Monday, April 03, 2017

Owner plans to rebuild plane hangar flattened by high winds




PANOLA COUNTY, TX (KSLA) -

Wounds from Sunday's storms still can be seen throughout the ArkLaTex; and there is a lot of cleanup that needs to be done.

An airplane hangar at the Panola County Airport in East Texas was destroyed by straight-line winds.

A survey team from the National Weather Service office in Shreveport estimated winds peaked at 120 mph to 130 mph. That is as strong as an EF-2 tornado.

The back wall of the hangar was uprooted and knocked down, while the roof was blown into the street and the property behind it.

"I got a call about 1:20 p.m. that the hangar had been blown over," said James Crooks, who owns the hangar.

He said he is just glad no one was hurt.

"This is just materialize possessions."

Crooks also was overwhelmed by the community support.

"My phone was just ringing off the hook. 'James, we'll come. We'll bring equipment.'

"It was really, really touching. The people of Panola County are just really nice."

And, believe it or not, none of the airplanes in the hangar was damaged.

"It's like floating down the river. We fly around in the evening. It's just kind of relaxing," Crooks said of flying.

"So the good Lord spared us the planes."

Crooks plans on rebuilding, just not right now.

He said it's going to cost him about $25,000.

Story and video:   http://www.ksla.com

Cessna U206D, N72094: Incident occurred April 01, 2017 in Wein Lake, Alaska

http://registry.faa.gov/N72094

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fairbanks, Alaska 

Aircraft wingtip and prop struck ground after hitting a pothole in ice.  

Date: 01-APR-17
Time: 00:00:00Z
Regis#: N72094
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 206
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: WEIN LAKE
State: ALASKA

Aviation CEO claims Bendigo owners of crashed plane were still its licensed operators during fatal accident: Beechcraft B200 Super King Air, Corporate and Leisure Charters, VH-ZCR; accident occurred February 21, 2017 near Melbourne-Essendon Airport, Australia

An aviation company is distancing itself from last month's fatal plane crash in Essendon by claiming the aircraft's Bendigo owners were its registered operators at the time.  

Australian Corporate Jet Centre co-chief executive officer Vas Nikolovski told the Bendigo Advertiser on the afternoon of the crash they held the operating certificate for the aircraft.  

But he said yesterday his company was only told it was the registered operator three hours after the disaster. 

An bid by Bendigo-based MyJet to transfer the plane’s operating licence to ACJC was lodged on December 15 last year but stalled when it used an expired credit card to pay for the procedure. The application was cancelled on December 20 when they failed to amend the error. 

Only when Mr Nikolovski’s co-CEO Sam Iliades enquired in January about the progress of the transfer did he realise the original application expired and reapplied for the operation transfer. 

The Administrative Appeals Tribunal heard last month the Civil Aviation Safety Authority shifted the operating licence from MyJet to ACJC on February 16, five days before the plane crashed into the DFO shopping centre in Essendon.

CASA said it told both parties of the change, but Mr Nikolovski yesterday disputed its version of facts, saying it was only an email at 12.01pm on the day of the incident that notified ACJC of the change.  

His co-CEO, Sam Iliades, replied to CASA at 1.27pm, writing the plane was destroyed "and had nothing to do with our company".  

"Sad news all round but we won’t be requiring the certificate," Mr Iliades wrote. 

But Mr Nikolovski told the Bendigo Advertiser in the hour before that day the plane was registered to his Melbourne aviation company. 

"My Jet is the owner, although it's on our certificate to charter and use for commercial purpose," he said shortly after midday. 

“In order to be able to operate an aircraft for revenue, for it to be chartered, it needs to be on our operator certificate.

"It's only just come across on our certificate a week or so ago."

Mr Nikolovski also backed away from those comments yesterday, saying he must have been making reference to the CASA email from earlier in the afternoon, and indicated his belief Bendigo aircraft owners Dr Chris Richards and Andrew Hoare were also its plane's operators.  

A lawyer acting on behalf of Dr Richards and Mr Hoare cited yesterday the ongoing Australian Transport Safety Bureau investigation as the reason the men would not respond to Mr Nikolovski's comments.  

CASA also declined to comment while the investigation continued. 

Pilot Max Quartermain and four American tourists were killed when the Beechcraft Super King Air  collided with the Essendon DFO shopping complex moments after takeoff. 

The plane was en route to King Island when it plummeted from the sky.   

It was later revealed Mr Quartermain was already the subject of an ATSB investigation at the time of his death for a near-collision in Mount Hotham two years ago. 

A preliminary report from the ATSB on its investigation revealed a black box flight recorder was recovered from the wreckage but contained no audio of the crash.  

Examination of the planes’ engines found no evidence of “pre-impact failure”. 

However, parts of both engines were kept for further analysis.

About 100 emergency service workers responded to the disaster, which premier Daniel Andrews later called Victoria’s worst civil aviation disaster in the past three decades. 

Original article can be found here:  http://www.bendigoadvertiser.com.au



UPDATE 9.40am: The head of an aviation company seeking to distance itself from last month's DFO plane crash said on the day of the tragedy the destroyed aircraft had been registered with the company for “a week or so”. 

Fairfax Media is reporting the Australian Corporate Jet Centre CEO sent an email to the Civil Aviation Safety Authority at 1.27pm on February 21 saying the crashed plane had “nothing to do with our company” and that it would not be requiring the certificate. 

The company received an email from CASA confirming its ownership of the plane at 12.01pm. The email said the decision was actioned on February 16.  

Australian Corporate Jet Centre CEO Vas Nikolovski told the Bendigo Advertiser at approximately 1.19pm his company registered the plane “a week or so” ago. 

“My Jet is the owner, although it's on our certificate to charter and use for commercial purpose,” Mr Nikolovski said. 

“In order to be able to operate an aircraft for venue, for it to be chartered, it needs to be on air operator certificate.

“It's only just come across on our certificate a week or so ago.” 

Civil Aviation Safety Authority records show Australian Corporate Jet Centres became the registered operator of VH-ZCR on February 16, just five days before it went down.

EARLIER: The aviation company potentially facing a multimillion-dollar lawsuit over the Essendon DFO disaster was told three hours after the crash that the plane involved had been registered in its name.

As the wreckage smoldered at 12.01pm on February 21, and it was confirmed that five lives had been lost, Australian Corporate Jet Centres received an email from the aviation authority confirming it was the plane's registered operator.

The company's CEO replied at 1.27pm: "Unfortunately this aircraft was destroyed in an accident today which you may have seen in the media, the plane was flown by Max Quatermaine [sic] under his AOC – Corporate and Leisure Travel and had nothing to do with our company. Sad news all round but we won't be requiring the certificate."

With the threat of lawsuits and insurance payouts mounting over Victoria's worst aviation disaster in 30 years, the Essendon-based company has sought to have its registration overturned.

Australian Corporate Jet Centres claims it was not responsible for the plane due to an administrative bungle over a $65 application fee in December.

Civil Aviation Safety Authority records show Australian Corporate Jet Centres became the registered operator of VH-ZCR on February 16, just five days before it went down.

Emails published in a finding by the Commonwealth's Administrative Appeals Tribunal show the company did not find out its application to transfer registration had been approved until midday on February 21 – three hours after the crash at 8.58am.

"Your application was actioned ... it should be on its way in the mail," CASA wrote in the email sent at 12.01pm.

With the media spotlight intensifying and emergency services still on the scene, the company's CEO, Sam Iliades, replied to CASA telling it that the plane had gone down. The plane was being flown by pilot Max Quartermain under his air operator certificate, he wrote.

The company continues to maintain that position: "It was not our air operator's certificate, not our client, not our revenue, not our pilot," Australian Corporate Jet Centres said in a statement on Monday.

Fairfax Media understands just who was legally responsible for the flight is still being investigated.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau has been sifting through the wreckage of the plane, trying to piece together what caused it to go down shortly after take-off.

A recent preliminary report found that both engines and propellers appeared to be in working order at the time of the flight and that there was no evidence of mechanical failure.

Australian Corporate Jet Centres recently applied to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal to have the CASA registration decision overturned but the matter was dismissed due to a lack of jurisdiction.

The matter was taken to the tribunal after the company originally had its application to become the plane's operator cancelled in late December because incorrect credit card details were used to pay the $65 application fee.

According to emails published in the tribunal finding, the company was not informed its application had been cancelled.

On January 30 the company emailed the regulator to find out what the delay was, only to be told the transfer had not gone through.

A new application was submitted and approved just over two weeks later.

CASA updated its register on February 16, sending out a letter to Australian Corporate Jet Centres and the previous registered operator, MyJet Aviation, informing them of the change.

The letter also contained a reminder of the operator's obligations.

These included the display of nationality and registration marks, as well as responsibility for airworthiness and maintenance. 

When the letter hadn't arrived by February 20, Mr Iliades sent another email asking CASA about the "status of the registered operator application".

The response came a day later, when the plane had already crashed.

Any lawsuit could run into tens of millions of dollars, with the family of the passengers plus the hundreds of people who witnessed the crash all having a potential claim. At least three law firms have been retained, Fairfax understands.

"[The case] could generate a very large lawsuit for the entity that is found to be responsible under the law of negligence for the air crash by a court," Shine Lawyers aviation department manager Thomas Janson said.

Negligence is yet to be proved in the case, as investigators continue to work through the plane's wreckage. But if it could be proved, hundreds of bystanders who saw the flight go down might be able to claim for nervous shock, Mr Janson said.

Read more here:  http://www.bendigoadvertiser.com.au



 Max Quartermain

John Washburn

Pilot Max Quartermain, Russell Munsch, Glenn Garland and Greg De Haven.



Glenn Garland, Russell Munsch, Greg DeHaven and a fourth golfing partner (left) at Cape Kidnappers golf course in New Zealand.


Collision with terrain involving B200 King Air VH-ZCR at Essendon Airport, Victoria on February 21, 2017: http://www.atsb.gov.au

NTSB Identification: CEN17RA106
Accident occurred Monday, February 20, 2017 in Melbourne, Australia
Aircraft: RAYTHEON B200, registration:
Injuries: 5 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


On February 20, 2017, at 2159 hours universal coordinated time (0859 hours Australian eastern daylight time on February 21, 2017), a Raytheon model B200 (King Air) airplane, Australian registration VH-ZCR, impacted a building and roadway shortly after takeoff from runway 17 (4,934 feet by 148 feet, asphalt) at Melbourne/Essendon Airport (YMEN), Victoria, Australia. A post-impact fire ensued. The pilot and four passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed. The intended destination was the King Island Airport (YKII), Currie, Tasmania, Australia.


The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau. This report is for informational purposes only and contains information released by or obtained from the government Australia.


Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:


Australian Transport Safety Bureau

PO Box 967
Civic Square ACT 2608
Tel: +61 2 6257 4150
Website: http://www.atsb.gov.au
Email: atsbinfo@atsb.gov.au

Controlled Flight Into Terrain: Cirrus SR22, N167CB; accident occurred April 02, 2017 in Brinnon, Jefferson County, Washington

 













The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Renton, Washington
Continental Motors Inc; Mobile, Alabama
Cirrus Aircraft; Duluth, Minnesota

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N167CB 

Location: Brinnon, WA
Accident Number: WPR17LA084
Date & Time: 04/02/2017, 1528 PDT
Registration: N167CB
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT)
Injuries: 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On April 2, 2017, about 1528 Pacific daylight time, a Cirrus Design Corporation SR22, airplane, N167CB, was substantially damaged when it impacted mountainous terrain near Brinnon, Washington. The flight instructor and the student pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight.

The cross country flight departed from Whidbey Air Park (W10), Langley, Washington, about 1500 with a planned destination of Bremerton National Airport (PWT), Bremerton, Washington.

According to the flight instructor, they had planned a 3-hour instructional flight and planned to accomplish their traffic pattern work at PWT. While enroute, the flight instructor stated that he wanted to show the student "that there was more to flying than just training." In his words "flying was also fun." Subsequently, the airplane was turned west towards a large valley in the Olympic Mountain range. While flying in the valley, the flight instructor stated that he believed their altitude was at least 2,000 ft above ground level (agl) and that no wind or turbulence was present. However, at some point, the pilots realized they needed to climb to avoid terrain and the flight instructor applied full power and pitched the airplane up into a climb. However, he realized that even with these control inputs, the terrain was rising faster than the airplane was climbing. The flight instructor instructed the student pilot to start a right turn. Shortly thereafter, he felt the turn was too slow and just as the student pilot was increasing the bank of the turn, he took control of the airplane. The flight instructor stated that things were happening too fast for him to recover the airplane and he knew that they were going to crash. Subsequently, the airplane impacted terrain.

The accident airplane was equipped with an Avidyne Primary Flight Display that contained two flash memory devices. The flash memodevices were recovered from the accident airplane and sent to the National Transportation Safety Board's Vehicle Recorder laboratory for download. The downloaded files captured the accident flight.

The data started with the airplane flying southwest over Puget Sound, about 1,700 ft mean sea level (msl). At 1518, the airplane turned left to a south-southwesterly heading. At 1520, the airplane turned to the west and crossed the shoreline north of Brinnon, Washington. The airplane then flew along the Dosewallips river valley, about 1,600 ft msl. At 1523, the airplane began a climb and at 1526, the airplane's altitude indicated about 2,407 ft msl. The airplane then turned left to fly along the Hungry Creek valley; however, the terrain continued to rapidly rise in height. Subsequently, at 1528, the data was consistent with the airplane impacting terrain, near 5,400 ft msl. The accident site was in a box canyon with ridgelines present in front and on each side of it, that were between 100 ft to several hundred ft higher in elevation, than the accident site. Further, the terrain at the accident site, was about 2,000 ft higher in elevation, than that of the river valley that was about 1.5 miles below it.

No anomalies in the recorded data from the accident flight would have precluded the normal operation of the airplane. The last recorded information before impact, indicated the engine was at 2,620 rpm, the airplane in about 29° of right bank, and an indicated ground speed of about 81 knots.

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 25, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/03/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/22/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1400 hours (Total, all aircraft), 26 hours (Total, this make and model), 1100 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 70 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 35 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 36, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: None
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 5 hours (Total, all aircraft), 5 hours (Total, this make and model), 5 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

The flight instructor held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and rotorcraft. He also held ratings for an instrument airplane and instructor single-engine airplane. The pilot was issued a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) second class airman medical certificate on February 3, 2016, with no limitations or waivers.

The flight instructor reported that he had accumulated 1,400 total hours of flight experience and had logged 70 flight hours in the previous 3 months and 35 flight hours in the previous 30 days. About 26 flight hours and 10 instructor hours were accumulated in the accident airplane make and model. He also reported that he had hundreds of hours experience flying in mountainous terrain.

The flight instructor had recently been hired by the operator and spent the prior week in their standardization training. A review of the operator's training logbooks indicated that the accident flight instructor took 5 training flights and logged 10.2 flight hours in the Cirrus SR22 airplane during his training. Four of the flights were cross country flights. Additionally, 7.6 hours of ground training was accomplished.

The student pilot held a student pilot certificate. The student pilot was issued a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class airman medical certificate on May 11, 2016, with the limitation that he must wear corrective lenses. The student pilot reported he had accumulated 5 hours of flight experience. The was his third instruction flight.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP
Registration: N167CB
Model/Series: SR22 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2004
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 0822
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/31/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 25 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 841.6 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: C126 installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-550 N (27)
Registered Owner: BOUDJAKDJI CHERIF
Rated Power: 310 hp
Operator: The Flight Academy
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

The low-wing airplane was manufactured in 2004. It was powered by a 310 horsepower Continental IO-550 series engine that drove a three-bladed Hartzell constant speed propeller.

A review of maintenance logbooks revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on July 30, 2016, at a Hobbs time of 841.6 hours. The flight meter read 557.1 hours at the accident scene; the Hobbs meter read 1,082.4 hours at the accident site.

The Pilot's Operating Handbook listed the airplane's rate of climb at 6,000 ft pressure altitude and 98 KIAS to be about 1,046 ft per minute at 0° C. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSHN, 271 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 32 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2253 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 149°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 17 knots / 26 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 250°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.25 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 12°C / 1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: LANGLEY, WA (W10)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: BREMERTON, WA (PWT)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1500 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

The closest official weather reporting location to the accident site was PWT, located about 25 miles southeast of the accident site. However, due to unknown reasons, the PWT station was off line the day of the accident.

The next closest official weather reporting station was from William R. Fairchild International Airport (CLM), Port Angeles, Washington, located about 32 miles north-northwest of the accident site. The CLM weather observation at 1453, was wind from 310° at 9 knots, visibility unrestricted at 10 miles or more, few clouds at 3,100 ft ceiling broken at 4,000 ft, overcast at 6,500 ft, temperature 8° C, dew point 4° C, and altimeter 30.31 inches of mercury.

A review of the weather information revealed that no significant weather was reported or forecast in the accident area around the time of the accident. A high-pressure system was located off the northwest pacific coast. The local weather surveillance radars for the 1 hour period before the accident time, detected no significant weather echoes over the area for that period.

The wind speed near the accident area around the time of the accident was estimated to be from the northwest about 11 knots from the surface to about 2,000 ft msl, with little directional variation with height and with winds increasing with height. At 6,300, ft the approximate height of Mount Christie, located about 13 miles west of the accident site, the wind was from 305° magnetic at 16 knots, and would have resulted in a downslope wind over the accident site.

A turbulence model indicated that above the surface, about 700 ft, there was a strong vertical shear of about 8.1 knots per 1,000 ft, and a high probability of moderate turbulence. No defined mountain wave or orographic type clouds were identified from the period between one hour prior, and one hour after, the accident time.

An AIRMET, valid at the time of the accident, was issued for mountain obscuration, occasional moderate turbulence below 15,000 ft, and icing conditions between 2,000 and 12,000 ft in clouds and precipitation was current in the area at the time of the accident. 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 47.692222, -123.221944 (est) 

The airplane impacted on a mountainous slope of about 45° and came to rest upright. The airplane wreckage showed that the airplane was in a right turn during impact. All major components of the airplane were located at the site. The accident site was located about 13 miles east from the summit of Mount Christie, in snow packed mountainous terrain. Mount Christie is the high peak of the Olympic mountains, in the Olympic State Park in Washington.

A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any anomalies with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. The Cirrus Aircraft Parachute System was not activated.

Additional Information

The FAA's Aviation Safety Program publication "Tips on Mountain Flying," section on ridge and pass crossing, states that "experienced pilots recommend crossing a ridge line or pass, at the ridge elevation plus at least 1,000 ft. The publication also states, "plan to be at that altitude at least three miles before reaching the ridge."

The airplane's turn performance was evaluated using a performance chart from the Aerodynamics for Naval Aviators, NAVAIR 00-08T-80 publication. Based on 30° of bank, the performance chart indicated that the accident airplane would have about an 1,500 ft turn radius. A review of the accident area indicated only about 1,000 ft between the higher terrain on each side of the airplane, was available to complete a turn away from the high terrain in front of the airplane. Additionally, during the first half of the turn, the terrain continued to rise.

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA084
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 02, 2017 in Brinnon, WA
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N167CB
Injuries: 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 2, 2017, at 1529 Pacific daylight time (PDT), a Cirrus Design Corporation SR22, N167CB, impacted mountainous terrain near Mount Christie, in Jefferson County, Washington. The airplane was operated by The Flight Academy under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The certified flight instructor (CFI) and student pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage during the accident sequence. The instructional flight departed Langley, Washington, about 1400. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed.

The operator reported that the instructional flight had departed with no known destination or flight plan. The United States Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC) received a 406 mhz Emergency Locator Transmission (ELT) from an unregistered source at 1529 PDT with a location near the accident site. Washington Air Search and Rescue (WASAR) responded to the reported ELT location. Additionally, at 1548 PDT, a Delta Airline flight received a radio transmission from the accident flight stating they had crashed.

The wreckage was subsequently located and both pilots were hoisted from the accident site and transported to a local hospital.

The accident site was located .4 NM southwest of Mount Christie, at an elevation of 4,700 feet MSL. The accident site is located inside the Olympic National Forest. 

The airplane wreckage will be recovered for further examination.


Dr. Michael Mequio
~

A Coupeville ophthalmologist is recovering at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle after surviving a plane crash Sunday in Olympic National Park.

Agencies involved with the rescue and investigation of the crash are not releasing the names of the victims, but Ria Claassen, office manager for Whidbey Eye Center, confirmed Thursday that Dr. Michael Mequio had been involved in a plane crash. She declined to comment further.

A spokesperson for Harborview reported that Mequio was in satisfactory stable condition and out of the intensive care unit.

Mequio and one other unidentified person reportedly crashed a Cirrus SR22 into the side of Mount Jupiter inside the national park. The plane took off from Everett.

Just before 4 p.m. Sunday, the Department of Transportation received an emergency signal, the Peninsula Daily News reported. Around the same time, another aircraft reported to air traffic controllers in Seattle that they had heard a mayday call from a small aircraft over the radio.

A Search and Rescue crew from Naval Air Station Whidbey Island responded and located the wreckage in a snowy valley at 5,700 feet.

Crews noted the plane’s parachute hadn’t deployed and opted to approach from a further distance in case it inadvertently deployed, the Navy reported.

Medical technicians from Search and Rescue, along with the Helicopter Inland Rescue Aircrewman, rappelled down to the survivors where they were assessed, treated and prepared for transport.

Both Mequio and the other person were airlifted to Harborview.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash, but according to Ian Gregor, a public information officer for the FAA, it might take months for an investigation to conclude the cause.

ABC News reported the National Transportation Safety Board is also investigating the crash and that the survivors were a student and instructor.

Whidbey Eye Center’s website describes Mequio as an active outdoorsman and humanitarian who has travelled overseas to provide ophthalmology services in the Philippines, Thailand and Zambia.

https://www.whidbeynewstimes.com

American Champion 7GCBC, TMF Development Inc., N59WD: Incident occurred March 31, 2017 at Stockton Metropolitan Airport (KSCK), San Joaquin County, California

TMF Development Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N59WD

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

Aircraft was blown over on left wing.

Date: 31-MAR-17
Time: 20:38:00Z
Regis#: N59WD
Aircraft Make: CHAMPION
Aircraft Model: 7A
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: STOCKTON
State: CALIFORNIA

Incident occurred April 02, 2017 at Brackett Field Airport (KPOC), La Verne, California Los Angeles County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California 

Aircraft veered off runway and struck a runway distance remaining sign.

Date: 02-APR-17
Time: 19:47:00Z
Regis#: N144WP
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: LA VERNE
State: CALIFORNIA

Canadair CL-600-2B16 Challenger 604, N2FD: Incident occurred April 02, 2017 in West Palm Beach, Palm Beach County, Florida

TVPX ARS INC  TRUSTEE
C/O TVPX
http://registry.faa.gov/N2FD

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Hollywood, Florida

Aircraft wing struck an empty school bus while parking.

Date: 02-APR-17
Time: 18:30:00Z
Regis#: N2FD
Aircraft Make: BOMBARDIER
Aircraft Model: CL60
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: WEST PALM BEACH
State: FLORIDA

Piper PA-32-300, Hammond Flying Club Inc., N694DB: Incident occurred March 31, 2017 at Hammond Northshore Regional Airport (KHDC), Louisiana Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana

Hammond Flying Club Inc:   http://registry.faa.gov/N694DB

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana 

Aircraft slid off runway into mud. 

Date: 31-MAR-17
Time: 22:30:00Z
Regis#: N694DB
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: 32
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: HAMMOND
State: LOUISIANA

Cessna 182D Skylane, Livestock Innovations Inc., N8889X: Accident occurred April 02, 2017 near Blue Earth Municipal Airport (KSBU), Faribault County, Minnesota



Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Livestock Innovations Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N8889X

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA215 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 02, 2017 in Blue Earth, MN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/20/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N8889X
Injuries: 2 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, while approaching the destination airport in night, marginal visual meteorological conditions, he turned on the pilot-controlled runway lights. He added that he began a descent to the runway without observing the runway lights or airport and encountered “ground fog” about 200 to 300 ft above ground level (agl). He further added that he continued the descent to the runway while referencing the navigational moving map and GPS altitude on his electronic flight bag (EFB) application ForeFlight. Subsequently, while in a left turn, the airplane impacted terrain about 1 nautical mile south of the runway. 

The left wing, firewall, and fuselage sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. He added that, while en route, he reset his airplane-installed barometric pressure altimeter to the GPS altitude indicated on his EFB, which resulted in a “300 ft. error.” 

An automated weather observing station, about 14 nautical miles west of the accident airport, recorded visibility at 2 1/2 statute miles, light rain, mist, and an overcast cloud ceiling at 300 ft agl.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's decision to continue the night, visual flight into instrument meteorological conditions, which resulted in controlled flight into terrain while on final approach. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's improper use of an electronic flight bag.

The pilot reported that while approaching the destination airport, in night marginal visual meteorological conditions, he turned on the pilot controlled runway lights. He added that he began a descent to the runway, without observing the runway lights or airport, and encountered "ground fog" about 200 to 300 ft. above the ground. He further added that he continued the descent to the runway while referencing the navigational moving map and GPS altitude on his electronic flight bag (EFB) application ForeFlight. Subsequently, while in a left turn, the airplane impacted terrain about one nautical mile south of the runway. 

The left wing, firewall, and fuselage sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. He added that while enroute, he reset his airplane installed barometric pressure altimeter to the GPS altitude indicated on his EFB, which resulted in a "300 ft. error." 

An automated weather observing station, about 14 nautical miles west of the accident airport, recorded visibility at 2 ½ statute miles, light rain, mist, and an overcast cloud ceiling at 300 ft. above ground.



NTSB Identification: GAA17CA215 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 02, 2017 in Blue Earth, MN
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N8889X
Injuries: 2 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that while approaching the destination airport, in night marginal visual meteorological conditions, he turned on the pilot controlled runway lights. He added that he began a descent to the runway, without observing the runway lights or airport, and encountered "ground fog" about 200 to 300 ft. above the ground. He further added that he continued the descent to the runway while referencing the navigational moving map and GPS altitude on his electronic flight bag (EFB) application ForeFlight. Subsequently, while in a left turn, the airplane impacted terrain about one nautical mile south of the runway.

The left wing, firewall, and fuselage sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. He added that while enroute, he reset his airplane installed barometric pressure altimeter to the GPS altitude indicated on his EFB, which resulted in a "300 ft. error." 

An automated weather observing station, about 14 nautical miles west of the accident airport, recorded visibility at 2 ½ statute miles, light rain, mist, and an overcast cloud ceiling at 300 ft. above ground.
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A Cessna 182D Skylane force landed near the city of Blue Earth.

According to the Faribault County Sheriff’s Office, police responded just before 10:30 last night to a plane that had force landed in a field south of Blue Earth near the Blue Earth airport.

The pilot, 67-year-old Robin Hermanson of South Dakota, along with two passengers were treated and released at the scene.

The scene is being secured by the Faribault County Sheriff’s Office until the FAA completes its investigation. 

Story and video:   http://www.keyc.com

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash of a small plane about four miles south of Blue Earth.

According to the Fairbault County Sheriff’s Office, the plane crashed into a field near the Blue Earth airport around 10:20 Sunday night.

The pilot and two passengers were all treated at the scene by the responding ambulance crew.

They’ve been identified as 67-year-old Robin Hermanson of Garretson, South Dakota, along with 56-year-old Tim Lippert of Easton and his 13-year-old son.

The scene is being secured by the Faribault County Sheriff’s Office until the FAA completes its investigation of the crash.