Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Dozens of animal incidents impact Tulsa International Airport (KTUL)



Quick Facts:

  • Tulsa International Airport had 75 bird strikes from 3/14 to 7/15
  • Incidents also include other animals
  • Airport takes precautions to prevent these issues

Tulsa International Airport officials deal with animal incidents almost daily.

“Wildlife is wildlife. The environment that we have here is ideal for birds for their habitat, and right across the street we also have the park,” said Chuck Hannum, deputy director for Tulsa International Airport.

According to a report from the Federal Aviation Administration obtained by FOX23 the number of birds that have caused trouble at TIA may surprise you.

This report shows between March 2014 to July 2015 there were seven animal related incidents involving every type of plane at TIA, sometimes twice a week.

The report also lists numerous species of birds that have come into contact with planes mid-flight or were pulled out of the sky after flying behind a plane's engines, two even caused emergency landings.

It's not just birds airport officials are dealing with. The report stated at the end of one runway airport officials found the remains of a coyote.

The coyote, according to the report, had head and neck trauma believed to be from a plane that hit it without the pilots even knowing.

“We just felt a tremendous thud. We didn't know what it was,” said Jay Garrett. Owasso pilot at Viking Aviaiton.

Jay Garrett is a Green Country pilot who has experienced a bird strike.

Something hit his plane mid-flight and only after he landed did he find the remains of a crow.

“It's something that is in the back of your mind. It certainly is unexpected when it happens,” said Garrett.

Garrett told FOX23 that he and other pilots train for these moments and even radio each other when animals create issues.

“There are documented cases of that happening where the birds go completely inside the cockpit, and do damage to property and people,” said Garrett.
Garrett was forced to make an emergency landing with his own children inside his plane.

“It would be a lottery type event if you had a catastrophic failure due to a bird strike,” he said.

“We call this one the bird banger because it goes up in the air and pops really loud,” Don Wyatt, Tulsa International Airport Police Department

Don Wyatt is one of those keeping birds and other animals, like coyotes skunks and snapping turtles, out of TIA.

“Some birds go away immediately. Sometimes we have to use two or three. Depending on the bird sometimes we use multiple,” Wyatt said.

From sirens and lights, to small firecracker launchers, to putting anti-nesting spikes on the field and keeping the grass tall, Wyatt has not only been specially trained to scare off animals without harming them-- he has a whole arsenal of tools at his disposal.

But even airport deputy director Chuck Hannum told FOX23 sometimes even that's not good enough.

“After while the birds adapt. That's what wildlife does. They adapt to their surroundings, and we have to keep mixing it up and changing it up so it's always something new,” said Hannum.

Airport officials said they know their planes have to share the sky, they just want to make sure when it comes time for you to fly you don’t have any issues with creatures.

Story and video:  http://www.fox23.com

Incident occurred February 09, 2016 in Cowichan Valley, British Columbia, Canada



A small plane made an emergency landing on Highway 18, east of Lake Cowichan, Tuesday afternoon.

The plane was returning to the Duncan Air Park when it had engine trouble.

The pilot, who was alone in the homebuilt plane, was able to glide it down and land safely on the highway.

There was no traffic on the road.

RCMP say the plane has been moved off to the shoulder of the highway.

Mechanics are coming from Victoria to remove the wings so the plane can be towed away.

Story and photos:  http://www.cheknews.ca



WestJet says Bombardier’s C Series is ‘too small’ for its mainline service

The new Bombardier Inc. C Series is a great airplane, but it doesn’t work for WestJet Airlines Ltd., Gregg Saretsky, chief executive officer of the Calgary-based carrier, said Wednesday.

The 100- to 150-seat C Series, which is scheduled to carry its first passengers during the second quarter, is too small for WestJet’s mainline service and too big for its Encore regional network, which uses the turboprop Bombardier Q400 plane, Mr. Saretsky said during a meeting with The Globe and Mail’s editorial board Tuesday.

For its mainline service, WestJet has Boeing 737 Max airplanes on order.

“We’re looking for bigger planes, not smaller planes, and the Bombardier C Series is too small,” Mr. Saretsky said.

“It’s kind of the size we’re getting rid of,” he said, pointing to WestJet’s Boeing 737-700 models, 10 of which the airline just sold to Southwest Airlines Co. “These are 130-seat units going away and being replaced with 168-seat units and the trend is to larger [airplanes].”

He noted that Boeing spent a lot of time talking with customers such as WestJet and eventually decided to drop plans to build a wide-bodied, but shorter plane to replace the single-aisle 737, one of the most successful airplane programs in aviation history.

If Bombardier had asked WestJet, the airline would have told Bombardier that the C Series is too small for its mainline needs, Mr. Saretsky said.

“I don’t know if they had dated market research or they didn’t talk to enough customers to know,” he said.

Marianella de la Barrera, a spokesperson for Bombardier Commercial Aircraft, said the Montreal-based transportation giant spoke with various airlines before developing the C Series.

“We developed an airline working group, which was very instrumental in voicing the needs and wants of a clean-sheet aircraft. And some of them became customers,” Ms. de la Barrera said. “And some of them, even though they’re not customers yet, some of them still contributed to it and are now revisiting us and are potential customers.”

Bombardier flew the C Series to Calgary last year and showed it to WestJet, she said.

“At this point, WestJet is not in a position where they might need our aircraft in the near term. So we do respect that they are a Q400 customer and a Max customer.”

Bombardier has 243 firm orders for the C Series, which can seat a maximum of 160 passengers in a single-class configuration. The C Series program is $2-billion over its original $3.4-billion budget and the Quebec government has stepped in with a $1-billion (U.S.) financial package for the program.

The federal government is considering a similar contribution.

Mr. Saretsky said he generally opposes bailouts, but more help for Bombardier is something he can support.

“Is there a low spot here that Bombardier finds itself in that with some help they can extricate themselves?”

Story and comments:  http://www.theglobeandmail.com

Porter Airlines denies report it's shopping for a buyer: Airline shelved an initial public offering in 2010 but says an IPO is still a possibility

The company that operates Toronto-based Porter Airlines has denied a report that it is looking for a buyer.

The Globe and Mail, citing "people familiar with the plans," reported Tuesday that the search process is underway and there is no guarantee it will result in a deal. The paper said the company's financial backers "have been actively looking for an exit strategy through a sale."

"There is no truth to this rumor," Porter Airlines spokesman Brad Cicero wrote in an email to CBC News. "We have heard this many times over the past several years. Porter is not for sale and there have been no discussions with any parties," he wrote.

Cicero said Porter has the "strongest balance sheet of any airline in North America" thanks to its sale last year of the passenger terminal at Toronto's Billy Bishop Airport. 

"We are positioning ourselves very well to complete a future [initial public offering], as has previously been reported," he wrote.

In 2010, Porter Aviation Holdings Inc. put on hold plans to file an IPO and list itself as a publicly traded company. The airline blamed unfavourable market conditions caused by volatility in the equity markets.

In 2013, it announced plans to buy up to 30 CS-100 jets from Montreal-based Bombardier, which would expand the regional carrier's reach from coast to coast, taking direct aim at Air Canada and WestJet.

However, those plans were contingent on getting approval for a required runway extension at Billy Bishop airport so it could handle jets. The Liberal government refused to reopen an agreement that prohibits jets at the island airport. 

Porter, which was founded in 2006, flies to 24 year-round and seasonal destinations in Canada and the United States, using Bombardier Q400 turboprop aircraft. 

Source:  http://www.cbc.ca

Airport director dismisses complaints over Youngstown to Chicago service provider



VIENNA TWP., Ohio - The Director of Aviation for the Youngstown-Warren Regional Airport released a statement on Tuesday expressing confidence in the ability of Aerodynamics Incorporated to provide daily, nonstop flights to Chicago O'Hare International Airport, despite recent objections filed with the Department of Transportation.

The statement from Dan Dickten comes after an air carrier complained that SeaPort Airlines, which has the same owner as ADI, failed to pay one of the carriers for flights it had picked up for SeaPort.

An aircraft leasing company also filed an objection, claiming SeaPort failed to make December and January payments for aircraft used by the airliner.

Earlier this week, SeaPort filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy.

Aerodynamics Inc. claims it is an entirely different company than Seaport, although both are owned by John Beardsley and his wife Janet.

The Department of Transportation recently granted ADI a certificate to offer the daily round-trip service between Youngstown and Chicago.

ADI says the objections to the certificate are attempts to resolve business disputes and has nothing to do with the airline's fitness to provide the flight service.

“These comments are inspired by self-interest, not the public interest, and must be looked at with extreme skepticism,” says Dickten.

Dickten says he expects that ADI’s Youngstown flights will begin in late April to early May, with plans to work up to three daily round-trip flights depending on passenger demand.

Source:  http://www.wfmj.com

Marine Museum hangs WWII plane recovered from Lake Michigan



A World War II plane pulled from the depths Lake Michigan now hangs in the National Museum of the Marine Corps.

Riggers today hoisted the SBD-3 Dauntless into place above the Leatherneck Gallery — the atrium visitors to the famous museum see upon entering the building. There, it will hang with other aircraft that were integral to the missions of U.S. Marines throughout history.

The Dauntless was used by the U.S. Navy starting on Aug. 24, 1942. Several Marine Corps squadrons used the plane in the U.S.

The aircraft transferred from the Marine Corps to the U.S. Navy Carrier Qualification Training Unit in Glenview, Ill. in 1943. It was lost in a training accident that same year when the plane crashed and sank to the bottom of Lake Michigan.

A team from the National Museum of Naval Aviation recovered the plane in 1991, 48 years after it crashed. Aside from being scraped by boat anchors, damage to the aircraft was light.




The plane was restored and place at the USS Alabama Battleship Memorial Park in Alabama. The airplane was acquired in 2005 by the Marine Corps Museum, and the plan was to display the plane in the museum’s World War II Gallery.

It was later learned the airplane needed an overhaul before it could be displayed in the museum. Work on the project began in 2009. The plane was stripped down to its rivets and rebuilt. Rocks and sand were found fell out of the aircraft as workers began the restoration, said Marine Museum spokeswoman Gwenn Adams.

The majority of the restoration work took place on Quantico Marine Corps Base, in the now condemned Larson’s Gym. The final restoration work took place over six months at the Udar-Hazy Center of the National Air and Space Museum in Chantilly.

Riggers from iWeiss used a lift and a hoist to move the plane in place shortly after 7:30 a.m. Tuesday. The aircraft will be placed into a dive altitude with dive flaps open, with a 1,000-pound bomb strapped to its belly.

Also waiting inside the Leatherneck Gallery is a Vietnam-era helicopter, a U434-D. It will be hoisted into place onto a new display as part of the over exhibit in the large gallery. Another Vietnam-era helicopter that had been on display in the gallery will be moved into storage, said Adams.

The addition of the new aircraft is the reason the museum closed its doors for winter. Work also continues the museum’s efforts to “complete the circle,” with the addition of new halls that will showcase life for Marines who fought in Afghanistan and Iraq, and a gallery that shows life for Marines on the front lines of battle.

Those new galleries and a new theater and art gallery should open next year. The additions will complete the vision for the original museum that opened in 2006.

Story and photo gallery:  http://potomaclocal.com


Cessna U206G Stationair, N756ZD: Incident occurred February 08, 2016 in Eugene, Lane County, Oregon

Date: 08-FEB-16
Time: 00:00:00Z
Regis#: N756ZD
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 206
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Portland FSDO-09
City: EUGENE
State: Oregon

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, GEAR COLLAPSED, EUGENE, OR

http://registry.faa.gov/N756ZD

The lingering mystery of Era Flight 874: Era Aviation (d.b.a. Era Alaska), De Havilland Canada Dash 8-102, N886EA, incident occurred September 05, 2012 in Soldotna, Alaska


On the morning of September 5, 2012, Era Alaska Flight 874 departed Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport for what was scheduled to be a 40-minute flight to Homer.

The de Havilland DHC8 twin-turbine aircraft, more commonly known as a Dash 8, carried 15 passengers and a crew of three (two pilots, one flight attendant). At about 11 a.m., according to a preliminary report later filed by the National Transportation Safety Board, the aircraft “experienced an uncommanded left roll and uncontrolled descent during climb at about 12,000 feet.”

The flight crew regained control at about 7,000 feet and the flight returned to Anchorage with no injuries or damage to the aircraft.

More than three years later, The NTSB hasn't issued a final report finding a probable cause for the incident.

NTSB Public Affairs Officer Eric Weiss, said the investigation is being handled by the agency's Washington, D.C. office, not by Anchorage investigators.

“When a major incident or accident occurs, it may be handled by D.C.,” he explained in a phone call. The 2012 Era incident could be considered “major” due the type of operation, a scheduled commuter flight, and the size of the aircraft. According to NTSB databases, only one other Alaska investigation from 2012 remains open, a February incident involving a mechanical problem with Everts Air Cargo. That investigation is also being handled by the NTSB's Washington office.​

Passenger Vince Tillion, who holds a commercial pilot's license and builds aircraft for personal use, said he believes the plane entered a full aerodynamic stall.

“The weather was lousy when we took off and the props threw a lot of ice as we flew through the clouds,” he said in a phone conversation. (The preliminary report states that instrument meteorological conditions, frequently abbreviated as "IMC," prevailed in Anchorage at the time.) “We were up on top of the clouds when it happened though.”

“There was a classic pre-stall buffet (shaking), then the left wing dropped and we fell into the IMC and we kept falling for several thousand feet. That’s when I texted my wife that I thought we were going to crash.” 

A pilot operating in instrument conditions would encounter reduced visibility down to even whiteout conditions. The weather could also include fog, rain, snow and ice, which under some conditions, can quickly build up on an aircraft.

Other similar commuter aircraft have been involved in stalls in recent years. The most tragic case involved a Colgan Air Dash 8 that crashed near Buffalo, New York in 2009 killing all 49 people onboard and one person on the ground. The NTSB determined that, among other human factors, the captain’s actions led to an aerodynamic stall “from which the aircraft did not recover.”

Era Flight 874 was required by federal regulations to have both a cockpit voice recorder and a flight data recorder onboard, which could provide investigators further insight.

Asked about the delay in determining a probable cause in the incident, the NTSB's Weiss replied only that “The NTSB tries to handle all cases in as timely a manner as possible. Unfortunately, we come up against staffing and resource constraints.”

Original article can be found here: http://www.adn.com

http://registry.faa.govN886EA 

NTSB Identification: DCA12IA141
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier operation of ERA AVIATION INC (D.B.A. Era Alaska)
Incident occurred Wednesday, September 05, 2012 in Soldotna, AK
Aircraft: DE HAVILLAND DHC8, registration: N886EA
Injuries: 15 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators used data provided by various sources and may have traveled in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft incident report.

On September 5, 2012, at about 11:00 AM Alaskan Daylight Time, Era Aviation (d.b.a. Era Alaska) flight 874, a Bombardier DHC-8-103, registration N886EA, experienced an uncommanded left roll and uncontrolled descent during climb at about 12,000 feet. The flight crew regained control of the airplane at about 7,000 feet and the flight returned to Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (ANC), Anchorage, Alaska. There were no injuries to the 12 passengers or 3 crew members, and the airplane was not damaged. The flight was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 as a regularly scheduled passenger flight between ANC and Homer Airport (HOM), Homer, Alaska. Daylight, instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the incident.

Cessna T206H Turbo Stationair, N562H: Accident occurred February 08, 2016 at Billings Logan International Airport (KBIL), Yellowstone County, Montana

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena, Montana

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N562H 

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA073 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, February 08, 2016 in Billings, MT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/23/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA T206H, registration: N562H
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot reported that, just after landing, the airplane began to veer left and exited the side of the runway. Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the nose landing gear fork and the right main landing gear strut were fractured in a manner consistent with overload. Examination of the damage to the airplane revealed that the main landing gear attachment points sustained upward crushing and the tail was bent downward; damage consistent with a hard landing.  Control continuity was established, and no anomalies were revealed that would have precluded normal operation. 

Recorded wind information for the time of the accident indicated a 50- to 60-degree crosswind at 8 knots with gusts to 19 knots for the selected runway. Shortly before the airplane landed, a general wind shear warning was broadcast on the airport’s tower control frequency. Wind shear was present in the area at altitudes below 2,000 ft above ground level (agl), and review of weather information valid at the time of the accident indicated several areas of clear air turbulence extending from the surface through 14,000 ft agl. Given the damage to the airplane, the surface wind profile, and upper level winds over the terrain, the accident flight likely encountered gusting wind conditions and low-level wind shear while landing. The airplane landed hard, damaging the landing gear, which resulted in the pilot’s subsequent inability to maintain directional control. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to attain a proper flare during landing in gusting wind conditions and low-level wind shear, which resulted in a hard landing and a subsequent loss of directional control. 



On February 8, 2016, about 1131 mountain standard time, a Cessna T206H, N562H, veered off of the runway after landing at Billings Logan International Airport (BIL), Billings, Montana. The pilot, sole occupant, sustained minor injuries and the airplane sustained substantial damage throughout. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Red Reflect Ranch Airport (WY00), Ten Sleep, Wyoming at 1030.

The pilot reported that the airplane touched down very smoothly. Shortly thereafter, it started to veer to the left with no lateral control. The airplane veered 90 degrees and went off the side of the runway. 

Postaccident examination by a Federal Aviation Administration Inspector revealed heavy damage to the airplane. The windscreen was partially separated. The fuselage at the main landing gear attachment points sustained upward crushing, and the nose wheel fork was fractured. The right wheel strut was fracture separated about three inches from the wheel assembly and the wheel separated from the airplane. The fracture surface was visually inspected and was consistent with overload. The outboard about four feet of the right wing was bent upward, and the fuselage just aft of the rear window was bent downward. Overall, there were no anomalies noted with the airplane that would have precluded normal operations.

Review of the Billings Air Traffic Control Tower recordings revealed that shortly before the pilot landed a general wind shear warning was broadcasted on the frequency. 

BIL was the closest official weather station. At 1153 the automated surface observing system (ASOS) reported wind from 220 degrees at 8 knots with gusts to 19 knots, 10 miles visibility, few clouds at 8,500 feet agl, scattered clouds at 20,000 feet agl, temperature 9 degrees C, dew point -6 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.38 inches of mercury. The one-minute BIL ASOS surface data was provided by the National Weather Surface. At 1131, BIL reported the two-minute average wind from 222 degrees at 12 knots and a five-second maximum average wind from 233 Degrees at 17 knots. In addition, the complete Rawinsonde Observation program reported low-level wind shear in the lowest 2,000 feet agl. Several layers of possible clear-air turbulence were identified from the surface through 14,000 feet.

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA073
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, February 08, 2016 in Billings, MT
Aircraft: CESSNA T206H, registration: N562H
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 8, 2016, about 1130 mountain standard time, a Cessna T206H, N562H, veered off of the runway after landing at Billings Logan International Airport (BIL), Billings, Montana. The pilot, sole occupant, sustained minor injuries and the airplane sustained substantial damage throughout. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Red Reflet Ranch Airport (WY00), Ten Sleep, Wyoming at about 1030.

The pilot reported that shortly after landing, the airplane suddenly veered sharply to the left. During the turn, the airplane's right landing gear strut fracture separated, and the wheel assembly departed the airplane. The airplane exited the left side of the runway surface and came to rest on the grass adjacent to the runway.

The airplane was moved to a secure location for further examination.

Federal Aviation Administration Tracks Four Airspace Violations During Super Bowl 50: The pilots received an alert that they were violating the airspace and were escorted or diverted


Video from the California Wing of the Civil Air Patrol shows a military jet practicing how to escort a private plane out of a Super Bowl "No Fly Zone" on February 3, 2016, in Central California.



There were four airspace violations by private planes during Sunday's Super Bowl at Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, California, the Federal Aviation Administration said. 

FAA spokesman Ian Gregor told NBC Bay Area on Monday that the he knew of four "temporary flight restrictions" during the game, one more than was originally reported on Sunday.

In general, FAA spokeswoman Laura Brown said, pilots could face sanctions ranging from warning letters to license suspensions or revocations.

The FAA declared the airspace above the stadium a "no fly zone" during the Super Bowl game between the Denver Broncos and the Carolina Panthers. That meant drones and other aircraft were not allowed to fly within 32 miles of the stadium between 2 p.m. and midnight on game day.

Major Katrina Andrews, a spokeswoman for the air component of the North American Aerospace Defense Command, said the violators were not drones. Instead, she said they were pilots of  private planes, such as small Cessnas, who didn't read their notices telling aircraft to stay away from the stadium during the big game.

The FAA said these four planes violated the airspace: a Cessna 150, a Cessna 172, a Vans RV 6 and a Beechcraft BE35.

She said the pilots received an alert that they were violating the airspace and were escorted or diverted to the Livermore Municipal Airport or Palo Robles, where they were headed anyway.

"It appears they had not read their notice to airmen (NOTAMS), which explains the parameters of the restricted area," she said.

NORAD is the agency charged with the missions of aerospace warning and aerospace control for North America.

Story and video:  http://www.nbcbayarea.com

Drones registered with Federal Aviation Administration outnumber manned aircraft at 325,000 and growing



Drones registered with the Federal Aviation Administration have exceeded the number of manned aircraft on record with the government, FAA Administrator Michael Huerta said on Monday.

More than 325,000 people have registered unmanned aerial vehicles with the FAA since Dec. 21, 2015, eclipsing the 320,000 or so piloted aircraft on file with the agency, Mr. Huerta said at a drone summit in Washington, D.C., on Monday during which he applauded the agency’s recent efforts to keep statistics on the surging number of privately owned drones.

“The speed with which we were able to roll this out is a testament to the invaluable input we received from the diverse task force of stakeholders we brought together to work on this issue,” The Hill quoted Mr. Huerta as saying at the event.

“It’s proof that when government and industry partner, we can innovate, cut through red tape and use technology to tackle emerging risks,” he added.

The Department of Transportation launched an online portal in December where drones weighing between 9 ounces and 55 pounds can be registered with the FAA. Owners have until Feb. 19 to register their devices without risking penalty, and new drones must be on file with the agency before they’re allowed in the air.

“You enter basic information — name, address and email address — into our online system, and read and acknowledge our basic safety guidelines,” Mr. Huerta said at Monday’s summit. “Then you pay $5 and get a registration number that’s valid for all of your unmanned aircraft for three years.”

Because owners can list more than one drone with each entry, Mr. Huerta said that the actual number of unmanned aerial vehicles registered for flying in U.S. airspace may be even higher than the more than 325,000 registrations on file.

Drone owners who fail to register their aircraft are subject to being fined up to $27,000 and risk being sentenced to as many as three years in prison if caught operating unmanned devices not on file with the FAA.

Source:  http://www.washingtontimes.com

Beech F33A Bonanza, Airline Training Center Arizona Inc, N1564A: Incident occurred February 08, 2016 at Phoenix Goodyear Airport (KGYR), Maricopa County, Arizona

AIRLINE TRAINING CENTER ARIZONA INC: http://registry.faa.govN1564A

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07

AIRCRAFT ON TAKEOFF, STRUCK A BIRD, RETURNED AND LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, GOODYEAR, AZ

Date:  08-FEB-16
Time:  18:22:00Z
Regis#:  N1564A
Aircraft Make:  BEECH
Aircraft Model:  33
Event Type:  Incident
Highest Injury:  None
Damage:  Minor
Flight Phase:  TAKEOFF (TOF)
City:  GOODYEAR
State:  Arizona

US agency to fund India's aviation safety upgrade: Under the agreement, United States Technical Development Agency will partially fund improving systems at the Directorate General of Civil Aviation

Union Minister for Civil Aviation, Ashok Gajapathi Raju Pusapati meeting the Director of US Trade Development Agency, L I Zak, in New Delhi



The US will fund India to improve its overall aviation safety mechanism, including in the areas of operation, airworthiness and licensing. India’s aviation regulator, the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA), and United States Technical Development Agency (USTDA) on Tuesday signed the Grant Agreement for India Aviation Safety Technical Assistance Phase II.

Under the agreement, USTDA will partially fund improving systems at the DGCA. While USTDA’s assistance will be of $808,327, contractor firm The Wicks Group (TWG) would share the cost of assistance at $75,000.

The assistance, according to the ministry, became necessary after the International Civil Aviation Organization raised safety concerns about the country’s aviation in its audit report in 2012. Later, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) carried out an International Aviation Safety Assessment (IASA) audit in September 2013 and a review in December 2013. After the assessment, India was assigned Category 2 safety rating in January 2014.

Under Phase I of the agreement, TWG had assisted DGCA in preparing for reassessment by FAA in December 2014, the ministry said.

The government’s contribution would be $446,866, including “in-kind cost share, valued at $196,866 for international round-trip air travel on Indian air carriers between the US and India and in-country ground transportation for the contractor during the duration of the assistance”. Besides, it would cover the cash cost share of $250,000.

In March 2014, the USTDA, in coordination with FAA, approached DGCA and offered assistance under a grant agreement to address issues in the wake of IASA audit findings.

Then, TWG assisted DGCA in addressing the issues and prepared for a reassessment by FAA in December 2014. Based on that reassessment and a follow-up visit in March 2015, India’s Category 1 status was restored in April 2015.

“Phase II of the current project is aimed at sustaining efforts undertaken during 2014 for restoration of IASA Category 1 status and bringing in more systemic improvements in the area of operation, airworthiness and licensing. It will include components on general aviation and business aviation,” the ministry of civil aviation said.

OFF TO A FLYING START

United States Technical Development Agency will fund $808,327, to improve systems at the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA); contractor firm The Wicks Group (TWG) to share $75,000

The government’s contribution to be $446,866

The assistance became necessary after International Civil Aviation Organization raised safety concerns about India’s aviation, in its audit report in 2012

Under Phase I of the agreement, TWG had assisted DGCA in preparing reassessment by FAA

Story and photo:  http://www.business-standard.com

Three airlines file bids for Visalia air service



Visalia recently lost scheduled air service after SeaPort Airlines abruptly discontinued service from Visalia to Burbank and Sacramento in mid-January. They mysteriously closed up all their operations in the state and filed for bankruptcy protection.

Wasting little time, the Department of Transportation (DOT) called for a new bidding round Jan. 20 under the Essential Air Service (ESA) subsidy available to Visalia.

Now, three airlines have filed notice with the DOT that they would like to take over the contract to offer regular flights to other California cities from Visalia. The city has been asked to respond to the bids by Feb. 25.

The three airlines are Great Lakes who lost out to SeaPort after several years of rocky service in Visalia, Boutique Air of San Francisco and Hawaii-based Mokulele Airlines.

Mokulele may be the least expensive, asking for a $2.1 million subsidy. They would fly 24 weekly round-trip flights to LAX. All three would duplicate that schedule. Great Lakes asks for $2.6 million and Boutique Air says they want $3.5 million to provide regular service to both LAX and Oakland or Sacramento.

Visalia council members could choose to take an alternate offer – $3 million from the DOT – for airport improvements and give up on the ESA after years of trying to make it work. That would leave the city to boost efforts for private commercial use and freight air service.

Passengers would be encouraged to fly in and out of Fresno.

Source:   http://www.visaliatimesdelta.com

Cessna 152, N555UF, United Flight Systems: Fatal accident occurred November 17, 2013 in Spring, Texas

NTSB Identification: CEN14FA057 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, November 17, 2013 in Spring, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/08/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 152, registration: N555UF
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The purpose of the night instructional flight was to in remain in the airport traffic pattern and practice touch-and-go landings. According to air traffic control data, during the initial climb following the second touch-and-go landing, the flight instructor told the tower controller that the airplane was experiencing “engine problems” and requested to make an immediate 180-degree turn back to the airport for landing. Based on available radar data, the airplane was likely less than 250 ft above the ground when the flight instructor reported the engine problem. A witness reported that, while the airplane was on the downwind leg for the first landing, the engine sounded abnormal and that the engine continued to run roughly while the airplane was on initial climb following the second landing. Several witnesses reported seeing the airplane in a steep left turn before it entered a near-vertical descent into terrain. A postaccident airframe examination did not reveal any malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. The carburetor heat control was found in the “off” position. Control cable continuity was confirmed between the carburetor heat box and the cockpit control; however, impact damage to the carburetor air box precluded a determination of whether the carburetor heat was activated at the time of the accident. Although the weather conditions at the time of the accident were conducive to the formation of carburetor ice at reduced engine power settings, the investigation was unable to determine to what extent carburetor ice might have formed during the accident flight. 

Additionally, disassembly of the carburetor revealed that one of its two hollow polymer floats was flooded with fuel, which would reduce the buoyancy of the float and could result in poor idle power performance and/or possible flooding of the carburetor. During the 5 years preceding the accident, the carburetor manufacturer issued multiple service bulletins (SB) that acknowledged that the hollow polymer float design had known issues with fuel leaking into the float through a welded seam. The carburetor manufacturer specified that all affected carburetors should be inspected within 30 days and then at 30-day intervals until the affected floats were replaced with an updated solid-epoxy float design that was impervious to flooding. Owner/operator compliance with the service bulletins was considered optional under FAA regulations. According to maintenance documentation, the accident carburetor had not been inspected as specified by the SBs.

Ultimately, the root cause for the partial loss of engine power could not be identified because the investigation was unable to determine to what extent carburetor icing, the flooded float, or a combination of the two conditions could have contributed to the loss of engine power. Following the partial loss of engine power, it is likely that the flight instructor failed to maintain airspeed during the turn back to the airport, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The flight instructor's failure to maintain airspeed following a partial loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined during postaccident examination, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall and subsequent loss of airplane control.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On November 17, 2013, at 1915 central standard time, a Cessna model 152 airplane, N555UF, was substantially damaged during a forced landing at the David Wayne Hooks Memorial Airport (DWH), Spring, Texas. The flight instructor and student pilot were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to WBR Interests LLC and operated by United Flight Systems, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, without a flight plan. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local area training flight that had departed DWH at 1900.

According to air traffic control (ATC) data, the purpose of the instructional flight was to remain in the airport traffic pattern to practice night takeoffs and landings. At 1900:22, the tower controller cleared the accident flight for takeoff and to remain in a left traffic pattern for touch-and-go landings on runway 17R (7,009 feet by 100 feet, asphalt). The accident airplane was first observed on radar about 150 feet above ground level (agl) while on the upwind leg. The airplane continued to make left traffic for runway 17R before being cleared for the first touch-and-go landing at 1904:42. At 1906:48, the airplane descended below available radar coverage while on a 1/4 mile final for runway 17R. The airplane reemerged on radar at 1908:15, about 1/4 mile south of the runway departure threshold at about 250 feet agl. The airplane continued to make left traffic for runway 17R before being cleared for the second touch-and-go landing at 1911:08. At 1913:48, the last radar return was recorded for the accident flight about 1/3 mile north of the runway approach threshold at about 150 feet agl. At 1914:41, the flight instructor told the tower controller that they were having "engine problems" and requested to make a 180-degree turn back to the airport for a landing. At 1914:47, the tower controller cleared the flight for the 180-degree turn back landing. Based on available information, the airplane had completed the second touch-and-go landing and was on initial climb when the flight instructor reported the loss of engine power. At 1914:51, there was an open-microphone transmission from the accident airplane that comprised of "No, No, My." No additional transmissions were received from the accident flight.

The tower controller reported that after he cleared the flight for the 180-degree turn back landing, he saw the airplane enter a steep left bank and descend nose-down into the terrain located on the east side of the airport.

Another witness reported hearing the accident airplane while it was on a left downwind leg for runway 17R and remarked that the sound of the engine was abnormal. The same witness reported that the engine continued to run rough while the airplane was on initial climb following the second touch-and-go landing. Several witnesses to the accident reported seeing the accident airplane in a steep left turn before it entered a near vertical descent into terrain. Two of these witnesses reported seeing the wingtip navigation and strobe lights in a near vertical line, indicating a near 90-degree bank angle, before the airplane banked past 90-degrees and descended nose-down into the terrain.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

--- Flight Instructor ---

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the flight instructor, age 22, held a commercial pilot certificate with single and multi-engine land airplane and instrument airplane ratings. He also held a flight instructor certificate with single engine airplane and instrument airplane ratings. His last aviation medical examination was completed on May 23, 2013, when he was issued a second-class medical certificate with no limitations or restrictions. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings. His last flight review, as required by FAA regulation 61.56, was completed upon the reissuance of his flight instructor certificate dated September 6, 2013.

The flight instructor's flight history was reconstructed using pilot logbook information and employment documentation. He had been employed by the airplane operator, United Flight Systems, since October 11, 2013. His most recent pilot logbook entry was dated November 15, 2013, at which time he had accumulated 332.4 hours total flight time, of which 247.9 hours were listed as pilot-in-command. He had accumulated 290.6 hours and 40.6 hours in single engine airplanes and multi-engine airplanes, respectively. He had logged 166 hours of flight time in Cessna 152 airplanes. He had logged 2.1 hours in actual instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) and 58.6 hours as simulated IMC. He had provided 63.5 hours of flight instruction since receiving his initial flight instructor certificate on August 6, 2013. He had flown 13.2 hours during night conditions. According to the logbook, there was only one logged night flight during the 12 month period before the accident flight. The night flight was completed on November 15, 2013, and included 3 landings.

According to the flight instructor's logbook, he had flown 119.3 hours during the prior 12 months, 97.3 hours in the previous 6 months, 71.1 hours during prior 90 days, 65.7 hours in the previous 60 days, and 62.3 hours in the 30 day period before the accident flight. The flight instructor's logbook did not contain any recorded flight time for the 24 hour period before the accident flight; however, according to operator records, he had completed two earlier flights, totaling 2.5 hours, on the day of the accident.

--- Student Pilot ---

According FAA records, the student pilot, age 23, held a student pilot certificate. His last aviation medical examination was completed on July 1, 2013, when he was issued a first-class medical certificate with no limitations or restrictions. A search of FAA records showed no accident, incident, enforcement, or disciplinary actions.

The student pilot was a foreign-national who was receiving flight instruction toward a pilot certificate. According to available logbook information, between February 4, 2008, and September 18, 2008, the student pilot had received basic flight instruction in the Republic of India. During this period of flight instruction, the student pilot received 21.4 hours of dual flight instruction and flew 19.6 hours solo. After September 18, 2008, there were no logged flights until the student pilot completed his first instructional flight in the United States on October 18, 2013. The student pilot received an additional 12.5 hours of dual instruction and flew 0.3 hours solo while receiving flight instruction in the United States. The student pilot's combined flight experience totaled 53.8 hours, of which 19.9 hours were logged as solo flight. All of the student pilot's flight experience had been accumulated in Cessna 152 airplanes. According to available information, the student did not have any night flight experience before the accident flight. The student pilot's logbook contained a flight instructor endorsement for solo flight in a Cessna 152 that was dated November 9, 2013.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane was a 1981 Cessna model 152 single-engine airplane, serial number 15284692. A 110-horsepower Lycoming model O-235-L2C reciprocating engine, serial number L-17634-15, powered the airplane through a fixed-pitch, two blade, McCauley model 1A103/TCM6958 propeller. The airplane had a fixed tricycle landing gear, was capable of seating two individuals, and had a certified maximum gross weight of 1,675 pounds. The accident airplane was issued a standard airworthiness certificate on October 27, 1980. The current owner-of-record, WBR Interests LLC, purchased the airplane on February 20, 2007; however, the airplane had been operated by United Flight Systems since March 15, 1993.

The recording tachometer indicated 5,699.4 hours at the accident site. The airframe had accumulated a total service time of 15,699.4 hours at the time of the accident. The engine had accumulated a total service time of 5,610.4 hours at the time of the accident and 3,674.3 hours since a field overhaul that was completed on November 4, 2004. The last annual inspection of the airplane was completed on July 25, 2013, at 15,622.4 total airframe hours. On September 5, 2013, at 15,676.1 total airframe hours, the carburetor heat control cable was replaced. The last recorded maintenance was the replacement of the airplane's transponder on November 4, 2013. A postaccident review of the maintenance records found no history of unresolved airworthiness issues.

The airplane had a total fuel capacity of 26 gallons (24.5 gallons useable), which was distributed evenly between two 13-gallon wing fuel tanks. A review of fueling records established that the airplane fuel tanks were topped-off before the accident flight. Following the accident, a fuel sample was collected from the truck that was used to fuel the accident airplane. The fuel sample was blue in color, consistent with 100 low-lead aviation fuel. Additionally, the collected fuel sample did not contain any particulate or water contamination.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1853, the DWH automated surface observing system reported: calm wind, visibility 10 miles, sky clear, temperature 23 degrees Celsius, dew point 21 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 29.89 inches-of-mercury. The United States Naval Observatory reported that the sunset and end of civil twilight at DWH was at 1725 and 1751, respectively. The moonrise was at 1742 for the full-phase moon.

The carburetor icing probability chart included in Federal Aviation Administration Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin No. CE-09-35, Carburetor Icing Prevention, indicated that the accident flight was likely operating in atmospheric conditions that were associated with a serious risk of carburetor ice accumulation while operating at reduced engine power settings.

COMMUNICATIONS

A review of available ATC information indicated that the accident flight had received normal air traffic control services and handling. A transcript of the voice communications recorded between the accident flight and David Wayne Hooks Air Traffic Control Tower are included with the docket materials associated with the investigation.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The David Wayne Hooks Memorial Airport (DWH) is a privately owned airport that is open to the public. The airport is located approximately 17 miles northwest of Houston, Texas. The airport field elevation was 152 feet msl. The airport is serviced by an air traffic control tower and ground control. The airport has three parallel runways: runway 17R/35L (7,009 feet by 100 feet, asphalt); runway 17L/35R (3,987 feet by 35 feet, asphalt); and a water runway 17W/35W (2,530 feet by 100 feet).

Runway 17R incorporated a displaced threshold measuring 1,007 feet, a 4-light precision approach path indicator, runway end identifier lights, and high intensity runway edge lighting. According to air traffic control documentation, all runway lighting was functional at the time of the accident.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

A postaccident investigation confirmed that all airframe structural components and flight controls were located at the accident site. The wreckage was located on the east side of the airport, north of taxiway hotel and east of taxiway mike. The initial impact point was determined to be where the right wing collided with the northwest corner of a hangar structure. The outboard 9 feet of the right wing separated during the initial impact and was found about 90 feet northwest of the initial impact point on taxiway mike. The main wreckage, located about 29 feet north of the initial impact, consisted of the left wing, fuselage, empennage, engine, and propeller. The forward fuselage, including the cockpit, exhibited impact damage that significantly reduced the cabin volume. The left wing remained partially attached to the fuselage. The left wing had impacted a structural post and a spiral staircase that was associated with a residential hangar. The aircraft wreckage was orientated on a 035 degree magnetic heading. The fuselage was found resting on its lower surface. There was no evidence of an inflight or postimpact fire. The first responders reported that there was a substantial fuel odor at the accident site.

Flight control cable continuity could not be established due to multiple separations; however, all observed separations were consistent with overstress fractures. Both flaps had separated from their respective wings; however, a flap actuator measurement was consistent with the flaps being extended between 0 degrees and 10 degrees. The measured extension of the elevator trim actuator was consistent with a nose-level attitude. The ignition/magneto switch was found selected to the left magneto. The throttle was found extended about 1-inch from a full power position. The mixture control was found in the full-rich position. The carburetor heat control was found full forward in the OFF position. The carburetor air box had been crushed during the impact sequence, which precluded a determination if the carburetor heat had been activated at the time of the accident. Control cable continuity was confirmed between the carburetor heat box and the cockpit control. The cockpit fuel shutoff handle was found in the ON position and the firewall fuel strainer contained fuel. A fuel sample obtained from the fuel strainer exhibited no indication of water contamination when exposed to water detection paste. The fuel primer was found full forward and secured. The stall warning horn sounded when a vacuum was applied to the leading edge inlet.

The engine remained attached to the firewall by its mounts and control cables. Mechanical continuity was confirmed from the engine components to their respective cockpit controls. Internal engine and valve train continuity was confirmed as the engine crankshaft was rotated. Compression and suction were noted on all cylinders in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. The spark plugs were removed and exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. Both magnetos provided spark on all leads when rotated by hand. All four engine cylinders were removed and no anomalies were noted with the cylinders, valves, pistons, connecting rods, or crankshaft. There were no obstructions between the air filter housing and the carburetor. The carburetor fuel bowl contained a liquid that was consistent with the color and odor of 100 low-lead aviation fuel. The fuel sample obtained from the carburetor bowl did not exhibit any water or particulate contamination. The Precision Airmotive model MA-3A carburetor, p/n 10-5199, s/n CR15409, was equipped with white, hollow, polymer floats (p/n 30-804). One of the two floats was found flooded with a blue fluid that was consistent with 100 low-lead aviation fuel. The second float was void of any fuel.

The propeller remained partially attached to the engine crankshaft flange. Both propeller blades exhibited minor leading edge damage. One propeller blade exhibited chordwise scratches. Neither blade exhibited appreciable spanwise bends or blade twist.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

On November 18, 2013, an autopsy was performed on the flight instructor by the Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences, located in Houston, Texas. The cause of death was attributed to multiple blunt-force injuries that were sustained during the accident. The FAA's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology tests on samples obtained during the autopsy. The toxicological test results were negative for carbon monoxide and ethanol. Atropine was detected in liver and blood samples. Atropine, often used in emergency resuscitation efforts, is a prescription anticholinergic agent and muscarinic antagonist.

On November 19, 2013, an autopsy was performed on the student pilot by the Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences. The cause of death was attributed to multiple blunt-force injuries that were sustained during the accident. The FAA's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute performed toxicology tests on samples obtained during the autopsy. The toxicological test results were negative for carbon monoxide, ethanol, and all drugs and medications.

ADDITIONAL DATA/INFORMATION

On January 30, 2008, Precision Airmotive LLC, the manufacturer of the MA-3A carburetor, issued Mandatory Service Bulletin No. MSA-13 that required the replacement of brass and polymer hollow floats with a new solid-epoxy float design. According to the service bulletin, the installation of the new solid-epoxy float design would eliminate the known issues of hollow floats becoming flooded with fuel. Additionally, the service bulletin acknowledged that the polymer float design had known issues with fuel leaking into the hollow portion of the float through the welded seam. The service bulletin stated that a flooded float would reduce the buoyancy of the float, which could result in poor idle power performance and/or possible flooding of the carburetor. The service bulletin stipulated that affected carburetors be inspected within 30 days and then at 30 day intervals until the new solid-epoxy float was installed. The service bulletin stated that if the carburetor exhibited any signs of flooding, the float should be replaced immediately. Additionally, the service bulletin stipulated that all carburetors affected by the bulletin be overhauled every 10 years or at the specified engine time between overhaul (TBO), whichever occurred first.

On July 18, 2008, Lycoming Engines issued Mandatory Service Bulletin No. 582 that required all Lycoming engines that were equipped with Marvel-Schebler, Facet, Precision Airmotive, or Volare carburetors to be in compliance with Precision Airmotive Mandatory Service Bulletin No. MSA-13. The Lycoming service bulletin stipulated that affected carburetors be inspected within the next 30 days and then at 30 day intervals until the new solid-epoxy float was installed.

On February 1, 2009, Volare Carburetors LLC, who had acquired the Precision Airmotive carburetor line, issued Service Bulletin No. SB-2, which reiterated that hollow floats needed to be replaced with the newer solid-epoxy float design. The service bulletin stated that deteriorated, leaking, or broken floats can negatively affect engine performance. In conformance with the previously issued service bulletins, it stipulated that all affected carburetors be inspected within 30 days and then at 30 day intervals until the affected floats were replaced with the newer solid-epoxy float design.

On April 2, 2009, Volare Carburetors LLC issued Service Bulletin No. SB-5, which superseded the older Mandatory Service Bulletin No. MSA-13. The updated service bulletin clarified that the new float design was made of a solid, blue epoxy material. Previous service bulletins had mistakenly identified the new float design as being made from foam. Service Bulletin No. SB-5 stipulated that affected carburetor floats should be inspected per the guidance contained in Service Bulletin No. SB-2.

A review of maintenance records established that the carburetor was rebuilt and tested by Precision Airmotive on August 11, 2004, before being installed on the accident engine during a field overhaul completed on November 4, 2004. The engine overhaul documentation specified that the accident engine had a 2,400 hour TBO. At the time of the accident, the accident engine had accumulated 3,674.3 hours since its last overhaul. A review of available maintenance paperwork did not reveal any maintenance, repair, inspection, or overhaul of the carburetor since the last engine field overhaul. Additionally, the reviewed maintenance information did not contain any documentation that Service Bulletin Nos. MSA-13, 582, SB-2, or SB-5 had been complied with.

WBR INTERESTS LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N555UF

NTSB Identification: CEN14FA057 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, November 17, 2013 in Spring, TX
Aircraft: CESSNA 152, registration: N555UF
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 17, 2013, at 1915 central standard time, a Cessna model 152 airplane, N555UF, was substantially damaged during a forced landing at the David Wayne Hooks Memorial Airport (DWH), Spring, Texas. The flight instructor and student pilot were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to WBR Interests LLC and operated by United Flight Systems, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, without a flight plan. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local area training flight that had departed DWH at 1900.

According to preliminary air traffic control (ATC) data, the purpose of the instructional flight was to remain in the local traffic pattern to practice nighttime takeoffs and landings. At 1900:24, the tower controller cleared the accident flight for takeoff and to remain in a left traffic pattern for touch-and-go landings on runway 17R (7,009 feet by 100 feet, asphalt). The accident airplane was first observed on radar about 150 feet above ground level (agl) while on the upwind leg. The airplane continued to make left traffic for runway 17R before being cleared for the first touch-and-go landing at 1904:40. At 1906:48, the airplane descended below available radar coverage while on a 1/4 mile final for runway 17R. The airplane reemerged on radar at 1908:15, about 1/4 mile south of the runway departure threshold at about 250 feet agl. The airplane continued to make left traffic for runway 17R before being cleared for the second touch-and-go landing at 1911:10. At 1913:48, the last radar return was recorded for the accident flight about 1/3 mile north of the runway approach threshold at about 150 feet agl. At 1914:42, the flight instructor told the tower controller that they were having "engine problems" and requested to make a 180-degree turn back to the airport for a landing. (The airplane had completed the touch-and-go landing and was on initial climb when the flight instructor reported the loss of engine power.)

A witness reported hearing the accident airplane while it was on a left downwind leg for runway 17R and remarked that the sound of the engine was abnormal. The same witness reported that the engine continued to run rough while the airplane was on initial climb following a touch-and-go landing. Several witnesses to the accident reported seeing the accident airplane in a steep left turn before it entered a near vertical descent into terrain. Two of these witnesses reported seeing the wingtip navigation and strobe lights in a near vertical line (indicating a near 90-degree bank angle) before the airplane banked past 90-degrees and descended nose-low into the terrain.

At 1853, the DWH automated surface observing system reported: calm wind, visibility 10 miles, sky clear, temperature 23 degrees Celsius, dew point 21 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 29.89 inches-of-mercury. The United States Naval Observatory reported that the sunset and end of civil twilight at DWH was at 1725 and 1751, respectively. The moonrise was at 1742 for the full-phase moon.



Officials with the Harris County Medical Examiner’s Office have released the names of the two victims killed in Sunday evening’s fatal plane crash at David Wayne Hooks Memorial Airport.

Twenty-two year-old instructor Pedro Coronado, of Spring, and 23-year-old pilot Kartheek Balija were both killed in the accident, according to officials. According to HCN news partner KTRK-TV, investigators say the pilot reported engine trouble moments before the crash but the cause is currently unknown.

Federal Aviation Administration representative Lynn Lunsford said that the pilot was attempting to return to the runway when the plane crashed into the hangar at about 7:15 p.m, according to KTRK-TV’s report. Initial reports from the scene indicated that the plane crashed into a hanger and was fully engulfed in flames. Due to the heavy amount of fuel and fire, responders were unable to approach the wreckage.

Officials confirmed the plane, a single-engine Cessna 152, only had two occupants on board. One victim died at the scene and one was transported by ground to Memorial Hermann Hospital. According to KTRK-TV, medical examiners identified the two on board as a student and an instructor.

Representatives from the airport and nearby flight school could not be reached for comment.

The National Transportation Safety Board is currently leading the investigation, Lunsford said.


 



 








 

HOUSTON (KTRK) -- A plane crashed Sunday night at an airport in Spring, killing two people aboard, and experts want to know what went wrong. 

Dozens of firefighters rushed to David Wayne Hooks Memorial Airport on Boudreaux Road in northwest Harris County as alerts about the plane crash rang out around 7:15pm.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the pilot of the single-engine Cessna 152 had been in the traffic pattern performing touch-and-go landings when engine problems were reported.

We're told the pilot was returning to the runway when the plane clipped one hangar, then crashed into another hangar.

Harris County Sheriff's Office authorities said the it took a moment before emergency crews could safely approach the wreckage due to the large amount of fuel that spilled.

Witnesses reported seeing the plane out of control just before the crash happened.

Rob Patterson, who works near the airport, said, "It was towards the end of the day. They said the plane was going straight up and it started going straight up in the air. And it looked like it got inverted and then it came down. Turn around to land and then came straight down on the side of the runway."

One person in the plane died at the scene. Another was rushed to Memorial Hermann Hospital in critical condition, but later died. The crash victims have not yet been identified.

The National Transportation Safety Board is now responsible for this investigation. So far we have only been told an investigator will be assessing the wreckage and determining what potentially caused the engine to fail.


Source:  http://abclocal.go.com

 HOUSTON (KTRK) -- A plane crashed Sunday night at an airport in Spring, killing two people aboard, and experts want to know what went wrong.

Investigators say the pilot of that plane reported engine trouble moments before the crash. They're still, however, trying to figure out why.

As National Transportation Safety Board investigators work to determine what caused the crash, we were able to get a closer look at the wreckage in the daylight. According to the FAA, the single engine Cessna 152 came down Sunday at about 7:15pm. FAA spokesperson Lynn Lunsford says the pilot was trying to return to the runway when the plane crashed into the hangar.

Rob Patterson, who spoke with eyewitnesses, said, "It started going straight up in the air. It looked like it got inverted and then came down."

Patterson knows people who witnessed the aircraft's final moments. He says they couldn't believe what they were seeing.

"It turned around, it looked like to land and it just came straight down," he said.

The tail number on that plane N55UF matches that on the website of nearby United Flight Systems. They run a flight school at Hooks Airport. The medical examiner identifies the two on board that plane as a pilot and an instructor.

At United on Monday we found a sign on the door reading "closed until further notice." No one from the flight school returned our repeated calls.

Authorities have not yet publicly identified the two who died in the crash.


http://abclocal.go.com

HARRIS COUNTY – A flight instructor and a student pilot  were killed after their small plane crashed into a building at Hooks Airport Sunday evening in northwest Harris County, officials confirmed. 

 It happened at the airport located at 8830 Boudreaux Road around 7:15 p.m.

According to the Harris County Sheriff’s Office, the two were performing touch and go maneuvers in the Cessna 152 when the pilot called the tower to report engine trouble. The plane then slammed into a hangar and burst into flames.

First responders were not able to get close to the wreckage because of the blaze. Once they were able to get to the victims, the injuries were too severe.

The student was pronounced dead at the scene and the instructor was taken by ambulance to Memorial Hermann Hospital, but also died.

The plane is registered to an insurance company in New Castle, Delaware.


Source:   http://www.khou.com