Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Martha's Vineyard Airport (KMVY) Commission meeting discusses grant, Federal Aviation Administration inspection, and potential solar farm

The Martha’s Vineyard Airport Commission met last Thursday with good news on its agenda that included a grant totaling $8.3 million and a mostly positive inspection by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

The FAA construction grant, announced on July 13 by the office of Representative Bill Keating, “will fund the construction of approximately a 20,000-square-foot Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting (ARFF) building. “Construction of a new Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting Building and the important safety upgrades that go along with that will allow first responders at the Martha’s Vineyard Airport to have the infrastructure that they need to be prepared for any emergency situation,” Congressman Keating said in a press release.

Airport commissioner Robert Rosenbaum and Airport Commission chairman Myron Garfinkle had worked to secure the grant over the past 11 months.

“It’s hard for me to say without smiling, ” Mr. Garfinkle said when he announced the grant to the commissioners.

The FAA has conducted several inspections, and the most recent, a land-use inspection on July 6 and 7, was another topic of discussion at the Thursday meeting. Mr. Garfinkle called the inspection an educational opportunity, and said that overall, the airport received an excellent review. However, the FAA took issue with two items related to lease arrangements.

The airport has two leases with zero revenue to the airport, which is not permitted by FAA regulations. In a phone conversation with The Times, airport manager Ann Crook said leases for the Dukes County Sheriff’s Department, which operates the communications center on airport property, and a bicycle motocross (BMX) track have expired. Ms. Crook said their paperwork has lapsed, and that the airport is “working to bring them into compliance.”

The second issue was the airport’s fair market values. According to Ms. Crook, these are appraised values of a piece of property based on the highest and best use of that property. The values have slipped at the airport, and the FAA said they must maintain them. Ms. Crook told The Times that all leases must be in compliance, which means changing the lease language to ensure they charge the fair market value for their property.

Also Thursday, airport commissioners discussed the airport’s “master plan,” which refers to the maintenance of runways, maximizing parking spaces, and the potential construction of a solar farm. Ms. Crook told The Times that the solar farm is an idea they’re still considering. She said that they’re looking at a property at the airport that isn’t needed for aeronautical development.

“We’re considering building a solar farm there as a way to provide for electrical use of the airport, or to partially offset the use of electricity in a way that’s sustainable,” Ms. Crook said.

Mr. Garfinkle said the Airport Commission plans to hold an upcoming public meeting about the airport’s potential solar farm.

Source:   http://www.mvtimes.com

Hundreds of Southwest flights delayed after ground stop



SEATTLE -- Hundreds of Southwest flights were delayed Wednesday after the airline was hit with technical issues.

The trouble started when a "system outage" led to a nationwide ground stop for all Southwest flights that lasted for just over an hour.

The company said in a statement that an early-afternoon outage impacted "multiple technology systems." After the ground stop was lifted, flights were left flights backlogged.

"We expect to continue our move toward a normal operation, but believe it will take time," Southwest said in a statement. The airline declined to say what caused the system outage.

The airline's airport kiosks and web site were not available for check-in or booking.

Some passengers reported that Southwest was in the process of issuing hand-written paper tickets to get fliers back in the air.

Sea-Tac International Airport officials reported a backup at the Southwest check-in counter and reminded passengers to please be patient.

Dozens of fliers took to Twitter to complain about the delays. Some said they were aboard flights held on the runway.

"I love @SouthwestAir but I don't love wasting my PTO on the Tarmac," one user wrote.

About 450 Southwest flights were delayed Wednesday as of about 2 p.m., according to FlightStats, though it's not clear how many of those delays were due to the technical glitch. At that same time, 261 domestic United Airlines flights and 278 American Airlines flights were delayed.

Customers also reported problems accessing the airline's website and mobile app, which prevented them from booking flights or checking in for an upcoming trip.

Downdetector counted more than 3,000 social media posts complaining about the issues beginning around 11:30 a.m. PT.

Southwest Airlines is the No. 4 U.S. airline by passenger traffic.

Source: http://q13fox.com

Gunnison-Crested Butte Regional (KGUC) runway work will close airport during spring of 2017

The schedule for runway repairs at the Gunnison airport next spring is nearly set. Airport manager Rick Lamport gave the Gunnison Valley Rural Transportation Authority (RTA) an update on the situation at the July 8 meeting.

Based on design criteria, the schedule is tentative and might need some fine-tuning but will be close to what has been expected. Materials for the project will begin to be prepped and stored at the airport starting this fall.

Some taxiway work and asphalt testing will be conducted starting April 1. The project kicks into high gear April 10, the day after the ski area closes, when both the main airport runway and a small grass runway on the western side of the airport will be shut down.

Paving work will move to the east side of the airport starting May 16 and that will allow the grass runway to reopen to small aircrafts. The main runway work is scheduled to be complete June 10 with the airport opening on that Saturday.

But as with any project of this magnitude, Lamport said there were 12 contingency days built into the project in case some unexpected problems arise.

The asphalt will take a month, until July 21, to completely cure. On July 22, grooving work will commence and Lamport said that could impact residents living near the airport. Workers “will groove the runway at night,” he said. “So from July 22 until August 1 work will take place from 10:30 at night until 5 a.m. There will be some noise out there at night for those two weeks.”

Lamport said the work is needed since the runway is currently cracked. It is a $10 million project funded mainly by the federal government. Lamport said the design/engineering company setting the schedule, Jviation, just completed a similar project at the Hayden airport and it came in on time with even more work than will be done at Gunnison. Jviation will manage the actual project but will not do the actual construction.

“Moisture and weather is always a little challenge, but I am confident in this company, and think it will get done in this timeframe,” said Lamport.

Bids are currently being solicited for the work.

Source:  http://crestedbuttenews.com

Aeronca 7BCM/CONV, N1639E: Accident occurred July 20, 2016 at Joseph A. Hardy Connellsville Airport (KVVS), Connellsville, Dunbar Township, Fayette County, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA16CA264
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 20, 2016 in Connellsville, PA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/22/2017
Aircraft: AERONCA 7BCM, registration: N1639E
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot stated that he hand-propped the engine, boarded the airplane, and began to taxi and that, shortly thereafter, the engine "sputtered and stalled." He then realized that he had left the fuel selector in the “off” position. He set the parking brake, turned the fuel on, exited the airplane, and hand-propped the engine again. The engine started and ran at a high rpm. The airplane moved forward and began to spin in circles. The pilot attempted to get back in the cockpit; however, the door had swung closed, and the airplane struck him, knocking him to the ground. The airplane spun a few more times before striking a hangar, which resulted in substantial damage to the right wing, and coming to a stop. Afterward, the pilot recalled that he had forgotten to retard the throttle before attempting the second engine start. The airplane was not equipped with an electric starter.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to properly set the throttle and secure the airplane before hand-propping the engine for startup.



Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allegheny, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N1639E








NTSB Identification: ERA16CA264
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 20, 2016 in Connellsville, PA
Aircraft: AERONCA 7BCM, registration: N1639E
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot stated that he hand-propped the engine, boarded the airplane and began to taxi. Shortly thereafter, the engine "sputtered and stalled." He then realized that he had left the fuel selector in the off position. He set the parking brake, turned the fuel on, exited the airplane and hand-propped the engine again. The engine started and ran at a high rpm. The airplane moved forward and began to spin in circles. The pilot attempted to get back in the cockpit; however, the door had swung closed and the airplane struck him, knocking him to the ground. The airplane spun a few more times before striking a hangar, which resulted in substantial damage to the right wing, and coming to a stop. Afterward, the pilot recalled that he had forgotten to retard the throttle before attempting the second engine start. The airplane was not equipped with an electric starter.
Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allegheny, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N1639E


NTSB Identification: ERA16CA264
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 20, 2016 in Connellsville, PA
Aircraft: AERONCA 7BCM, registration: N1639E
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot stated that he hand-propped the engine, boarded the airplane and began to taxi. Shortly thereafter, the engine "sputtered and stalled." He then realized that he had left the fuel selector in the off position. He set the parking brake, turned the fuel on, exited the airplane and hand-propped the engine again. The engine started and ran at a high rpm. The airplane moved forward and began to spin in circles. The pilot attempted to get back in the cockpit; however, the door had swung closed and the airplane struck him, knocking him to the ground. The airplane spun a few more times before striking a hangar, which resulted in substantial damage to the right wing, and coming to a stop. Afterward, the pilot recalled that he had forgotten to retard the throttle before attempting the second engine start. The airplane was not equipped with an electric starter.





An accident involving an unmanned, antique plane sent its owner to the hospital Wednesday morning when it began circling on the Tarmac at the Joseph A. Hardy/Connellsville Airport.

Authorities said John Warren, 72, of Monongahela was outside of his plane when the propeller knocked him to the ground twice before crashing into the hangar.

The man was flown to UPMC Presbyterian Hospital in Pittsburgh, according to state police.

The 1946 Aeronca Champion has no electric starter, according to airport Manager Bud Neckeraurer. Instead, the plane is started by turning the propeller by hand. When Warren did this, the plane began making uncontrolled circles outside the hangar.

Neckeraurer said Warren attempted to get in the plane, but was unable and began chasing it.

"I went out to chase it too, but I didn't know what to do but yell at John to stay away," he said.

He said the propeller hit Warren and knocked him to the ground -- hard. Neckeraurer said he was surprised to see him get up and start chasing the plane again. It knocked him to the ground a second time, and Warren struggled to get to his feet. Neckeraurer and other witnesses rushed to help him.

"To me, it seemed about like all day," Neckeraurer said, describing the incident. "But it was probably less than a minute."

Neckeraurer said that while he has not seen this type of accident before at the Connellsville airport, he said they are not uncommon.

"From now on, we will tie the tail down," he said. "We'll do things differently now."

He said Warren was only making a quick stop at the airport for fuel with plans to spend the afternoon meandering around the skies.

"He said to me, 'It's a great day to fly," he said.

Neckeraurer said it appeared that Warren suffered head injuries and seemed to be going into shock before regaining coherence. He said Warren seemed to be most concerned about his antique aircraft.

"It's like a piece of jewelry," Neckeraurer said. "It's absolutely beautiful."

He said Warren is a member of the Rostraver Township chapter of the Experimental Aircraft Association. Neckeraurer said the pilot has multiple airplanes, and operates his aircraft safely.

He said he is confident Warren will find a way to repair his plane when he recovers.

"John will fix it," he said. "It might take years, but that's what these experimental aircraft guys do."

The damage to the hangar will require replacing a door, he said. A panel on a truck was damaged by the plane's tail.

Neckeraurer thanked the emergency personnel, saying the response was superb.

State police, Fayette EMS, Dunbar fire department and Fayette County Emergency Management Agency responded to the scene.

Source:  http://www.heraldstandard.com




CONNELLSVILLE, Pa. —A pilot was injured when his antique plane began spinning out of control Wednesday morning at Joseph A. Hardy Connellsville Airport.

A pilot is injured while working on his antique plane at Joseph A. Hardy Connellsville Airport and is flown to a Pittsburgh hospital.

The man was preparing to take off in the plane when he got out to hand turn the propeller, but did not put the throttle in idle. 

"The engine started at a much higher RPM than it should have, with enough power to override the brakes," said Gary Sobek, who was preparing to fly out on his own plane.

Video: Runaway plane: pilot injured at Connellsville airport

The plane, said to be a 1946 Aeronca Champ, began to move when the propeller started spinning, moving the plane from one end of the airport's apron to the other.

"We didn't know what to do," said Bud Neckerbauer, the airport's manager. "You have an airplane running around out there wild. We were chasing it, then it was chasing us."

The pilot, identified as John Warren, 72, of Monongahela, was struck by the tail section of the plane when he tried to stop it and was knocked into the air and fell, striking his head on the ground.

The plane then smashed into a truck parked nearby and crashed through a hangar door before stopping.

Warren was taken to UPMC Presbyterian Hospital in Pittsburgh.

Story and video:  http://www.wtae.com



A pilot trying to stop a runaway classic aircraft was hurt when he was struck by the plane Wednesday morning at Joseph A. Hardy Connellsville Airport.

Airport manager John Neckerauer identified the pilot as John Warren of Monongahela, an officer with the Experimental Aircraft Association of Pittsburgh.

Neckerauer said Warren was planning to take up his Aeronca Champ, a 1946 fixed-wing, single engine two-seater.

“It's an old aircraft without a starter. You hand-prop it (pull the propeller by hand),” Neckerauer explained.

When Warren spun the propeller, the plane took off and struck an airport hangar, he said.

“He was trying to catch it. The tail section of the aircraft flipped him onto the asphalt. He hit his head hard,” Neckerauer said.

Warren was transported from the scene by ambulance and then flown to a Pittsburgh hospital, Neckerauer said.

The accident was reported about 10 a.m.

No further information on Warren's condition was immediately available.

Sonex, N393SX: Accident occurred December 15, 2018 in Columbia County, Wisconsin and accident occurred July 18, 2016 at Lodi Lakeland Airport (9WN5)


Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Struck tree line and landing in a field.


https://registry.faa.gov/N393SX


Date: 15-DEC-18

Time: 20:10:00Z
Regis#: N393SX
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: SONEX
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 91
City: LODI
State: WISCONSIN




One man has been taken to the hospital after a small plane crash in Lodi. The crash happened just before 2:15 p.m.

According to the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office, the pilot was the only person inside the plane when it went down. He suffered minor injuries but was able to get himself out of the plane before an ambulance took him to the hospital.


Investigators have not released his name, but they said the pilot is in his 70’s and lives in the Village of Dane.


Lt. Wayne Smith from the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office said the cause of the crash is still under investigation but they know the plane was coming in for a landing at the nearby Lodi-Lakeland airport. The plane flew too low and struck a tree before crashing in the field.


“This is really fortunate that this worked out the way it did,” Smith said. “It’s a bad crash but he was able to walk away to get help, there was no fire and nothing else was struck.”


Chris Layton was working just yards away at a nearby bar.


“We heard crackling from the trees behind us and we just happened to turn our heads just in time to see the plane nose dive right into the ground,” he said.


That’s when Layton said he ran towards the wreck.


“I kicked off my shoes because I don’t tie them and I was running barefoot through the field to make sure he was okay,” he said.


Layton said there was smoke at first but it dissipated before the man pulled himself out.


“He was conscious and he was a little shaken up,” Layton said. “He said he was done flying.”


Smith said the pilot is expected to recover and there was no evidence of any fuel leaks caused by the crash.


“The bad news is there was an airplane here that crashed,” he said. “The good news is the pilot is going to be fine and no one else on the ground was hurt.”


Layton said he didn’t know the man inside the plane but he’s looking forward to the pilot’s recovery. After such a violent scene, he said he never expected good news.


“From what I had seen,” he said. “I didn’t think anyone would have been alive.”


According to Smith, they’re still working to figure out why the plane was flying so low. He said they are in touch with the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board. Those agencies will take the lead on the investigation.


Crews were on scene until about 4:30.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://wkow.com




LODI, Wis. - A Lodi resident is feeling lucky to be safe tonight after a plane crashed in his backyard Saturday.

Officials are investigating the Columbia County crash which happened near KD’s Bar and Grill on Fair Street. The pilot, a town of Dane resident in his 70s, hit some trees and crashed into a field while on his way to a landing strip about a half-mile away, according to the Columbia County Sheriff’s Department.


“It’s kind of surreal,” said Kurtis Gauger, whose house is about 50 yards from the crashed plane.


It was strange enough for Gauger to see a commotion in his backyard Saturday afternoon. He definitely didn't expect to see the plane.


"I kind of had to look at it a couple times,” he said. “(I was thinking,) ‘Oh my God, what the hell happened? I hope everyone’s OK.'”


 Lt. Wayne Smith, of the Columbia County Sheriff’s Department, said the pilot was able to walk away from the crash, but was taken to the hospital with minor injures.


"This is really fortunate this worked out the way it did,” Smith said. "You're first concerned about how many people are on the plane and what might their conditions be, but also when a plane comes down out of the sky, what may it have struck?"


Smith said the plane will stay in place until the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board decide what should happen next.


He said the crashed plane is a Sonex, one that can be home-built. He's glad the aircraft took the brunt of the injuries.


"Oh my God, what if it was over a little bit?” Gauger said. “It could have been worse for him too."


Knowing everyone is safe, Gauger instead has something to tell his friends. He just hopes a plane never hits so close to home again.


"Oh no, this is a once-in-a-million thing that happens,” he said. “It’s just kind of crazy.”


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.channel3000.com




COLUMBIA COUNTY, Wis. (WMTV) -- A pilot of a single-engine plane suffered minor injuries after crashing near Lodi Lakeland Airport on Saturday.


According to the Columbia County Sheriff's office, the Sonex 393 plane crashed into a field near 1445 Fair St., after striking trees while approaching the airport just after 2:00 p.m.


The 73-year-old male pilot from Dane County was transported to the hospital. The aircraft was heavily damaged.


Officials at the Columbia County Sheriff's Office believe the plane is privately operated and there are no reports pilot had communication with the Lodi Lakeland Airport.


The cause of the crash is under investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration.


The Columbia County Sheriff's Office was assisted by Lodi Fire and EMS.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.nbc15.com


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N393SX


Location: Lodi, WI
Accident Number: CEN16LA273
Date & Time: 07/18/2016, 1915 CDT
Registration: N393SX
Aircraft: BRANDT SONEX
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis

During a local flight, the pilot of an experimental amateur-built airplane had a partial engine power loss. He said that the engine sounded different but remained running. He turned the airplane back to the airport and noted he was high and fast. He indicated that he bled off airspeed, as he wanted to avoid buildings before landing. He subsequently reduced power and performed a landing with calm wind present. The airplane's nose and left main landing gear collapsed after touchdown, the airplane skidded to the north side of the runway, and exited the runway into a ditch where it sustained the substantial damage. The airplane was powered by an engine that the pilot/builder assembled from a kit. The airplane accumulated 25 hours of flight time at the time of the accident. The kit manufacturer engine assembly and installation manual had specific rocker shaft instructions that included procedures on how to adjust and install rocker arms. An examination revealed that the threaded shaft of a rocker arm swivel pad had separated at a point on the shaft where there was a cross drilled hole. The remaining rocker arms did not exhibit the appearance of arm adjustment in accordance with the kit manufacturer's assembly manual. Detailed examination of the failed valve adjuster showed it separated into two portions approximately mid length in the shank area between the two threaded areas. This location was coincident with a hole drilled crosswise through the shank of the valve adjuster. The fracture surfaces exhibited crack arrest patterns consistent with a fatigue fracture. The origin of the fatigue fracture appears to be coincident with the edge of the cross-drilled hole. Examination of the exemplar valve adjuster and specifically the cross-drilled hole revealed a roughly finished surface with a pronounced burr around the circumference of the hole. A professional materials engineering publication, in part, stated, "The fatigue strength of components can be reduced merely by the presence of a drilled hole; it is further reduced by failure to remove burrs (incurred during drilling) from the hole edges. Fractures originating at drilled holes are common in complex parts containing internal, intersecting machined passages because of the difficulty and expense of providing adequate break-edge radii at such locations. It could not be determined if the failure of the rocker arm was due to the misassembly of the rocker arm assembly and/or the toolmarks left by the manufacturing process. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The separated rocker arm assembly for undetermined reasons, which resulted in the partial loss of engine power and led to the landing gear collapsing during the subsequent forced landing.

Findings

Aircraft
Recip eng cyl section - Failure (Cause)

Personnel issues
Installation - Owner/builder
Fabrication - Other/unknown

Factual Information 

On July 18, 2016, about 1915 central daylight time, a Brandt Sonex experimental amateur-built airplane, N393SX, impacted a ditch when it exited runway 9 (1,875 feet by 105 feet, turf) at the Lodi Lakeland Airport (9WN5), near Lodi, Wisconsin, during a forced landing following a partial loss of engine power. The sport pilot was uninjured. The airplane fuselage was substantially damaged during the impact with the ditch. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated without a flight plan. The local flight originated from 9WN5 at time unknown.

The pilot reported a partial loss of engine power, which occurred northwest of 9WN5. He said that the engine sounded different but remained running. He turned the airplane back to the airport and noted he was high and fast. He indicated that he bled off airspeed, as he wanted to avoid buildings before landing. He subsequently reduced power and performed a landing. The airplane's nose and left main landing gear collapsed after touchdown, the airplane skidded to the north side of the runway, and exited the runway into a ditch where it sustained the substantial damage.

The pilot, age 71, held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) sport pilot certificate and he reported that he accumulated 180 hours of total flight time.

N393SX was a low-wing, fixed tricycle gear, 2-seat, experimental amateur-built airplane with serial number 393. It was powered by a 70-horsepower AeroVee engine driving a fixed pitch Sensenich propeller. The pilot reported that the airplane had a condition inspection completed on December 4, 2015, and that the airplane accumulated 25 hours of flight time at the time of the accident.

The airplane and engine were sold as kits that the owner assembled. The kit manufacturer engine assembly and installation manual had specific rocker shaft instructions that included procedures on how to adjust and install rocker arms.

At 1953, the recorded weather at the Dane County Regional Airport-Truax Field, near Madison, Wisconsin, was: Wind calm; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition few clouds at 5,500 feet; temperature 27 degrees C; dew point 17 degrees C; altimeter 30.15 inches of mercury.

An FAA inspector examined the wreckage and observed that the threaded shaft of a rocker arm swivel pad on the rocker arm assembly had separated at a point on the shaft where there was a cross drilled hole. The accident engine's remaining rocker arm assemblies did not exhibit the appearance of arm assembly adjustment in accordance with the adjustment directions in the kit manufacturer's assembly manual. The separated rocker arm swivel pad and an exemplar pad from the accident engine were shipped to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Materials Laboratory for detailed examination.

An NTSB Materials Laboratory Engineer examined the items and produced Materials Laboratory Factual Report No. 16-101, which is appended to the docket material associated with this investigation. The report, in part, indicated the failed valve adjuster separated into two portions approximately mid length in the shank area between the two threaded areas. This location was coincident with a hole drilled crosswise through the shank of the valve adjuster. The fracture surfaces exhibited crack arrest patterns consistent with a fatigue fracture. The origin of the fatigue fracture appears to be coincident with the edge of the cross-drilled hole. The ball bearing on the end of the valve adjuster had seized in place and could not be rotated. A measurement of the hardness on a section of the fractured valve adjuster revealed a hardness of 20.2 on the Rockwell C scale.

Examination of the exemplar valve adjuster and specifically the cross-drilled hole revealed a roughly finished surface with a pronounced burr around the circumference of the hole.

ASM International Handbook, Volume 11, Failure Analysis and Prevention, in part, stated:

The fatigue strength of components can be reduced merely by the
presence of a drilled hole; it is further reduced by failure to remove burrs
(incurred during drilling) from the hole edges. Fractures originating at
drilled holes are common in complex parts containing internal, intersecting
machined passages because of the difficulty and expense of providing
adequate break-edge radii at such locations.

History of Flight

Prior to flight
Aircraft maintenance event

Enroute
Powerplant sys/comp malf/fail
Loss of engine power (partial) (Defining event)

Emergency descent
Off-field or emergency landing

Landing
Collision during takeoff/land 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Sport Pilot
Age: 71, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Unknown
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/30/2015
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 180 hours (Total, all aircraft), 180 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BRANDT
Registration: N393SX
Model/Series: SONEX
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 393
Landing Gear Type: Unknown
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/04/2015, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1100 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 25 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Aerovee
ELT: C91  installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: 
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 70 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMSN, 866 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 14 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1953 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 146°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 5500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 30.15 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 17°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Lodi, WI (9WN5)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Lodi, WI (9WN5)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  CDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: LODI LAKELAND (9WN5)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 844 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 09
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 1875 ft / 105 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  43.333333, -89.520833 (est)

Costruzioni Aeronautiche Tecnam P2008, N615BS: Accident occurred July 19, 2016 at Warrenton-Fauquier Airport (KHWY), Warrenton, Fauquier County, Virginia

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

The  National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Herndon, Virginia 

http://registry.faa.gov/N615BS

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA263
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 19, 2016 in Warrenton, VA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/25/2017
Aircraft: TECNAM P2008, registration: N615BS
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The sport pilot reported that he was on the ramp ready for departure and that he was aware of helicopter traffic in the airport traffic pattern. He turned right onto the runway and saw a helicopter hovering over the runway ahead of him. He initiated the takeoff roll but then chose to reject the takeoff to avoid a possible collision. He stated that he pushed too hard on the left toe brake and that the airplane then departed the left side of the runway. The airplane then nosed down in the grass, which resulted in structural damage to the right wing. 

The pilot did not report any mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. The pilot reported that he had recently transitioned to the airplane with toe brakes from his previous airplane, which was equipped with a hand brake. He had only logged about 7 hours of flight time in the accident airplane make and model. It is likely that the pilot’s lack of experience using a toe brake led to his failure to use it properly.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s decision to begin the takeoff roll with helicopter traffic on the runway, which led to a rejected takeoff. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s improper use of the toe brakes, which he had limited experience using and resulted in a runway excursion.

On July 19, 2016, at 1233 eastern daylight time, a Costruzioni Aeronautiche Tecnam P2008, N615BS, was substantially damaged following a rejected takeoff and runway excursion at Warrenton-Fauquier Airport (HWY), Warrenton, Virginia. The private pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that he was on the ramp and ready for departure when he heard via the airplane's radio a helicopter calling "downwind, base, final, and departure." He made a right turn onto the runway and observed a helicopter hovering over the runway, ahead of his position. After initiating the takeoff roll, he elected to reject the takeoff to avoid a possible collision. He had recently transitioned to a new airplane with toe brakes, and his previous airplane was equipped with a hand brake. He pushed hard on the brakes, "very likely too much on the left side" and the airplane departed the left side of the runway. The airplane departed the runway surface and nosed down in the grass. The pilot did not report any mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot, age 87, held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single engine land and glider. He also held a FAA experimental aircraft builder certificate. The pilot held a FAA third class medical certificate and reported 1,295 total hours of flying experience on his most recent medical certificate application that was dated October 28, 2013. He reported 7 hours of flying time in the accident airplane make and model.

Piper PA22, N3609A: Incident occurred July 19, 2016 in Bismarck, Burleigh County, North Dakota

http://registry.faa.gov/N3609A

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Fargo FSDO-21

Date: 19-JUL-16
Time: 23:09:00Z
Regis#: N3609A
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA22
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: BISMARCK
State: North Dakota

AIRCRAFT LANDED WITH GEAR PARTIALLY EXTENDED, BISMARK, NORTH DAKOTA.

Meyers 200B, N229RS: Accident occurred July 19, 2016 near Huron Regional Airport (KHON), Beadle County, South Dakota

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA275
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 19, 2016 in Huron, SD
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/06/2017
Aircraft: MEYERS 200, registration: N229RS
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot and passenger were on a cross-country personal flight when the pilot noticed oil on the airplane's windscreen. The pilot subsequently landed and had maintenance personnel inspect the airplane. Maintenance personnel noted that the crankshaft seal was leaking and identified several other discrepancies. The pilot chose to have the repairs completed. During the repairs, maintenance personnel noticed that the bolt holding the throttle cable bracket was loose, worn, and not safety wired. The maintenance facility did not have an exact replacement bolt, so the mechanic found a similar bolt, drilled a hole in the bolt head for the safety wire, and installed the bolt. The mechanic installed the safety wire through the throttle bolt and then down to the mixture control bolt. The pilot periodically inspected or observed the work as maintenance personnel finished the repairs on the airplane. The pilot also took a photo of the throttle linkage area, which showed that the safety wire was installed.

After the repairs were completed, the pilot conducted a local test flight. No problems were noted, and the pilot and passenger continued their flight. After an en route fuel stop, the airplane departed and reached 2,300 ft, at which point the engine lost power Although the engine remained at idle, it would not respond to the pilot's throttle inputs. The pilot subsequently conducted a forced landing to a field. Following the forced landing, the pilot re-entered the airplane to ensure that the electrical power and fuel and were off and that there was no fire. He then removed the engine cowling and found the throttle linkage "disconnected or broken."

A postcrash examination of the airplane, revealed that the bolt holding the throttle cable bracket was missing, which had allowed the throttle cable to "float," meaning that manipulating the throttle control from the cabin would not govern the engine's throttle position. The examination also revealed that the mixture control bolt was in place. However, the throttle cable bolt and associated safety wire were not found.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The partial loss of engine power due an unsecured throttle cable. Contributing to the unsecured throttle cable was the missing bolt and associated safety wire; the reason for the missing bolt and safety wire could not be determined.


  The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rapid City, South Dakota 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N229RS

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA275
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 19, 2016 in Huron, SD
Aircraft: MEYERS 200, registration: N229RS
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 19, 2016, about 1900 central daylight time, a Meyers 200B airplane, N229RS, conducted a forced landing to a field near Huron, South Dakota. The airline transport rated pilot was not injured and passenger received minor injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged during the landing. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a cross country flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time.

The pilot reported the cross-county flight originated from the Wendover Airport (KENV), Wendover, Utah, on July 17, 2016. During the flight, he noted oil on the windscreen, so he stopped in Casper, Wyoming, for maintenance personnel to look at the airplane. The pilot reported that maintenance personnel identified several discrepancies; the crankshaft seal was leaking, the propeller bolts did not have enough threads showing through the crankshaft flange, the throttle linkage connecting the landing gear warning horn was loose, and the fuel distributor drain fitting did not have an overboard line.

In addition, maintenance personnel also noted that a bolt holding the throttle cable bracket was loose. The bolt was worn and not safetied to the mixture control bolt. Since the maintenance facility did not have an exact replacement bolt, the mechanic selected a bolt, absent holes in the bolt head intended for safety wire. He then drilled a hole in the bolt head for the safety wire, and installed the bolt. The mechanic added that he installed the safety wire through the throttle bolt head, then down to the mixture control bolt. 

During the maintenance work, the airplane pilot/owner periodically inspected or observed maintenance personnel as noted by maintenance personnel and security camera footage provided by the maintenance facility. After the accident, the pilot provided the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector a photo of the throttle linkage area, and the photo confirmed that the safety wire was in place during that maintenance.

On July 19, 2016, after maintenance personnel completed work on the airplane, the pilot started the engine and completed an engine run-up. The pilot then took the airplane on a test flight around the traffic pattern, and after landing, the airplane was checked for leaks.

The pilot and passenger then continued their flight, stopping for fuel about 1830 at the Huron Regional Airport, (KHON), Huron, South Dakota. After departing and reaching an altitude of 2,300 ft, the pilot reduced the throttle, and the engine lost power. The engine then continued to run at idle power. The pilot manipulated the throttle; however, the engine only responded with momentary increases in rpms. Subsequently, the pilot conducted a forced landing in a field, and the airplane came to rest upright. Substantial damage was noted to the airplane's fuselage. 

Following the forced landing, the pilot added that after a period of time, he re-entered the airplane to ensure the electrical power and fuel and were off and there was no fire. In addition, he removed the engine cowling and found the throttle linkage was "disconnected or broken."

A post-crash examination of the airplane by an FAA inspector, conducted after the pilot had removed the cowling, noted that the bolt holding the throttle cable was missing. This was the bolt that the maintenance personnel installed with the safety wire earlier that day. The absence of the bolt allowed the throttle cable to "float", meaning, manipulating the throttle control from the cabin, would not govern the engine's throttle position. The throttle bolt was not located. The mixture control bolt was in place; however, the safety wire which ran from the mixture control bolt to the throttle bracket bolt was also missing and not recovered.

The airplane was recovered to the salvage yard located at Beegles Aircraft Service, Greeley, Colorado. During an inspection there, Beegles personnel reported that after removing the top cowling, they found a loose bolt in an area of the bottom cowling. The bolt; however, had manufactured holes in the head, not new in appearance, and was not the missing bolt.


A review of FAA records revealed that the airplane's original Continental IO-470 engine was replaced with a Continental IO-550 engine under a field approval. The last annual inspection was completed on May 2, 2016, and the airplane had accumulated 10.44 hours, since the annual inspection.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA275
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 19, 2016 in Huron, SD
Aircraft: MEYERS 200, registration: N229RS
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 19, 2015, about 1900 central daylight time, a Meyers 200B airplane, N229RS, conducted a forced landing near Huron, South Dakota. The airline transport rated pilot and passenger received minor injuries and the airplane was substantially damaged during the accident. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time.

The pilot reported to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector that the flight originated from Nevada. During the flight, he noted a little oil on the windscreen, so he stopped in Casper, Wyoming, for maintenance personnel to look at the airplane. After an en route stop at the Huron Regional Airport, (KHON), Huron, South Dakota, he continued his flight. However, shortly after departure, the airplane's engine lost power, he added that the engine did not stop, but went to idle power.

The pilot conducted a force landing in a field; the airplane came to rest upright, with the landing gear retracted. Substantial damage was noted to the airplane's fuselage.

The airplane was retained for further examination.





HURON—A Hawaii woman suffered minor injuries Tuesday in the emergency landing of a small plane near Huron.

Bruce Mayes, of Hawaii, was forced to conduct an emergency landing after experiencing engine troubles shortly after takeoff, according to Beadle County Sheriff Doug Solem.

Solem said Mayes was unharmed, but his wife, whose name authorities declined to release, sustained a cut to the head in the landing.

Solem said Mayes and his wife had touched down in Huron to refuel during a trip from Hawaii to Oshkosh, Wisconsin, when Mayes experienced engine trouble.

According to Beadle County Sheriff's Deputy Chad Olerud, Mayes was able to land safely despite skidding an estimated 200 yards in the pasture east of 27th Street Northeast and Sherman Avenue.

Olerud said the female passenger was then transported to a Huron hospital. He also said the Federal Aviation Administration will be investigating the crash.

The Beadle County Sheriff's Office was assisted by Huron police, fire and ambulance, as well as Beadle County Emergency Management.

Source:  http://www.mitchellrepublic.com




Two people received minor injuries Tuesday night as the small plane they were flying was forced to land in a pasture north east of Huron.  First Assistant Fire Chief Howard Alter says crews were dispatched around seven P-M.

Alter says the two on board had just taken off from Huron Regional Airport.

The plane crashed about three-quarters to a mile of the intersection of 27th Street Northeast and Sherman Avenue and was hidden by the terrain.

The crash site is approximately two miles northeast of the Huron Regional Airport.  Responding to the scene were units from the Huron Police Department, Beadle County Sheriff, Huron Ambulance and South Dakota Highway Patrol.