Friday, April 15, 2016

Officials: FedEx stowaway awoke from worktime nap mid-flight



LUBBOCK, TX (KCBD) -   A stowaway taken into to custody by police at Lubbock Preston Smith International Airport has been identified as a Memphis FedEx airport ground crew employee who fell asleep on the plane before it took off for Lubbock.

It happened around 5:17 a.m. Friday. Police were called after a FedEx employee noticed the person on the plane.

Lubbock Airport Director Kelly Campbell confirms the employee was loading FedEx Flight 1459 in Memphis, became tired at some point and fell asleep on the plane before takeoff. 

Campbell says the employee awoke during the flight and knocked on the cabin door, but the pilot did not open the door for safety reasons. Instead, the pilot notified the Lubbock airport and air traffic control that there was a stowaway on the plane.

City officials say Airport police and operations staff responded to the plane when it landed, and Lubbock police, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and the Transportation Security Administration were notified as well. 

The man who fell asleep will not face any criminal charges. The employee was released to local FedEx officials.

His name has not been released at this time.

There was no impact to aircraft operations at Lubbock’s airport.

FedEx officials released a statement Friday morning:

"We are aware of an incident involving FedEx Flight 1459 from Memphis to Lubbock. There was never any danger to our employees or cargo. We are fully cooperating with investigating authorities."

Story and video:  http://www.kmov.com

Cessna 172, N736BC: Incident occurred in Lafayette, Louisiana

http://registry.faa.gov/N736BC

Date: 15-APR-16
Time: 00:12:00Z
Regis#: N736BC
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Baton Rouge FSDO-03
City: LAFAYETTE
State: Louisiana

AIRCRAFT ON TAXI, ENGINE CAUGHT FIRE AND WAS EXTINGUISHED, LAFAYETTE, LA

Brush fire in West Broward near I-75 not a plane crash



WEST BROWARD, Fla. (WSVN) -- Broward Sheriff's Office deputies responded to the scene of brush fire in West Broward after several eyewitnesses reported seeing something fall from the sky.

It was at first feared that a small plane had crashed in the area near Interstate 75 and U.S. 27, but no evidence of a crash was found.

According to BSO, several eyewitnesses contacted them at around 5:45 p.m., Friday, saying they saw something fall out of the sky. 

However, Broward Sheriff Fire Rescue reached out to area airports, and no towers had reported any missing or distressed planes.

An airboat was sent shortly after to search the area, as well as a BSO helicopter. Neither found any signs of debris or victims. 

Original article can be found here: http://www.wsvn.com

Cessna 172R Skyhawk, Vincennes University, N135VU: Incident occurred April 15, 2016 in Terre Haute, Vigo County, Indiana

VINCENNES UNIVERSITY: http://registry.faa.gov/N135VU

Date: 15-APR-16
Time: 01:24:00Z
Regis#: N135VU
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Indianapolis FSDO-11
City: TERRE HAUTE
State: Indiana

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, GEAR COLLAPSED, TERRE HAUTE, IN

Loaded Firearm Found at Columbia Metropolitan Airport (KCAE)



Columbia, SC (WLTX) -- The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) says a loaded gun was found at checkpoint at the Columbia Metropolitan Airport (CAE) on Thursday afternoon.

Officials say that at around 1:30 p.m., a .45 caliber handgun was found in a passenger's carry-on bag. TSA then alerted local law enforcement who then took possession of the bag. 

TSA would like to remind passengers that firearms can only be transported in checked luggage provided they are declared to the airline, in a proper carrying case and unloaded. Firearms are not prohibited in carry-on bags. 

“Passengers are responsible for the contents of bags they bring to the checkpoint,” says Mark Howell, TSA Regional Spokesperson. “Our advice is to look through bags thoroughly before coming to the airport to make sure there are no illegal or prohibited items.”

Officials say the passenger was given a ticket and then continued on his travels through the airport. 

For more information about the TSA prohibited items, please follow these links: http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtravel/prohibited/permitted-prohibited-items.shtm
http://www.tsa.gov/traveler-information/firearms-and-ammunition  

Story and video:  http://www.wltx.com

Cessna 414, Olsson Associates, N880A: Incident occurred April 14, 2016 at Flying Cloud Airport (KFCM), Eden Prairie, Hennepin County, Minnesota

OLSSON ASSOCIATES: http://registry.faa.gov/N880A

Date: 14-APR-16
Time: 13:45:00Z
Regis#: N880A
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 414
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Minneapolis FSDO-15
City: EDEN PRAIRIE
State: Minnesota

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING ROLLOUT, GEAR COLLAPSED, FLYING CLOUD AIRPORT, EDEN PRAIRIE, MN

Allegiant Air Says It's Bolstering Safety After Flight Mishaps

Allegiant Airlines, which came under special scrutiny by federal safety regulators last year, said operations are improving after it increased spending on safety management, training facilities and younger aircraft.

“We’re investing in everything we know to invest in,” Chief Operating Officer Jude Bricker told reporters Wednesday. “Most of the indicators we watch are positive. Everything is moving in the right direction.”

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration stepped up oversight at some areas of the airline last year after a mechanical failure caused the nose of an Allegiant jet to rise off the ground prematurely before takeoff from Las Vegas, defying the crew’s attempts to push it down. The carrier later discovered that a critical piece of equipment in the tail of the Boeing Co. MD-83 had come loose.

FAA officials said in October that the agency intensified its scrutiny of Allegiant’s “flight operations and aircraft maintenance programs” as a result. When the airline inspected all its MD-80s after the incident, it found three jets with bolts that weren’t properly secured to aircraft control systems, according to repair logs obtained by Bloomberg.

Outside Auditor

Following last year’s incidents, Allegiant hired an outside auditor to review its safety programs and regulatory compliance and invested in an extensive safety database and risk assessment system. It also has added pilot training beyond FAA requirements, actively encouraged employees to report concerns and stepped up oversight of contractors that work on engines, airframes and aircraft components.

The airline said it’s seen a decrease in the rate of flight interruptions -- maintenance-caused diversions, turn backs after takeoff or aborted takeoffs in excess of 80 knots -- to 1.37 per 1,000 flights in March from 2.81 per 1,000 in April 2015. Engine failure rates are steady or declining, said Eric Gust, vice president for operations.

The carrier, a unit of Allegiant Travel Co., also said it’s resolving a pilot shortage that stemmed from adding flights faster than it could train employees.

Reports about last year’s difficulties have led to more questions from passengers about safety issues, Bricker said. The Las Vegas-based airline will operate 333 daily nonstop flights at 113 airports as of July, primarily ferrying passengers from smaller cities to leisure destinations such as Las Vegas, San Francisco and New Orleans.

While sales haven’t fallen, “we take it on faith” that the incidents discouraged some travelers from flying Allegiant, Bricker said.

FAA Reprimand

The FAA reprimanded Allegiant last year because of a July incident in which two of its pilots declared they were so low on fuel they needed to make an emergency landing in Fargo, North Dakota. The agency issued a formal letter of correction, something short of an enforcement action, in which the agency could assess a civil fine. Allegiant said it implemented new procedures and training after the incident.

The Aviation Mechanics Coalition, a nonprofit that was previously aligned with the Teamsters union, issued a report last month saying it documented 98 instances of preventable maintenance issues during a five-month period at Allegiant, including 35 related to engine function. About 12 percent of the affected flights were diverted and 16 percent returned, said the report, which covered September 2015 to January 2016.

“I’m confident all of the write-ups we got were absolutely correct,” Chris Moore, chairman of the coalition, said in an interview Thursday. “I know we don’t have all of them. Based on the reports I got, it looks to me very much the same as it did almost two years ago. That doesn’t mean those systems aren’t in place and won’t pay dividends at some point.”

Fleet Renewal

Allegiant is retiring its oldest planes -- the MD-80s with an average age of 26 years and Boeing Co. 757-200s at nearly 23 years -- and replacing them with younger used planes made by Airbus Group SE.

The carrier will add 23 Airbus A320s to its fleet by 2018 and remove the MD-80s by early that year, said Tom Doxey, vice president of fleet and corporate finance. Eventually, Allegiant will fly only Airbus A320s and A319s.

The FAA currently is conducting a National Certificate Holder Evaluation Program at Allegiant. The agency conducts the review at all airlines at specific intervals.

Original article can be found here: http://www.bloomberg.com

Cessna 150, N23112: Incident occurred April 14, 2016 in Akron, Washington County, Colorado

http://registry.faa.gov/N23112

Date: 14-APR-16
Time: 20:40:00Z
Regis#: N23112
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 150
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: Minor
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Denver FSDO-03
City: AKRON
State: Colorado

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, GEAR COLLAPSED AND THE PROPELLER STRUCK THE GROUND, AKRON, CO

Cessna U206F Stationair, N1346Q: Incident occurred April 15, 2016 off Haulover Beach, Miami-Dade County, Florida

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA158 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, April 15, 2016 in Atlantic Ocean, Unknown
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/06/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA U206, registration: N1346Q
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, before departing on the overwater cross-country flight, he performed a preflight inspection and noted that the engine oil quantity was full. He also performed an engine run-up before takeoff, during which no discrepancies were noted, and he specifically stated that the oil pressure was satisfactory. After takeoff, the flight proceeded toward the destination. About 20 minutes from the destination, the pilot noticed a sudden loss of oil pressure and saw smoke coming from the engine compartment. The engine subsequently lost power, and the pilot ditched the airplane into the ocean. The airplane sank in about 2,360 ft of water and was not recovered. Although the engine oil and oil filter were changed the day before the accident flight, no correlation could be made between that event and the reported loss of engine power. Because the airplane and engine were not recovered and could not be examined, no determination could be made as to the reason(s) for the sudden loss of oil pressure, smoke, and then subsequent total loss of engine power.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A total loss of engine power for reason(s) that could not be determined because the airplane was not recovered.

On April 15, 2016, about 1010 eastern daylight time, a Cessna U206F, N1346Q, was ditched in the international waters of the Atlantic Ocean about 23 nautical miles east of the shoreline of North Miami Beach, Florida. The private pilot and two passengers were not injured. The airplane was not recovered; therefore, it was considered to be substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to Aircraft Guaranty Corp Trustee, and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations as a Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport (FXE), Fort Lauderdale, Florida, about 0955, and was destined for South Bimini Airport (MYBS), North Bimini, Bahamas. 

The pilot stated that prior to departure of the accident flight he performed a preflight inspection, which included a check of the oil quantity and noted that it was full. The preflight inspection and engine run-up before takeoff were satisfactory with no discrepancies noted; the oil pressure was satisfactory. The flight proceeded with visual flight rules flight following, and when they were about 20 minutes from the destination, the pilot noted a rapid decrease in oil pressure, and saw smoke coming from the engine cowling. The engine then ceased producing power, and he declared an emergency with the air traffic controller. He briefed the passengers about the ditching procedures, and ditched the airplane near two boats. All occupants exited the airplane, boarded a life raft, and shortly thereafter he noticed another airplane orbiting their position. They were rescued by a yacht that motored to their location. The airplane permanent maintenance records were on-board at the time of the ditching and were not recovered. 

The day before the accident, the engine oil and oil filter were changed by an airframe and powerplant mechanic with inspection authorization (this same mechanic had maintained the airplane for several years). As part of his procedure, he visually inspected the oil filter adapter and did not see any evidence of oil seepage or leakage. He also checked the oil filter adapter and confirmed it was tightly installed. He reported torqueing the Tempest AA48108-2 oil filter to the recommended value of 16 ft/lbs and safety wired it. Following the oil and oil filter change, he ran the engine twice, to about 1,800 rpm, with the engine cowling installed and noted no issues. After each engine run he checked the engine compartment for oil leaks and did not find any associated with the oil change. While in the engine compartment he did notice dampness at the starter adapter pulley. As part of his oil change he also cut open the oil filer and inspected the filter element finding only carbon deposits (normal), but no metal. He did not submit a sample of oil for oil analysis testing. He returned the airplane to service by making a hand written entry in the permanent maintenance records; he did not make a copy of the entry. After hearing of the ditching, he inspected the ramp where the airplane had been parked after the oil change and he did not find any evidence of oil leakage on the ground. 

Documents provided by the airplane owner indicated the engine was overhauled by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)-approved repair station in August 2007, and subsequently installed in the airplane. According to FAA airworthiness records, in May 2008, an oil filter adapter was installed in accordance with Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) SE09356SC. The STC replaced the original engine metallic oil screen and allowed for the installation of a full flow oil filter. The mechanic who installed the oil filter adapter, and who was the same mechanic who performed the most recent oil change, reported applying anti-slippage material in two places at installation. The first place was at the top of the hex head that was torqued and safety wired, and the second place was at the bottom of the casting of the adapter where it met the accessory case of the engine. 

According to the pilot, the engine had accrued approximately 700 hours since major overhaul at the time of the accident. 

A review of the oil filter adapter Instructions for Continued Airworthiness specify to inspect for oil seepage, to inspect the safety wire for security and integrity, and to inspect integrity of fit. 

According to the captain of the yacht that rescued the occupants, the water depth in that area was about 2,360 feet. Because of the depth, the insurance adjuster indicated the airplane would not be recovered, and could not be examined. 

The airplane was ditched in international waters of the Atlantic Ocean; therefore, in accordance with ICAO Annex 13 as State of Registry, the investigation was the responsibility of the U.S. Government National Transportation Safety Board.

AIRCRAFT GUARANTY CORP TRUSTEE: http://registry.faa.gov/N1346Q

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA158
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, April 15, 2016 in
Aircraft: CESSNA U206, registration: N1346Q
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 15, 2015, about 1010 eastern daylight time, a Cessna U206F, N1346Q, was ditched in the Atlantic Ocean about 23 nautical miles east of the shoreline of North Miami Beach, Florida. The private pilot and two passengers were not injured. The airplane will likely not be recovered; therefore, it was considered to be substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to Aircraft Guaranty Corp Trustee, and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) as a Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport (FXE), Fort Lauderdale, Florida about 0955, and was destined for South Bimini Airport (MYBS), South Bimini, Bahamas.


The pilot stated that prior to departure of the accident flight he performed a preflight inspection which included a check of the oil quantity which was full. The preflight inspection and engine run-up before takeoff were satisfactory with no discrepancies noted. The flight proceeded with VFR flight following and when about 20 minutes from his destination, he noted a rapid decrease in oil pressure followed by seeing smoke coming from the engine cowling. The engine then quit, and he declared an emergency with the controller. He briefed the passengers about the ditching procedures, and ditched near 2 boats. All occupants exited the airplane, boarded a life raft from the airplane, and shortly thereafter he noticed an airplane orbiting their position. They were rescued by a yacht that motored to their location.




From left: Sandra Rasmussen, Carol Rasmussen


A small Bahamas-bound plane with three passengers Friday lost power between Florida and the Bahamas, in the middle of the Gulf Stream, causing the plane to crash into the water around 10:30 a.m.

The pilot was able to navigate the crash near a yacht, owned by Sandra Rasmussen, 79, of Des Moines.

"They don't know what happened," said one of the yacht passengers and Sandra's daughter-in-law, Carol Rasmussen, 52, of Ojai, Calif. Carol said the pilot told her it had been a reliable plane up until that point. "It was pretty genius on his part (to steer the crash near them)."

Sandra and Carol said the plane pilot had his own life raft that he quickly deployed and he and the survivors boarded.

Sandra said the yacht captain did not see the plane "so much as a splash," and, knowing something was wrong, he began traveling north.

"If we had been just a little further back, it would have been very hard to see that little yellow raft," Sandra said. "I'm very grateful we were where we were. I think God had something to do with it."

The yacht was about a mile and a half away from where the plane hit water, Carol said. They reached the survivors in under 10 minutes and were able to get them on board. The plane sank in about four minutes.

"Every once in a while you could see this little boat and then it would be gone," Carol said. "We made a beeline for this raft … it felt like an hour."

The survivors "didn't have a scratch on them," Carol said, describing the group as calm.

The plane passengers were heading to a birthday party. One of the survivors was a 17-year-old girl who had never been on a plane before, Carol said. Sandra added the girl did not know how to swim.

Sandra said a medical responder who arrived later checked out the survivors, adding the girl was shaking and close to shock.

The Rasmussen family was bringing the yacht back to Fort Lauderdale, where it stays in the off-season, from the Bahamas. Carol said the yacht is 105 feet long and carried eight passengers, including crew, prior to picking up the survivors.

Sandra said she had been on the yacht since January. She returned to Iowa on Saturday where, with the exception of family trips, she will stay through August.

"It is some of the best water in the world for boating, honestly," Sandra said about the Bahamas area.

Source:  http://www.desmoinesregister.com



FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (WSVN) -- Three people were rescued by good Samaritans on a yacht after a Cessna plane crashed in the ocean, east of the Haulover Inlet, Friday.

According to the U.S. Coast Guard, the Cessna 206 plane crashed into the waters 22 miles east of Aventura, at approximately 10:30 a.m. The pilot had reported engine problems, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

The aircraft had departed Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport en route to Bimini in the Bahamas.

The three people on board the the plane were rescued by people aboard a yacht called the Free Spirit. The boaters witnessed the plane plummet into the ocean and headed toward the crash scene to help.

A passenger on the yacht described the captain's swift rescue. "I was down below, and the captain saw the plane go down, saw the waves break and he beelined to them pretty quickly," he said. "There were three people on the life raft, and he got them on board pretty quickly. Everyone was unscathed."

Speaking with reporters, yacht owner Sandra Rasmussen said she was glad to be able to come to the passengers' rescue. "I really can't give you the odds, but I praise God we were there because if we left there just a little bit earlier or a little bit later, we would not have seen it, and we would not have been able to do what we did."

"We made sure that they had water and blankets and towels, and they were just very grateful," said boater Carol Rasmussen.

Once the three people were rescued from the water, Miami-Dade Fire Rescue sent two paramedics via fire boat to the yacht to evaluate those rescued.

Those rescued were not injured. "I expected to see at least some bruises and cuts, and actually, there were no bruises, no cuts," said Miami-Dade Fire Rescue paramedic Eli Malcon.

Fort Lauderdale Fire Rescue waited for the yacht to arrive with ambulances at the 15th Street Fisheries inside Lauderdale Marina in Fort Lauderdale. Once the yacht docked, rescuers confirmed no one needed transport to the hospital.

The survivors said they were grateful to be back on dry land. When asked whether she feels lucky to be alive, a woman who was on board replied, "Thank God for life." 

Family members said the Cessna's passengers may have been traveling to the Bahamas to celebrate a birthday.

The FAA will investigate the crash.

Story and video:  http://www.wsvn.com

The yacht Free Spirit pulling into a dock in Fort Lauderdale.

Luckily for the three people aboard a Cessna that crashed offshore after leaving Fort Lauderdale Friday morning, nearby yachties saw the aircraft splash into the ocean and raced to their rescue.

With an eye on the plane's tail protruding from the water, the luxury yacht's captain gunned it full throttle for 10 minutes until they got to the survivors bobbing in a life raft and plucked them from the sea, the yacht owner said.

The trio — a man, woman and a teenage girl from Bimini — were in good condition and did not require hospitalization when the yacht docked at a Fort Lauderdale boat landing about 12:30 p.m.

"They look good. They're in good health and in good spirits," said Lt. Lisa Bullard, of Miami-Dade Fire Rescue. "They're pretty lucky."

It was about 10:15 a.m. when the single-engine Cessna 206 crashed about 25 miles off of Haulover Inlet in north Miami-Dade County after leaving Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport enroute to Bimini, officials said.

"The pilot reported engine problems," Arlene Salac, a spokeswoman for the Federal Aviation Administration, said via email. The agency will investigate the crash, she said.

"The [yacht] captain saw the tail end, he saw a huge splash, and we're always looking for huge splashes because that means fish, but it wasn't a fish, it was a plane," said Carol Rasmussen, the yacht owner's daughter-in-law.

The captain of the Free Spirit, a 105-foot North Star yacht, took a hard right turn and opened up the throttle to reach the downed plane within 10 minutes, said Ian Rivero, a family friend of the Rasmussens.

"We kept our binoculars on the life raft," Rasmussen said. "Every once in a while we could see a head and by the time they got to the boat we did see three people."

From the yacht they threw a life ring, went to the life raft in a pontoon and brought the three aboard. The male pilot and his two passengers, a mother and her teen daughter, remained calm and repeatedly thanked their rescuers, Rasmussen said.

"They were very happy, very grateful and, well, obviously in shock," she said.

Miami-Dade Fire Rescue sent a boat to the yacht while it was still at sea, a paramedic boarded and assessed the survivors' conditions. The girl's heart was racing and the paramedic chalked it up to shock, Carol Rasmussen said.

"Every rescue is different but they were very lucky and the way the seas work, and to land the plane without having any serious injuries is pretty good," said Eli Melcon, of Miami-Dade Fire Rescue.

Paramedics also met the yacht when it docked at 1784 SE 15th St. but nobody required hospitalization, said Capt. Greg May, of Fort Lauderdale Fire Rescue.

The three met with customs agents aboard the yacht then relocated to the marine patrol station at the landing. They are making arrangements to return home to Bimini.

"I really can't give you the odds but I praise God we were there, because if we had left just a little bit earlier or a little bit later, we would not have seen it and we would not have been able to do what we did," said yacht owner, Sandra Rasmussen, 79, of Des Moines, Iowa. "We're just very, very grateful that we could help them."

Story and video:  http://www.sun-sentinel.com

Cessna TR182 Turbo Skylane RG, M W Price Corp. N619MW: Incident occurred April 15, 2016 in Carlsbad, San Diego County, California

M W PRICE CORP: http://registry.faa.gov/N619MW

Date: 15-APR-16
Time: 04:22:00Z
Regis#: N619MW
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Diego FSDO-09
City: CARLSBAD
State: California

AIRCRAFT DECLARED AN EMERGENCY WITH A FIRE AND SMOKE IN THE COCKPIT, LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, CARLSBAD, CA

SportCruiser (PiperSport), N197PS: Accident occurred April 14, 2016 in Mansfield, Richland County, Ohio

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA157 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, April 14, 2016 in Mansfield, OH
Aircraft: CZECH SPORT AIRCRAFT AS PIPER SPORT, registration: N197PS
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 14, 2016, at 0822 eastern daylight time, a Czech Sport Aircraft AS Piper Sport, N197PS, impacted runway 32 during landing at Mansfield Lahm Regional Airport (MFD), Mansfield, Ohio. The nose landing gear separated at a weld, which resulted in the airplane nose impacting the runway. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the engine firewall. The pilot was uninjured. The airplane was registered to an operated by the pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. The flight departed from Columbia Airport, Columbia Station, Ohio at 0745 and was destined to MFD.

The pilot stated that after the main landing gear touch down at an airspeed of about 55 knots, he began to ease backpressure on the control stick. As the backpressure eased, the nosewheel landing gear strut separated from the airplane. The airplane slid on the runway for about 150 feet and the nosewheel/strut remained about 30 feet behind the airplane and along the runway centerline.

Postaccident examination of the nose landing gear, part number SG0270N, by a Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Safety Inspector revealed that it had fractured at a weld. 

According to a logbook entry dated August 18, 2014, at an engine total time since new of 196.6 hours, the nose landing gear was inspected in accordance with a Czech Sport Aircraft AS service bulletin, SB-CR-016. There were no subsequent logbook entries citing compliance with SB-CR-016. 

The pilot reported that the nose landing gear accumulated a total time in service of 371 hours at the time of the accident and was last inspected 31 hours in service before the time of the accident. The airplane and engine total times in service at the time of the accident were 371 hours.

Czech Sport Aircraft AS service bulletin, SB-CR-016, dated October 9, 2013, Inspection of the Landing Gear Leg for all SportCruiser aircraft with the [nose landing gear] (NLG) SG0270N, all Piper Sport aircraft with the NLG SG0270N installed, and all PS-28 Cruiser aircraft with the NLG SG0270N installed, stated:

"Some Sport Cruiser / Piper Sport / PS-28 Cruiser aircraft have developed cracks in the bottom side of the lower section of the nose landing gear. The cracks develop on the nose landing gear assembly along the weld of the tube and the bracket. Furthermore, on several aircraft bending of the pivot connecting the fork with leg was discovered and cracks from holes of bolts on the fork. To address this potentially unsafe condition, a repetitive inspection is required of the bottom side of the lower section, in the area of the weld of the tube, the bracket and the pivot and the fork in the place of the bolts mounting the fork to the landing gear."

The compliance with SB-CR-016 was cited as:

A. Before next flight after issue of this bulletin.

B. Periodically at each 25 FH or 50 cycles whatever occurs first check as described in documents [1] for PS-28 Cruiser and [2] for Sport Cruiser (see REFERENCES).

C. During pre-flight check (see POH, Section 4, 4.1 Pre-flight check, Inspection Check List, Point 4 - Nose gear) visually inspect pivot (see the picture on the Page 3 of 4 of this Service Bulletin) and verify that there is no evidence of cracks or bending.

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N197PS

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Cleveland FSDO-25

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA157
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, April 14, 2016 in Mansfield, OH
Aircraft: CZECH SPORT AIRCRAFT AS PIPER SPORT, registration: N197PS
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 14, 2016, at 0822 eastern daylight time, a Czech Sport Aircraft AS Piper Sport, N197PS, impacted runway 32 during landing at the Mansfield Lahm Regional Airport (MFD), Mansfield, Ohio. The airplane sustained substantial damage and the pilot was uninjured. The airplane was registered to an operated by the pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. The flight departed from Columbia Airport, Columbia Station, Ohio, and was destined to MFD.

An examination of the airplane showed the nose landing gear separated at a weld when it touched down, which resulted in the airplane's nose impacting the runway. The airplane's firewall sustained substantial damage.

Grumman American AA-5A Cheetah, N9684U: Fatal accident occurred August 09, 2015 in Harrisburg, Saline County, Illinois

Dr. Erich Snyder

Tommy Snyder

Grumman American AA-5A Cheetah (N9684U)


POPE COUNTY -- First responders call a fatal plane crash in Pope County last year a tragic accident, as new details surface about what caused it. 

That plane crash in Burden Falls near Harrisburg on August 9, 2015 killed a father and son from Carterville.

"When I got to the scene, I looked straight up and you could tell where that plane just fell," said Pope County Sheriff Jerry Suits, who led the search for the plane wreckage.

According to Suits, hundreds of police and volunteers helped search for the crash site last August. They had hoped for a different ending.

"Every time I go by Burden falls now, I think about that plane. It was tough for us," Suits said.

Nine months after the crash killed Erich and Tommy Snyder of Carterville, Suits still keeps the voicemail from a fellow officer that first alerted him the discovery of the wreckage.

"It was devastating to this community and it was devastating to me," Suits said.

A new report from the National Transportation Safety Board shows as the Snyder family attempted to fly from Marion, Kentucky to Marion, Illinois they faced poor weather conditions making it impossible to see.

The pair crashed into the Shawnee National Forest, more than 20 miles from their destination.

"Visibility was only five miles with mist and there was also no moon," said Mike Robertson, a Southern Illinois University aviation expert.

He examined the accident report and believes human error caused the crash. The report shows no mechanical problems with the plane, but the pilot had just 30 hours of flight experience, something Robertson fears may not have included night practice.

"The biggest factor was that it was dark. He lost visual reference with the horizon which basically tells you where you are," Robertson said.

The devastating crash scene, which witnesses describe as crumpled metal spanning hundreds of yards, left an image many in Pope County will remember for years to come.

"We're coming up here now seven, eight, nine months and I'm hoping the family got some closure," Suits said.

The pilot's log book could not be recovered in this investigation, which makes it difficult to determine what previous flying experience he had, experts say. The Snyders did not file a flight plan with any airport.

According to Robertson, pilots aren't legally required to do that but he calls it an important safety measure that guarantees a search and rescue effort should the need arise.

Story and video:  http://www.wsiltv.com

Docket And Docket Items: http://dms.ntsb.gov 

Erich J. Snyder: http://registry.faa.gov/N9684U

FAA  Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Springfield FSDO-19

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA347
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 09, 2015 in Harrisburg, IL
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AMERICAN AVN. CORP. AA 5A, registration: N9684U
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 9, 2015, about 2050 central daylight time, a Grumman AA-5A airplane, N9684U, impacted terrain in the Shawnee National Forest near Harrisburg, Illinois. The student pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Dark night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the route of flight, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the Marion-Crittenden County Airport (5M9), Marion, Kentucky, about 2030, and was en route to the Williamson County Regional Airport (KMWA), Marion, Illinois.

The pilot was not on a flight plan and was not in radio contact with any air traffic control center. An unconfirmed message from the pilot to his spouse about 2045 reported that the pilot was going to return to the airport; presumably 5M9. The airplane was located on August 10 in a heavily wooded area of the Shawnee National Forest.

A search of radar facilities did not find any primary or secondary radar targets consistent with the accident airplane. The airplane's exact route of flight could not be determined.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 36, held a combined student pilot and second class medical certificate issued on May 21, 2015. At the time of his application for the medical certificate, the pilot reported logging 30 hours of total time with 20 hours accumulated in the preceding six months.

The pilot's log book was not recovered during the course of the investigation, and the pilot's total experience could not be determined. It could not be determined if the pilot had received recent flight instruction and if he possessed a current solo endorsement. The amount of experience he had flying at night could not be determined.

The passenger was not pilot rated and the student pilot was not authorized to fly with passengers.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane was a Grumman AA-5A, serial number AA5A-0050, manufactured in 1975. It was powered by a 150-horsepower, normally aspirated, Lycoming O-320-E2G engine which drove a metal, 2-bladed, fixed-pitch, McCauley 1C172/BTM7359 propeller. The airplane's logbooks were not recovered and the airplane's maintenance history was not established. A September 7, 2013 auction listing for the airplane on an internet page, reported the engine hours at 7,578 hours, which also appeared in an included interior photo of the airplane's instrument panel.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

A review of weather information revealed that at 1900 a low pressure system was over western Illinois with an associated frontal wave. A warm stationary front was in the immediate vicinity of the accident site which had the potential to form a partially cloudy sky. The closest weather reporting facility was the Harrisburg-Raleigh Airport (HSB), Harrisburg, Illinois, located about 15 nautical miles north of the accident site at an elevation of 398 feet mean sea level (msl). At 2035 the weather reporting facility at HSB reported wind from 070° at 3 knots, visibility 5 miles in mist, a clear sky, temperature 77° F, dew point 77° F, and a barometric pressure of 29.91 inches of mercury.

Data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) 13 system found that at 2035, the accident site was located in an area ahead of a large mesoscale convective system (MCS). The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Severe Storms Laboratory defines a MCS as "a collection of thunderstorms that act as a system. An MCS can spread across an entire state and last more than 12 hours." Astronomical Conditions for the accident site found that the moon had set at 1648 and was below the horizon at the time of the accident.

There is no evidence of the pilot receiving a weather briefing prior to the flight.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

At the beginning of the debris path, several broken and downed trees tops were found with airplane wing parts suspended in the trees and on the ground. About 55 yards from the start of the tree strikes, generally aligned along a 320° magnetic heading, was an impact point that was about 2.5 feet deep. The main wreckage had come to rest partially outside of the impact point. The debris field continued another 25 yards through the trees. Impact signatures were consistent with the airplane impacting the ground at least 25° nose low.

Portions of the right wing were found near the tree strikes with left wing components found next when walking towards the impact crater. The engine and propeller were found at the bottom of the impact crater with the fuselage and empennage resting on top of the engine. Both wings were fragmented in multiple locations. When reconstructed, all flight controls were accounted for without any evidence of preimpact damage. The engine was removed from the fuselage and examined down to its crankshaft. No preimpact anomalies were detected with the engine. The propeller remained attached the engine at the propeller flange. One blade was curled rearward and displayed chordwise scratches, gouges, and leading edge polishing. The other blade remained straight with light leading edge polishing. No preimpact anomalies were detected with the airframe or engine.

A majority of the cockpit instrumentation was destroyed by impact force. The ignition switch was in the both position. The turn and slip indicator displayed a 45° right bank. The altimeter's Kollmans window displayed 29.92. The emergency location transmitter (ELT) was found separated from the airplane and the switch was found in the OFF position. Soil was deposited in the area surrounding the switch and its preimpact position could not be determined.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Although requested, the Pope County Coroner's Office did not perform an autopsy on the pilot, as the office deemed it not necessary due to the high velocity nature of the airplane crash.

A few milliliters of blood were recovered by the Country Coroner's Office. The entire sample was sent to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) for toxicology. The sample was marked putrefied. Testing detected 29 mg/dL of ethanol.
     








NTSB Identification: CEN15FA347
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 09, 2015 in Harrisburg, IL
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AMERICAN AVN. CORP. AA 5A, registration: N9684U
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 9, 2015, about 2050 central daylight time, a Grumman AA-5A airplane, N9684U, impacted terrain in the Shawnee National Forest near Harrisburg, Illinois. The student pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Dark night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the route of flight, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the Marion-Crittenden County Airport (5M9), Marion, Kentucky, about 2030, and was en route to the Williamson County Regional Airport (KMWA), Marion, Illinois.

The airplane was located on August 10 in a heavily wooded area of the Shawnee National Forest. At the beginning of the debris path, several broken and downed trees tops were found with airplane wing parts suspended in the trees and on the ground. About 55 yards from the start of the tree strikes was an impact point that was about 2.5 feet deep. Near the impact point was the main wreckage. The debris field was aligned with a 320° magnetic heading and continued another 25 yards.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

At 2055, an automated weather reporting facility located at KMWA, about 20 nautical miles northwest of the accident site reported a wind from 210° at 3 knots, visibility 10 miles, a broken ceiling at 8,000 feet, temperature 81° F, dew point 77° F, and barometric pressure of 29.92 inches of mercury. It listed a remark for lightning to the distant west and northwest of the station.

Bureaucrats threaten skydivers



Tauranga's skydiving industry is included among about half the industry's small to medium sized operators being driven out of business by unsustainable Civil Aviation Authority charges.

The CAA 2016 funding proposals is about to take $1.7 million from some of aviation's most vulnerable businesses, with 40 percent set to be taken from small to medium sized tourist operators like Tauranga Tandem Skydiving, says New Zealand Parachute Industry Chairman Stuart Bean.

“One of the most debilitating aspects of the proposals is the targeted attack on small to medium sized aviation businesses while the larger and most profitable airports and airlines will no longer contribute to funding key CAA services such as surveillance,” says Stuart.

“This quite simply is inequitable and unfair.”

The increases come after former Minister of Transport Gerry Brownlee promised Cabinet in 2012, that CAA costs would be reduced and the need for further increases in fees and charges would be reduced or removed.

“Instead, we find commercial general aviation businesses such as skydiving facing cost increases far in excess of the rate of inflation,” says Stuart.

The CAA funding proposals result in about another $250,000 per year going from the parachute industry to CAA, without CAA having to provide any additional services, says Stuart.

Other small- to-medium-sized aviation companies like rescue helicopters, tourist helicopters/fixed wing and agricultural operations are being similarly targeted, while the largest and most profitable aviation businesses—big airlines, airports and the Airways Corporation—all pay a lot less.

If the cost of parachuting goes up, it will adversely affect tourism revenue nationwide, says Stuart.

The cost of certification has driven prices to a point where New Zealand skydiving businesses are barely competing with Australia, when they used to be significantly cheaper.

“They are now about equal and there's no evidence certification has improved safety,” says Stuart.

“The costs of meeting these new levies will drive prices up even more and further erode competitiveness, possibly leading to losses of revenue for the businesses, the districts they're in, and New Zealand tourism.

“Many visitors to New Zealand are on multi-destination holidays, and may choose to do a parachute jump elsewhere if it is too expensive here,” says Stuart.

“Tourists who are not making a parachute jump in your town may spend less time in your town, or bypass your town entirely on their way somewhere else.

“The implications for the local economy and tourism revenue nationwide are huge.”

CAA certification has already priced parachuting well above other adventure activities that are not as heavily regulated, says Stuart, and higher costs will widen the price gap between parachuting and other adventure activities to a point where skydiving will struggle to compete for the tourist dollar.

“Our ability to effectively compete with Australia is already very tenuous and the new levy will further undermine this with no comparable safety benefits or efficiency gains.

“The new taxes do not represent value for money and should be halted immediately. It is very clear that CAA is presently well funded to discharge all of its functions; these new changes are simply an attack on small to medium sized businesses which help form the backbone of New Zealand's tourism industry.”

Tauranga Tandem Skydiving director John Martin says the number of tandem skydive operators in New Zealand has been virtually halved since the CAA got involved with certifying the sky diving operators.

There were 23 and now there are 11.

“We've been in operation for 24 years and nothing has changed except increased costs,” says John.

“We are seriously concerned whether we will continue to operate in future or become another casualty.

“We are in full support of the NZPI on this and we are quite concerned as to viability of our future operations if CAA continue along this line.”

The CAA Board will make its final decision on April 21, and then sends its recommendations to the Minister of Transport.

CAA makes its money charging the third highest hourly rate in the country for safety audits, but the main source of income is the passenger levy imposed on airline passengers, says Stuart Bean.

Airlines themselves pay the normal hourly rate charges for certification and audit, just like any other sector of the aviation community.



“Airlines appear to have lobbied for a rebalancing on the basis that they are having to pay more than is equitable,” says Sean.

“The Ministry of Transport, in a recent discussion of fuel levies, also made the distinction that it is the passenger and not the airlines paying the levy – CAA appear to be the only agency confused on that point.”

The CAA Board is dominated by individuals who have close present and past professional linkages with those who will benefit most from the proposed changes, says Stuart.

There's no one on the board representing commercial general aviation.

“Many in industry believe there is a conflict of interest with the Board looking after their ‘mates',” says Stuart.

If the proposed changes proceed, only commercial general aviation companies will pay audit costs, which will be buried in an “operators safety levy”.

Airlines, engineering companies, airports, regulated freight cargo agents and Airways Corporation will no longer make a contribution to audit costs.

CAA can operate for the next three years satisfactorily without having to increase charges. In other words, if they do nothing in terms of changing the funding mix, CAA will still receive income of $43m, because the growth in the number of passengers paying the passenger levy is similar to growth in CAA's expenditure.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.sunlive.co.nz