Friday, October 27, 2017

Hospital visit for plane crash survivor turns his luck again: Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche, N7376Y, fatal accident occurred May 27, 2017 in Haines, Alaska





Despite the fact he wasn't supposed to be on the plane headed toward Haines that crashed into Lynn Canal during Beer Fest last spring, it's hard not to describe Chan Valentine, 32, as lucky.

Valentine, the lone survivor, suffered a broken hip, a crushed face and the loss of two friends in the crash. If none of that had happened, doctors would not have discovered the grade three tumor growing on Valentine's brain this summer.

A cascade of random events led to that discovery. It's tough to pinpoint which event led doctors to find the tumor. The plane crash that put him in the hospital is an obvious one. The fact that he survived the initial crash is noteworthy. One could also point to the circumstances facilitating his rescue from the crushed twin-engine Piper Comanche that the incoming tide threatened to drown.

Stanley Su Quoc Nguyen and Valentine were supposed to fly to Haines from Juneau on a Friday evening, but flight trouble in Seattle delayed Nguyen's arrival until Saturday morning. Valentine waited and tried to book a ferry, but the terminal's computer system was down and they couldn't sell him standby tickets.

"Initially I was a little irritated that that had happened but now I'm like, 'Ah well, I wouldn't have known about the tumor otherwise,'" Valentine said.

Valentine and Nguyen decided to fly to Haines with his old boss and friend David Kunat. Kunat and Valentine worked together at a small tech support company in Juneau.

Valentine likely wouldn't have known about the tumor either, had he accepted Nguyen's offer to sit in the front seat of Kunat's plane.

"I knew I wanted to sit in the back," Valentine said. "I knew that if I sat up front I was going to have to do some flying whether I wanted to or not."

Valentine said Kunat would have probably tried to pressure him into flying, and thought it would be safer if Nguyen, also a pilot, sat up front.

"I just wanted to kick back and relax and watch the scenery go by," Valentine said.

Shortly into the flight, Kunat quizzed Nguyen on the proper recovery steps should an engine fail. They discussed the protocols and then Kunat told Nguyen to take the controls. Kunat cut the right engine. Valentine said Nguyen took the proper steps, but the engine wouldn't restart.

Kunat took the controls back and attempted to jumpstart the engine by diving the plane.

Through it all, Valentine said he never felt scared. Even after Kunat attempted several dive starts that failed and he'd watched Kunat and Nguyen manually lower the landing gear, he trusted they'd be OK.

"I wasn't nervous at all," Valentine said. "It was just kind of fun. I never felt scared. I just blacked out. The last thing I remember was them manually putting the gear down and then hearing a backhoe rev up."

If it weren't for Steve Dice, who spotted the out of control plane through binoculars, the crash might have gone unnoticed. Dice was visiting friends when they witnessed the plane crash. Once the group crossed the inlet, a high school track and cross-country runner raced to get help at a nearby summer tour operation.

Dice, who coincidentally happened to be a heavy equipment operator, was able to tow the wreckage away from the tide with a backhoe brought from the camp.

Valentine woke up to the sound of the backhoe. He remembers hearing the helicopter show up, but not much else over the next few days.

Before the helicopter arrived, the backhoe had to pull the plane five to ten feet at a time, about 30 feet in total, to keep Valentine's head above water as the tide came in. When local paramedics Al Giddings and Tim Holm arrived, they had to use snips to cut a hole in the plane to pull him out.

"I mostly just remember my left hip hurting like hell," Valentine said. "Pretty much nothing else hurt at that point, or I don't remember anything else hurting. It's hard because my glasses were broken, too, and so much of what you remember is what you can see. My vision without my glasses might as well be 20/2200 so I couldn't see a damn thing, which is probably good."

Valentine was eventually transported to Seattle's Harborview Hospital where doctors discovered the tumor, Valentine's mother, Theresa Valentine, said. She said she didn't know the details of what her son had gone through until she read about it in the newspaper.

"We didn't really know what had happened and we were kind of confused because his wallet was all wet and we didn't know he'd been in the water," Theresa Valentine said. "It was like, 'Oh, how many more miracles can we have? It was kind of surreal."

Theresa said they dealt with a host of different doctors before a neurosurgeon informed them of the tumor which was between the size of an egg and a golf ball.

"There was a different group for the brain, another one for the hand, another one for the face, another one for the hip, another one for the neck," Theresa Valentine said. "(The tumor) was pretty scary, but it was kind of something I tried not to think about. We had to get through the rest of this stuff first. We kept it on the back burner. I remember one day going and looking on the web about the tumor, but that was too scary."

Valentine named the tumor "Bobby the Brain Mass" because he loves the television show King of the Hill, and it made the tumor easier to talk about with people.

Doctors removed Bobby and Valentine has since received radiation therapy. He'll have to get biannual MRIs for the rest of his life to monitor for tumor recurrence.

In addition to the brain surgery, doctors had to reconstruct Valentine's face. His parents had to feed him liquid food out of what he described as a "turkey baster" because his jaw was wired shut. He was on a no chew diet for two weeks after doctors unwired his jaw. He ate grits and burrito bowls.

"Burritos without tortillas as long as you remember not to have lettuce," Valentine said. "It seems like if you put food on your tongue it lets you know pretty quick whether it thinks you can swallow that safely or not. At that point I was mostly trying to avoid choking because I was like 'Alright, you survived a plane crash let's not choke on a chunk of burrito."

Valentine has spent the last five months healing and completing physical therapy at his parent's home in Corvallis, Ore. He sat for two months in a wheelchair. They caught a college football game. In his spare time he plays the banjo, poorly, he said.

He said he has a pile of get well letters he's working on responding to. Earlier this month he visited Juneau and proposed to his girlfriend of five years. They're going to get married around Christmas. Valentine said doesn't think too much about the crash. When he does, he said, he mostly just feels grateful. Grateful and lucky.

"I feel really lucky," Valentine said. "It's hard to not feel lucky."

Valentine has a fundraising site to help with his medical cost: https://www.gofundme.com/chancerfund.

Original article ➤ http://www.chilkatvalleynews.com



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Juneau, Alaska
Piper Aircraft; Chino Hills, California
Lycoming Engines; Gilbert, Arizona

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N7376Y 



NTSB Identification: WPR17FA108
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 27, 2017 in Haines, AK
Aircraft: PIPER PA 30, registration: N7376Y
Injuries: 2 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 27, 2017, about 1101 Alaska daylight time, a Piper PA-30, a multiengine airplane, N7376Y, collided with the ground shortly after a low-level pass over a remote airstrip at Glacier Point, 12 miles southeast of Haines, Alaska. The commercial pilot, and a pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured, and a rear-seated passenger sustained serious injuries. The aircraft was registered to the pilot and operated as a personal flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Juneau International Airport, Juneau, Alaska, about 1015 and was destined for Haines Airport, Haines, Alaska.

An eyewitness located across Lynn Canal, about 2 miles east of Glacier Point, observed the accident airplane through binoculars, flying northbound at tree top level near the airstrip. He stated the airplane reached the end of the airstrip, descended just before it banked to the right, and subsequently impacted the shoreline in a right wing-down, nose-down attitude. The airplane came to rest near the water's edge about 1/4-mile northeast of the airstrip. The eyewitness and three other people responded to the accident site by boat. About halfway across the canal, when cell coverage was available, the witness called local authorities. The eyewitness stated that the rear-seated passenger was the only occupant that was responsive when they arrived at the accident site. The witnesses reported that impact damage prevented them from extricating the rear-seat occupant from the wreckage. Within minutes, tidal water rose and submerged the airplane. A tractor was brought to the site from a local tour facility, and used to drag the airplane to shallow water. Local authorities arrived shortly thereafter and extricated the rear-seated passenger.

The rear-seated passenger was interviewed by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), and reported that about 20 minutes into the flight the pilot intentionally shut down the right engine and was demonstrating how to restart the engine during flight. Despite several attempts, the engine would not rotate through with electrical power to start the engine. The pilot then made several attempts to air-start the engine by gaining altitude and diving the airplane down to use airflow to assist in rotating the engine. After two unsuccessful attempts to air-start the engine, the pilot diverted to a remote gravel airstrip at Glacier Point. The witness stated the pilot intended to land at Glacier Point and use a battery booster located in the baggage compartment to start the engine. As the airplane approached the airstrip, the pilot made a low-level pass to check the conditions at the airstrip. He concluded by stating this was his last memories of the flight.

Initial examination of the airplane by the NTSB-IIC and Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed impact damage consistent with a right wing-down, nose-down airplane attitude during ground impact. The airplane remained intact and all flight control surfaces were accounted for and cable control continuity was attained. The landing gear was in the down position and the landing gear position switch was also in the down position. The landing disengage motor-raise motor release arm was found in the disengaged position. The emergency landing gear extension handle was removed from its stowed position and installed in a socket on the emergency disengage control. The flaps were in the up position and the flap lever was in the down position. Both engines separated from their respective wing mounts and remained partially attached to the wings by control cables and tubing. The left propeller blades revealed gouging, twisting and material loss of one blade. The right propeller was found in the feathered position with one blade bent rearward; the opposing blade that was unremarkable. The elevator trim actuator was found in the full nose-down position, and the rudder trim indicator was in the nose left position.

The wreckage was recovered for further examination.

Michigan State taking bus to Northwestern after team plane fails on multiple takeoff attempts

Mark Dantonio's Michigan State squad didn't get off the ground Friday. 


The Michigan State football team might be feeling sore when it faces Northwestern on Saturday.

The Spartans are taking a bus to Evanston, Illinois, after the team’s plane showed an error before two takeoff attempts Friday, per a report from Cody Tucker of the Lansing State Journal.

The journey from East Lansing to Evanston runs about 4 hours, although afternoon traffic could change that. A plane ride takes about 1 hour.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.landof10.com

A Soaring Passion

David Patterson with his daughter.



By David Patterson

David Patterson always wanted to fly. As a pre-teen, he shuttled between parents in Los Angeles and San Jose, Calif., on PSA (Pacific Southwest Airlines), the “smiley jets.” Although the trip lasted only an hour, Patterson thought the view out the window was spectacular. The summer after his 10th-grade year, he called a friend, Jeff, “just to catch up.” Jeff said he was taking a summer school course on aviation careers at the local airport, and as part of the course, the school district was paying for two hours of flight lessons. Patterson promptly signed up for the same course.

Fast-forward 20 years: Patterson is a commercial airline pilot and although he still loved to fly, the duties of a pilot had become “too procedural.” He looked for an inexpensive way to get back into the “spirit” of general aviation. The pilot admits “soaring” had always been in the back of his mind. (Soaring is defined as the sport of flying a sailplane or glider — a motorless aircraft — through the air using gravity or air currents instead of engine power.) Through an internet search, Patterson discovered a soaring club right here in the Metroplex, Texas Soaring Association, one of the largest soaring clubs in the United States with 60 years of history. TSA owns several gliders and operates from of a private airfield in Midlothian where they charge $100 for a 20-30 minute flight (there are size and height requirements). For youth and adults who wish to learn to fly, the association also offers classes. No experience is necessary. Information on flights and requirements can be found at texassoaring.org.


David Patterson with his son. 


One fine Saturday I drove down and signed up for a flight, and life has never been the same. I spend my weekends soaring with the birds, listening to air brush by the canopy, enjoying the cool air at 6,000 feet, usually with my kids along (they’ve been soaring since they were 5 and 4, and are now 18 and 17). All your worries and concerns seem to drop away as you make lazy figure eights in the sky.

The sport of soaring features high-performance fiberglass and carbon-fiber sailplanes that can cost upwards of $100,000 -- and that don’t have motors (some do, but they’re only used part time). These are fully enclosed planes, not hang gliders. Typically, they have much longer wings than airplanes. These wings have rollerblade wheels on the tips so that, as they slow down after landing, if one of the wings scrapes the ground, the rollerblade wheels take the impact. They connect by rope to a tow plane in order to get pulled up into the sky. The tow plane goes as high as the glider pilot wants, and then the glider pilot pulls a release knob in the cockpit and the tow rope falls away from the glider. The tow plane then goes back down to get yet another glider.

Meanwhile, the glider pilot looks for rising air currents called thermals. By using these thermals, a pilot can stay aloft for hours on end and, if desired, even fly hundreds of miles. We’ve got folks who do it every week for a majority of the year. They even have contests to see who can get around a course of GPS “waypoints” in the least time, again, often covering hundreds of miles.

How do you find these rising air currents? Easy. Look for the little cumulus clouds that usually dot the Texas sky. Underneath each one of them is a thermal. But sometimes there isn’t enough moisture in the air to form clouds. In that case, you can look for dark brown fields on the ground. They absorb more sunlight than the green fields do and usually produce good thermals. Another good indicator is turkey buzzards and other soaring birds. It’s not uncommon to be in the same thermal with several birds at the same time. Once you find a thermal, circle in it to gain altitude. It’s as easy as that. Repeat as necessary until the sun starts getting low in the sky (or until you have to go to the bathroom.) If one thermal peters out, head for the nearest cumulus cloud or dark field. Thermals can last 10 to 30 minutes or so. They tend to drift with the winds aloft.

But what if you don’t find a thermal? No big deal. These gliders typically have glide ratios of 1:34 or better. That means for each foot of altitude lost, they will go 34 feet forward in still air. This equates to an altitude loss of only maybe 126 feet per minute at about 41 mph. So if you’re at 2,500 feet above the ground, you’ve got a good 18 minutes to get back to the airport, which is more than adequate. It’s probably more gradual than a leaf falling from a tree.

Do people ever land away from the airport? Yes, sometimes, but you’re only landing at about 44 mph and these planes land fine in a plowed field. They are easy to disassemble and put in a special trailer and tow them back to the club. But usually the tow plane just comes and gives you another tug up into the sky. There are hundreds of small private airports you can land on if you ever need to. They’re literally everywhere.

How do you land without an engine? A sailplane has airbrakes that pop up out of the wing. When you are on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern, at about 800 to 1,000 feet, abeam (or adjacent to) your intended landing spot, you put out about half to two-thirds speed brakes, using a lever you control with your left hand. You plan your landing approach using this extra “drag.” If you end up being too low, you merely put the speed brakes back into the wing by pushing the lever forward, and it’s like adding power. If you are too high, you pull the lever further aft and get more speed brakes, which helps you go down faster, while not accelerating. So it’s really just like having an engine. It doesn’t take long to learn and anyone can do it. If you can drive a stick shift, you can fly a glider. If you can’t drive a stick shift, you can fly a glider.

My favorite thing about soaring is the wonder of doing something that man longed to do for thousands and thousands of years, which is to soar like the birds. Now we have the ability to do it, but only one percent or less of the population ever does it. So take a ride in a sailplane or glider sometime. I guarantee you’ll be hooked!

Go to ssa.org for more info on soaring in the United States.

Story and photo gallery ➤ http://www.star-telegram.com

Man breaches security, approaches plane at Bellingham International Airport (KBLI)

An unidentified man breached security and ran onto the airfield at the Bellingham International Airport Thursday night, according to Mike Hogan, spokesman for the Port of Bellingham.

Shortly before 11:30 p.m., a man in his 20s with a scruffy beard and wearing a dark tracksuit jumped the fence at the base area and ran onto the airfield, according to emergency radio traffic.

The man had apparently jumped over the fence and approached an airplane before he was “challenged” by airport security, according to emergency radio traffic.

The suspect was last seen jumping the fence again, to get out, near the general aviation building – near Gate 9 – and the fuel area off Airport Way, according to the radio traffic.

Extensive search of the area were done but the suspect was nowhere to be found – the case remains under investigation, Hogan said. No damage was reported to any airplanes or airport property.

Video surveillance footage was available and is being examined, Hogan said.

The Whatcom County Sheriff’s Office is leading the investigation in coordination with the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security.

Every airport has a “unique footprint” that requires every facility to have its own airport security program that’s approved by the Transportation Security Administration, said Lorie Dankers, spokeswoman for TSA with Homeland Security. Each security program is designed to address perimeter security, prevention and detection of unauthorized entry, presence and movement of individuals and vehicles into and within secured airport areas, Dankers said.

She said TSA regulates each airport’s compliance with its security plan and does comprehensive inspections.

Further information about the incident was not made immediately available.

Original article  ➤ http://www.bellinghamherald.com

Albuquerque International Sunport Airport (KABQ) announces new carry-on procedures

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (KRQE) – The Transportation Security Administration announced new carry-on procedures at the Albuquerque International Sunport Friday.

The new procedures require travelers to place all electronics larger than a cell phone in bins for x-ray screening when going through the security checkpoint. These electronics should not have anything on top or below them, just as laptops have been screened for years.

Objects such as chargers and electronic toothbrushes can stay in the bag.

Passengers are still asked to remove their one-quart bag containing liquids, gels and aerosols in quantities of less than 100 ml (3.4 ounces). New procedures require the bag be placed in a bin by itself for the x-ray screening.

Carry-on Bag Procedures

Organize the carry-on bag so electronics larger than a cell phone can be quickly and easily accessed when at the security checkpoint;

Ensure the quart-size bag of liquids, gels and aerosols can be accessed quickly and easily;

Don’t overstuff the carry-on bag. An uncluttered bag makes the screening process easier and quicker for the passengers and TSA officers. Consider checking bags when feasible;

Once screening is complete, be sure to put all electronics back in the carry-on bag. Double-check the bins to make sure nothing is left behind.

There are no new changes to what travelers can bring through a checkpoint.

The TSA says the new procedures are already in place at Farmington Four Corners Regional Airport, Lea County Regional Airport in Hobbs and the Santa Fe Municipal Airport.

These safety measures are going to be implemented nationwide in the coming weeks.

Story and video ➤ http://krqe.com

Cessna 182P, N1216M, Haywood Flying Club: Accident occurred October 26, 2017 at Hayward Executive Airport (KHWD), Alameda County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

Aircraft on taxi, struck a parked aircraft, Cessna 525A CitationJet CJ2, N854FM.

Haywood Flying Club: http://registry.faa.gov/N1216M 

Date: 27-OCT-17
Time: 02:00:00Z
Regis#: N1216M
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C182
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: HAYWARD
State: CALIFORNIA

Beech B200 King Air, N22F, Timmerman Air LLC: Incident occurred October 26, 2017 at Centennial Airport (KAPA), Englewood, Arapahoe County, Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Aircraft landed and the gear collapsed.

Timmerman Air LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N22F

Date: 26-OCT-17
Time: 18:33:00Z
Regis#: N22F
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: BE20
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ENGLEWOOD
State: COLORADO

Airbus A321-200, American Airlines, N542UW: Incident occurred October 26, 2017 at Orlando International Airport (KMCO), Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Flight AAL1905: Sustained nose cone damage due to birdstrike. No injuries.

American Airlines Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N542UW

Date: 26-OCT-17
Time: 14:54:00Z
Regis#: N542UW
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A320
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: AMERICAN AIRLINES
Flight Number: AAL1905
City: ORLANDO
State: FLORIDA

Boeing 767-400, Delta Air Lines, N833MH: Incident occurred October 26, 2017 at Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport (KATL), Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Flight DAL110: Aircraft on landing, flap sustained unknown damage from tire tread loss. No injuries.

Delta Air Lines Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N833MH

Date: 26-OCT-17
Time: 09:45:00Z
Regis#: DAL110
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: B767
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: DELTA AIRLINES
Flight Number: DAL110
City: ATLANTA
State: GEORGIA

Stinson 108-2 Voyager, N927D: Accident occurred October 26, 2017 at Lewiston–Nez Perce County Airport (KLWS), Idaho

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane, Washington

http://registry.faa.gov/N927D

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA028
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 26, 2017 in Lewiston, ID
Aircraft: STINSON 108, registration: N927D

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.


Aircraft on landing, ground looped.

Date: 26-OCT-17
Time: 19:16:00Z
Regis#: N927D
Aircraft Make: STINSON
Aircraft Model: L5
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: LEWISTON
State: IDAHO

Cessna 402C, N2714M, Cape Air: Incident occurred October 23, 2017 at Hanscom Field Airport (KBED), Bedford, Middlesex County, Massachusetts

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston, Massachusetts

Flight KAP21: Aircraft cabin overhead dome light caught fire. Fire extinguished. Aircraft landed without incident.

Hyannis Air Service Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N2714M

Date: 23-OCT-17
Time: 22:37:00Z
Regis#: N2714M
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C402
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Aircraft Operator: CAPE AIR
Flight Number: KAP21
City: BEDFORD
State: MASSACHUSETTS

Piper PA28: Incident occurred October 26, 2017 in Rochester, Olmsted County, Minnesota

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota

Aircraft wing struck a parked truck.

Date: 26-OCT-17
Time: 18:30:00Z
Regis#: N8199B
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: ROCHESTER
State: MINNESOTA

Robinson R44: Incident occurred July 09, 2017 in Austin, Lander County, Nevada

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada

Rotorcraft on landing sustained minor damage. Notice received October 26, 2017

Date: 09-JUL-17
Time: 01:00:00Z
Regis#: N810BX
Aircraft Make: ROBINSON
Aircraft Model: R44
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: AUSTIN
State: NEVADA

Cessna 510 Citation Mustang, N378CM, 378 Mustang LLC: Incident occurred October 26, 2017 at Charlotte Douglas International Airport (KCLT), North Carolina

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charlotte, North Carolina

Aircraft windshield sustained unknown damage inflight. Diverted and landed without incident.

378 Mustang LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N378CM

Date: 26-OCT-17
Time: 20:20:00Z
Regis#: N378CM
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C510
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: CHARLOTTE
State: NORTH CAROLINA

Piper PA-28R-201T Turbo Arrow III, N551DK, Tarrow Group LLC: Incident occurred October 26, 2017 near Millington Regional Jetport Airport (KNQA), Shelby County, Tennessee

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Memphis, Tennessee

Aircraft force landed on a highway.

Tarrow Group LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N551DK

Date: 26-OCT-17
Time: 15:15:00Z
Regis#: N551DK
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MILLINGTON
State: TENNESSEE




TIPTON COUNTY, Tenn. — Two people in a single-engine aircraft were unharmed when they were forced to make an emergency landing on a Tipton County highway.

WREG was told the plane was traveling from Smyrna to the Millington airport when it began experiencing engine trouble.  

The pilot was forced to land on Highway 14 near 206 between two lanes of traffic.

No one on board was injured.

The Federal Aviation Administration is headed to the scene to investigate.

Story and video:  http://wreg.com

ELA Aviacion 10 Eclipse, N230MG: Incident occurred October 26, 2017 at Tri-Cities Airport (KTRI), Bristol, Sullivan County, Tennessee

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville, Tennessee

Rotorcraft on landing flipped over.


http://registry.faa.gov/N230MG


Date: 26-OCT-17

Time: 16:40:00Z
Regis#: N230MG
Aircraft Make: ELA AVIACION GYROCOPTER
Aircraft Model: 10 ECLI
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: BRISTOL
State: TENNESSEE 



BLOUNTVILLE, Tenn. — Public safety officers are investigating after an aircraft crashed Thursday at Tri-Cities Airport.

Sullivan County Emergency Management Director Jim Beam said a small two-seat aircraft was hovering close to the ground when it hit the tarmac and rolled over about 12:30 p.m.

The crashed vehicle appeared to be a gyrocopter, an aircraft that uses propellers to get airborne — similar to a helicopter, but smaller and less powerful.

The aircraft’s pilot, the only person on board, was walking around soon after the crash, Beam said. No one was injured on the ground.

Airport spokeswoman Kristi Haulsee said the incident resulted in the temporary closure of the main runway. A Delta flight from Atlanta was diverted as the runway was closed, but the flight was able to land later Thursday afternoon, she added. The runway was closed for more than an hour.

Haulsee said the airport’s public safety office is investigating the incident. The office will write an incident report and send it to the Flight Standards District Office in Nashville, which is part of the Federal Aviation Administration. The FAA may decide to follow up with its own investigation, she added.

The gyrocopter, which received some damage, was cleared from the runway and could be seen Thursday afternoon in an airport hangar.

The airport resumed normal operations by 2 p.m.

http://www.heraldcourier.com

Six Chuter West Legend XL, N781SC, Skystriders Light Sport Aviation LLC: Accident occurred on October 26, 2017 in Prosser, Benton County, Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane, Washington

Skystriders Light Sport Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N781SC

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 26, 2017 in Mabton, WA
Aircraft: SIX CHUTER WEST LLC LEGEND XL, registration: N781SC

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft struck powerlines and crashed.

Date: 26-OCT-17
Time: 16:00:00Z
Regis#: N781SC
Aircraft Make: LEGEND POWERED PARACHUTE
Aircraft Model: LEGEND XL
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: SERIOUS
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: PROSSER
State: WASHINGTON

Skystar Kitfox, N157D: Accident occurred October 01, 2016 at Jennings Airport (3R7), Jefferson Davis Parish, Louisiana



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N157D




NTSB Identification: CEN17LA001
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 01, 2016 in Jennings, LA
Aircraft: DRAKE KITFOX SPEEDSTER, registration: N157D
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 1, 2016, at 1300 central daylight time, an experimental light sport, amateur-built Drake Kitfox Speedster, N157D, collided with the terrain following a loss of control after takeoff from the Jennings Airport (3R7), Jennings, Louisiana. The pilot received serious injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by the private pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The intended destination was Slaughter Airpark (SL77), Slaughter, Louisiana.

The pilot reported that he was the last airplane in a flight of four to takeoff. He stated he verified his altitude and airspeed, and retracted the flaps during the takeoff. He stated he checked the airspeed, lowered the nose of the airplane, and resumed the climb. The pilot reported the airplane rolled to the right, which he corrected, then the airplane "abruptly" rolled to the left. He was unable to correct the roll and the airplane descended to impact with the terrain. The pilot reported that there were no mechanical failures/malfunctions of the airplane.

A witness reported the airplane was airborne in a wings level, "very high" nose up attitude when he first saw it. He stated that after a few seconds the left wing dropped and the nose lowered. Shortly after that, the right wing dropped and the airplane nosed down even more until it impacted the terrain.

A video posted on YouTube by furley85 showed the airplane climbing out in a steep, nose-high attitude after takeoff. The airplane was a couple hundred feet above the grass airstrip when the left wing dropped and the nose lowered. The airplane rolled back through wings level then the right wing dropped and the airplane impacted the terrain. The airplane received substantial damage to the wings and fuselage.



NTSB Identification: CEN17LA001
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 01, 2016 in Jennings, LA
Aircraft: DRAKE KITFOX SPEEDSTER, registration: N157D
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 1, 2016, at 1400 central daylight time, an experimental light sport, amateur-built Drake Kitfox Speedster, N157D, collided with the terrain following a loss of control after takeoff from the Jennings Airport (3R7), Jennings, Louisiana. The pilot received serious injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The aircraft was registered to and operated by the private pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight was originating at the time of the accident and the destination is unknown at this time.

Cirrus SR22, N295AR, Advance Wellness: Accident occurred March 05, 2016 in Hauppauge, Suffolk County, New York



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Farmingdale, New York
Cirrus Aircraft; Duluth, Minnesota
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Advance Wellness: http://registry.faa.gov/N295AR



NTSB Identification: ERA16LA124
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 05, 2016 in Hauppauge, NY
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N295AR
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 5, 2016, about 1508 eastern standard time, a Cirrus Design Corporation SR22, N295AR, was substantially damaged following a total loss of engine power and forced landing at Hauppauge, New York. The pilot and one passenger were not injured. The airplane was registered to Advance Wellness and was operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight from Groton, Connecticut (GON) to Farmingdale, New York (FRG) originated about 1430.

According to the pilot, during cruise flight, at 2,200 feet mean sea level, the engine "sputtered" twice, then lost all power. The fuel selector was on the left tank, so he switched to the right tank and attempted a restart. The engine would not restart, so he elected to activate the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS). The CAPS deployed normally and the airplane touched down in a lawn adjacent to an industrial complex near Hauppauge. The pilot and passenger exited the cockpit and first responders arrived to assist.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. Structural damage to fuselage was evident. The wing fuel tanks contained fuel. An initial inspection of the engine with a borescope revealed physical evidence of valve strikes to the top surfaces of all six pistons.

The engine was removed from the airframe and sent to the manufacturer's facility for further examination. During the disassembly of the engine, the starter adapter was removed, and damage to the camshaft gear teeth was noted. The oil filter was removed and opened; metal particles were found inside the filter element. Several metal particles were found in the oil sump after removal. The cylinders were removed; each piston head exhibited valve strike signatures. The camshaft was removed from the engine case. The camshaft was intact; however, about 50% of the camshaft gear teeth were smeared or missing.

Metallurgical examination of the failed camshaft gear teeth revealed that the first fractured tooth, located about 180ยบ from the timing mark, failed from fatigue. The fracture surface exhibited beach marks and multiple initiation areas at the surface of the tooth. From the direction of the crack growth indicated by the arrest lines, the tooth separated in the direction of loading from engine operation by the mating crankshaft gear. Most of the remaining broken or missing teeth exhibited overload signatures. Camshaft gear hardness was measured with a diamond slim profile penetrator and met the manufacturer's specifications.


The engine, model number IO-550-NB7, was built on February 25, 2001, and had accumulated 1,543.7 hours at the time of the accident. On August 9, 2005, Continental Motors Inc. issued Service Bulletin SB05-08, which called for the replacement of the camshaft gear with an improved gear, nominally 0.060" wider. The bulletin compliance time was, "At next engine overhaul or at camshaft gear replacement." The recommended overhaul time for this engine was 2,000 hours or 12 years, whichever occurred first. At the time of the accident, the service bulletin had not been complied with and the accident airplane's engine did not have the improved camshaft gear installed.









NTSB Identification: ERA16LA124
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 05, 2016 in Hauppauge, NY
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N295AR
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 5, 2016, about 1508 eastern standard time, a Cirrus Design Corporation SR22, N295AR, was substantially damaged following a total loss of engine power and forced landing at Hauppauge, New York. The pilot and one passenger were not injured. The airplane was registered to Advance Wellness and was operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight from Groton, Connecticut (GON) to Farmingdale, New York (FRG) originated about 1430.

According to the pilot, during cruise flight, the engine sputtered twice, then went quiet. The fuel selector was on the left tank, so he switched to the right tank and attempted a restart. The engine would not restart, so he elected to activate the Cirrus Airplane Parachute System (CAPS). The CAPS deployed normally and the airplane landed in a lawn adjacent to an industrial complex near Hauppauge. The pilot and passenger exited the cockpit and first responders arrived to assist.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. Structural damage to fuselage was evident. The wing fuel tanks contained fuel. An initial inspection of the engine revealed physical evidence of valve strikes to the top surfaces of all six pistons.

The engine was retained for further examination.