Saturday, March 9, 2013

Robinson R66, Heli-Sika (Taupo), ZK-IHU: Accident occurred on March 09, 2013 in Oamaru Valley, near Taupo - New Zealand

 
Mark Didsbury


 
Pilot Mark Didsbury moved from the Wairarapa to Taupo recently to fly for Helisika. 
Photo / Sean Andrews



A pilot killed when his helicopter crashed in rugged bush was a hard worker who was loving his first flying job, his brother says. 

Mark Didsbury, 39, of Wairarapa, was flying a Robinson helicopter when it crashed on a ridge above the Oamaru Valley, east of Turangi, after dropping off a hunting party.

The helicopter was reported missing early Saturday afternoon and was found about 7pm.

Rescuers winched down to the crash site were not able to find the body on Saturday before the search was called off.

A police search and rescue team flown back to the scene yesterday found the body 50m from the wreckage.

Mr Didsbury's older brother, Guy, who runs Pirinoa Station in South Wairarapa, said: "He was a very hard worker, a very generous man and he's left a massive hole. This accident has certainly affected a lot of people."

He said Mark had worked as a shearer, rural worker and musterer here and in Australia before taking up training as a helicopter pilot.

He was absolutely loving his first job with Taupo-based Helisika, where he began flying last year.

A twin, Mark was one of four brothers , and had a long-term girlfriend, Louise Nix.

Veteran Taupo-based rescue pilot John Funnell said Mr Didsbury was well regarded.

"He learned to fly in Whakatane and had been flying hunters out of Taupo for about six to nine months. He had about 500 hours flying time."

Mr Funnell flew a fixed-wing aircraft over the scene when the crashed helicopter was found early on Saturday evening.

The area was very steep and rugged, about 1000m above sea level, and the wreck was in heavy native bush at the top of a ridge about 10km from Oamaru Hut.

Mr Funnell said he could not speculate on what caused the crash.

Mr Didsbury was flying a nearly new Robinson R66 which the company had acquired in December.

The helicopter was based at Poronui Station, a luxury fishing lodge east of Turangi, and Mr Didsbury lived in a house on the station.

Two helicopters based at the station fly anglers into the nearby Ngaruroro and Rangitikei river valleys.

"The pilots have an intimate knowledge of the mountain canyons, gullies and streams," the Poronui website says.

Transport Accident Investigation Commission chief investigator Tim Burfoot said two investigators had flown to the scene to establish the cause of the crash. 

Story:   http://www.stuff.co.nz

FX 210, N524VT: Accident occurred March 09, 2013 near Punta Gorda Airport (KPGD), Florida

NTSB Identification: ERA13LA159
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 09, 2013 in Punta Gorda, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/13/2014
Aircraft: 781569 INC FX 210, registration: N524VT
Injuries: 3 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that he performed a preflight inspection of the experimental amateur-built airplane and noted that about 25 gallons of fuel remained in both of the airplane’s fuel tanks. He subsequently departed for a local sightseeing flight, and, upon returning to the airport traffic pattern, the engine lost all power while the airplane was turning from the base to the final leg of the approach to the runway. The pilot was unable to glide the airplane to the runway, so he landed the airplane in a grass area short of the runway. The airplane’s nose landing gear collapsed, and the airplane nosed over, which resulted in substantial damage to the fuselage. The reason for the loss of engine power could not be determined from the available evidence.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A total loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined from the available evidence.

On March 9, 2013, about 1150 eastern standard time, an experimental amateur-built FX 210, N524VT, was substantially damaged during a forced landing while on approach to Punta Gorda Airport (PGD), Punta Gorda, Florida. The airline transport pilot/owner/builder and two passengers incurred minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for a local flight. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot performed an uneventful preflight inspection of the airplane and noted a total fuel quantity of 25 gallons (of a possible 98 gallons) remained in both of the airplane's fuel tanks. He subsequently departed on a brief local sightseeing flight and upon returning to the airport, entered the traffic pattern for landing on runway 4. While turning from the base to the final leg of the traffic pattern, the engine suddenly lost all power. The pilot ensured that all of the fuel valves remained open and that the electric fuel boost pump was still activated. He then attempted to restart the engine, but was unsuccessful.

Due to the airplane's low altitude at the time of the engine power loss, the pilot was unable to glide the airplane to the runway, and performed a landing in the grass area short of the runway threshold. During the landing roll, the nose landing gear collapsed and the airplane nosed over, resulting in substantial damage to the fuselage.

A cursory examination of the airplane was conducted by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, and found that the composite fuselage had been substantially damaged during the accident sequence. A detailed examination of the wreckage was conducted after the airplane was recovered from the accident site by an aircraft composite repair facility, which had experience with the accident airplane make/model. During the examination, it was found that the airplane's fuel tanks had been preassembled by the kit manufacturer and provided to the builder without swing gate baffles installed, which would have prevented fuel from sloshing within the tank. Additionally, the airplane was not equipped with a header fuel tank, as specified by its original design. The airplane's engine was not further examined.

The experimental amateur-built airplane was certificated in April 2008, and was certified by the pilot to have completed phase I flight testing on January 4, 2012, after 25 total flight hours. The airplane was equipped with a Lycoming TIO-540-AE2A engine. The airplane's most recent condition inspection was completed on March 8, 2013, and at the time of the inspection the airplane had accumulated 26.7 total flight hours. 

The pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with numerous ratings including airplane single engine land. He reported about 15,000 total hours of flight experience, 27 hours of which were in the accident airplane make and model.




PUNTA GORDA, Fla.—A pilot made an emergency landing upside-down in Florida. The pilot tried to land at the Punta Gorda Airport but came up short of the runway. The plane nose-dived and the propeller hit the ground, which caused the plane to flip over. It looked bad but no one was seriously hurt. Two people had minor injuries and were taken to a hospital. A third person refused medical treatment. The FAA is investigating the crash.  

PUNTA GORDA, FL -   The FAA is investigating a plane crash that happened at the Punta Gorda Airport.

According to the Charlotte County Sheriff's Office, a single-engine experimental plane started having engine problems, ran out of gas and had to make an emergency landing.

The plane landed in a grassy area, nearly missing a fence in its path.

The nose and propeller hit the ground causing the plane to flip over.

The pilot, 72-year-old Charles D. Williams and two passengers, Gregg Anderson, 47 and Scott Williams, 40, all sustained injuries and were taken to Charlotte Regional Hospital.

Their conditions are unknown at this time.  The Federal Aviation Administration is now investigating.

Accident occurred March 09, 2013 at Montgomery Field Airport (KMYF), San Diego, California

(Photo courtesy: G. Creighton / 10News)

(Photo courtesy: G. Creighton / 10News)


SAN DIEGO - A small plane made a hard landing at Montgomery Field on Saturday, but no one was injured, authorities reported. 

 The incident occurred on the runway at about 2:30 p.m. According to the San Diego Fire-Rescue Department, the plane's landing gear may have failed.

No fuel was spilled in the hard landing.

All of the plane's occupants were able to get out of the plane safety and no injuries were reported.

More details will be posted as they become available.


Story and Photos:    http://www.10news.com

Indigo Airbus A320-200, VT-IEW, Performing Flight 6E-433

MUMBAI: Preliminary investigations into Saturday's landing goof-up involving an Indigo flight from Chandigarh have revealed that the aircraft lost control twice before the pilot brought it under control.

The commander and the co-pilot of flight 6E 433 were de-rostered on Sunday pending a probe by the Directorate general of Civil Aviation (DGCA) into the incident.

The flight, with 140 passengers on board, deviated from the center-line of the runway and went left towards the shoulder, breaking five lights in the process. It then went further up to the unpaved area.

The pilot reportedly tried to steer the aircraft back to the runway and brought it back till the shoulder, but it veered off again towards the unpaved patch. It was only in the second attempt that the plane was brought back on the runway.

The Airbus A-320 landed at Mumbai airport at 6.35pm and went-off the 60-feet wide runway into the unpaved patch. It came back to the runway towards the taxiway without notifying the air traffic control. The incident was discovered eight minutes later when a Mumbai International Airport Pvt Ltd staffer spotted the five damaged runway lights.

On Sunday, a preliminary draft was made and the pilots were summoned for a statement, said director general of civil aviation Arun Mishra.

An Indigo spokesperson said that a gust of wind caused the incident. However, a DGCA official said that "the pilot seems to have lost control due to a technical glitch because of which the aircraft didn't turn towards the designated taxiway".

The DGCA will be taking the wind pressure reading from the meteorological department to verify the airline's contention and submit a total assessment report on Monday.

The primary findings by DGCA officials also show that while the aircraft was to vacate the main runway by a taxiway on the right side, it went off in the opposite direction. It first went left and broke one light on the runway's edge. While attempting to get back on the runway from the unpaved patch, it broke three more lights and went back towards the patch. In the second attempt, the aircraft damaged one more light.

"Eventually, the aircraft vacated through a taxiway which is about 300 m from the one it was originally supposed to take," said a DGCA officer. The aircraft speed at that moment was around 60-80 knots, which is usual while landing.

Officials said that not informing the air traffic control and apron control about the incident was another grave error. "The lights were broken and there were shards of glass on the runway. In such a situation, it isn't safe for other aircraft landing later. The runway has to be clear of metal and glass," said an airport official. "Fortunately, the incident was detected in 10 minutes before more flights started coming in."

Airport officials said the airline also changed the tire of the aircraft without telling the apron control. "The tire is replaced only if it is not working and it has to be notified as per rules," said an official. 


Source:  http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com

‘Confusion over controls may have delayed rescue’ 

The pilots of the Indigo Airlines aircraft that veered to the left of the runway on Saturday were caught up in a brief moment of confusion over manning cockpit controls, found the aviation regulator’s primary probe.

Investigators found that the confusion could have delayed the rescue. The pilots told the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA), which is investigating the incident, that the co-pilot mouthed commands used when the senior pilot is incapacitated. Soon after touchdown, the co-pilot said, “I have the controls”, after which the commander said the same words. However, the co-pilot then repeated the command. “The statement reflected a moment of panic and lapse in co-ordination in the cockpit,” said a source requesting anonymity.

The aircraft failed to land on the center of the runway owing to incorrect ‘rudder’ input. A rudder is a steering tool crucial to maintain a flight’s alignment.

The error could be because the crew overreacted to a negligible wind blowing across the runway. Investigators also found a fault in the rescue effort to bring the aircraft back to the middle of the airstrip. According to the debriefing report submitted by the crew, the commander used a ‘tiller’ to control the deviation.

A tiller is used to manoeuvre aircraft taxiing at low speed on ground. As the aircraft was at a high speed, the tiller was less effective.

On Sunday, the airline grounded both the pilots pending the probe, while a team of DGCA officials interrogated them. The safety regulator is likely to submit a preliminary report on Monday.

An Indigo Airlines spokesperson refused to comment on the preliminary findings, saying that investigations were on.

The DGCA will also probe why the airline failed to report the incident. A report submitted by airport authorities showed there was a deliberate attempt to cover up the incident.

What was worse, however, was that an aircraft maintenance engineer who discreetly changed the aircraft tyres did not inform the airfield staff.

Maule M-5-210C Strata Rocket, N17PR: Accident occurred March 09, 2013 in Woodinville, Washington

NTSB Identification: WPR13FA141
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 09, 2013 in Woodinville, WA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/08/2014
Aircraft: MAULE M5, registration: N17PR
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The passenger reported that he could not remember if the pilot checked the fuel before the flight, but he remembered that, during the engine start, the engine turned over several times before it started. About 30 minutes into the flight, the engine started to sputter, and then it stopped; the pilot was unable to restart the engine, and the airplane began to lose altitude. The passenger recalled that he observed the stall warning light illuminate and that the airplane was in a turn, but he did not recall the impact.

One witness reported that he observed the airplane circle and that it appeared very low. Another witness reported hearing a "pop" sound and then a "puff" or a "sputter" and then seeing that the propeller had stopped. A third witness reported that he saw the airplane in a hard banking turn and that he could tell that the airplane "was going down." The airplane impacted a single-family residence about 16 nautical miles northeast of the departure airport.

GPS data revealed that the airplane made several course heading changes at varying altitudes and airspeeds during the flight. During the last 16 seconds of the flight track, the airplane turned left, which was likely indicative of the pilot attempting to make a forced landing to a nearby pond. The last GPS data were recorded when the airplane was at an altitude of 650 feet mean sea level and a groundspeed of 40 knots.

The airplane's previous flight occurred 102 days before the accident. During this period of inactivity, the airplane remained parked outside on an airport ramp exposed to inclement weather conditions conducive to the formation of condensation in the airplane's partially filled fuel tanks. No records were found indicating that the airplane had been refueled before the accident flight. Fuel was recovered from the airplane at the accident site. Analysis of a fuel sample revealed the presence of water. The fuel contamination likely resulted in the loss of engine power and the pilot's inability to restart the engine after the power loss. The pilot likely failed to maintain adequate airspeed following the loss of engine power. A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The pilot's failure to maintain adequate airspeed following a total loss of engine power due to fuel contamination, which resulted in a stall/spin and subsequent impact with terrain.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On March 9, 2013, about 1445 Pacific standard time, a Maule M-5-210C, N17PR, was substantially damaged after it impacted a residential house following a loss of control while maneuvering at a low altitude near Woodinville, Washington. The certified private pilot sustained fatal injuries, while the sole passenger was seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions existed for the local flight, which was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. No flight plan was filed. The local flight departed the Renton Municipal Airport (RNT), Renton, Washington at 1431.

In an interview conducted by the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge (IIC) and a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aviation safety inspector, the right seat passenger who survived the accident, reported that prior to the flight he could not remember if the pilot had checked the fuel or not. The passenger stated that during the initial starting of the engine, the engine did not start right up, but that it turned over several times before it started; he said this was different from the other times he had flown with the pilot. The passenger further stated that after taking off and flying around for what he thought was about 30 minutes, the engine started to sputter, and then it completely stopped. He added that the pilot attempted to restart the engine, but it wouldn't start and that they were losing altitude. The passenger opined that he observed the stall warning light illuminate and that the airplane was in a turn, however, he did not recall the impact or the altitude they were at when the engine quit.

Several witnesses who lived in the residential area where the accident occurred submitted statements to a local law enforcement agency. One witness reported that he observed the airplane circle and that it appeared very low. A second witness stated that she heard a pop sound, then a puff or a sputter, and then nothing. She added that she could see that the propeller had stopped and then heard a thud. A third witness reported that he observed the airplane traveling in a northeast direction and in a hard bank and knew that it was going down. Another witness revealed that he observed the airplane in the distance make a right turn and appeared to be losing altitude; he did not hear or see the airplane impact the terrain.

According to data downloaded from the pilot's handheld GPS device that was recovered from the accident site, the airplane departed RNT at 1431, exited the traffic pattern on a left downwind, and proceeded to the northwest for about 12 nautical miles (nm). It then turned toward the southeast for about 7 nm, made a left turn to the north for about 4.5 nm, then another left turn to the northwest for about 3 nm. This was followed by a right turn to a heading of north, which it flew for about 4 nm. The airplane's cruising altitude during this portion of the flight, which was about 18 minutes in duration, was between 1,500 to 1,700 feet mean sea level (msl), with an average groundspeed of about 107 knots (kts). The recorded data indicates that about 1449, the airplane made a left turn from heading of north to the southwest, which was in the direction of the departure airport (RNT). At 1449:43, the airplane's heading, altitude, and groundspeed were 245 degrees, 1,400 feet msl, and 92 kts, respectively.


The airplane proceeded on the southwesterly course for about 3.3 nm at an altitude of about 1,500 feet msl, and an average groundspeed of about 95 kts. At 1451:36, while still heading southwest, the airplane's groundspeed had decreased 5 kts to 91 kts, and at 1451:41, 5 seconds later, its groundspeed decreased further to 69 kts; the airplane then began a slow descending turn to the right. The airplane completed the right turn to a northeast heading of 030 degrees, now at an altitude of 1,421 feet msl, and a groundspeed of 62 kts. The airplane then proceeded northeast for about 0.5 nm, having descended to an altitude of about 1,000 feet msl, or about 573 feet above ground level (agl) at 1452:31; its groundspeed was now recorded as 56 knots. At this time the airplane was about 200 feet west laterally of a clearing, which was mostly occupied by a fish pond. The clearing was about 2,150 feet in length (east to west) and about 700 feet in width (north to south). Additionally, at this time that the airplane started a left turn from a heading of 070 degrees, which resulted in the following: at 1452:35, the airplane was 591 feet agl on a heading of 029 degrees, and a groundspeed 57 kts; at 1452:38, altitude 584 feet agl, heading 345 degrees, groundspeed 57 kts; at 1452:41, altitude 579 feet agl, heading 300 degrees, groundspeed 52 kts; at 1452:44, altitude 573 agl, heading 259 degrees, groundspeed 43 kts, and at 1452:47, which was when the final data was recorded, the airplane's altitude was 569 feet agl, its heading was 202 degrees, and its recorded groundspeed was 40 kts.

The main wreckage was located with its engine and cockpit partially inside the garage of a residential home. The airplane initially impacted a van that was parked on the west side of the home's driveway with its left wing. The wing subsequently separated from the fuselage and came to rest about 20 feet west of the main wreckage. The aft fuselage came to rest oriented upwards at about a 30-degree angle oriented in a northwesterly direction, the same direction from which the airplane had approached the residence prior to impact. The aft fuselage was only slightly damaged. The forward cabin and cockpit areas sustained extensive impact damage. The right wing remained attached to the airplane and was found positioned upward at about 45-degree angle and oriented toward the northeast. All airplane components necessary for flight were identified and accounted for at the accident site.

The airplane was recovered to a secured salvage facility for further examination.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 45, held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. He was issued a third-class Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airman medical certificate on September 25, 2012, without limitations.

A review of the pilot's personal pilot logbooks revealed that as of November 27, 2012, which was the date of the last entry, the pilot had accumulated a total of 946.3 hours, of which 897.3 hours were as pilot-in-command, 110.7 hours were in the same make and model as the accident airplane, and 668 hours of tail wheel time. The pilot successfully completed his most recent flight review on September 7, 2012.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The single-engine, high-wing, airplane was manufactured in 1975, and was equipped with a Teledyne Continental Motors (TCM) IO-360-D fuel injected engine. It was also equipped with a McCauley constant speed propeller.

A review of the airplane's maintenance records revealed that the most recent annual inspection was performed on July 26, 2011, at an engine total time of 1,802.2 hours, a time since major overhaul of 153.0 hours, and a tachometer time of 3,107.6 hours. At the time of the accident the tachometer read 3,143.7.

The investigation revealed no record of the pilot having flown the accident airplane from the date of his last pilot logbook entry, November 27, 2012, until the day of the accident, March 9, 2013; this accounts for 102 days inactivity. On November 27th, according to the pilot's logbook, he made a local flight of 1.3 hours. A search of fueling records during the investigation revealed that the pilot did not refuel subsequent to the previously referred to flight. It was additionally reported by a family member that the airplane was not stored in a hangar, and remained tied down outside on the ramp at RNT where it was based.

METEROROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1453, the RNT weather reporting facility, which was located about 16 nautical miles (nm) south-southwest of the accident site, reported wind 170 degrees at 5 knots, visibility 10 miles, sky clear, temperature 13 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 0 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.44 inches of mercury.

At 1453, the weather reporting facility located at Paine Field (PAE), Everett, Washington, which was located about 14 nm northwest of the accident site, reported wind 290 degrees at 5 knots, visibility 10 miles, temperature 9 degrees C, dew point 2 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.43 inches of mercury.

It was revealed during the investigation that the total monthly rainfall for the months of November 2012 through March of 2013 were as follows:

November 2012 - 8.28 inches
December 2012 - 6.85 inches
January 2013 - 4.16 inches
February 2013 - 1.58 inches
March 2013 - 2.74 inches

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane came to rest partially inside a garage in a residential area, which was located about 16 nm north-northwest of RNT, the departure airport. The airplane's initial impact was with a personal van that was parked on the adjacent driveway; the airplane had impacted the van with its left wing, which was separated during the impact sequence. The airplane's measured magnetic impact and at rest heading was 110 degrees. The airplane came to rest inverted and partially laying on its right forward cabin area, with the aft fuselage and empennage being supported by the airplane's left elevator and left horizontal stabilizer.

The left wing, which separated from the airplane after impacting a vehicle parked in the residence's driveway, was observed lying inverted about 20 feet west of the main wreckage. The outboard one-third of the wing was observed to have impacted the vehicle, and the leading edge of the wing section was crushed aft. The associated flap remained attached at both attach points, while the inboard 18 inches of the flap was observed bent inward and downward. The flap was also observed deformed at the mid-span area. The left aileron remained attached to the trailing edge of its associated wing at both attach points. The fuel tank was destroyed. The outboard fuel cap was observed in place and secure, while the main fuel cap was not observed.

The right wing, which remained attached to the fuselage at all root attach points, was observed wrinkled on both the top and bottom surfaces. The associated flap and aileron both remained attached to the wing at all attach points, and exhibited minimal damage. The right wing tip was bent and twisted due to impact forces. Neither the inboard fuel tank nor the outboard auxiliary fuel tank were breached. Both fuel caps were secure and in place. About 5 gallons of fuel was captured from the fuel tanks for analysis.

The airplane's empennage sustained only slight damage. The left elevator remained attached to the left horizontal stabilizer at all attach points, and the stabilizer remained attached to the fuselage at all attach points. Additionally, the right elevator remained attached to the right horizontal stabilizer at all attach points, and the stabilizer remained attached to the fuselage at all attach points, with no damage observed to any of the components. The airplane's rudder remained attached to the vertical stabilizer and was not damaged. There was also no damage noted to the vertical stabilizer. The rudder trim tab was observed deflected full right, not damaged, and attached to the rudder at all attach points. The tail wheel assembly was observed intact and not damaged.

The airplane's engine came to rest just inside the garage of the subject residence, upright and laying slightly on its left side. The engine was subsequently recovered and examined at a secured storage facility

An onsite examination of all control cables revealed that each remained attached to their respective control surfaces. Control continuity from the control surfaces to the cockpit controls was confirmed.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot by the King County Medical Examiner's Office, Seattle, Washington. The cause of death was attributed to blunt force injury to head, torso, and extremities.

Forensic toxicology was performed on specimens obtained from the pilot by the FAA Forensic Toxicology Research Team CAMI, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The toxicology report states that tests for cyanide were not performed. No ethanol was detected in urine, no carbon monoxide detected in blood, and no drugs detected in urine.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Engine Examination

The engine was recovered from the accident site, and examined by the NTSB IIC and a representative from Continental Motors, Inc. The examination revealed the following:

The accessory end of the engine was displaced aft into the aircraft firewall. All accessories remained attached to the accessory section though they sustained varying degrees of impact-related damage. The oil sump sustained impact-related scraping damage. The oil cooler remained intact and attached to the aft end of the engine. The oil filler cap was found free from the filler neck but remained attached to the connecting chain. The filler neck was displaced forward due to deformation damage to the cooling baffling. Removal of the oil quantity dipstick revealed about 4 quarts of oil remained in the oil sump. There was no evidence of a pre-impact oil leak on the engine or the airframe.

All of the cylinders remained attached and secured to the engine crankcase. The #6 cylinder
sustained impact damage to the cylinder head exposing the intake and exhaust valve springs. The exhaust riser for the #6 cylinder was also separated from the cylinder. The left side exhaust system displayed impact-related deformation.

There was no external evidence of a catastrophic damage. Rotation of the propeller resulted in
thumb compression in all six cylinders; confirming crankshaft continuity. Rotation of the propeller also resulted in camshaft continuity as all of the rocker arms and valves operated normally, with the exception of the #6 cylinder's exhaust and intake valves. A borescope examination of each of the cylinders revealed no evidence of operational anomalies.

The fuel system, from the gascolator filter to the fuel manifold, was examined. The gascolator drain was fractured from the base of the gascolator bowl. The bowl was removed and a fine, sand-like debris was adhering to one side of the cylindrical wall. The laminated disk filter element was intact and did not show any visual signs of blockage. When electric power was supplied to the electric boost pump, the pump could be heard operating and a residual spray of fuel could be observed exiting the pump outlet. The fuel line between the electric boost pump and the engine-driven fuel pump was empty. The engine-driven fuel pump remained attached and secured to the front right side of the crankcase. The mixture cable was separated from the mixture control lever on the fuel pump and the mixture lever was in the idle-cutoff position. Blue discoloration was noted at the base of the low pressure relief valve adjustment screw. Fuel was present in the line between the fuel pump and the fuel metering unit on the throttle body; the fuel was drained into a glass jar. Fuel was also present in the line between the metering unit and the manifold valve. Fuel was also found in the manifold valve. A water detection paste was placed in the fuel found in the manifold valve, with no change in paste coloration noted. The manifold valve plunger and plunger seal contained a small amount of beige sludge. The screen was not covered with the sludge.

The fuel recovered from the engine fuel supply lines was tinted blue, but also displayed a fine, charcoal grey sedimentation that did not settle out of the fuel sample. There was also a small drop of beige water found in the fuel sample.

The engine-driven fuel pump was removed from its mounting pad and its drive coupling was found intact. Manual rotation of the coupling while installed in the fuel pump resulted in rotation of the pump with no binding noted. The bronze mixture control lever remained secured to its control shaft.

The throttle body remained intact and attached to the topside of the engine crankcase. The manifold pressure reference line to the cockpit instrumentation remained intact. The metering unit remained attached to the throttle body and the throttle control lever remained connected to the control cable and to the throttle shaft. The throttle valve was found in the full open position. Manual manipulation of the throttle control cable resulted in a corresponding movement of the throttle valve.

Fuel Testing

About 5 gallons of aviation fuel was recovered from the right wing's fuel tanks for analysis. The fuel testing was performed by an independent, third-party laboratory. A copy of the fuel test report for a fuel sample from the accident airplane was submitted to the NTSB Materials Laboratory for review by an NTSB chemist. The chemist's analysis revealed the following:

All tests were found to be within specification with three exceptions: 1) Potential Gum (ASTM D873) which was found to be higher than the specification; 2) Reid Vapor Pressure (ASTM
D5191) which was found to be lower than the specification and 3) Distillation (D86) temperature at 10% evaporated volume was found to be higher than the specification. These out-of-range results are consistent with aged fuel or fuel that had been exposed to air for a period of time (i.e. sitting in an aircraft fuel tank). The low Reid vapor pressure could also have been a result of the sample container.

In addition, the fuel was tested for interstitial (absorbed) water using ASTM D6304
(Water by Karl Fischer). This test does not have a pass/fail range. The result for the
accident sample found 113 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) of water present within the fuel sample. The presence of water within fuel can become an issue when the
absorbed water separates from the fuel. Changes in temperature can cause absorbed
water to separate out and can lead to icing within the fuel system under the certain
environmental conditions. (Refer to Materials Laboratory Factual Report No. 13-077 for the fuel testing review and attached reports, which is appended to the docket for this accident.)

Garmin GPSMAP 496 Device

The device was taken into custody by the NTSB IIC at the accident and subsequently sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Division, Washington, D.C., for examination by a Vehicle Recorder Specialist. The Specialist reported the following:

The Garmin GPSMAP 496 is a battery-powered portable 12-channel GPS receiver. A flight record is triggered when groundspeed exceeds 30 knots and altitude exceeds 250 feet, and ends when groundspeed drops below 30 knots for 10 minutes or more.

The Specialist reported that upon arrival, an exterior examination revealed that the unit had sustained impact damage which compromised the LCD screen. Data was extracted using the manufacturer's software normally and without difficulty.

The Specialist's report indicated that the recorded data ended at 1452:47 PST, at 650 feet GPS altitude. Local altitude at the last recorded GPS position location was 569 feet as reported by Google Earth. Groundspeed was computed by the download software using time-tagged position location information. The average groundspeed between the last two recorded GPS track points was 40 knots. Ninety seconds prior to the last recorded position update, and just after the track crossed a road named Tolt Pipeline Train, aircraft ground speed began decaying from a steady cruise speed of approximately 97 knots.


 http://registry.faa.gov/N17PR

NTSB Identification: WPR13FA141
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 09, 2013 in Woodinville, WA
Aircraft: MAULE M5, registration: N17PR
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 9, 2013, about 1445 Pacific standard time, a Maule M-5-210C, N17PR, was substantially damaged after it impacted a residential house following a loss of control while maneuvering at a low altitude near Woodinville, Washington. The certified private pilot sustained fatal injuries, while the sole passenger was seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions existed for the local flight, which was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulation Part 91, and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight departed the Renton Municipal Airport (RNT), Renton, Washington at 1431.

Several witnesses who lived in the residential area where the accident occurred submitted statements to a local law enforcement agency. One witness reported that he observed the airplane circle and that it appeared very low. A second witness stated that she heard a pop sound, then a puff or a sputter, and then nothing. She added that she could see that the propeller had stopped and then heard a thud. A third witness reported that he observed the airplane traveling in a northeast direction and in a hard bank and knew that it was going down. Another witness revealed that he observed the airplane in the distance make a right turn and appeared to be losing altitude; he did not hear or see the airplane impact terrain.

The main wreckage was located with its engine and cockpit partially inside the garage of a residential home. The airplane initially impacted a van that was parked on the west side of the home’s driveway with its left wing. The left wing separated from the fuselage and came to rest about 20 feet west of the main wreckage. The aft fuselage came to rest oriented upward at about a 30-degree angle oriented in a northwesterly direction, the same direction from which the airplane had approached the residence prior to impact. The aft fuselage was only slightly damaged. The forward cabin and cockpit areas sustained extensive impact damage. The right wing remained attached to the airplane and was found positioned upward at about a 45-degree angle and oriented toward the northeast. All airplane components necessary for flight were identified at the accident site.

The airplane was recovered to a secured salvage facility for further examination.


 
Jay Reagan Uusitalo




 
Jay Uusitalo


 
Early Sunday morning crews removed the wreckage of the Maule M-5-210C Strata Rocket (N17PR) plane that on Saturday had crashed into a home in Woodinville, killing the pilot and seriously injuring a passenger. The NTSB investigation is ongoing.










Emergency medical personnel wheel the plane crash victim from the airlift helicopter.



(Photo from King County Sheriff's Office)


(Photo from King County Sheriff's Office)




























 Jay Reagan Uusitalo of Redmond, Wash., much-loved son, brother, husband, uncle, father, and friend passed away unexpectedly on March 9, 2013. Born in Napa on Dec. 25, 1967, Jay graduated from Napa High School and UC Berkeley, where he became a lifelong Bears fan.

Jay, an avid pilot, learned to fly at a young age from his grandfather. The bond with his family created the foundation for the man he became — caring, genuine, trustworthy–the same qualities Jay wanted to pass down to his daughters.

Jay’s zest for life was truly contagious. He made everyone with whom he came into contact feel special. Jay truly valued the simple things in life, never taking a single moment for granted, always fortunate and thankful for the many blessings he received. The most important of these were his wife, Stephanie, and their two beautiful daughters, Ava and Ashley.

His dad, John, uncle, Bruce, and grandparents, Bill and Lorraine Duncan, and Sylvia and Jack Uusitalo, preceded Jay in death. In addition to his wife and daughters, Jay is survived by his mom, Cheri Norton, her husband, Mike, his two sisters, Rebecca Uusitalo, Heather Hubbard, and her husband Jeff. Jay was also the proud uncle of Aiden, Rylie, Jake, Kohlton, Finley, and Dakota.

A memorial service and reception will be 2 p.m. Friday, March 22, 2013, at Washington Cathedral, 12300 Woodinville-Redmond Road NE, Redmond, WA 98052.

A remembrance and family fund for Jay’s daughters has been established. Information can be found on fundrazr.com. Search for “Uusitalo.”

Source:  http://napavalleyregister.com

Plane crash aftermath: 'It really came home, how fleeting life can be'

WOODINVILLE, Wash. - A local family is recovering from a frighteningly close call as federal investigators try to figure out what caused a small plane to crash into their Woodinville home Saturday.

Meanwhile, the family of the plane's pilot is grieving his death while waiting at the bedside of his nephew, who was in the plane and survived the crash but suffered serious injuries

A crane removed the wreckage from the side of the Woodinville family's house on Sunday as a federal crash investigator gathered more evidence.

It was an emotional moment for the homeowners - who just returned from out of town and are just now able to hug their 21-year-old son, who was at home when the plane slammed into the garage, missing him by only a few feet.

"Just knowing my son was so close to the accident. He was right above it - it really came home, how fleeting life can be," says homeowner Rodney Korn.

His son, Tallon Korn, was playing video games with a friend in a room above the garage when the single-engine, four-seater plane smashed through the garage door and against the side of the house.

"I feel very lucky - if it hadn't hit where it did, if it hit 10 feet up, I would have been done," says Tallon.

The pilot at the controls, 45-year-old Jay Uusitalo of Redmond, did not survive. His only passenger, a nephew visiting from Eastern Washington, was airlifted to Harborview Medical Center. He was initially listed in critical condition, but was upgraded to serious condition on Sunday.

"Finding out there was a young man involved - it really got into my heart," says Rodney Korn. "I feel very bad for the family that had this happen."

Investigators say it could take up to nine months to determine an official cause for the crash.

Witnesses say they heard the engine sputtering and saw the propeller stop spinning before the aircraft flipped over and came down, smashing into the Woodinville home.

Right now, Rodney Korn and his family want another family to know ...

"People are thinking about them and hoping for the best result out of what was a very terrible tragedy," he says.

Story and Photos:  http://www.kirotv.com

Story and Video:   http://www.king5.com

Story and Reaction/Comments:  http://www.komonews.com 

Jay Uusitalo, whom KOMO TV identified as the man who died when a small plane crashed into a Woodinville home, was an experienced and good pilot, said the man who sold him the Maule M-5.

Tom Wrolstad from Molalla, OR, sold the Maule M-5 four-seater to Uusitalo in 2007.

He called the Redmond man, "an experienced pilot. A good pilot."

"I flew with him and he was a good pilot," Wrolstad said when reached by telephone Sunday. "It's a sad thing."


Uusitalo died, and a passenger believed to be his teenaged nephew was critically injured, when his Maule M-5 four-seater crashed into a minivan parked in a driveway of a home in the Ring Hill neighborhood and plowed into the garage door, according to Woodinville Fire and Rescue authorities.

Witnesses who live a couple of miles away said they heard the small plane sputtering before it crashed, but that the impact was so quiet, that some neighbors didn't even realize that there had been a crash.

Virginia Hanson, who lives across the street, said it sounded like someone dropped a garbage can. She didn't realize a plane had crashed until she saw trucks from Woodinville Fire and Rescue parked in front of her home.

The home's occupant declined to talk to Patch on Saturday about two hours after the incident. Neighbors said the man was the son of the homeowners, who were away. The occupant was not injured and the home remained structurally sound.

Woodinville Fire & Rescue spokesman David Weed confirmed that the teenage passenger was taken to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle with critical injuries. Uusitalo, believed to the boy’s uncle, died at the scene.

Uusitalo is listed as the co-founder and president and CEO of Mobile Experience Solutions, a cellular communications testing firm located on Airport Way in Renton.

The crash is being investigated by the National Transportation Safety Board and the cause of the crash was not immediately available.

Wrolstad said he owned the Maule for a few years. He said it was a very well-maintained aircraft and it is known as a slow, safe and predictable flyer.

"(Uusitallo) had it extensively checked by a mechanic when he bought it --  as is standard," Wrolstad said. "I did the same when I bought it. It was a very safe airplane and had a low-time engine."

"It's really very sad," he continued. "It's a fluke accident."

Story and Reaction/Comments:   http://www.komonews.com

Cessna R182, N4773S: Accident occurred March 09, 2013 at Smith Field Airport (KSMD), Fort Wayne, Indiana

 
Emergency crews responded to an aircraft accident at Smith Field Airport around 4:15 p.m .Saturday.

 
Two people were on the plane when it landed without landing gear down at Smith Field Airport. No one was hurt.

 
This plane landed without landing gear down at Smith Field Airport Saturday afternoon.


 
 A pilot and passenger occupied a 1979 CESSNA R182 that crash landed at Smith Field Saturday evening. The aircraft heading towards runway 13 landed gear up and both occupants walked away with no injuries reported.



http://registry.faa.gov/N4773S 

 
No one was injured when a small plane crash landed at Smith Field on Fort Wayne's north side Saturday.

Craig Williams, director of operations for the Fort Wayne-Allen County Airport Authority, said the plane's landing gear had not been lowered when the craft touched down in the middle of the runway.

The plane skidded a distance before coming to a stop on the edge of the runway. The pilot and passenger were not injured, he said.

The plane is a Cessna 182 Skylane RG II.

The landing scraped the underside of the plane and bent the propeller.

The airfield was closed while authorities dealt with the crash.

Story and Photo:  http://www.journalgazette.net


FORT WAYNE, Ind. (WANE) - Smith Field Airport officials said no one was hurt when a plane crashed Saturday afternoon.

Fort Wayne police and firefighters were dispatched to an aircraft accident at Smith Field Airport off Lima and Cook Roads around 4:15 p.m.

NewsChannel 15 has learned that the plane was doing take off and landing exercises. During one of the landings, the plane landed without the landing gear down. The director of the airport said it's not clear yet if the pilot didn't put down the gear for some reason or if there was a mechanical issue with the plane.

There were two people on the plane. No one was hurt. It's not know if one of the people on the plane was an instructor. There is a flight school located at the airport.

The plane is registered out of Auburn. The names of the people on board haven't been released.
 
Crews are raising the plane to lower the landing gear and tow the plane off the runway.

http://www.wane.com

Identity Released on Pilot and Passenger of Brenham Drug Trafficking Bust: Brenham Municipal Airport (11R), Texas


New details have come to light since Friday after a pilot and his passenger were arrested in Brenham for trafficking drugs. Department of Public Safety Investigators found more than 65-pounds of marijuana, cocaine and a firearm inside the single engine plane. 

 Whether it's by ground, water, or even by air -- the Department of Public Safety -- is always watching.

In fact, Friday undercover agents with the DPS CID - zeroed in on this fixed-wing single engine Cessna 172. The pilot, Vernon Murphy and his passenger Freddy Aguayo, both from Texarkana, had flown to McAllen on business.

"Some months are a little more active than others,” said DPS Trooper Jimmy Morgan. “Narcotics is a 12-month, all year-long business and some months are more active than others.”

After picking up nearly 70 pounds of cargo -- authorities believe the two would then make their way back to Texarkana. The content of the cargo, however, is exactly what caught the attention of DPS.

An aircraft zeroed in on the Cessna for 350 miles -- but made its move after Murphy landed at the Brenham Airport to refuel. Those agents, along with Troopers and Washington County Sheriff's deputies moved in. Murphy and Vernon were arrested after DPS discovered that cargo was 65 pounds of marijuana, three ounces of cocaine and a .40 caliber handgun.

After a little digging, we found out this isn't Aguayo's first drug arrest. In 2000 he was convicted and sentenced to 28 years in prison for possession of cocaine with intent to deliver. Although the court assessed punishment at twenty-eight years - he was released after 14.

According to investigators, Murphy hasn't had any run-ins with the law...at least until now.

Murphy remains in the Washington County Jail on $210,000 bond. Aguayo's bond is set at $1.4 million.

The investigation continues. 


http://www.kbtx.com



What's usually a quiet airport turned into the scene of a drug bust.

"There were about ten different vehicles," said Adam Crow.

Crow was working near the Brenham Municipal Airport when he says it all went down about nine Friday morning.

The Texas Department of Public Safety says one of its planes had been following a single engine plane flying from South Texas suspected of trafficking drugs. When that plane needed to refuel, an opportunity presented itself.

DPS troopers and Washington County Sheriff's deputies moved in.

"During the stop we located 60 pounds of marijuana, three grams of cocaine and a 40-caliber pistol," said Department of Public Safety Trooper Jimmy Morgan.

Two men were arrested. Investigators are not releasing any information on the suspects. The drugs they say they found on the plane were confiscated.

"It looked like that guy was about to have a real bad day," Crow said. "It looked like they were waiting for him. They definitely had some kind of information on him. They were prepared and as soon as they got here they went into motion."

Investigators are not saying where the plane was headed. They are questioning the suspects to find out if this is part of a larger operation.

"Sometimes we get a lucky break and we get information, or through conducting an investigation we're allowed to catch some of these folks and deal with that," Trooper Morgan said. "Today has to be one of these days."

The Department of Public Safety says it's working with other Federal investigators on the case.


Story, Video, Photo, Reaction/Comments:   http://www.kbtx.com

Budget cuts cancel Gator Fly In air show: Gainesville Regional Airport (KGNV), Florida

GAINESVILLE, Fla. -- The effects of sequestration forced event organizers to cancel the third annual Gator Fly In.

The Gator Fly In was scheduled to be held April 27 at the Gainesville Regional Airport.

The show usually brings in thousands of visitors to get an up close look at military aircraft, including the F/A-18 Hornet.

A message on the air show’s Facebook page reads “we hope that things will be different next year so that we may be able to provide an excellent aviation event for our community.”

Around half of the $85 billion in forced federal spending cuts will come from the defense budget.


Source:   http://www.actionnewsjax.com

Radio-control enthusiasts touch down at Lebanon Valley Expo Center, Pennsylvania

(LEBANON DAILY NEWS JEREMY LONG) 
A radio-control enthusiast from New Jersey who identified himself only as Andy takes apart the wing struts of a Piper Cub he bought from John Savage, right, of Wilkes-Barre during the Central Penn Aeromodelers Association's 33rd annual Radio Control Flea Market at the Lebanon Valley Expo Center on Saturday. The event featured radio-controlled airplanes, sailplanes, cars, boats and related accessories. The association bills the event as the largest one-day radio-controlled flea market in the country.

Adelaide man Rick Hopper is suing Virgin Australia over fall near aircraft

A BALI escape for an Adelaide man ended with him being catapulted face-first from a wheelchair and headlong into a court battle with an airline.

Rick Hopper is suing Virgin Australia over the incident in which he was flung from a wheelchair as he boarded a flight from Perth to Adelaide after the Bali trip with his wife in 2011.

Mr Hopper, 59, who needed help because of a knee injury, was being wheeled down an airbridge to the plane when the wheelchair caught on a plate and sent him hurtling.

He says he suffered injuries to both knees and his head and exacerbated an existing hip condition, forcing him to undergo a double hip replacement.

He has launched District Court action against the airline, claiming its employees failed to help him after the accident and it had breached its duty of care.

"It was an all-male crew and they came running after the fall then said 'I didn't see anything' and then walked away and left me, didn't even help me up, and that's what hurt me," he said.

"I thought they would have done a bit more. They never even said 'are you all right?' and 'do you need to go to hospital?'."

Mr Hopper said he spent almost five months off work after surgery.

He said he hoped his legal fight would stop other people being hurt in the same way.

"If it was an older woman they probably would have broken a few bones," he said.

In its statement of defence, Virgin Australia said the man pushing the wheelchair was an employee of contractor Aero Care Pty Ltd, which has been added as a defendant in the case.

Virgin claims Mr Hopper should have told the employee to slow down, worn a seatbelt and kept a firmer grip on the wheelchair.

It says he unbalanced the wheelchair by carrying luggage on his lap.

Court documents do not show how much compensation Mr Hopper is seeking. The case returns to court in May.


Story and Photo:   http://www.adelaidenow.com.au

Sabreliner announces more layoffs



Sequestration hit close to home this week as Sabreliner Corporation, an aviation repair and maintenance facility with facilities in both Perry and Ste. Genevieve counties, announced to employees on Thursday another round of layoffs that have been plaguing the company since late last fall.

Management blames a lack of government contracts and cuts in federal defense spending as the reason for the layoffs.

The company’s workforce has been cut nearly in half, with roughly 180 members from the Teamster Local 600 being furloughed since November 2012, with additional layoffs coming from corporate of office positions. Layoffs have occurred every month since November according to David Bruckerhoff, Business Agent for the Teamster Local 600.

The most recent layoff left 80 people without work.

On March 8, notice from Sabreliner was sent to Randy Contrell, Manager of the State Dislocated Worker Unit,stating that within a two-week period on or beginning March 8, 80 employees at Sabreliner Corp. facilities located in both Perryville and Ste. Genevieve would be permanently laid off.

“We are feeling the sequestration,” Steve Sperry, Sabreliner’s Vice President of Business Development said on Friday. “It is no secret that 80 to 90 percent of the work we do comes from defense contracts, and less defense spending by the government means less work for us.”

Sperry said he hopes the latest round of layoffs will be the last for the company that has been cutting back to the “bare bones.”

“We are hopeful the next two or three weeks will see the last of the lay offs,” he said. “We are trying to size ourselves down to the amount of work we do have.”

Sperry said the company is currently exploring other options to bring in work.

“We are exploring other options, including civil and commercial work with the hopes that we will soon be able to put these fine people back to work again very soon.”

Sperry said the layoff did not come as much of a surprise to the employees.

“They have seen how things have slowed down for us,” he said.

According to the United States Department of Labor, the Worker Adjustment and Retaining Notification Act (WARN) of 1988 was enacted to protect workers, their families, and communities by requiring most employers with 100 or more employees to provide notification 60 calendar days in advance of plant closings and mass layoffs.

In the letter to Cottrell, Sabreliner said that notice time under the WARN of 1988 was reduced “based on business circumstances that were not reasonably foreseeable at the time notice would have been required,” stating that the layoffs are the direct results of the cancellation of federal defense contracts due to the sequestration where across- the- board federal budget cuts went into affect on March 1.

Perry County Economic Development Director Scott Sattler said that Sabreliner is one of Perry County’s largest employers, with an estimated 425 employees listed in recent years.

“Any time we lose jobs, it concerns me,” Sattler said on Friday. “We here at the EDA will do whatever we can to help Sabreliner during this time, with the hopes of helping them succeed.”



Story and Reaction/Comments:   http://www.kfvs12.com


For a more complete story see Tuesday’s print edition of the Republic-Monitor


http://www.sabreliner.com

Retiring Delta pilot never missed a day in 45 years

Atlanta News, Weather, Traffic, and Sports | FOX 5 


  After 45 years and more than 12 million miles in the air, a Delta captain said goodbye on Friday. 


A water cannon salute welcome Captain Calvin "Cal" Flanigan as he returned from his final flight from Los Angeles.

Flanigan began as a mechanic back in 1968, but eventually realized his childhood dream of becoming a pilot.

"Even as a little kid watching airplanes take off when I was 9 or 10 years old, I knew I wanted to fly," said Flanigan.

In 37 years, Flanigan flew more than 12.5 million miles to more than 95 different cities, amassing some 27,000 hours of flight time as he became the most senior pilot in the entire airline. The pilot, who never missed a day of work in all his decades, was looked upon as a role model by other Delta employees.

"He's been the number one guy for almost eight years now. I don't think that's something that will ever be replicated, certainly in my lifetime," said Steve Dickson of Delta Airlines.

Delta rules state that pilots must retire when they reach 65; Flanigan's 65th birthday is Saturday.

"I'm going to miss the people. I really, truly will miss the people," said Flanigan.

Flanigan said that he had other offers to retire, but wanted to fly until the very last possible moment.

"After 37 years of doing what you love and not being able to think of any profession that you would prefer versus what you were doing, you know, I know it's time," Flanigan said. "I'm 65 tomorrow so there's no denying that, but do I still love it? Yes, I do. But it's time to pass the baton, and I've recognized that, and I'm going to do it."

Flight attendants and pilots gathered to welcome Flanigan back as he arrived at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport on Friday.

"The list of accomplishments is long, but I think even more than that, everybody realizes what a great friend and colleague Cal has been throughout his career," said Dickson.

Cal and his wife plan to do more traveling together now that he's retired.

Story and Video:   http://www.myfoxatlanta.com
 

Cessna 310A, N167Z: First start after overhaul