Tuesday, September 4, 2012

Diamond Aircraft DA42 NG: Emergency decent over the shoreline - Simulating a loss of cabin pressure or other emergencies that could require a lower altitude immediately

Civil Aviation Authority clarifies: Pakistan International Airlines Avion de Transport Regional ATR-42-500, AP-BHJ, Flight PK-653 - Lahore Airport

 

PERVEZ GEORGE
Public Relations Manager, CAA


This is with reference to Gul Zaman’s letter “Closure of Lahore runway” (04 Sep). CAA have always welcomed criticism and have responded positively to the suggestions that could contribute for the betterment of the organization. Unfortunately, lack of knowledge on the part of people results in misunderstanding. As far as Airblue and Bhoja Air crash investigations are concerned, they have been undertaken strictly according to ICAO requirements in most transparent manner.

Regarding ATR incident at Lahore Airport that took place on 31 August, 2012, at 1510 hours, and resulted in blockage of runway for few hours. This must be made clear that PIA’s ATR never skidded off the runway but it was a short landing by the pilot that resulted in this accident.

CAA immediately sent its fire and rescue vehicles and passengers were disembarked safely. Removal of ATR aircraft or for that matter any other aircraft from the runway is the responsibility of operator and not CAA. Since rescue apparatus was not available with the operator at Lahore Airport, it had to be transported from Karachi and hence the delay. It is incorrect to suggest that Lahore runway remained closed for 30 hours, in fact traffic was regulated through parallel runway and the blocked runway was cleared for traffic at 1920 hours just after over four hours.
 

It is the prerogative of the government to appoint various heads of organizations throughout Pakistan and abroad and CAA is not an exception. It would have been more appropriate if the writer had not indulged in uncalled for remarks about DG CAA, CFO of CAA and various retired officers. CAA is continuously engaged in improving upon the facilities at all the airports in Pakistan. Let us not settle personal scores under the cover of incidents.

PERVEZ GEORGE
Public Relations Manager, CAA


http://www.pakistantoday.com.pk/2012/09/05/comment/editors-mail/caa-clarifies/

http://www.pakistantoday.com.pk/2012/09/04/comment/editors-mail/closure-of-lahore-runway/

Helicopter damaged in North Pass Fire as crews gain control

 A helicopter working on the North Pass Fire northeast of Covelo was damaged Sunday when smoke obstructed the pilot's view as it flew low and snagged on a tree, according to the U.S. Forest Service.

The helicopter, on contract with USFS, was flying low to dip water from Howard Lake to dump on the fire, when all five of its rotor blades hit a tree nearby, according to USFS spokeswoman Kate Kramer.

"It was very smoky," Kramer said, "and it's not an unusual accident to have happen in those conditions."

The helicopter could still fly, she said, and landed about a mile and a half away near Howard Lake, where it will stay until its blades are replaced.

Read more:   http://www.ukiahdailyjournal.com

Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority: Board seeking to repair its image

The board of directors of the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority meets Wednesday with one goal in mind: to repair an image battered by reports of insider contracts, lavish travel spending and other questionable dealings.

Members are expected to approve new rules for travel and entertainment, and begin discussion on a new ethics policy they hope will erase the image of a dysfunctional board that operates by its own rules.

The proposed travel policy would put limits on the amount of money board members can spend on plane tickets and meals. In the past, board members argued that the money they get for trips and meals makes up for the fact they are not paid for their board service.


But board Chairman Michael Curto said that if the board is to restore trust in its ability to manage the Silver Line Metrorail extension, is must change its practices.

For the first time in the authority’s history, board trips must be approved by the board’s chairman or vice chairman. While meals will be covered, board members who want to order a glass of wine or a cocktail will have to do so at their own expense.

Read more here:   http://www.washingtonpost.com

How did the United States fall behind Canada in air traffic safety?

Opinion: Columnists

Sean Higgins,  

Senior editorial writer for The Washington Examiner

Three US Airways jets came uncomfortably close to crashing into each other above Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport a month ago, thanks to botched instructions from the air traffic controllers there.

This followed an incident in March that has become depressingly familiar: A controller fell asleep on the job, forcing two planes to land without assistance from the tower. The Federal Aviation Administration reported 1,887 such "operational errors" in fiscal 2010, up from 1,234 the previous fiscal year.

We wouldn't have to run a lot of these risks in the first place if the United States used the most up-to-date air traffic control technology. Global positioning systems have revolutionized air travel, overtaking the old radar-based technology. But progress in adopting the new technology has been slow.

"If we had these [GPS] systems in place, we could reduce congestion and improve air traffic control and dispatching so that the likelihood of these situations occurring would be reduced," said Marc Scribner, transportation policy analyst for the free-market Competitive Enterprise Institute.

Why the FAA is so slow to change is a classic tale of big-government inertia: layer upon layer of regulatory red tape, cost overruns and public-sector unions being given virtual veto power over any change. Meanwhile the efforts to make air traffic safer languish.

Read more here:   http://washingtonexaminer.com

Aspen-Pitkin County/Sardy Field (KASE), Colorado: Fuel sales could boost airport rent revenues

ASPEN—Pitkin County could receive at least $3 million in annual rent from a proposed new private jet center—a sum that is 16 times more than what the current fixed-base operator pays at Sardy Field.

Airport finance consultants explained the situation to the Pitkin County commissioners during a mid-August meeting on the airport master plan, which the county is expected to adopt this fall.

The current draft airport plan includes building a new fixed-base operations facility—a terminal and services for private planes (or general aviation, as it’s officially called)—on the west side of the airport. The current fixed-base operator, Atlantic Aviation, leases a facility on the east side, and is expected to pay the county $167,000 in rent this year.

The current lease was signed back in 1993 by Atlantic’s predecessor, and at that time was probably a fair deal for the county, airport director Jim Elwood told the commissioners.

The discrepancy in what Atlantic is paying now and what a new fixed-base operator would pay is based on market value, explained Stephen Horton of Leibowitz and Horton Airport Management Consultants of Greenwood, Colo.

“The market value of any FBO operating in Aspen has increased in the last 20 years and will continue to increase in the next 10 years,” Horton told the commissioners.

His “conservative calculation” of $3 million annual rent is based on comparable airports and a recent contract for a replacement FBO at San Diego International Airport. Fixed-base operator Landmark won a competitive bidding process to build and operate one new private facility at the San Diego airport, pledging $39 million toward a new terminal and $5.2 million in rent for 35 years.

Read more here:  http://www.aspenbusinessjournal.com

Schempp-Hirth Nimbus 3, G-EENN: Accident occurred September 04, 2012 at Portmoak Airport, Scotlandwell, Kinross - United Kingdom

 
The glider crashed as it was in the process of taking off at Portmoak Airfield in Kinross


A GLIDER pilot in his forties was killed yesterday when his aircraft crashed as it took off from the airfield at Scotland’s largest gliding club.

The man, who has still to be named, was pronounced dead at the scene after the emergency services were called to Portmoak airfield on the shores of Loch Leven near Kinross, the home of the Scottish Gliding Centre.

The single seat glider, a Schempp-Hirth Nimbus-3 aircraft, was only a matter of feet off the ground when the plane crashed early yesterday afternoon as it was being winched into the air, The pilot was found inside the cockpit of the overturned carbon fibre fuselage.

A spokesman for Tayside Police said the emergency services had been called to Portmoak Airport, Scotlandwell, Kinross, shortly after 1:30pm following reports of a serious crash involving a glider at the centre.

He said: “One person – a man in his late forties – was found within the upside-down Nimbus 3 aircraft and despite the efforts of paramedics, he was pronounced dead at the scene.

“It is understood the aircraft was in the process of taking off and had only been a matter of feet off the ground when the incident happened. No-one else was injured.”

The spokesman continued: “Details of the deceased will not be released until next of kin have been full informed and formal identification has taken place.

“An investigation, involving Tayside Police, the Air Accident Investigation Bureau and the Civil Aviation Authority, is being carried out to establish the full set of circumstances surrounding the incident. As with all sudden deaths, a report will be submitted to the procurator-fiscal.”

The Scottish Gliding Centre is operated by the Scottish Gliding Union, the largest gliding club in Scotland, and provides year-round flying to both members and many visitors.

The club’s website states: “Although gliding is generally a solo sport, it is far from a solo activity, and lots of co-operation is required to get the gliders into the air. 

“The SGC employs professional winch-drivers to ensure this essential facility is always available, but all other airside jobs, such as inspecting the gliders, driving the tow-out and retrieve vehicles, and signalling the launch, are done by club members with training as required.”

A spokeswoman at the Scottish Gliding Centre declined to comment on the tragedy.

A spokesman for the British Gliding Association said: “This is a terrible tragedy. It happened within the airfield grounds during the launch phase. 

“The glider was being winch-launched. From the start of the glider moving to being airborne is just a matter of seconds. The alarm would have been raised straight away. I’ve been involved with the British Gliding Association and cannot recall another accident there.”

The Nimbus-3 first took to the air in 1981. The aircraft is 25ft long with a wingspan of 80ft, and can reach a top speed in flight of 170mph.

http://news.stv.tv

http://www.heraldscotland.com

http://www.scotsman.com

http://www.bbc.co.uk

Marine F/A-18C Hornet: San Diego-Based Marine Jet Crashes In Nevada

The military is investigating the crash of a San Diego-based Marine F/A-18C Hornet in a remote area of Nevada on September 1st. 

The pilot ejected safely and was later treated and released for minor injuries at a Fallon, Nevada hospital. 

Both the pilot and the aircraft are assigned to the Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 323, based at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar.

According to a Navy news release, VMFA 323 (part of Carrier Air Wing 11) is currently training at Naval Air Station Fallon.

Naval Air Forces Pacific spokesman Lt. Aaron Kakiel told the U-T San Diego:
“The job itself is of a dangerous nature, but it’s not common for an F/A-18 or military aircraft in general to crash. Luckily, it’s one of the safety precautions we have in the aircraft — when the pilot is able to recognize a situation that is unrecoverable, they are able to eject and get out safely.”
According to Kakiel, the $30 million jet was completely destroyed in the crash.

Sources:   

http://www.utsandiego.com

http://www.navy.mil

http://www.kpbs.org

http://www.lahontanvalleynews.com

Firefly in talks to buy new planes

KUALA LUMPUR: Firefly is negotiating with several aircraft manufacturers to buy new planes to fuel the community airlines’ robust expansion plans two years from now, chief executive officer Ignatius Ong said.

He said the airline was keeping its options open on the range of the aircraft, which might be bigger in size from the turboprops the airline was currently using.

“If Firefly buys bigger airplanes, the community airline can shift its focus to medium-haul routes from the current short-haul destinations,” he told reporters at Firefly’s Hari Raya open house here yesterday.

Currently, Firefly, a subsidiary of Malaysia Airlines (MAS) operates 12 turboprops, all have been 80% utilized.

“We are aiming for brand new planes.

“On the number of aircraft to be acquired, it all depends on the manufacturers and what the market has to offer.

“We are talking to the manufacturers to know the slots they have for aircraft delivery, and then we have to bring back the proposals to MAS’ board,” Ong added. — Bernama

Source:  http://biz.thestar.com.my

Air India bleeds, pilots party


While national carrier Air India (AI) bleeds, its management has stitched up cushy deals with its pampered pilots - the best-paid in the industry. They are guaranteed fewer flying hours per week, longer rest periods and fat perks.

While pilots of private airlines operate quick-return flights to destinations in West Asia and South East Asia such as Singapore and Bangkok, AI pilots stay in five-star hotels and return only after a day or two.

For example, a pilot who flies to Dubai on Monday rests there for two days and returns on Thursday.

Several years after the merger of the erstwhile domestic Indian Airlines (IA) and international carrier Air India (AI) with the latter's brandname retained, IA pilots continue to have their own rules called flight and duty time limitations (FDTL), which is much more liberal than the Directorate General of Civil Aviation's (DGCA) FDTL that is followed by private airlines.

Pilots of the erstwhile international carrier Air India also enjoy liberal terms, but not as liberal as those from IA.

After years of study and research carried out jointly by the US Federal Aviation Administration and NASA, the DGCA had laid down revised flight duty limitations in August 2011.

"But erstwhile IA pilots continue to have their own set of rules, belittling the regulatory authorities," an official said.

As per the DGCA's FDTL, the maximum flying hour duration for a pilot operating on domestic sectors is nine hours in a day.

However, IA pilots - unionised under the Indian Commercial Pilots Association (ICPA) - have their own limit at six-and-a-half hours.

Similarly, the duty time limitation which includes reporting time, debriefing time and time spent on transit halts is 12.5 hours as per DGCA regulations while IA pilots have restricted it to 9.5 hours.

In case of exigencies, the pilots fly for an extra hour at the most and in turn are financially compensated for through an additional payment at 150% of their hourly flying allowance, which can work out to as much as Rs. 7,905 for a senior captain.

Likewise, the maximum number of landings permitted by DGCA in a day is six. IA pilots restrict it to only three.

An additional landing will be done provided the scheduled operation is between 0530 and 2300 hrs and the flight time is also restricted to only five hours.

This also will be done only four times in a month and the pilots have to be compensated to the equivalent of one hour of flying, which is Rs. 5,270 in the case of a senior captain.


Source:    http://www.hindustantimes.com

Senior Air India pilot caught flying without license

A senior Air India pilot was caught operating flights between Mumbai and Jeddah allegedly without a valid license on August 31. On Tuesday, officials from the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) interrogated the pilot at the Delhi headquarters but no action has been taken yet.
 

According to sources the pilot operated a return flight from Mumbai to Jeddah via Calicut carrying more than 400 passengers one-way.

“It is a serious offense. If the flights had a mishap, the passengers or their relatives would not be eligible for insurance,” said a senior AI official requesting anonymity. The official said that even the national carrier would not be able to claim insurance in such a situation.

Source said the pilot told DGCA that it was a minor “procedural lapse” where he forgot to get his Air Line Pilot License (the license to operate a commercial flight as a commander in India) stamped. However, HT learned that he had not applied for renewal.

“A pilot is supposed to apply for renewal at least 15 days before the date of expiry wherein the copy of the license has to be submitted to the regulator,” said another source in the civil aviation ministry.

Officials pointed out another lapse in the case. According to sources, the airline’s crew scheduling department, which is responsible for assigning flying duties to pilots and cabin crew, maintains a record of licenses. “The rostering department should be questioned on how they assigned him flight duty. Pilots could be arrested for such an offense in the US,” said an air safety expert.




Watch Video:    http://www.timesnow.tv
 

Source:   http://www.hindustantimes.com

Emergency landing at Auckland International Airport

A Boeing 767 jet has landed safely after a full emergency call out at Auckland International Airport this morning.

Fire communications manager Jaron Phillips said the aircraft had an undercarriage gear warning indication so declared an emergency.

There were 230 passengers aboard the Air New Zealand flight from Honolulu to Auckland.

Both airport crash fire units and Mangere fire engines turned out and the plane landed safely just after 6.30am.

Air New Zealand said the incident wasn't an emergency landing. A spokeswoman said there was an issue with a cockpit indicator light.

"The light, which would normally confirm the landing gear was in place, failed to come on during the approach phase.

"The captain took the precautionary step of advising air traffic control. A visual check and other on board systems confirmed the gear was in place and the flight landed safely with no further incident."

Alastair Baker and his wife were aboard the plane and said it "wasn't as dramatic as it sounds".

"That said it was a relief to touch down safely on all three wheels," he said. "Everyone remained calm and the captain and crew kept us informed and remained very optimistic that the problem wasn't as serious as first thought.

"My wife's only concern was that if things had gone wrong her shopping would be lost."

Another passenger said the captain remained "very calm and assured passengers that it was probably just the bulb not the undercarriage itself".


Source:   http://www.stuff.co.nz

Kestrel Aircraft Gets $30 Million to Create 600 New Jobs in Superior, Wisconsin

 


Tuesday, September 4, 2012
Press Release


MADISON – Governor Scott Walker has announced the Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority (WHEDA) and the Wisconsin Community Development Legacy Fund (WCDLF) have completed a $30 million allocation of federal New Markets Tax Credits (NMTCs) to the Kestrel Aircraft Corporation.

Established in 2010, Kestrel is developing a single engine turboprop aircraft for production, and is moving operations from Duluth, Minnesota and Brunswick, Maine to Superior, Wisconsin.

"Attracting this visionary entrepreneur to relocate with the potential to create 600 new jobs is incredible news for the city of Superior and the entire state of Wisconsin," said Governor Scott Walker. "In putting together an aggressive package, Wisconsin has decisively demonstrated its commitment to job creation and boosting our state economy."

"I am thrilled that WHEDA is able to utilize its economic development and job creation tools to help Kestrel revolutionize aviation right here in Wisconsin," said WHEDA Executive Director Wyman Winston. "Kestrel recognizes Wisconsin's know-how and talent and WHEDA is committed to helping Kestrel develop the next generation of commercial aircraft in our great state."

WHEDA's New Markets Tax Credit program promotes economic development in low-income communities. WHEDA is a part of the nonprofit WCDLF that is responsible for allocating federal NMTCs in Wisconsin.

Kestrel qualifies for the credits as an eligible business seeking to make an investment in a federally-designated qualified low-income area.

The Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation (WEDC) has created an Enterprise Zone in Superior to provide $18 million in tax credits, and has provided a $2 million loan to the company.

"This is a significant step and valuable economic development tool in supporting Kestrel Aircraft's move to establish its manufacturing and headquarters in Superior," said Paul Jadin, CEO of the WEDC.

The city of Superior has provided a $2.4 million loan in addition to providing two parcels of land for development, and $1.125 million in tax incremental financing (TIF).

"The decision of Kestrel Aircraft to locate in Superior is a high level addition to our corporate base, which will benefit the entire region and the State of Wisconsin," said city of Superior Mayor Bruce Hagen. "We thank all of the private/public partnerships that reached out on all levels and depth to solidify and welcome Kestrel as our newest corporate citizen. The economic ripple effect will be very promising in growing the community, along with the introduction of complementary businesses and industries. We all owe a debt of gratitude to Kestrel President Alan Klapmeier and the Kestrel team."

Douglas County has provided $800,000 in loans.

"Douglas County is pleased that one of the final steps in the financing of Kestrel Aircraft has been approved," said Douglas County Board Chairman Douglas Finn. "This has been an exciting project for all of the residents of the area with the potential for several hundred jobs along with spin-off opportunities. We would not be at this point without a great partnership between Kestrel Aircraft, the State of Wisconsin, the City of Superior, Douglas County and all the other agencies involved along with the Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College. These are exciting times for our community and this is just one of many great opportunities if we continue to work together."

Since 1972, WHEDA has financed more than 68,000 affordable rental units, helped more than 110,000 families purchase a home and made more than 29,000 small business and agricultural loan guarantees.


Source:    http://fox21online.com

Safari Homebuilt, N70415: Accident occurred September 01, 2012 in McVeytown, Pennsylvania

http://registry.faa.gov/N70415

NTSB Identification: ERA12LA541  
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 01, 2012 in McVeytown, PA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/10/2013
Aircraft: JOHNSTON DOUGLAS S SAFARI, registration: N70415
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

A witness who spoke with the pilot before the flight reported that the pilot had checked the fuel before departure and intended to "make a couple of laps" before proceeding to a local airport to purchase more fuel. Another witness observed the helicopter perform two 180-degree turns before it descended and impacted the ground. Examination of the accident site confirmed a vertical impact, and the helicopter damage was consistent with low or minimal rotor speed at the time of impact. Inspection of the fuel system revealed no fuel in the right fuel tank and about 2 pints of fuel in the left fuel tank. No contamination was observed in the fuel on board, and no obstructions were observed in the fuel system.

The experimental amateur-built helicopter was constructed from a kit and received its airworthiness certificate in 2003. The pilot purchased the helicopter about 4 months before the accident through the kit manufacturing company, which was brokering the sale of the helicopter for the builder’s estate. The pilot did not hold a pilot certificate and did not register the helicopter with the FAA. Examination of the pilot's logbook revealed that about 2 years before the accident, he had received 3.2 hours of helicopter instruction. Interviews revealed that when the pilot acquired the helicopter, he flew an additional 15 hours with the owner of the helicopter kit manufacturing company (in the accident helicopter and another company helicopter). However, these flights were limited to hover practice.

It is likely that while the pilot was maneuvering the helicopter at a low altitude, it experienced a loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion. At this point, the pilot needed to immediately enter an autorotation. However, given the pilot’s limited flight training and his lack of pilot certification (he would have had to demonstrate an autorotation in order to become a certificated helicopter pilot), he almost certainly was not proficient in performing autorotations. The helicopter’s vertical impact with low rotor rpm is consistent with the pilot failing to make the control inputs necessary to enter an autorotation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's lack of proficiency and certification, which resulted in his failure to enter an autorotation when the engine lost power. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s inadequate fuel planning, which resulted in fuel exhaustion and a subsequent loss of engine power.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On September 1, 2012, at 0900 eastern daylight time, N70415, experimental amateur-built Safari helicopter was substantially damaged when it impacted the ground while maneuvering in McVeytown, PA. The non-certificated pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal, local flight that was conducted under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 91.

According to a witness, he observed the helicopter flying away from him, and then made a 180-degree turn toward the hangar it was kept in. The helicopter then made another 180-degree turn and "started to go down." The witness observed a puff of smoke as the helicopter disappeared from his view.

PILOT INFORMATION

A review of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) database revealed the pilot did not hold a pilot certificate.

According to a pilot logbook provided by the pilot's wife, he logged three flights on: August 14, 2010, August 21, 2010, and October 9, 2010. The total flight time for these flights was 3.2 hours.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The helicopter was built from a kit, by the previous owner, and received its first airworthiness certificate on April 10, 2003. It was equipped with a Lycoming O-320, 160-horsepower engine.

The accident pilot purchased the helicopter in March 2012; however, there was no evidence that he attempted to acquire an airworthiness certificate or register the helicopter with the FAA.

A review of the helicopter and engine logbooks revealed the most recent condition inspection was completed on June 30, 2011 by the previous owner/builder. No anomalies were noted in the entry, and a tachometer time of 395 hours was noted.

The tachometer time at the accident site was 442 hours.

According to the kit manufacturer, they brokered the sale of the helicopter between the accident pilot and the widow of the previous owner/builder. After the accident pilot purchased the helicopter, the kit manufacturer performed some maintenance on it to assure it was in a flyable condition. The work they performed included: replacing the main rotor spindle, and performing an annual condition inspection. This work was completed on May 11, 2012.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The weather recorded at the nearest airport, at 0853, included wind from 280 degrees at 7 knots, 10 miles visibility, a broken cloud layer at 7,000 feet, temperature 23 degrees C, dew point 19 degrees C, and altimeter setting 30.13 inches mercury.

WRECKAGE INFORMATION

Examination of the accident site confirmed the helicopter impacted the ground in a vertical attitude with minimal forward speed. Inspection of the main rotor blades and tail rotor blades revealed damage consistent with low or minimal rotor speed (RPM) impact with terrain. Main and tail rotor control system continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to the control surfaces. Inspection of the fuel system revealed no fuel in the right fuel tank and approximately 2 pints in the left fuel tank. A sample of fuel from the left tank was found to be free of contamination and consistent with 100LL aviation fuel. The carburetor bowl drain was opened and fuel was observed. No obstructions were noted in the fuel system, or the air induction system. The fuel selector was in the ON position.

The engine crankshaft was rotated at the propeller flange and thumb compression and valve train continuity was confirmed on all four cylinders. No mechanical anomalies were noted during the engine examination. [Additional information regarding the on-scene helicopter examination can be found in the FAA Inspector Statement located in the public docket.]

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Mifflin County Coroner performed an autopsy on the pilot on September 1, 2012. The cause of death was listed as blunt force trauma.

The FAA Toxicology and Accident Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma conducted toxicological testing on the pilot. No drugs or alcohol were noted in the testing.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

A witness who spoke with the pilot prior to the flight reported that the pilot had "five and a half inches" of fuel in the helicopter prior to departure. He reported the pilot intended to "make a couple of laps," and then they were going to fly to the local airport to purchase more fuel.

According to the kit manufacturer, when the pilot arrived at their facility to acquire the helicopter in May 2012, the owner of the kit manufacturing company flew with the pilot for about 15 hours (both in a company helicopter and in the accident helicopter). The purpose of these flights was for the pilot to practice hovering the helicopter. Because the pilot did not have a pilot's license and was not familiar with this type of helicopter, the company owner told him not to lift the helicopter more than 2 feet off the ground, once he arrived home, until he received instruction in it.

According to the pilot's wife, she believed the pilot flew the helicopter for the first time after it arrived at their home from the manufacturer's facility, on July 4, 2012. She estimated the pilot flew approximately every other weekend since then (three times in July and two in August).The pilot's wife believed the flights only included the pilot practicing lifting the helicopter off the ground and setting it back down again. He may have circled the field where he kept the helicopter, but she believed that would have been the longest duration of a flight. The pilot's wife was not aware that he intended to fly the helicopter on the day of the accident.

A review of the Height-Velocity diagram contained in the Safari Helicopter Flight Manual revealed that operations below an altitude of 400 feet and below airspeeds of 50 knots should be avoided.

According to the FAA Rotorcraft Flying Handbook, FAA-H-8083-21, the height/velocity (H/V) diagram depicts critical combinations of airspeed and altitude should an engine failure occur. Operations in crosshatched or shaded areas of the H/V diagram may not allow enough time for the critical transition from powered flight to autorotation.


NTSB Identification: ERA12LA541
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 01, 2012 in McVeytown, PA
Aircraft: JOHNSTON DOUGLAS S SAFARI, registration: N70415
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 1, 2012, at 0900 eastern daylight time, N70415, experimental amateur-built Safari helicopter was substantially damaged when it impacted the ground while maneuvering in McVeytown, PA. The non-certificated pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal, local flight that was conducted under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 91.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration inspector, the pilot was maneuvering over his property when witnesses heard the engine "skip." The helicopter subsequently descended vertically and impacted a field.

Examination of the accident site confirmed the helicopter impacted the ground with no evidence of forward speed. A preliminary examination of the helicopter revealed cyclic, collective, and tail rotor control continuity.

The helicopter was removed from the scene and secured for a subsequent examination.

The weather recorded at the nearest airport, at 0853, included wind from 280 degrees at 7 knots, 10 miles visibility, a broken cloud layer at 7,000 feet, temperature 23 degrees C, dew point 19 degrees C, and altimeter setting 30.13 inches mercury.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 70415        Make/Model: EXP       Description: SAFARI HELICOPTER
  Date: 09/01/2012     Time: 1400

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Substantial

LOCATION
  City: MCVEYTOWN   State: PA   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  EXPERIMENTAL HELICOPTER CRASHED IN A FIELD, THE 1 PERSON ON BOARD WAS 
  FATALLY INJURED, NEAR MCVEYTOWN, PA

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: HARRISBURG, PA  (EA13)                Entry date: 09/04/2012 


 Kenneth M. Smith

McVEYTOWN - Kenneth M. Smith, 61, of 90 Pine Hill Road, McVeytown, Pennsylvania, died at 9:20 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 1, 2012, as a result of injuries sustained in a helicopter accident near his home.

Mr. Smith was born on June 27, 1951, in Wayne Township, Mifflin County, a son of James M. Smith and the late Thelma J. (Ranck) Smith, of McVeytown. He married Carol J. Pollicino on April 24, 1992, in Winchester, Va. She survives at their home.   He also is survived by: children, Tracey L. Carolus and husband, David, of Milroy, and Ken J. Smith, of Dillon Beach, Calif.; a stepson, Nathan E. Longacre, of Mount Union; a granddaughter, Katelyn S. Carolus; and siblings, Dorothy Gearhart, of McVeytown, Peggy Souders and husband, Sam, of Newton Hamilton, Sandra Scott and husband, Eric, of McVeytown, Tammy Worthy and husband, Neal, of Shirleysburg, and Tina S. Smith, of Warfordsburg.

Mr. Smith was the owner of K M Smith & Son Logging and Land Clearing, a business that started with his father, with whom he worked, even as a child, and continued to operate after his father's retirement.

He was a 1969 graduate of Mount Union Area High School.

Mr. Smith was a member of the F & AM Lodge 688, Mount Union.

He was well known as a sprint car owner and driver and raced for many years primarily at Port Royal Speedway. He was also involved in drag-racing, particularly at Beaver Springs, and raced go-karts in his younger years at area tracks.

Mr. Smith will be remembered for his strong work ethic and his generosity to others. He also was proud of his special bond with his granddaughter Katelyn and his constant companion, his dog Belle.

Funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012, at the Robert D. Heath Funeral Home, Mount Union, with Pastor Brian Myfelt officiating. The interment will be in the Atkinson Mills Methodist Cemetery.

The family will receive friends at the funeral home from 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday evening, and from 9 a.m. until the time of the service, on Wednesday.

Memorial contributions can be made to the Huntingdon County Humane Society, 11371 Schoolhouse Hollow Rd, Huntingdon, PA 16652, or the American Cancer Society, PO Box 22718, Oklahoma City, OK 73123.

Skykits Savannah ADV, N9764J: Accident occurred September 03, 2012 in Murtaugh, Idaho

NTSB Identification: WPR12FA395 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, September 03, 2012 in Murtaugh, ID
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/09/2014
Aircraft: SKYKITS USA CORP SAVANNAH ADV, registration: N9764J
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was flying over his mountainous ranch property to check on his cattle following a fire. When he did not return, the family reported him overdue. The wreckage was subsequently found on the ranch property at an elevation of about 7,115 feet mean sea level. The density altitude at ground level was estimated to be about 12,495 feet; the operating limitations for the airplane state that the maximum ceiling is about 14,000 feet pressure altitude at maximum weight. On-site wreckage documentation indicated that the airplane collided with terrain in a nearly vertical attitude. Because of the high density altitude on the day of the accident and the elevation of the terrain, the pilot had little altitude within which to operate before reaching the airplane's maximum ceiling. It is likely that, while maneuvering the airplane near or above the airplane's maximum ceiling, the pilot failed to maintain adequate airspeed, which resulted in a stall and a subsequent loss of control. A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain adequate airspeed while maneuvering at or above the airplane's maximum ceiling, which resulted in a stall and a subsequent loss of airplane control. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's decision to operate the airplane in the high density altitude conditions, which placed the airplane near or above its maximum ceiling.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On September 3, 2012, at an undetermined time, a Skykits USA Corp Savannah ADV, N9764J, collided with terrain near Murtaugh, Idaho. The pilot/owner was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The commercial pilot sustained fatal injuries; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The local personal flight departed Twin Falls, Idaho, about 1200. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot had indicated to family members that he was going to fly up to his mountain ranch property to check on his cattle following a fire. When he did not return, the family reported him overdue, and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an Alert Notice (ALNOT). The Cassia County Sheriff reported that the wreckage was discovered about 2030 MDT.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

A review of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airman records revealed that the 81-year-old pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. The pilot held a third-class medical certificate issued on January 7, 2010. It had the limitation that the pilot must wear corrective lenses. The pilot's medical certificate had expired, but he was operating a light-sport airplane.

No personal flight records were located for the pilot. The IIC obtained the aeronautical experience listed in this report from a review of the FAA airmen medical records on file in the Airman and Medical Records Center located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The pilot reported on his medical application that he had a total time of 3,000 hours with 11 hours logged in the last 6 months.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The single-engine, high-wing airplane was a Skykits USA Corporation Savannah ADV, serial number 07-07-51-621. A review of the airplane's logbooks revealed that the airplane had a total airframe time of 300.1 hours at the last engine maintenance performed (an oil change) on August 12, 2012. The last annual inspection was on June 1, 2012, at a total airframe time of 276.6 hours.

The engine was a 100-horsepower ROTAX 912 ULS, serial number 5649340. Total time recorded on the engine at the last annual conditional inspection was 276.6 hours.

The operating limitations state that the maximum ceiling is about 14,000 feet pressure altitude at maximum weight. However, if the pilot is operating under sport pilot privileges, FAR Part 61.315 (C) (11), restricts the airplane to 10,000 feet msl, or 2,000 feet above ground level (agl), whichever is higher.

METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS

The closest official weather observation station was Twin Falls, Idaho (KTWF), which was 21 nautical miles (nm) northwest of the accident site at an elevation of 4,154 feet mean sea level (msl). An aviation routine weather report (METAR) for KTWF issued at 1153 MDT stated: wind from 030 degrees at 5 knots; visibility 10 miles; sky clear; temperature 23/73 degrees Celsius/Fahrenheit; dew point -1/30 degrees Celsius/Fahrenheit; altimeter 30.16 inches of mercury.

The elevation of the accident site was approximately 7,115 feet, which was about 3,000 feet higher than the reporting weather station. Using a dry adiabatic lapse rate of 3 degrees F per thousand feet; the accident site temperature would be 67 degrees F with a dew point of 21 degrees F. Using a pressure differential (between 5,000 and 10,000 feet) of 0.86 inches per 1,000 feet, the atmospheric pressure would decrease from 30.16 to 27.20 inches. Using those numbers in a density altitude calculator, the calculated density altitude was 12,495 feet.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

An FAA inspector examined the wreckage on scene. The airplane came to rest nose down in a stand of willow trees in a marshy area. Only the trees in the immediate area of the wreckage had broken branches. The cabin area was crushed aft, and the leading edges of the wings were in contact with the ground. The fuselage buckled 90 degrees aft of the cabin so that the empennage was in a horizontal upright position. He established control continuity for the rudder and elevators to the crushed cabin area. The ailerons remained connected.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Cassia County Coroner, Burley, Idaho, completed an autopsy, and found blunt force trauma as the cause of death.

The FAA Forensic Toxicology Research Team, Oklahoma City, performed toxicological testing of specimens of the pilot. Analysis of the specimens contained no findings for carbon monoxide, cyanide, or volatiles. The report contained the following findings for tested drugs: amlodopine detected in urine; amlodipine detected in blood (cavity); metoprolol detected in liver; metoprolol detected in blood (cavity).

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge (IIC), the FAA, and an investigator representing ROTAX examined the wreckage at the owner's hangar on October 31, 2012. A detailed report is part of the public docket.

The postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

NTSB Identification: WPR12FA395 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, September 03, 2012 in Murtaugh, ID
Aircraft: SKYKITS USA CORP SAVANNAH ADV, registration: N9764J
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On September 3, 2012, about 1230 mountain daylight time (MDT), a Skykits USA Corp Savannah ADV, N9764J, collided with terrain near Murtaugh, Idaho. The pilot/owner was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The commercial pilot sustained fatal injuries; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The local personal flight departed Twin Falls, Idaho, about 1200. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot had indicated to family members that he was going to fly up to his mountain ranch property to check on his cattle following a fire. When he did not return, the family reported him overdue at 1300, and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an Alert Notice (ALNOT). The wreckage was discovered about 2235 MDT.

The airplane came to rest nose down in a stand of willow trees in a marshy area. The cabin area was crushed aft, and the leading edges of the wings were in contact with the ground. The fuselage buckled 90° aft of the cabin so that the empennage was in a horizontal upright position. An FAA inspector established control continuity for the rudder and elevators to the crushed cabin are. The ailerons remained connected.



Rancher Dies in Cassia Co. Plane Crash




TWIN FALLS • Joseph Edgar Tugaw, a prominent rancher and veterinarian in the Twin Falls area for more than three decades, died Monday evening in a plane crash in Dry Creek Canyon.

An announcement from the Cassia County Sheriff’s Office states deputies received information about a plane crash in the Dry Creek Canyon area at about 8:30 p.m.

They found Tugaw’s single engine Savannah ADV fixed-wing plane about 18 miles up the canyon, the announcement states.

“Everyone here is deeply saddened,” said Wyatt Prescott, Idaho Cattle Association executive vice president. “He’s a legend in the Idaho cattle industry.”

Tugaw was elected president of the Idaho Cattle Association in 1995 and in 1999 was inducted into the Southern Idaho Livestock Hall of Fame.

Mott Hill assisted in the search for Tugaw’s plane. He said he worked with Tugaw for 20 years, but was also a friend.

“Joe had a fire in his belly for raising quality cattle,” Hill said.

Along with a passion for cattle, Hill said Tugaw was a good horseman, a considerate neighbor and was a great environmentalist.

“He took care of the land and it took care of him,” Hill said.

Tugaw also took care of his friends, Hill said.

“He was just a kind, gentle person,” he said. “He took better care of his friends and relatives — keeping contact and providing encouragement more than anybody I’ve ever known.”

Just recently, fire swept through most of Tugaw’s grazing land, but Tugaw remained optimistic and was looking for ways to keep the herd fed, Hill said.

Monday evening, Hill said, Tugaw was checking on his cattle in grazing allotment in the South Hills and enjoyed that he could combine his love of flying with caring for his herd.

“He couldn’t have been happier than when he was up there,” Hill said.

Monday’s crash is still under investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board.

Allen Kenitzer with the FAA said Tugaw’s plane had departed the Twin Falls airport earlier Monday. The aircraft was completely destroyed, he said.

Mini-Cassia Search and Rescue, Rock Creek Ambulance and Air St. Luke’s assisted in the response.

According to a 1999 profile on Tugaw in Ag Weekly following his entrance into the Livestock Hall of Fame, Tugaw grew up on a cattle ranch in Okanogan, Wash., and in 1954 graduated from Washington State University in Pullman with a degree in veterinary medicine. Tugaw then entered the U.S. Air Force where he served at a hospital in Taipei, Taiwan, the article states. After two years in the service, Tugaw opened the Central Valley Veterinary Hospital in Salt Lake City with an uncle and later opened several more clinics in the Salt Lake Area.

In the article Tugaw spoke of the variety of experiences he had throughout his life, while always returning to ranching.

“I wanted to be a cowboy and own a ranch for ever and ever and ever, so that’s what I did,” Tugaw said at the time.


Source:  http://magicvalley.com

 
Credit: ICP 
Twin Falls rancher Joe Tugaw owned and flew a small plane similar to the one pictured here. The aircraft is manufactured by the I.C.P. company, and known as a Savannah A.D.V.


Cassia County, Idaho (KMVT-TV) - In remote Cassia County off of Dry Creek Road Fire, EMS, Police and search and rescue teams spent several hours Monday Night into the early morning hours of Tuesday looking for a reported downed airplane.

The Cassia County Sheriff’s Office was assisted by ground crews on ATVs and by Lifeflight in the search for the downed airplane. The plane was eventually located in the Dry Creek Canyon just off of Dry Creek Road outside of Murtaugh.

We spoke with Lt. Kevin Horrick of the Cassia County Sheriff's Department and he confirmed that a plane had crashed in the canyon. "The Sheriff's Department today responded to a plane crash up dry creek canyon. The crash is still under investigation."

While the Cassia County Sheriff's Office is releasing very little information about the plane crash, we have learned that there was 1 person aboard the plane, the pilot, and that the 1 person was a fatality. Family members tell us that Joe Tugaw, 82 years old of Twin Falls, was aboard the plane when it crashed.

Tugaw reportedly left the Joslin Field Airport in Twin Falls sometime Monday evening. He was flying over his ranch off of Dry Creek Road when the plane crashed near his cabin in the canyon. The Cassia County Sheriff's Office is continuing their investigation and we will have the latest information as it becomes available.

Story and video:    http://www.kmvt.com


 
 Joe Tugaw 
 Credit: Idaho Cattle Association

MURTAUGH, Idaho -- Emergency crews in Cassia County continue to investigate a serious airplane crash that happened near a remote canyon about 20 miles southeast of Twin Falls Monday night.

Cassia County dispatchers say the plane went down in Dry Creek Canyon around 9 p.m. Monday.

As of 8 a.m. Tuesday, officials couldn’t confirm details in the crash; however, they did say that authorities continue to investigate the scene.


http://www.ktvb.com

 http://registry.faa.gov/N9764J

IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 9764J        Make/Model: LSA       Description: SAVANNAH ADV SKYKITS
  Date: 09/03/2012     Time: 2000

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: MURTAUGH   State: ID   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES, THE 1PERSON ON BOARD WAS 
  FATALLY INJURED, NEAR MURTAUGH, ID

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Pleasure      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: BOISE, ID  (NM11)                     Entry date: 09/04/2012 
 

Piper PA 34 200T Seneca II G-LORD: Ferry to UK - Ice Conditions and Blown Tire on Landing

September 2, 2012 by kesswil

Ferry to UK for Maintenance in ice conditions at FL 100 and a tire blown on landing.

Cessna 182P Skylane, N5981J: Accident occurred September 02, 2012 in Newberry, Michigan

NTSB Identification: CEN12TA604 
 14 CFR Public Use
Accident occurred Sunday, September 02, 2012 in Newberry, MI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/22/2013
Aircraft: CESSNA 182P, registration: N5981J
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this public aircraft accident report.

The pilot detected a “hot electrical” odor during the local flight and decided to return to the airport. While on short final, a large puff of smoke was emitted from under the right side of the instrument panel and distracted the pilot. About the same time, the airplane encountered convective turbulence so severe that the pilot hit his head on the ceiling and everything that was on the seats was thrown forward. The pilot stated that he was further distracted by the turbulence encounter, and the airplane entered a nose down attitude and impacted the terrain before the pilot could take remedial action. The airplane slid about 200 feet before coming to a stop and a postimpact fire ensued. The cause of the electrical smell and smoke could not be determined as the fuselage was consumed by the postimpact fire, which likely resulted from fuel lines being ruptured during the impact.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s failure to maintain control of the airplane due to distraction from a combination of smoke in the cockpit and a sudden turbulence encounter while on short final approach. The cause of the cockpit smoke could not be determined due to the extensive damage sustained by the airplane during the postimpact fire.

On September 2, 2012, at 1415 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 182P, N5981J, owned and operated by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, collided with the terrain while landing at the Luce County Airport (KERY), Newberry, Michigan. The airline transport rated pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged by impact and a postimpact fire. The public use flight was being operated under 14 Code of Federal Regulation Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from KERY at 1257.

The pilot reported he was on a routine fire detection mission and was about 10 to 12 miles from the airport when he detected a “hot electrical” odor. He stated that everything was operating normally with the airplane at the time, but he was concerned enough that he radioed the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and told them he was going to return to KERY.

The pilot reported he entered the traffic pattern for runway 11 at KERY and set up for a stabilized approach to the runway. He reported the air was a little choppy and there was some convective turbulence in the area. While on final approach at a distance of 400 to 500 feet from the approach end of the runway, a large puff of smoke was rapidly emitted from under the right side of the instrument panel under the circuit breaker panel. This momentarily distracted him. At almost the same time, the airplane encountered convective turbulence that was severe enough that he hit his head on the ceiling and everything that was on the seats was thrown forward. He stated the turbulence extended his distraction. When he looked forward and turned his attention back to the airplane, the nose was down and all he could see was grass out of the windscreen. The airplane immediately hit the ground.

The nose gear broke off upon impact and the airplane slid forward up onto the runway. It continued to slide about 200 feet before stopping. By the time the airplane came to a stop, there were flames coming up into the cockpit. He suspected the flames were at least in part from damage sustained in the impact.

The pilot exited the airplane at which time he noticed his legs were burned. The airplane continued to burn. The fuselage aft of the firewall back to the empennage and the inboard section of both wings was consumed by fire. The empennage was present, but it sustained a substantial amount of damage from the fire. Due to the amount of fire damage, the cause of the electrical smell and subsequent smoke could not be determined.




 NTSB Identification: CEN12TA604
14 CFR Public Use
Accident occurred Sunday, September 02, 2012 in Newberry, MI
Aircraft: CESSNA 182P, registration: N5981J
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.


On September 2, 2012, at 1245 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 182P, N5981J, owned and operated by the Michigan Department of Natural Recourses, collided with the terrain while landing at the Luce County Airport (KERY), Newberry, Michigan. The airline transport rated pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged by a post impact fire. The public flight was being operated under 14 Code of Federal Regulation Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from KERY at 1115.

The pilot reported he was on a routine fire detection mission and was about 10 to 12 miles from the airport when he detected a “hot electrical” odor. He stated that everything was operating normally with the airplane at the time, but he was concerned enough that he radioed the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and told them he was going to return to KERY.

The pilot reported he entered the traffic pattern for runway 11 at KERY and set up for a stabilized approach to the runway. He reported the air was a little choppy and there was some convective turbulence in the area. While on final approach at a distance of 400 to 500 feet from the approach end of the runway, a large puff of smoke was rapidly emitted from under the right side of the instrument paned near the circuit breaker panel. This momentarily distracted him. At almost the same time, the airplane hit turbulence that was severe enough that he hit his head on the ceiling and everything that was on the seats was thrown forward. He stated the turbulence extended his distraction.

When he looked forward and turned his attention back to the airplane, the nose was down and all he could see was grass out of the windscreen. The airplane immediately hit the ground.

The nose gear broke off and the airplane slid forward up onto the runway. It continued to slide about 200 feet before it stopped. By time the airplane came to a stop, there were flames coming up into the cockpit. He suspected the flames were at least in part from damage sustained in the impact.

The pilot exited the airplane at which time he noticed his legs were burned. The airplane continued to burn. The only portions of the airplane remaining were forward of the firewall, the wings from the fuel caps outboard, and a portion of the empennage.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 5981J        Make/Model: C182      Description: 182, Skylane
  Date: 09/02/2012     Time: 1816

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Serious     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: NEWBERRY   State: MI   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED OFF THE END OF THE RUNWAY, NEWBERRY, MI

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   1     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: GRAND RAPIDS, MI  (GL09)              Entry date: 09/04/2012 

 http://registry.faa.gov/N5981J


Courtesy Photo | Michigan DNR


Pilot burned in crash released from hospital 

September 4, 2012
By JACKIE STARK - The Mining Journal 

 
MARQUETTE - A 61-year-old Newberry man has been discharged from Helen Newberry Joy Hospital after sustaining burns to his arms and legs in a plane crash Sunday afternoon.

At 2:15 p.m., a Michigan State Police trooper from the Newberry detachment was dispatched to the Luce County Airport upon report of a plane crash. According to a written statement from police, the trooper observed Dean Minett walking away from a single-engine plane on the west end of the runway that was engulfed in flames.

Police said Minett was the lone occupant of the plane, which was owned by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and was being flown for aerial fire assistance.

Police said Minett told them he had attempted to land at the airport after the cockpit began smelling like smoke. Minett said as he came in for the landing, smoke began to fill the cockpit, distracting him and causing him to crash.

Police said the plane was a total loss.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash.

The MSP was assisted by the Luce County Airport staff, the Luce County Emergency Management director, Luce County EMS, the DNR and the Newberry Fire Department.

Source:   http://www.miningjournal.net


 June 2, 2012:  How Duck Lake Fire was discovered: Michigan DNR pilot spots a curl of smoke

September 2, 2012:   LUCE CO. -- A single engine plane crashed at the Luce County Airport this afternoon, police said.
 

The pilot, Dean Minett, 61, of Newberry, was taken to Helen Joy Hospital for burns to his legs and arms. Troopers from the Michigan State Police Sault Ste. Marie Post arrived on scene around 2:15 p.m. 

To find the plane on the west of the runway fully engulfed in flames. Minett told police he smelled smoke in the cockpit and tried to turn around to land but was distracted by smoke filling up the cockpit and crashed.

The plane was owned by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. It was being flown for aerial fire assistance. The plane is a total loss.

The FAA and NTSB are investigating the crash. Michigan State Police was assisted on scene by the Luce County Airport staff, the Luce County Emergency Management Director, Luce County EMS, the Michigan DNR, and the Newberry Fire Department.

Read more:     http://www.uppermichiganssource.com
 

 LUCE COUNTY -- A Newberry man is lucky to be a live, after he crashed his plane and was able to walk away from the burning wreckage on Sunday. 

 Michigan State Police say they were called to the Luce County Airport at around 2:15pm Sunday afternoon on reports of a plane crash. When they got there, they saw a single engine plane on the west end of the runway fully engulfed in flames.

Fortunately the pilot, 61 year-old Dean Minett was able to walk away from the crash. He was taken to the hospital to be treated for some burns to his arms and legs.

Minett says during his flight, the cockpit of the plane filled with smoke, distracting him and caused him to crash.

The plane was owned by the Michigan DNR and was being flown for aerial fire assistance. The plane was a total loss.

The FAA and NTSB are investigating the crash.


Read more:  http://www.upnorthlive.com

Passenger dies on private jet, plane diverted to Halifax Stanfield International Airport

 A private jet made made an unscheduled landing at Halifax Stanfield International Airport this morning after a passenger died aboard the aircraft.

The passenger, an unnamed 64-year-old man from the United Arab Emirates, was on his way to Houston to receive medical treatment. He was being escorted by a doctor who asked for a medical diversion to land in Halifax.

Police and medical responders were waiting at the Esso Avatat Building when the aircraft stopped there at 1 a.m., but the man had already been declared dead.

Halifax RCMP spokesman Cpl. Scott MacRae said there is no sign of foul play.


Source:   http://thechronicleherald.ca

Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche, N7830Y: Aircraft on takeoff, struck props, then landed gear up - Springfield, Missouri


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 7830Y        Make/Model: PA30      Description: PA-30/39 Twin Comanche, Twin Comanche CR
  Date: 09/03/2012     Time: 1950

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: SPRINGFIELD   State: MO   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT ON TAKEOFF, STRUCK PROPS, THEN LANDED GEAR UP, SPRINGFIELD, MO

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Pleasure      Phase: Take-off      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: KANSAS CITY, MO  (CE05)               Entry date: 09/04/2012 

Story, video and comments:   http://ozarksfirst.com

 http://flightaware.com/live/flight/N7830Y

http://registry.faa.gov/N7830Y

  
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- People driving by Downtown Airport along East Division Monday saw an odd sight.   A small twin engine plane apparently made a landing without its landing gear.  The plane's propellers were also damaged.  No one was around when the KOLR10/KOZL News crew arrived in the afternoon, and a check of the Springfield Police Department shows no accident report.  The plane is a 1965 Piper PA30, registered out of Jacksonville Beach, Florida. 

Egypt: Nation Enters Age of Flying Doctors

The air force and the Health Ministry signed on Monday, September 3, 2012 cooperation protocol to operate two air ambulance helicopters for urgent medical evacuation for critical cases and accident victims.

Air Force Commander Gen. Younes el-Masry and Health Minister Mohamed Mostafa Hamed attended the signing ceremony.

According to the deal, the air force will train several doctors to work in the air ambulance service.

The first two helicopters that will operate as flying doctors were inaugurated on Monday. Their base will be Almaza Airport and will operate through cooperation between the health ministry and the air forces.

A sole plane of the model that will be used in the project is capable of carrying two injured people. The crew includes a doctor and assistant doctor.

Source:   http://allafrica.com

New home for old planes

HISTORIC aircraft have found a new home as the relocated Boscombe Down Aviation Collection nears completion.

The last aircraft to be moved from the collection’s former base at Boscombe Down to its new hangar at Old Sarum was a Bristol Sycamore XJ380.

The helicopter had fallen into disrepair after being decommissioned and was restored by the collection’s team of volunteers.

They plan to repaint the aircraft so it can be admired by visitors to the museum.

A Hunter F6 has also been reassembled at the hangar and is standing on its own two wheels for the first time in five years.

Read more here: http://www.salisburyjournal.co.uk

‘Mystery engineer’: Saitoti copter ‘was repaired by an outsider’ - Eurocopter AS 350B3e Ecureuil, Kenya Police Air Wing, 5Y-CDT, Ngong Hills, near Nairobi, Kenya


In Summary
  • It also emerged that Eurocopter, the suppliers of the helicopter, may have short-changed the government by delivering an aircraft, which failed to meet the specifications in the tender bid.
  • Police Airwing chief engineer Johnson Mwangi Gathatu said the man who repaired the helicopter was not known to the police.
  • He said that the engineer was brought on board after the Eurocopter sanctioned engineer, a Mr Aristide, failed to unravel the cause of the stress signal on the aircraft’s control panel.

The helicopter that came down killing Internal Security minister George Saitoti and five others was repaired by an engineer at Wilson Airport two days before the crash, a commission of inquiring into the accident heard on Monday.

It also emerged that Eurocopter, the suppliers of the helicopter, may have short-changed the government by delivering an aircraft, which failed to meet the specifications in the tender bid.

Police Airwing chief engineer Johnson Mwangi Gathatu said the man who repaired the helicopter was not known to the police. (READ: Saitoti crash copter had 11 parts missing)

He told the commission chaired by Lady Justice Kalpana Rawal that the engineer was brought on board after the Eurocopter sanctioned engineer, a Mr Aristide, failed to unravel the cause of the stress signal on the aircraft’s control panel.

Mr Mwangi said the arrangement between Mr Aristide and the Wilson Airport-based engineer did not involve the police.

“It was a third party arrangement when Aristide failed to find a solution to technical problem,” he told the commission sitting at KICC in Nairobi. “I did not authorise him, it was their own arrangement.”

No records exist 

He said no records existed to show the intervention was made but it was not strange as engineers consult each other throughout in the aviation industry. “I saw him go into the cockpit but I cannot tell what he did, again I am not trained on this type of aircraft, the responsibility fell with Aristide,” said Mr Mwangi.

Read more here:    http://www.nation.co.ke

http://cdn-www.airliners.net/aviation-photo

Corning Municipal (4M9), Arkansas: Tornado Damage to Airport Totals $6 to 10-million

 
Photo courtesy: KAIT and, Laura Brown

Watch Video:    http://arkansasmatters.com

CORNING, Ark. --

Update (September 3):
Two days after an EF2 tornado touched down in Clay County, damage at the Corning Municipal Airport is estimated at 6 to 10-million dollars.

That's according to Airport Commissioner Mark Rockwell, who told KARK 4 News by phone today that 16 airplanes were damaged in the storm, along with five buildings, two hangars and a shed. The hangars are expected to be covered by the city's insurance, he said.

About two dozen private and commercial (crop-dusting) airplanes are usually kept at the airport, Rockwell said.

The airport runway is open, but only during daylight hours, he said.

According to the National Weather Service in Memphis, the twister struck shortly before 4:30 Saturday afternoon. Some nearby homes had damage from blown out windows. 

Update (September 2):

The National Weather Service out of Memphis confirms an EF2 tornado did hit in Clay County Saturday. It caused damage to the Corning Municipal Airport.

Pictures came to KARK just after 6:00 pm Saturday night. Now we know for sure it was a twister that caused that damage.

One airplane is now surrounded by debris, and several hangers and a shed were damaged by the tornado.

Original Story (September 1):


Several areas of the state are reporting damage after storms that swept through the Natural State Saturday. Emergency officials tell KARK they have not heard of any injuries at this time.

The City of Hot Springs reported tree limbs down on power lines. The Austin Hotel also suffered some damage to the siding on the front of the building. The hotel was seriously damaged by another storm early last month when winds blew a hole into it.

The Department of Emergency Management also says the Corning Airport in Clay County was damaged. Several hangers and a shed were damaged by the winds Saturday.

In Paragould in Greene County, a tractor-trailer parked at a residence was toppled by the storm.

Conway County also saw some trees down.

Storms also hit Des Arc Saturday afternoon. Police say several homes and cars were damaged by falling trees, but no one was injured.

Dozens of people are without power in the Des Arc area.

As of 8:00 p.m. more than 10,000 people without power, mostly in Garland, Saline and White Counties.


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