  http://www.nbcmiami.com





A small plane made an emergency landing on U.S. 27 in Pembroke Pines Tuesday evening.

It happened near the 1000 block in the southbound lanes near Pembroke Boulevard. The pilot called in engine trouble and made the landing. No injuries were reported.

Pembroke Pines Police said there was no damage to the plane or to any surrounding roads or homes. They said the plane was occupied by the pilot and one passenger.

The plane is a single-engine propeller, fixed-wing aircraft. The FAA was called to the scene to investigate.

Pembroke Pines Fire crews responded to plug a fuel leak from the plane.

U.S. 27 was closed for a short time but has since been reopened. The plane is expected to be towed from the area on Wednesday.

Story and photo:  http://www.nbcmiami.com

Taylorcraft BC12-D, SkunkWorks III Research Inc., N94919: Accident occurred October 17, 2016 at Brook Bridge Aerodrome (8GA9), Griffin, Spalding County, Georgia

SKUNKWORKS III RESEARCH INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N94919

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Atlanta FSDO-11


NTSB Identification: ERA17LA020
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, October 17, 2016 in Vaughn, GA
Aircraft: TAYLORCRAFT BC12 D, registration: N94919
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 17, 2016, about 1220 eastern daylight time, a Taylorcraft BC12-D, N94919, was substantially damaged following a total loss of engine power during takeoff and subsequent forced landing at Brook Bridge Aerodrome (8GA9), Vaughn, Georgia. The flight instructor and a student pilot incurred minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local instructional flight. The airplane was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the flight instructor, their intention was to fly the airplane around the traffic pattern for a few touch-and-go landings prior to departing for North Carolina, where the airplane would be hangared. The flight instructor taxied the airplane up and down the runway three times to get himself and the student pilot comfortable with tailwheel handling before takeoff. The flight instructor then taxied to the end of the runway and performed the engine run-up. He stated that shortly after takeoff, approximately 30 feet above the ground, the engine started losing power and seconds later lost all power. The flight instructor tried to land the airplane on the runway, however, he "landed hard" and the left main landing gear separated. The left wing tip struck the ground, causing the main spar to fracture about 6 feet in from the wing tip. The engine compartment and propeller struck the runway before the airplane ground-looped, and the right main landing gear separated.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the left wing main spar was fractured mid-wing. Both main landing gear were separated. The propeller had one blade bent aft around the engine cowling and the other blade was straight.

The airframe and engine were retained for further investigation.

Beech J35, N35MH: Incident occurred October 17, 2016 in Eldon, Miller County, Missouri

http://registry.faa.gov/N35MH

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Kansas City FSDO-63

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, ELDON, MISSOURI 

Date: 17-OCT-16
Time: 10:10:00Z
Regis#: N35MH
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 35
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ELDON
State: Missouri

Cessna 172P Skyhawk, N51794, Christiansen Aviation Inc: Incidents occurred October 17, 2017 -and- October 17, 2016 at Richard Lloyd Jones Jr. Airport (KRVS), Tulsa County, Oklahoma

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Aircraft on taxi, struck a parked aircraft wingtip.

Christiansen Aviation Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N51794

Date: 17-OCT-17
Time: 18:25:00Z
Regis#: N51794
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: TULSA
State: OKLAHOMA

Aircraft on taxi, wingtip and nose struck the ground.

Date: 17-OCT-16
Time: 18:18:00Z
Regis#: N51794
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: TULSA
State: Oklahoma

Tuscaloosa Regional Airport seeks passenger air service



City officials are making a concerted effort to return passenger air service to the Tuscaloosa Regional Airport.

The City Council has approved a contract with Sixel Consultants Group to help lure a passenger airline while advising on upgrades to the airport’s existing facilities in order to accommodate the service. A commercial airline has not operated at the airport in nearly 20 years.

“We’re trying to take it on a step-by-step basis,” said Selvin Greene, director of the city’s new Department of Infrastructure and Public Services, which now oversees the airport. “This is a way for us to put a little bit of money in, see where we are, see what progress we’re making and then decide what steps to take beyond that point.”

The city is paying Sixel Consultants $5,500 to meet with various airlines in an effort to entice one to operate in Tuscaloosa and another $7,500 to consult on what upgrades the airport will need.

“Sixel provides air service development consulting services and provides a variety of studies and services that support a relationship between airports and airlines,” said Jeff Powell, manager of the Tuscaloosa Regional Airport. “We have asked them to partner with us for an upcoming conference that provides an environment to sit down with multiple airlines and discuss our community.

“It is not an all-or-nothing effort, but rather for building relationships with airlines so that we can be on the table when our market supports their business growth model.”

Greene said the meetings with the airlines, set to take place Sunday through Tuesday in Lexington, Ky., will help determine what enhancements, if any the airport will need to accommodate the commercial service.

The consultants are set to meet with representatives from American Airlines; SkyWest Airlines out of St. George, Utah; ViaAir, which flies out of West Virginia and North Carolina; and Southern Airways Express, a commuter airline based in Memphis, Tenn.

Greene said representatives from other airlines also are expected to be part of the discussions with Sixel Consultants.

“There will be multiple airline services there,” he said.

It’s unclear when, or if, passenger air service will return to Tuscaloosa, but it has been a topic of discussion among the City Council members off-and-on for years.

American Eagle, a regional subsidiary of American Airlines, was the last commercial airline to operate in Tuscaloosa, but it stopped serving the airport in 1997.

“For a smaller service, we may already have everything in place,” Greene said. “For somebody like American Airlines, we may need to extend primary runway to a certain length.

“Those are the kind of things that we would be developing to look at what we could realistically bite off to handle in order to provide some of these services.”

Source:   http://www.tuscaloosanews.com

If Iowa State University pilots chose to land at Elmira, it wasn't for cheap fuel




Iowa State University finally released its aviation insurance policy and some other documents related to President Steven Leath’s use of university-owned aircraft on October 12, a week after Leath promised to be "open and transparent" about the controversy.

While I work my way through those incomplete materials, let’s take a closer look at one of the least plausible narratives ISU has floated in connection with this scandal: en route to and from an NCAA Sweet Sixteen basketball game in March 2014, pilots of the university’s King Air 350 200 "unilaterally decided" to refuel at the Elmira Corning Regional Airport in Horseheads, New York. The stops supposedly chosen by the pilots allowed Leath’s brother and sister-in-law to hitch a ride at no additional cost to ISU.

FOUR VERSIONS OF ISU’S STORY PINNING THE DECISION ON THE PILOTS

A three-page document initially provided to the Associated Press, which ISU later sent to other reporters, explained the purpose of some flights Leath took on the university’s King Air. You can read the full document here. A portion of Ryan Foley’s October 4 scoop for the AP was based on this excerpt (emphasis in original):

March 27 [2014] Ames to Elmira/Corning, NY. Then to Teterboro, NJ. Then back to Elmira. Appears this was transporting Ken and Trish Leath.

Trip was from Ames to Teterboro, NJ (near NYC) enroute to NCAA basketball tournament. Pilots did not want to enter NYC airspace without a full tank of fuel (as holding patterns in NYC are common for small planes), and therefore unilaterally decided to schedule a fuel stop in Elmira, NY. President Leath’s brother and sister-in-law boarded the plane in Elmira. On the return trip, March 29, the plane again stopped in Elmira for fuel, and Ken and Trish Leath were dropped off. They had originally rented a car with the intent they would drive themselves home earlier, but since the team didn’t advance, President and Mrs. Leath were returning to Ames anyway, with a planned fuel stop in Elmira.

This account never sounded convincing, because the Beechcraft King Air 350 is known for its "large fuel capacity" and ability to cover great distances without refueling. The Ames Municipal Airport and the Teterboro Airport are about 880 nautical miles apart. Various charter company websites list the range of a King Air 350 at 1,700 to 1,800 nautical miles, or on the lower end at 1,440 to 1,500 nautical miles. (CORRECTION: The March 2014 trip happened on the university’s older King Air. But that 1977 airplane had the same fuel capacity as later models.)

Prevailing winds, temperature, number of passengers, or cargo weight can influence an airplane’s range, and weather conditions might prompt pilots to choose a flight plan that deviates from the shortest route between two points. That said, ISU’s plane should not have needed to refuel twice on an Ames-Teterboro round trip shorter than 2,000 nautical miles—especially not if the pilots had entered New York City airspace on March 27 with "a full tank of fuel," as ISU’s document stated

Read more here:  http://www.bleedingheartland.com