Friday, May 11, 2018

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, N738XT: Accident occurred May 11, 2018 at Markley Farm Airport (OH24), Orrville, Wayne County, Ohio

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cleveland, Ohio

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N738XT


Location: ORRVILLE, OH
Accident Number: CEN18LA171
Date & Time: 05/11/2018, 0940 EDT
Registration: N738XT
Aircraft: CESSNA 172N
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Aerodynamic stall/spin
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On May 11, 2018, about 0940 eastern daylight time, Cessna 172N airplane, N738XT, was substantially damaged when it impacted the ground and nosed over during takeoff from runway 10 at the Markley Farm Airport (OH24), Orrville, Ohio. The private pilot received serious injuries and the passenger received minor injuries. The airplane sustained damage to the fuselage, wings and vertical tail. The aircraft was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight was originating at the time of the accident and the Greenbrier Valley Airport (LWB), near Lewisburg, West Virginia, was the intended destination.

The pilot reported that he was taking off on runway 10 from his private grass airstrip. He reported that he noted the wind was calm and that the temperature was "warmer", and he referenced the pilot's operating handbook for a soft field takeoff using 10 degrees of flaps. He stated that after takeoff the airplane was in ground-effect and was gaining speed. He noted that he checked, and the airspeed was between 50 and 60 knots. When he looked back toward the runway, he was left of the runway and corrected back to the right. He re-checked the airspeed and it was now reading between zero and the bottom of the white arc (41 knots). He stated that he thought that the airspeed reading was due to a pitot system error and pulled back on the yoke to see if he could climb out; however, the stall warning horn sounded immediately. He diverted to the left to avoid obstructions and was losing altitude rapidly. He pulled the yoke back all the way to fully stall the airplane and it struck the ground and nosed over. He noted in his report that, to the best of his knowledge, there were no mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane, engine, or systems that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 64, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/10/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:   353 hours (Total, all aircraft), 353 hours (Total, this make and model), 320 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 50.6 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 24.8 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N738XT
Model/Series: 172N N
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1978
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 17270324
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection 02/11/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2299 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1924 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320-H2AD
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 160 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: BJJ, 1136 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1256 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 270°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 6500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 9500 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 30°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 9°C / 1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:  No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: ORRVILLE, OH (OH24)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Lewisburg, WV (LWB)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0940 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: MARKLEY FARM (OH24)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 1110 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: 10
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 1633 ft / 200 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  40.875556, -81.766389


ORRVILLE, Ohio -- Authorities are investigating after a small plane crashed near state Route 57 and Five Points Road Friday morning.

Two passengers inside the private plane suffered minor injuries. The passengers are local residents, according to Ohio State Highway Patrol.

The plane crashed shortly after takeoff from a privately owned airfield. Authorities believe the pilot was attempting to return the plane to ground to avoid striking powerlines when the plane ran out of runway space.

The plane's landing gear snapped, causing it to overturn in a yard near a house.

Ohio State Highway Patrol and fire crews remain at the scene.

 Story and video ➤ https://www.wkyc.com




ORRVILLE, Ohio-- A small plane crashed in Wayne County Friday morning, the Ohio State Highway Patrol says.

It happened at state Route 57 and 5 Points Road just north of Orrville during an aborted takeoff.

The two people on board, the pilot and his wife, were taken to Aultman Orrville Hospital for minor injuries.

Story and video ➤ http://fox8.com







ORRVILLE A small single-engine airplane with two people aboard crashed shortly after takeoff about 9:50 a.m. Friday near State Route 57, just north of Five Points Road.

According to Orrville Fire Chief Chris Bishop, the plane took off from a private landing strip nearby and failed to get any lift, crashing after getting about 30 feet off the ground. The front end hit first, and then the plane flipped over. According to the State Highway Patrol, which is investigating the crash, the pilot guided the plane down to avoid hitting the wires that run along the road.

The two occupants — Larry Markley, the pilot, and his wife Sally — were transported to Aultman Orrville Hospital with minor injuries, Bishop said.

When the first medics arrived they were still in the plane seat-belted, and medics helped them out of the plane.

The plane crashed within about 30 feet of a nearby house.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.cantonrep.com





ORRVILLE, Ohio - A small plane has crashed in Wayne County on Friday morning.

The plane crashed in a field at 6239 Wadsworth Road in Orrville, according to the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

Story and video ➤ https://www.news5cleveland.com

Aerodynamic Stall/Spin: Kolb Firestar II, N9216E; accident occurred May 11, 2018 near Atmore Municipal Airport (OR1), Escambia County, Alabama

Struck tree and wreckage. 
Federal Aviation Administration

Struck tree and struck powerline.
Federal Aviation Administration

Underside
Federal Aviation Administration

Left side
Federal Aviation Administration

Cockpit
Federal Aviation Administration

Underside close up.
Federal Aviation Administration

Right side
Federal Aviation Administration

Thirty (30) seconds prior to takeoff.

Just after takeoff.

Cruise

Right bank just prior to accident.

Left bank just prior to accident.

Impact tree

Just prior to ground impact. 

Post impact

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Vestavia Hills, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N9216E


Location: Atmore, AL
Accident Number: WPR18LA142
Date & Time: 05/11/2018, 1203 CDT
Registration: N9216E
Aircraft: KOLB FIRESTAR
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Aerodynamic stall/spin
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 11, 2018, about 1203 central daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Kolb Firestar 2 airplane, N9216E, sustained substantial damage when it impacted a tree and terrain near Atmore, Alabama. The non-certificated pilot was seriously injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The local flight had departed Atmore Municipal Airport (OR1), Atmore, Alabama about 13 minutes prior to the accident.

According to the pilot, he was in cruise flight at an altitude of about 600 ft above ground level (agl) when the airplane began "swaying left and right;" the pilot clarified that the airplane was "not yawing or rolling." He was unable to get the airplane "to straighten out," so he began a descent. When it was about 40 ft agl, the airplane struck a tree, and then a powerline, and then impacted the ground.

The airplane came to rest inverted on the lawn of a private residence, and the fuselage, tail boom, and wings were substantially damaged.

Pilot Information

Certificate: None
Age: 47, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: None None
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  36 hours (Total, all aircraft), 4 hours (Total, this make and model), 4 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft) 

The pilot's flight logbook was recovered from the wreckage. The logbook indicated that the pilot had accrued about 32 hours in Cessna airplanes more than 20 years ago, but then ceased flying until September 2017, when the pilot logged some time in an Aeronca Champ. The pilot's accident report stated that he had accrued a total flight time of 36.1 hours, including 13.6 hours as pilot in command, and 4 hours in the airplane accident make and model in the last 90 days. A search of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records did not reveal any pilot or medical certificates for the pilot.

The pilot's wife reported that this was the first time to her knowledge that the pilot had flown the airplane. She reported that he had previously taxied the airplane, and conducted "crow hopping" exercises in it as well. She defined crow hopping as a maneuver where the pilot would accelerate on the runway and allow the airplane to become momentarily airborne before touching down and stopping.

For undetermined reasons, the pilot erroneously reported a departure time of 1030, and an accident time of 1045, in his written account of the accident.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: KOLB
Registration:N9216E 
Model/Series: FIRESTAR II
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2017
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 01-17
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 630 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 45 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 503
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 50 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

The kit-built airplane was registered to the pilot about a year before the accident, but he was not the builder of the airplane. The airplane structure consisted primarily of aluminum tubing covered with fabric skin. The airplane was equipped with a 50 hp Rotax 503 series engine mounted in an overwing pusher configuration. Pilot-provided information indicated that the airframe had a total time (TT) in service of about 45 hours, and the engine had a TT of about 96 hours. No maintenance records were provided to the investigation. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: NSE
Distance from Accident Site: 29 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1156 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 135°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 6000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / Unknown
Wind Direction: 160°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / Unknown
Altimeter Setting: 30.13 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 12°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Atmore, AL (OR1)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Atmore, AL (OR1)
Type of Clearance: Unknown
Departure Time: 1157 CDT
Type of Airspace: Unknown 

The 1156 automated weather observation at an airport located about 29 miles southeast of the accident site included wind from 160° at 6 knots, visibility 10 miles, few clouds at 6,000 ft, temperature 31°C, dew point 12°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.13 inches of mercury.

Inflight images depicted clear skies, and were consistent with little or no wind. 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 31.016111, -87.446667 (est) 

The accident site was located about 4 miles east-northeast of OR1. Evidence indicated that the airplane struck a tree about 25 yards away from where the airplane came to rest, and that it also struck at least one powerline between the tree and the ground impact point. Ground scars indicated little to no horizontal travel during or after ground impact.

The two FAA inspectors who responded to the accident site on the day of the accident conducted a limited examination of the aircraft, and did not observe any pre-impact damage. Throttle and flight control continuity was unable to be verified. The ailerons, elevator, and rudder all remained securely attached to their respective airfoils and control links. Impact damage precluded determination of the pre-accident integrity of the aircraft structure or its control systems.

The fuel tank was approximately ¾ full, and there was fuel in the bowls of each of the two carburetors. The exhaust manifold was removed from the engine to examine the pistons and cylinders, and no pre-impact damage or abnormalities were observed.

Additional Information

A GoPro brand video camera was found attached to the exterior of the aircraft. Review of the data on the camera's memory card indicated that the camera recorded the entire accident flight. The camera was mounted low on the outside of the right fuselage, faced forward, and did not capture any aerodynamic surfaces, instruments, controls, or the engine/propeller. Except when the pilot's arm reached out of the cockpit to adjust the camera or something near it, the camera did not capture any of the pilot's anatomy.


The following events (in file elapsed time, format MM:SS) were observed during review of the video file. The airplanet began taxiing on the ramp about 00:15, and stopped on the midfield perpendicular taxiway about 01:20. About 01:48 he resumed taxiing towards the runway, and then the airplane crossed the point-hold line, and entered the airport movement area. About 02:30 the airplane stopped in the movement area between the point hold line and the runway, and remained there for about 30 seconds before entering the runway. The airplane turned left (south) onto the runway, and took about 1 1/2 minutes to taxi to the runway 36 end. The airplane remained at the left (east) side of the runway for that entire taxi. The aircraft remained on the runway 36 end for about 2 1/2 minutes before it began its takeoff roll. The 14 second takeoff roll was conducted well to the right of the runway centerline. About 2 minutes after takeoff, when the airplane appeared to be level at an altitude of about 500 to 750 ft above ground level, the airplane made a right turn to a heading of east. During the next 3 minutes, the altitude appeared to decrease slowly, and the heading drifted towards the northeast. About 12:30, the airplane turned right, towards the southeast. 20 seconds later, the airplane turned right to a heading of south, and then began maneuvers consistent with an aerodynamic stall. The airplane first banked and turned sharply right, the nose pitched down, and then the airplane banked and turned sharply left, descending rapidly during this sequence. The left and right turns both appeared to result in approximate 180° heading changes. About 13:00, the airplane struck a tree and then impacted the ground. The airplane was descending rapidly in a wings level attitude, and with a forward horizontal velocity component, when it struck the tree. About 14 seconds after the airplane came to rest, significant image vibration, similar to that resulting from engine operation, ceased. The file ended at 17:42; there was no visible activity or camera movement between the time of ground impact and the end of the file. 

Location: Atmore, AL
Accident Number: WPR18LA142
Date & Time: 05/11/2018, 1203 CDT
Registration: N9216E
Aircraft: MARTINEZ JOSE A FIRESTAR 2
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 11, 2018, about 1203 central daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Kolb Firestar 2 airplane, N9216E, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain under unknown circumstances near Atmore, Alabama. The pilot received serious injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the airplane was registered to the pilot about a year before the accident, but he was not the builder of the airplane. The airplane was equipped with a Rotax 503 series engine mounted in an overwing pusher configuration.

According to one of the two FAA inspectors who responded to the accident, the airplane came to rest inverted on the lawn of a private residence, and the tail boom and right wing were substantially damaged. The inspectors conducted a limited examination of the airplane, and did not observe any pre-impact damage. They noted that the fuel tank was approximately ¾ full, and that there was fuel in the bowl of each of the two carburetors. They removed the exhaust manifold from the engine to examine the pistons and cylinders, and again did not observe any pre-impact damage.

The inspectors recovered a Go-Pro camera that was attached to the airplane, and reviewed the camera's image files. The most recent file in the camera's memory depicted at least the latter portion of the accident flight. The airplane appeared to be in cruise flight, about 500 feet above the ground. It became laterally unstable, and then descended rapidly to the ground. The audio channel operated intermittently, and recorded the sound of the engine running subsequent to ground impact.

The pilot's flight logbook was also recovered from the wreckage. The logbook indicated that the pilot had accrued about 32 hours in Cessna airplanes more than 20 years ago, but then ceased flying until September 2017, during which the pilot logged some time in an Aeronca Champ. A search of FAA records did not reveal any pilot certificates for the pilot.

The 1156 automated weather observation at an airport located about 29 miles southeast of the accident site included wind from 160° at 6 knots, visibility 10 miles, few clouds at 6,000 ft, skies, temperature 31° C, dew point 12° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.13 inches of mercury. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: MARTINEZ JOSE A
Registration: N9216E
Model/Series: FIRESTAR 2 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: NSE
Observation Time: 1156 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 29 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 12°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 6000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots, 160°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.13 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 




A pilot was seriously injured in an ultralight crash in Escambia County, AL, Friday.

The pilot was identified as Matthew Scott Newton of Pensacola. He was transported by LifeFlight to Sacred Heart Hospital in Pensacola where he was listed in stable condition with a badly injured leg.

The crash happened near the end of Howard Page Lane, about a mile from the Robinsonville Baptist Church, and about 4.5 miles from the Alabama/Florida state line. The plane lost power, clipped a tree and power line before crashing into a yard.

The crash is under investigation by the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board.

The aircraft is listed as experimental by the FAA.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.northescambia.com





A single-engine aircraft crashed in the front yard of a Darryl Dawe Lane home this afternoon in Robinsonville.

The aircraft is a Jose Martinez Firestar 2 fixed wing single engine that’s registered to a Flomaton man, according to the Federal Aviation Administration’s website.

Officials from the FAA were on scene gathering information on the crash. However, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is in charge of the investigation, which is ongoing.

The pilot of the aircraft, whose name isn’t available, was airlifted by LifeFlight to Sacred Heart Hospital in Pensacola, Florida.

Original article ➤ https://www.atmoreadvance.com



ESCAMBIA COUNTY, Ala. (WKRG) - A pilot has been injured after crashing an ultralight plane into someone's front yard in the Robinsonville community outside of Atmore.

The crash happened Friday afternoon in front of a home on Howard Paige Lane.

The plane hit a tree and a power line after the engine failed, according to Chief Deputy Mike Lambert of the Escambia County (AL) Sheriff's Office.

Chief Deputy Lambert says the pilot, identified as Matthew Scott Nelson, suffered a leg injury. He was taken to Atmore Community Hospital and then flown to Sacred Heart Hospital in Pensacola, where he is now recovering.

The plane had a camera attached to it, and the video has been turned over to the FAA and NTSB to investigate the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wkrg.com

Legacy Flights: Lakeland Linder charter to offer weekend day trips to Key West



LAKELAND — A Lakeland-based air charter says it has an alternative to the seven-hour slog through Southeast Florida and U.S. 1 traffic for visitors looking to get a taste of Key West.

Starting Memorial Day weekend, for $199 for Florida residents and $229 for others, Lakeland-based Legacy Flights will be offering roundtrip day trips to Key West from Lakeland Linder Regional Airport.

The company is calling them “daycations,” and the Key West flight is the first of similar flights the growing company plans to offer in the future, company spokesman Mitch Pizik said, including Bimini, Bahamas; Gatlinburg, Tennessee; and Savannah, Georgia.

The company is likely looking toward siphoning some visitors to Orlando and Tampa who would like the chance to see Key West but maybe weren’t as eager to give up several days of their family Disney vacation to do it.

But the target is “anyone looking for a getaway,” Pizik said. “You can get there in an hour then have a full day down there.”

Now, passengers will have to board the return flight the day they left, but as the program develops, passengers will be able to stay overnight, Pizik said.

Those participating in the first flight leaving Lakeland at 8 a.m. Saturday, May 26, and arriving back 13 hours later, can fly roundtrip for $149. From then on, the charter service will fly scheduled flights three times a weekend, leaving Lakeland at 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Saturdays, and 8 a.m. Sundays, and arriving back that evening.

Legacy’s mainstay has been charters onboard its fleet of 30-passenger, turboprop Saab 340B aircraft: casino charters, sports teams, corporate retreats and church groups, as examples.

This new service is an expansion for the company, which is adding another Saab to its fleet soon and a sixth by the end of the year. Technically, Legacy Flights is hiring Legacy Airways, the charter operator, to operate the charter. Legacy Airways is the name that appears on the aircrafts’ livery.

Lakeland Linder Director Gene Conrad said it was an exciting addition to the services being offered by the airport tenant.

“We’re excited about the opportunity,” Conrad said. “It’s a great concept. People can fly down to Key West in the morning, enjoy themselves, and come back in the evening. It’s an easy and convenient service.”

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.theledger.com

Travel group coming to Hannibal, Missouri, via planes this summer



It is not uncommon to see a group of visitors arriving in Hannibal by riverboat or bus. In July a group of travelers is coming whose initial stop in America’s Hometown will not be the riverfront or historic district, but the city’s airport.

At the April meeting of the city’s airport advisory board, Robin Carroll, Hannibal Regional Airport fixed base operator, reported that a group of 15 aviators and their passengers will be arriving in mid-July.

“It’s exciting,” said Carroll.

A common bond shared by the group, aside from wanting to visit Hannibal, is that its members will all arrive in Comanche aircraft. Built by Piper Aircraft from the mid-1950s until 1972, Comanches are single-engine, low-wing, all-metal aircraft with retractable landing gear. While most feature four seats, some of the planes were designed to haul a pilot and five passengers.

Although the city’s airport is approximately six miles from the downtown historic district, Gail Bryant, director of the Hannibal Convention and Visitors Bureau (HCVB), does not see that distance as an obstacle for visiting aviators.

“The airport is really not far from the historic district,” she said. “In the past, flying groups have rented the trolley as transportation, or depending on the number of people, even passenger vans. With our downtown so walkable, it is easy once getting there to be dropped off to enjoy sightseeing, eating and enjoying the historic charm.”

The Comanche club is no stranger to Hannibal, landing here in 2010, according to Carroll.

“The Hannibal Convention and Visitors Bureau worked with them on an itinerary several years ago, and we have been working with them this year for their return visit,” said Bryant.

Karen Burditt, Hannibal’s finance director, noted during the meeting that the Comanche flying group is just one of many aircraft clubs whose members enjoy seeing the country.

“They will fly in somewhere for the weekend,” she said. “It makes perfect sense.”

Does the HCVB consider flyers to be another potential weekend traveling market?

“Flying groups, like any type of group, vary depending on the members,” said Bryant. “Organizations made up of mostly retired individuals are more likely to come during the week, while those with younger members still working a traditional 9-5 workday, will plan longer weekends.”

While the HCVB expends considerable time and effort to attract visitors aboard riverboats and buses, flyers are not ignored when it comes to marketing to them as potential weekend visitors.

“Flying clubs do not hold large travel marketplaces like bus tour operators do,” said Bryant. “However, Hannibal is very well situated to be attractive to hobbyist flyers, as our airport is relatively close to downtown.

“I think people would be surprised at the wide variety of unique groups that visit Hannibal, either strictly for leisure or for a conference and events. The Steampunk Festival is one that makes a big splash downtown, but we also have quilting groups, military reunions, retired railroad workers, motorcycle groups, RV clubs ... The list goes on and on.”

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.hannibal.net

Pilot numbers increasing in Nevada, but declining nationwide



An aerial view of the Las Vegas Strip emerged just past the control sticks and a dashboard of buttons.

Peter Forman, a former pilot and volunteer at the Henderson-based Future and Active Pilot Advisors’ Future Pilot Program, pointed out details from the scene below to his student as they glided over the city — virtually.

This flight simulation was one of the tools used at a May 2 Las Vegas event to educate students of all ages about an aviation career.

According to a 2017 market outlook from Boeing, North American airlines will need to hire 117,000 new pilots by 2036 to keep up with an expanding fleet of aircraft.

“We haven’t felt the effects yet,” said Hilarie Grey, the director of corporate communications at Las Vegas-based Allegiant Air. “But we know it will affect us eventually.”

Smaller, regional airlines have been hit the hardest so far, she said. But in Nevada, the number of pilots is on the upswing.

With pilot employment outpacing growth in the tourism, gaming and entertainment industry, Nevada is moving in the right direction, said Bob Potts, research director at the Governor’s Office of Economic Development.




‘Cascading issue’ 

Nevada added 39 airline pilots, copilots, and flight engineers over the last year, an increase of 3 percent, according to data from the Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation. Commercial pilot jobs saw a 6 percent increase, from 601 to 638.

Meanwhile, the tourism, gaming and entertainment industry grew by 1 percent last year, and the visitor volume growth numbers from the Nevada Commission on Tourism are similar, Potts said. In all, the two pilot categories had a combined growth rate of 3.7 percent, outpacing the 2.8 percent growth rate of passenger counts, according to Potts.

Still, a shortage is at the forefront of many local airline’s minds. Grey said the shortage is likely to get worse with a large number of pilots retiring in the near future.

By 2036, North American airlines will need to hire 118,000 technicians and 154,000 cabin crew members to keep up with demand, according to Boeing.

“It’s not only a pilot issue,” said Brent Mireles, the director of operations at Pan Am Career Pilot Academy. “It’s a large, cascading (issue).”

And it’s one that’s affecting a variety of businesses. At a recent FAPA pilot job fair, Mireles said he saw four charter companies actively recruiting pilots.

“It used to be only regional airlines at events like this. The major airlines didn’t need it and the charter companies got the overflow from the regionals,” he said. “UPS was doing on-sight interviews, which is something I haven’t seen, ever.”




Incentives

Tuition rates at the Pan Am academy hover around $60,000, and that number can be even higher for students who go through flight training at a four-year university. But Mireles said the return-on-investment is worth it.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, airline and commercial pilots had an average annual salary of $111,930 in 2017. And airlines are throwing in more and more retirement packages and bonuses to sweeten the deal, Mireles said.

“I started less than 10 years ago, and there were no bonuses,” he said.

Now, some regional airlines offer signing bonuses of more than $20,000 and retention bonuses near $6,000, according to Rob Canning, sales manager at Pan Am International Flight Academy.

Smith said financial incentives and events like the future pilots program are necessary steps to help the industry succeed.

“The industry needs to start spending money to develop the pipeline,” he said.

Story and video ➤ https://www.reviewjournal.com

David deBerardinis: Accused Ponzi scammer's plane, luxury boat on the auction block



Shreveport businessman David deBerardinis is an accused -- but not convicted -- fraudster, but the government is about to auction off two luxury items they've seized from him.

It's part of the government's efforts to confiscate assets belonging to the businessman, who's accused of running a multimillion dollar Ponzi scheme. deBerardinis denies it.

Going on the U.S. Treasury's on-line auction block: deBerardinis' private jet and a sailboat. The auction runs from May 16-23.



The jet is a 1982 British Aerospace Hawker that will carry a dozen passengers. It's described as in good condition and parked in south Florida.

The sailboat Starship is a 50-footer that's moored in South Texas. It has engine problems and its interior is described as in poor condition, with water damage.

The bigger haul of the two would be the jet, although one person familiar with the plane said its age and fuel economy are not factors in its favor.



Proceeds from the auction will go into a protected account and wait on the outcome of the case against deBerardinis.

deBerardinis has pleaded not guilty to charges he scammed $96 million from investors and banks who believed he was engaging in energy trades that provided double-digit returns on the money they loaned him. His accusers say no trades were made and deBerardinis diverted much of the money to himself. deBerardinis denies it.

In their criminal case, federal prosecutors served notice they will attempt to confiscate deBerardinis' assets and make restitution to investors. They want to forfeit a dozen bank accounts containing approximately $114,000; the jet, a $203,000 life insurance policy; his home in Shreveport's Pierremont Park area; and two vehicles. The sailboat is not part of that forfeiture move listed on the indictment but it has been seized by federal authorities.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.ktbs.com

Elon Musk Predicts Rocket Launches Will Be as Routine as Airline Flights: SpaceX chief says enhanced reusability eventually will enable the same booster to fly 100 times

The launch of a SpaceX Falcon rocket in February.


The Wall Street Journal 
By Andy Pasztor
Updated May 10, 2018 6:58 p.m. ET

Staking out another bold space objective, Elon Musk said the latest configuration of his rocket is designed to fly as many as 10 times without any scheduled maintenance, and ultimately could be refurbished and blast off at least 100 times.

Speaking Thursday before the first planned launch of an upgraded SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, Mr. Musk spelled out his long-term vision of reusability, a concept he has pioneered to revolutionize space transportation. The mission from Florida’s Kennedy Space Center was aborted by a last-minute technical problem, but a second attempt was scheduled for Friday.

Space Exploration Technologies Corp., as the company is formally known, already reuses the lower stage of its current-generation rockets, typically months after the first use.

But starting next year, the company plans to use the same main engines and lower stage to conduct two consecutive missions in a single day, Mr. Musk said. Going further than he has before, he predicted additional advances intended eventually to make space travel as routine and safe as boarding a jetliner.

When it comes to both SpaceX and electric-car company Tesla Inc., which Mr. Musk also runs, the billionaire has been criticized by auto-industry analysts and aerospace rivals for boasting about technical accomplishments while laying out super-ambitious goals and specific timetables that often prove unrealistic.

Recently he clashed with Wall Street analysts over whether Tesla has the ability to ramp up production and resolve nagging assembly-line problems.

Mr. Musk’s latest comments about SpaceX risk a repeat of that dynamic if the company fails to deliver. Over the years, the company has fallen short of goals to increase launch rates or complete new spacecraft on schedule.

But instead of dialing back public projections, Thursday’s news conference highlighted Mr. Musk’s determination to continue capturing the limelight with increasingly ambitious goals.

Extolling the latest Falcon 9 as “the most reliable rocket ever built,” the SpaceX chief went on to say he is certain his engineering team also “will achieve full reusability” of the upper stage, which now burns up “like a meteor” as it returns to the atmosphere. Falcon 9 rockets have suffered two catastrophic explosions since 2015. That has compared with no such failures involving rockets built by rival United Launch Alliance , a joint venture of Boeing Co. and Lockheed Martin Corp. , over a much longer period.

If the reusability strategy succeeds, Mr. Musk held out the promise of cutting the price of orbital launches to $5 million or $6 million, from $50 million or $60 million currently. “That would be quite insane,” he said, though customers still would have to shoulder part of the development costs.

But Mr. Musk didn’t explain when that could occur, or how such a drastic change in his business plan would still produce enough revenue to fund pending multibillion-dollar projects to develop a behemoth deep-space rocket and deploy thousands of small communication satellites.

Throughout his typically brash performance, Mr. Musk reiterated the tenets of his ambitions for SpaceX. He aims to build a fleet of rocket ships able to transport humans to Mars, but flexible enough to operate at roughly the cost and frequency of traditional airlines.

To move toward that goal, however, SpaceX first has to prove it can safely fly astronauts on today’s version of the Falcon 9. National Aeronautics and Space Administration officials are considering whether to approve putting astronauts in the capsule on top of the rocket while it is loaded with super-cooled fuel. Mr. Musk said the safety issue “has been somewhat overblown,” though for the first time he publicly said if necessary, “we can adjust our operational procedures” to fuel the rocket first.

But sticking with the airline analogy, Mr. Musk predicted that in the end, operational changes won’t be necessary “any more than passengers on an aircraft wait until the aircraft is full of fuel before boarding; that would be pretty silly.”

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wsj.com