Friday, February 26, 2021

Cessna R182 Skylane RG, N3652C: Fatal accident occurred February 26, 2021 near Lee Gilmer Memorial Airport (KGVL), Gainesville, Hall County, Georgia

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas 
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania 


Location: Gainesville, GA
Accident Number: ERA21FA140
Date & Time: February 26, 2021, 18:11 Local
Registration: N3652C
Aircraft: Cessna R182 
Injuries: 3 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On February 26, 2021, about 1811 eastern standard time, a Cessna R182 airplane, N3652C, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Gainesville, Georgia. The pilot and two passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The airplane took off from Lee Gilmore Memorial Airport (GVL), Gainesville Georgia, destined for Daytona Beach International Airport (DAB), Daytona Beach, Florida.

Prior to the airplane’s departure to DAB, between 1748 and 1758, a pilot at GVL observed the airplane at the end of runway 11, behind the hold short lines, just to the left of the taxiway centerline. At that time the engine was operating and there were no lights illuminated on the airplane.

According to preliminary Federal Aviation Administration air traffic control (ATC) information, while on the ground at GVL the pilot established communication with the clearance delivery controller and requested an instrument flight rules (IFR) clearance to DAB via a flight plan that included a route of flight over the Dobbins Very High Frequency Omni-directional Radio-range (“Dobbins VOR”). The pilot also requested an en route altitude of 3,000 ft msl. The controller issued the pilot an IFR clearance to DAB and instructed the pilot to “hold for release.” The pilot advised the controller that they would utilize Runway 11 for departure and depart within 5 minutes, to which the controller issued a release for departure with instructions to fly heading 140°, maintain 3,000 ft, and issued a clearance void time of 10 minutes.

The airplane departed GVL about 1808 to the southeast and the pilot established communication with the satellite radar controller. The controller instructed the pilot to “ident” and “say altitude.” The pilot responded that they were climbing through 1,800 for 3,000 ft. The controller radar identified the airplane 1 mile southeast of GVL and issued the current altimeter setting. The airplane then began
turning southwest as it climbed through 2,200 ft. The controller informed the pilot that the airplane appeared to be on a westbound heading and asked if he was on the assigned heading of 140°; however, the pilot did not respond. The airplane began a rapid descent and then the Low Altitude Alert System activated at the controller’s station. The controller issued a safety alert to the pilot as the
airplane was descending through 1,400 ft, but the pilot did not respond. The airplane was then observed on the radar display climbing to 2,500 ft, before it began another rapid descent which was followed by a loss of radar contact.

Preliminary track data indicated that after the airplane departed runway 11 at GVL, it began a right turn and continued climbing, and ground speed increased until about 1809:25, when ground speed started to decrease. The airplane reached a maximum altitude of 2,200 ft msl, before it began to descend. While remaining in a right turn the airplane continued to descend until about 1809:34. The airplane’s ground speed then increased from about 75 knots to about 165 knots before it began to decrease, and then altitude and ground speed varied between 1,700-2,000 ft msl and 100-110 knots. At 1810:19 the airplane’s ground speed began to decrease rapidly from about 100 knots to below 30 knots while climbing from about 2,000 to 2,500 ft, before its ground speed increased and the airplane descended rapidly until track data was lost.

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane impacted wooded terrain about 3/4 mile southwest of the approach end of Runway 5 at GVL. The outboard half of left wing was located in a tree. The engine and portions of the right wing, cabin, and empennage were found approximately 550 ft from the initial impact point with the tree.

All the flight control cables exhibited signatures of tension overload with their associated cable ends attached to the cockpit flight controls and flight control surfaces. The attitude indicator was disassembled, and rotational scoring was present on the gyro rotor and the rotor housing. Disassembly of vacuum pump revealed that the composite drive assembly, carbon rotor and carbon vanes were intact.

Examination of the propeller and engine revealed that the propeller remained attached to the engine crankshaft flange and the engine remained attached to the airplane firewall. Both propeller blades were free to rotated in the hub. One propeller blade was displaced aft about 50° and the outboard 8-inches was bent aft about 90°. The blade tip was broken off, and the trailing edge of the bent portion exhibited “S” bending. The tip of the second propeller blade was bent forward and twisted slightly toward the blade face. The engine crankshaft was rotated by turning the propeller and continuity of the crankshaft to the rear gears and to the valve train was confirmed. Compression and suction were observed from all cylinders except from the No. 4 cylinder which was impact damaged.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N3652C
Model/Series: R182
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: IMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGVL,1275 ft msl 
Observation Time: 18:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 7°C /6°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / 18 knots, 70°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 400 ft AGL
Visibility: 6 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Gainesville, GA (GVL) 
Destination: Daytona Beach, FL (DAB)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 Fatal 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 Fatal 
Latitude, Longitude: 34.262222,-83.848611 

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Dan Delnoce and Courtney Flanders at their wedding in the Bahamas in April of 2018. Delnoce and Flanders were killed in a plane crash in Gainesville on Friday, February 26, 2021.


Friends said a Gainesville couple who died in a plane crash Friday were "beautiful souls" -- loving, happy, engaged and fun to be around.

Dan Delnoce, 44, and his wife Courtney Flanders, 45, were killed after the Cessna 182 they were in crashed in a neighborhood off Memorial Park Drive shortly after taking off from Lee Gilmer Memorial Airport in Gainesville. Dan Delnoce’s brother, Matthew Delnoce, 39, from Ohio, was also on board the plane and died in the accident. The group was headed to Daytona Beach, Florida.

“They were just super outgoing and gregarious people," said Scott Dixon, owner of Scott's Downtown restaurant and a close friend of the couple. "They were just the kind of people that, when you’re around, you can’t help but feel comfortable and engaged and happy."

As a pilot himself, Dixon said there are always inherent risks with flying.

“What happened, how it happened, why it happened or any of those things are really fairly inconsequential at this point because the bottom line is that … three beautiful souls are no longer with us,” Dixon said.

Investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board remained on the scene of the crash Monday, searching for clues that might tell them what happened to the ill-fated flight.

Dan Delnoce worked as a physician’s assistant for Specialty Orthopaedics in Gainesville, and Flanders was a nurse anesthetist in Gainesville, Dixon said.

“They also worked in professions where they got to see and got to know a lot of people in the community, and I think that that goes a long way toward … how well-loved they are and how incredibly missed that they will be in the community,” Dixon said.

Dan Delnoce and Flanders each had two children from previous marriages, said Russ Moore, a close friend of the couple.

“Courtney’s got two girls, and Dan has a boy and a girl, ages between 8 and 15, give or take. They blended right in and the kids liked each other,” Moore said.

Dan Delnoce and Flanders were coming up on the third anniversary of their marriage, which occurred in an intimate ceremony in the Bahamas in April 2018, Moore said.

“Courtney’s dad had a house down there, and Dan’s mom went with us and it was just the four of us, and they hired an old preacher on the island to come over to the house and married them by the pool,” Moore said about the wedding.

According to Moore, Dan Delnoce would always dive deep into his passions, such as flying and cars.

Moore said he and his wife loved to travel and go to concerts with Dan Delnoce and Flanders, and they even recently took a trip to North Georgia for a special occasion.

“We were just with them on Valentine’s Day, and we went to Dahlonega and went to some wineries, and had dinner that night and spent the night with them,” Moore said.

One of Dixon’s favorite memories of Dan Delnoce and Flanders was a trip to see Jimmy Buffett live during what many would consider unfavorable weather.

“It was an outdoor concert and, you know, the weather was absolutely atrocious. We had thunderstorms and all kinds of rain, thunder and lightning, regardless of that, you could be with them and it would still be the best time, even with adverse situations,” Dixon said.

For those wishing to help the Delnoce family, a GoFundMe page was created Monday morning and had raised over $5,000 as of Monday afternoon.


Dan Delnoce and Courtney Flanders 


Update, March 1: Three people killed when a single-engine plane crashed in the Memorial Park Drive area of Gainesville have been identified.

The victims are Dan Delnoce, 44, of Gainesville; Courtney Flanders, 45, of Gainesville; and Matthew Delnoce, 39, of Ohio, according to a Hall County Sheriff's Office press release Saturday, Feb. 27.

Dan Delnoce and Flanders were married, and Matthew and Dan are brothers.

Scott Dixon of Scott’s Downtown said he was in the restaurant when the news broke. A number of doctors were having dinner when a number of pagers started going off.

Dixon said he met Flanders, a nurse anesthetist, through a mutual friend and met Dan Delnoce when the couple started dating several years ago. He described the pair as “absolutely a joy to be around.” 

Dixon recalled a memory of going with the couple about two years ago to a Jimmy Buffett concert. Even when a torrential downpour washed over the show, they never stopped smiling, he said.

"They were not only individually just really great people to be around, but together they really were just such a great couple and loved each other so much,” Dixon said. “And all of that showed, all of their joy and their joy with each other and joy of life.”

Dan Delnoce and Flanders each had two children who are between the ages of 9 and 15.

Specialty Orthopaedics Dr. John Vachtsevanos said Dan Delnoce had been part of the clinic’s family since 2007 and was also a certified athletic trainer.

“He was a trailblazer in his profession, always finding (a) way to expand the field,” Vachtsevanos wrote in an email. “He was the first athletic trainer to join our practice in 2007, and he paved the way for an additional nine certified athletic trainers to join in the following years.”

Vachtsevanos said Dan had a passion for life, whose “larger than life personality made him the center of attention wherever he went.” 

“He loved to laugh, he loved telling stories, and he never met a stranger,” he said. “His legacy of generosity and loyalty shines through in his children's lives. His commitment to our company and his impact on our employees is immeasurable.”

Dixon said he and Dan Delnoce started flight training around the same time a few years ago, with Delnoce logging well over a couple hundred hours.

One of the last times Dixon saw Flanders was when he requested her to perform the anesthesia for a surgery in December, though they had talked a few times after that.

"They touched a lot of people and a lot of lives in the area, so it's definitely a big loss to the community as well as those of us that were closer with them," Dixon said.

A Gofundme account was set up for the Delnoce family.

The bodies have been taken to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation Crime Lab for autopsy. The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are working other aspects of the crash.

The safety board did not have any new information Monday, March 1. A spokesman said a preliminary report should be out in two weeks, and a final report would come in one to two years.

According to the FAA, Dan Delnoce was certified as a private pilot.









HALL COUNTY, Georgia — Investigators have released the names of the three victims that died in a fatal Hall County plane crash on Friday. 

The Hall County Sheriff's Office identified the victims as 44-year-old Daniel Allan Delnoce, of Gainesville, 45-year-old Courtney Flanders, of Gainesville, and 39-year-old Matthew Delnoce of Ohio.

Authorities said the crash happened near Memorial park Drive and Atlanta Highway after the Florida-bound airplane left a local airport on Friday afternoon. Hall County Fire spokesperson Zach Brackett additionally reported that the aircraft crashed into a ravine just north of Memorial Park Drive. 

According to Division Fire Chief Keith Smith with Gainesville FIre, someone traveling in the area was actually one of the first to realize something was wrong.

"A passerby noticed debris on the roadway and called 911," he said. "They also looked down into the - across the street there into the wooded area and did see plane debris."

While in the county, a city fire station was one of the closest to the scene and firefighters from there were among the first to arrive.

Four adults and one child were also displaced due to fuel falling on their home. Smith later elaborated that, not only did fuel land on the mobile home, but a piece of the wing actually plunged into a bedroom. 

"That's part of the debris field that extends down Cross Street, across Memorial Park Drive and down into the wooded area which leads over into Catalina subdivision," he said.

He added that the residents were home at the time and eating dinner but were amazingly unharmed. They have since been referred to the American Red Cross for additional assistance.

Hall County Sheriff's Office will continue to handle the death investigation at this time and will give an update when the Georgia Bureau of Investigation finishes the autopsy. The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating and working on other aspects of the crash. 











Duluth-based Cirrus Aircraft sales hurt by pandemic, rebounded late in 2020

Second-quarter sales dropped nearly 40% but by year end shipments were 10% off 2019 levels.



DULUTH, Minnesota – Cirrus Aircraft sales dropped 10% last year compared to a record 2019 due to pandemic challenges, but the Duluth-based private aircraft manufacturer ended the year on an upswing.

Cirrus, which makes the top-selling SR Series piston airplanes and Vision personal jets, moved 420 planes last year after selling 465 in 2019, according to a recent report from the General Aviation Manufacturers Association.

"As expected, in 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic negatively impacted general aviation and stifled the industry's growth," association CEO Pete Bunce said in a statement. "While we continue to face headwinds globally, all signs point to strong demand for our products and services."

Cirrus saw its steepest drop in sales in the spring, when uncertainty over the pandemic's effect on the economy caused quarterly sales to plummet nearly 40% year over year. The company furloughed employees and started making personal protective equipment.

Sales improved steadily after that, with third-quarter shipments exceeding 2019 levels by 9% and fourth-quarter shipments 23% ahead of the previous quarter.

"It is encouraging to see that segments of our industry saw a solid rebound in the fourth quarter of 2020," Bunce said.

In total the company reported $491.7 million in billings in 2020. Sales of the $2 million Vision jet helped drive record billings of $547.3 million in 2019.

Cirrus has more than 100 jobs advertised for its facilities in Duluth, Grand Forks, N.D. and Knoxville, Tenn. It had about 1,600 employees across all locations before the pandemic, with a majority of them in Duluth.

The company recently unveiled the 8000 Limited Edition SR Series to commemorate the 8,000th delivery of its piston airplane series later this year.

"The SR Series has an incredible history of innovation, evolution and invention," CEO Zean Nielsen said in a news release. "Our team took that as inspiration to create a limited edition that breaks out of the boundaries of traditional aircraft design to reflect the energy and excitement of where we are going next."

Cirrus was founded in southern Wisconsin in 1984 and is now owned by Chinese Aviation Industry General Aircraft. The company has been headquartered in Duluth since 1994.

United Airlines will pay $49 million to settle air mail fraud case

United Airlines will pay more than $49 million to avoid criminal prosecution and settle civil charges of defrauding the U.S. Postal Service in the delivery of international mail. 

The Justice Department said Friday that former employees of United’s cargo division falsified parcel-delivery information between 2012 and 2015. Prosecutors said that as a result, United collected millions of dollars in payments that it should not have received.

Chicago-based United agreed to pay nearly $17.3 million in criminal penalties and forfeited revenue to end the criminal investigation, according to the Justice Department. The airline will also pay $32.2 million in related civil penalties.

United issued a one-sentence statement: “The U.S. Postal Service is a valued customer for United, and we are glad to have remedied these procedures and look forward to serving the Postal Service in the future.”

United’s contracts required it to scan mail when it was received, loaded on a plane, and delivered to a foreign country’s postal agency. The scans were transmitted back to the U.S. Postal Service. United faced penalties if mail was delivered late, damaged, or sent to the wrong destination.

According to settlement documents, two United managers and two other employees fabricated automated data to make it look like mail was delivered on time. Others, including employees of an IT contractor hired by United, were aware of the scheme.

When post office representatives raised questions about the automated data, the manager running the scheme emailed colleagues “we been caught” and changed the group’s methods to make the phony information about scans appear less suspicious, according to the documents.

The Justice Department said United cooperated after getting requests from the department’s fraud section. Prosecutors gave United credit for collecting “voluminous documents” and helping make employees available for interviews.

According to the documents, United removed the main manager involved in the scheme, the cargo division’s postal-sales manager. The airline also improved internal controls designed to detect misconduct, including limiting access to data to guard against employees manipulating information transmitted to the Postal Service.

In 2019, American Airlines agreed to pay $22.1 million to settle similar allegations that it falsified information about international mail deliveries.

United, American and other U.S. airlines trace their roots to air mail delivery contracts in the early part of the last century, and mail remains a source of revenue for them.



Justice Department had accused the carrier of submitting false data showing it delivered mail in a timely manner

United Airlines Holdings Inc. agreed to pay more than $49 million to settle criminal charges and civil claims related to the transportation of international mail, the Justice Department said Friday.

United was accused of submitting false delivery-scan data between 2012 and 2015 to make it appear that the airline and its partners had transported mail in a timely manner to the intended recipient, the DOJ said. Under the agreements, United was entitled to full payment when scans were provided and the mail was timely delivered, the agency said.

The DOJ said United admitted to concealing problems related to scanning and mail movements that, if known, would have subjected the carrier to financial penalties under the international contracts.

United said it was “glad to have remedied these procedures” and called the United States Postal Service a valued customer. The carrier transports United States mail internationally on behalf of the USPS.

United agreed to pay about $17.3 million in criminal penalties and $32.2 million under a false claims settlement, the DOJ said. United also agreed to continue to cooperate with the DOJ, the agency said, and strengthen its compliance program.

American AA-1B Yankee, N30JL: Accident occurred February 24, 2021 at St. Johns Industrial Air Park (KSJN), Apache County, Arizona

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona


Location: St Johns, AZ
Accident Number: WPR21LA118
Date & Time: February 24, 2021, 10:20 Local
Registration: N30JL
Aircraft: American AA-1B
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: American
Registration: N30JL
Model/Series: AA-1B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSJN,5733 ft msl
Observation Time: 10:54 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C /-10°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 17 knots / 24 knots, 250°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.08 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 34.518556,-109.37875

Robinson R44 Raven II, N442WM: Incident occurred February 15, 2021at Corona Municipal Airport (KAJO), Riverside County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California

Rotorcraft during hover, rotor blade struck hangar awning and crashed. 

Tumbleweed Leasing Company Inc


Date: 15-FEB-21
Time: 01:00:00Z
Regis#: N442WM
Aircraft Make: ROBINSON
Aircraft Model: R44
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: MANEUVERING (MNV)
Operation: 91
City: CORONA
State: CALIFORNIA

Beechcraft A36 Bonanza, N8043B: Accident occurred February 24, 2021 at Albert Whitted Airport (KSPG), St. Petersburg, Pinellas County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Aircraft nosewheel collapsed on landing.

BGH Aviation LLC


Date: 24-FEB-21
Time: 22:13:00Z
Regis#: N8043B
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 36
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ST PETERSBURG
State: FLORIDA

Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche, N7327Y: Incident occurred February 24, 2021 at Fayette County Airport (I23), Washington Court House, Ohio

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cincinnati, Ohio

Aircraft landed gear up. 


Date: 24-FEB-21
Time: 15:50:00Z
Regis#: N7327Y
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA30
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: WASHINGTON COURT HOUSE
State: OHIO

Cessna 560XL Citation Excel XLS+, N808SD: Incident occurred February 24, 2021 at Zelienople Municipal Airport (KPJC), Butler County, Pennsylvania

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allegheny, Pennsylvania

Aircraft struck a deer on departure damaging right landing gear door. 

Drillers Aviation LLC


Date: 24-FEB-21
Time: 11:15:00Z
Regis#: N808SD
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 560XL
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: ON DEMAND
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 135
Aircraft Operator: HOLMAN LEASING SYSTEMS
Flight Number: PJC80
City: ZELIENOPLE
State: PENNSYLVANIA

Cessna 172B Skyhawk, N7832X: Accident occurred February 24, 2021 near Winchester Regional Airport (KOKV), Frederick County, Virginia

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Washington, District of Columbia


Location: Winchester, VA 
Accident Number: ERA21LA137
Date & Time: February 24, 2021, 14:14 Local 
Registration: N7832X
Aircraft: Cessna 172B 
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N7832X
Model/Series: 172B Aircraft
Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting: 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor 
Latitude, Longitude: 39.168343,-78.356481 (est)







GORE — Test pilot and aviation legend Chuck Yeager’s adage that any landing you can walk away from is a good landing came into play Wednesday when a pilot walked away from a crash landing into a field on Back Mountain Road by Fishel Road.

The Cessna 172B Skyhawk crashed shortly after taking off from Winchester Regional Airport at 2:15 p.m., according to an email from a Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman. The pilot was the only person aboard. The crash was reported to the Frederick County Sheriff’s Office at 2:17 p.m.

The plane, which has a maximum speed of 105 mph, was flying west when it attempted an emergency landing. It nosedived into a hill in the field, flipped and slid about 25 yards before coming to rest upside down and pointed east. The front wheel, which broke off upon impact, was about 10 yards from the plane. State police said the pilot, identified as Jonathan D. Behnke, 42, of Mount Airy, Maryland, walked away from the crash, but was hospitalized at Winchester Medical Center for minor injuries.

A preliminary investigation said the cause of the crash was engine failure shortly after take off, according to an email from Sgt. Brent Coffey, state police spokesman.

The airplane’s registration says it was built in 1960. First built in 1956, the Skyhawk is “the most popular single-engine aircraft ever built” and is often used to train pilots, according to the Cessna website.

Nick Sabo, Winchester Regional Airport executive director, said the plane was not based out of the Winchester airport. He said up to 300 take-offs and landings occur at the airport on a daily basis, including practice flights.

Cessna 180K Skywagon, N2879K: Incident occurred February 24, 2021 at Renton Municipal Airport (KRNT), King County, Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle, Washington

Aircraft taxiing and struck a taxiway light. 

Two Niner Kilo LLC


Date: 24-FEB-21
Time: 23:40:00Z
Regis#: N2879K
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 180
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: RENTON
State: WASHINGTON

Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub, N8999D: Incident occurred February 25, 2021 in Anchorage, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

While landing, aircraft veered off left side of runway into snowbank. 


Date: 26-FEB-21
Time: 02:53:00Z
Regis#: N8999D
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA18-150
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ANCHORAGE
State: ALASKA

Piper PA-28-181, N4360F: Incident occurred February 25, 2021 at McClellan-Palomar Airport (KCRQ), Carlsbad, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California

While exiting the runway, aircraft struck a taxiway light. 


Date: 25-FEB-21
Time: 20:25:00Z
Regis#: N4360F
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28-181
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: CARLSBAD
State: CALIFORNIA

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N442ER: Incident occurred February 25, 2021 at Daytona Beach International Airport (KDAB), Volusia County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

During landing, aircraft experienced tailstrike. 

Embry–Riddle Aeronautical University


Date: 25-FEB-21
Time: 14:14:00Z
Regis#: N442ER
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172S
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
Aircraft Operator: EMBRY RIDDLE
Flight Number: ERU442
City: DAYTONA BEACH
State: FLORIDA

'Red Air' Mirage F1B, N601AX: Accident occurred February 25, 2021 at Tyndall Air Force Base (KPAM), Panama City, Florida

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham, Alabama 
Airborne Tactical Advantage Company

Airborne Tactical Advantage Company LLC
 

Location: Panama City, FL
Accident Number: ERA21LA138
Date & Time: February 25, 2021, 11:26 Local 
Registration: N601AX
Aircraft: DASSAULT AVIATION MIRAGE F1 B 
Injuries: 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Public aircraft
  
On February 25, 2021, about 1126 central standard time, a Dassault Aviation Mirage F1B, N601AX, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident at Tyndall Air Force Base (PAM), Panama City, Florida. Both commercial rated pilot’s sustained serious injuries. The airplane was operated by Airborne Tactical Advantage Company as a public aircraft.
  
The planned 1 hour 15 minutes long flight was in support of the Performance Work Statement for Combat Air Forces Contracted Air Support for the United States Air Force and was intended to certify the front seat pilot as a mission instructor pilot.
  
According to preliminary information either from the pilot or data downloaded from an APP on his iPad, he initiated takeoff on the left side of runway 14R with the nose gear steering selected to lo. A line speed check was performed at 100 knots when the flight was before the Barrier Arresting Kit 12 (BAK-12) arresting cable; everything was acceptable at that time. The takeoff roll continued and at about 125 knots, which was just after the BAK-12 arresting cable, the pilot reported, “there was this huge swerve to the left and it was an instantaneous swerve.” He applied full right rudder input and tapped the right brake. The airplane drifted towards the left edge of the runway and the pilot applied aft elevator input, got airborne, and remained in the same configuration (flaps and slats full, gear down), staying below 200 knots. He flew south over the water where he orbited numerous times to burn fuel and conducted the checklist for blown tires. He also performed a brake check and the left brake light illuminated. He turned the anti-skid off but the nose gear steering remained activated because there were no caution lights and he attributed the issue to be related to blown MLG tires. He added that the rear seater thought the problem was attributed to be a full left deflection “hardover” of the nose gear steering. The pilot of a chase airplane reported to him that both main landing gear struts appeared equally extended and there were no “shards of rubber” on the runway, but he (accident pilot) was not fully confident in the provided information.
  
After burning fuel and coordinating, he returned to PAM entering the downwind leg of the airport traffic pattern for runway 14L, with the intention of landing to the right side of the runway. He turned onto base and final legs of the airport traffic pattern and touched down near the right edge of the runway. 

When the main landing gears contacted the runway the rear seater deployed the airframe drag chute. He put the nose down as soon as he landed, and he reported he did not feel a tug at that time, but he did feel a significant pull to the left which occurred fast after he relaxed left wing up control input. He applied full right rudder and brake but centered the rudder pedals before leaving the runway. He applied after burner (AB) about the point the airplane was leaving the runway and did not recall how long he was in AB for; the drag chute was not released. At some point during the runway excursion, the rear seater ejected, but the pilot’s ejection seat did not. The airplane came to rest upright and he secured the engine, but because of his injury he could not get out of the airplane.
  
Examination of runway 14R revealed damage to several runway lights. Recovered debris on the runway from the airplane consisted of an anti-skid electrical connector associated with the right main landing gear. Tire marks on both runways, grass, and taxiway were examined and documented.
  
Post-accident examination of the airplane revealed the nose landing gear was collapsed aft. The sequence unit selector valve in the front cockpit was selected to “Dual.” The front ejection seat was made safe before the airplane was recovered. Following recovery, examination revealed damage to the airframe attachment of the nose landing gear actuator, and also to the adjacent front seat lower ejection gun seat mount. Examination of the nose gear steering system was performed by representatives of the operator and the current supporter of the airplane with oversight from the Federal Aviation Administration. Several wires associated with the nose gear steering were found cut consistent with collapse of the nose landing gear and the impact sequence. The wires were either temporarily repaired or a jumper wire was installed to facilitate operational testing of the nose gear steering system. Using auxiliary electrical and hydraulic units, with the nose landing gear (NLG) weight-on-wheels (WOW) switch activated and the nose gear steering set to lo, the nose landing gear went uncommanded to the left 45°, which was inconsistent with the switch position, rudder pedal position, and system design. When the NLG WOW was de-activated, the steering returned to neutral. This was repeated several times with the same results. The distribution block which sustained impact damage to a cover was removed which revealed damage to a bearing race and bearing that was not in the impact damaged area. The distribution block was retained for examination and testing.
  
Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information
  
Aircraft Make: DASSAULT AVIATION 
Registration: N601AX
Model/Series: MIRAGE F1 B NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan
  
Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAM,17 ft msl 
Observation Time: 11:56 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C /17°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / , 250°
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.17 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Panama City, FL
Destination: Panama City, FL
  
Wreckage and Impact Information
  
Crew Injuries: 2 Serious 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious 
Latitude, Longitude: 30.071363,-85.568849

Cessna 182F Skylane, N3209U: Accident occurred February 24, 2021 in Millville, Clayton County, Iowa

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines, Iowa


Location: Millville, IA 
Accident Number: CEN21LA138
Date & Time: February 24, 2021, 16:00 Local 
Registration: N3209U
Aircraft: Cessna 182F 
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On February 24, 2021, about 1600 central standard time, a Cessna 182F, N3209U, was involved in an accident near Milleville, Iowa. The commercial pilot and a passenger received minor injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot stated that during a cruise climb from the departure airport, the engine made a loud growling noise and lost power. He turned the magnetos off when he saw smoke near the propeller and trimmed the airplane for a best glide airspeed. He said there was no suitable landing area in front of the airplane, but there was a road to the left of the airplane for a forced landing. During the approach to
the road, he maneuvered the airplane below powerlines and avoided buildings before the airplane impacted the road and a snowbank. The airplane nosed over during the landing resulting in substantial damage to the fuselage and right wing and right wing strut.

The airplane was retained for further investigation.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N3209U
Model/Series: 182F 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: DBQ,1076 ft msl 
Observation Time: 15:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 20 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -4°C /-3°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 340°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.07 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Cassville, WI (C74)
Destination: Dubuque, IA (DBQ)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Unknown
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 42.7,91.0743 (est)

Clayton County Sheriff's Office

On February 25, 2021 at 7:59am, the Clayton County Sheriff’s Office received a report of an airplane crash at the intersection of Pumpkin Ridge Road and Omega Road. Investigator’s determined that on February 24, 2021 at approximately 4:00pm, a 1963 single engine Cessna attempted to make an emergency landing on Omega Road. The aircraft traveled South on Omega through the intersection of Pumpkin Ridge Road where it struck a snow bank and overturned end to end coming to rest in a field. The pilot, 44 year old Joseph Bolton of Peosta and a passenger, 43 year old Eric Harbaugh of Russell, KS received minor injuries but did not require medical attention. The crash was reported to the FAA at the time of the crash. The FAA and the Clayton County Sheriff’s Office continue to investigate the cause of the crash.

-Sheriff Michael Tschirgi



MILLVILLE, Iowa — Two people suffered minor injuries when a plane crashed Wednesday afternoon in Clayton County.

Pilot Joseph Bolton, 44, of Peosta, and his passenger, Eric Harbaugh, 43, of Russell, Kan., were injured “but did not require medical attention,” according to a press release issued Thursday afternoon by the Clayton County Sheriff’s Department.

The release states that the crash of the Cessna 182F Skylane was reported at about 8 a.m. Thursday but occurred at about 4 p.m. Wednesday near the intersection of Pumpkin Ridge and Omega roads, just east of Millville.

Investigators concluded that the pilot attempted to make an emergency landing on Omega Road. The aircraft traveled south on Omega through the intersection of Pumpkin Ridge before striking a snowbank, overturning and coming to rest in a field.

The incident was reported to the Federal Aviation Administration at the time of the crash.

Both the FAA and sheriff’s department are investigating the incident.




CLAYTON COUNTY, Iowa (KCRG) - The Clayton County Sheriff’s Office and the FAA are investigating after an airplane crashed during an emergency landing.

A Cessna 182F Skylane tried to land on Omega Road in Millville.

The plane travelled south through the intersection of Pumpkin Ridge Road where it hit a snow bank causing it to flip landing in a field.

The pilot and passenger had minor injuries.

Fairchild SA227-AC, N572GW: Incident occurred February 25, 2021 at Dwight D. Eisenhower National Airport (KICT), Wichita, Kansas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wichita, Kansas

During taxi, aircraft lost steering and brakes rolled through grass and damaged lights.

Gas/Wilson Inc 


Date: 25-FEB-21
Time: 13:25:00Z
Regis#: N572GW
Aircraft Make: SWEARINGEN
Aircraft Model: SW4
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: CARGO
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 135
Aircraft Operator: ENCORE AIR CARGO
Flight Number: DKT1804
City: WICHITA
State: KANSAS

Zenith STOL CH 750, N511CP: Accident occurred February 23, 2021 at Carrollton Memorial Airport (K26), Carroll County, Missouri

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Kansas City, Missouri 

Aircraft caught a gust of wind while taxiing damaging a wing.


Date: 23-FEB-21
Time: 21:00:00Z
Regis#: N511CP
Aircraft Make: ZENITH
Aircraft Model: CH750
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: CARROLLTON
State: MISSOURI

Piper PA-28R-201, N115ER: Last flew on October 19, 2018 and has not been touched since that time




















WARRANTY:
There is no warranty, express or implied for the information provided herein or the condition, useability, workability, operability or marketability of the aircraft salvage. All times are approximate and the logbooks and aircraft should be inspected by each bidder BEFORE BIDDING. Failure of the bidder to view the aircraft, salvage, or wreckage, or confirm any information provided is NOT grounds for a claim or withdrawal of bid after bid closing date.)

SPECIAL CONDITIONS FOR N115ER: PLACING A BID FOR N115ER INDICATES YOU UNDERSTAND AND AGREE THAT THE BUYER WILL HAVE TO REMOVE ALL ERAU (Embry–Riddle Aeronautical University) MARKINGS AND CHANGE THE TAIL NUMBER                                                   

AIRCRAFT: 2014 PIPER PA-28R-201 N115ER, s/n: 2844149

Current Total Time 2783.6

Last Annual Inspection 03/22/18 at 2749.4 TTAF

ENGINE: Lycoming, IO-360-C1C6, s/n: L-33067-51E

Current Total Time 2866.3, TSMOH 598.9 in 05/2017 by Lycoming

Last Annual Inspection 03/22/18 at 2749.4 TTAF

Engine has not been run since 10/19/18

PROPELLER:   McCauley B2D34C213, s/n: 140072

Current Total Time 2751.9, TSMOH: 790.2 in 03/2017

Last Annual inspection 03/22/18 at 2749.4 TTAF


DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:  N110ER last flew on October 19, 2018 and has not been touched since that time. Minor scratches and spots of corrosion.  See Condition Report & Photos

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:  Decatur County Airport, KBGE, Bainbridge, Georgia

REMARKS:    
Owner reserves the right to reject any and all bids. 
Buyer will have to remove all ERAU markings and change the tail number.
Sale is as is/where is. 
The posting information is the best to our knowledge. 
An inspection of the aircraft is highly recommended.                                                                                                                                        
Hours estimated from logbooks or other information - not guaranteed or warranted.

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com

Eurocopter EC-130-B4, N259AM: Accident occurred February 24, 2021 in Tulsa, Oklahoma

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Air Methods; Greenwood Village, Colorado  

Air Methods Corporation 


Location: Tulsa, OK
Accident Number: CEN21LA153
Date & Time: February 24, 2021, 22:00 Local 
Registration: N259AM
Aircraft: Eurocopter EC 130 B4
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air taxi & commuter - Non-scheduled - Air Medical (Unspecified)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Eurocopter 
Registration: N259AM
Model/Series: EC 130 B4 NO SERIES 
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Commuter air carrier (135)
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting: 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 3 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 36.039584,-95.984595 (est)