Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Piper J3C-65 Cub, N98198, Maggie's Mixer LLC: Incident occurred March 16, 2016 near Marina Municipal Airport (KOAR), Monterey County, California

Date: 16-MAR-16 
Time: 23:58:00Z
Regis#: N98198
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: J3C
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Jose FSDO-15
City: MARINA
State: California

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A FIELD, NEAR MARINA, CA

MAGGIE'S MIXER LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N98198


SALINAS, Calif. -

UPDATE 6:09 PM: The Monterey County Sheriff's Office said two people aboard a small plane that landed in a field in Salinas managed to walk away without major injuries. 

The plane made an emergency landing along Nashua Road near Cooper Road just before 5 p.m.

KION spoke with the pilot and will have more tonight at 10 on the CW and 11 on CBS. 

PREVIOUS STORY:

A small aircraft went down in Salinas Wednesday evening, according to the Monterey County Sheriff's Office.

The crashed was reported just before 5 p.m. on Nashua Road near Cooper Road.

Two people were in the plane, deputies said.

Story and video:  http://www.kionrightnow.com



CASTROVILLE, Calif. —A small private plane made an emergency crash landing in a farm field between Salinas and Castroville at 5 p.m. Wednesday.

The pilot and passenger were not injured, Monterey County Sheriff's Cmdr. John Thornburg said.

The bright yellow plane could be seen nose-down in the middle of a plowed field along Nashua Road.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.ksbw.com

Aero L-39C Albatros, Jet Fighters International Inc., N57XX: Incident occurred March 16, 2016 in the Everglades, Broward County, Florida

Date: 16-MAR-16 
Time: 23:01:00Z
Regis#: N57XX
Aircraft Make: AERO VODOCHODY
Aircraft Model: L39
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19
City: FORT LAUDERDALE
State: Florida

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED ON A ROAD NEAR THE EVERGLADES, 11 MILES FROM FORT LAUDERDALE, FL

JET FIGHTERS INTERNATIONAL INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N57XX 




BROWARD COUNTY, Fla. - Broward County Fire Rescue crews responded to a jet that made an emergency landing in the Everglades, while crews also responded to a fire in that same area Wednesday night.

The incidents happened just two miles apart from each other.

The jet landed just east of U.S. 27, north of I-75, and about three miles west of the Sawgrass Expressway, fire officials said. The two people on board were not injured and were taken to the Sawgrass Recreation Park. 

The type of jet has been used as a military fighter jet trainer, but has grown in popularity among private pilots in the U.S. 

"I looked up and it was a jet," Steve Radak, who was out fishing at the time of the landing, said. "It was about 200 feet or less." 

The Federal Aviation Administration reports that the pilot was flying an "experimental Aero Vodochody aircraft" that was headed to Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport when the aircraft experienced an engine-related problem. 

Authorities said the pilot landed on a levee.

A couple of miles from the crash site a fire was burning, and smoke from it could be seen just east of U.S. 27 in Weston. 

Crews aren't sure how it started, since there wasn't any lightning or storm clouds around. Fire crews, with the assistance of the Florida Forest Service, also responded to the fire. 

The FAA is investigating the jet crash, and forestry officials are now working to determine if the emergency landing and the fire are connected. 

Story and video:  http://www.local10.com



A small jet with two people on board made an emergency landing Wednesday night in the Everglades near Sawgrass Recreation Park, according to Broward Sheriff Fire Rescue.

The jet landed on a levee in the park, which is east of U.S. 27 and north of Interstate 75. Mike Jachles, a spokesman for fire rescue said in a tweet that an airboat was used to reach the plane's occupants.

No one was injured, he said.

It was not clear Wednesday night what caused the jet to land in the Everglades.

Original article can be found here: http://www.miamiherald.com

A small jet made an emergency landing in the Florida Everglades in western Broward County Wednesday night, officials said.

Two people were aboard the jet when it landed east of U.S. 27 and north of Interstate 75 near Sawgrass Recreational Park, Broward Sheriff Fire Rescue officials said.


No one was injured. It's unknown what forced the jet, from Jet Fighters International, to land.


Original article can be found here: http://www.nbcmiami.com

A small plane made an emergency landing on a levee in the Everglades, officials said.

The single-engine jet made its descent around 7 p.m. near Sawgrass Recreation Park, east of U.S. 27 and north of Interstate 75, said Broward Sheriff Fire Rescue spokesman Mike Jachles.

The two people on board were not injured, he said.

The aircraft, an experimental Aero Vodochody plane, was on its way to Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport when the pilot reported an emergency after an engine-related problem, said Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Jim Peters.

On its Twitter account, the city of Weston later tweeted images of the aircraft that had the words Jet Fighters International on its fuselage.

The area where the plane landed isn't easily accessible, Jachles said. A Broward Sheriff Fire Rescue airboat unit was sent out, but couldn't reach the pilot and passenger.

The two were picked up by sheriff's office deputies and a fire rescue battalion chief in a pickup truck and then taken to Sawgrass Recreation Park.

"The plane is probably staying there overnight," Jachles said.

The pilot and passenger have not been identified by authorities.  

The FAA will investigate the incident.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.sun-sentinel.com

Cessna P210N Pressurized Centurion, N55EU: Up for auction

The Cessna flown by Andrew Wright. 
Picture: National Crime Agency


A Cessna P210N Pressurized Centurion aircraft used in a foiled attempt to smuggle £33.5m worth of cocaine into the country via a North Yorkshire airfield is being put up for auction later this month.

Andrew Wright, who took his nickname from the fictional aviator Biggles, used the Cessna P210N Pressurized Centurion aircraft to import some 268 kilos of the Class A drug in eight trips from Breighton Airfield in Selby to Germany and back over three months.

Wright’s drug smuggling ring was smashed in November 2014 after Wright touched down in Selby with his latest consignment and a border officer searching his Porsche Cayenne discovered four bricks of cocaine.


Andrew Wright


The aircraft was confiscated and after being dismantled for search and storage purposes was delivered to Wilsons Auctions, who will be putting it under the hammer on March 31.

Auctioneers say the plane is a “high wing, single engine, six-seat, high performance, general aviation aircraft”.

It is one of only seven Cessna 210 aircraft on the UK and Irish register, but no estimate has been given for its value.

Andrew Wright was jailed last month for 19 years for his part in the drug smuggling conspiracy. The 52-year-old, along with the plot’s mastermind Mark Dowling, 43, and his trusted lieutenant Jamie Williams, 38, were handed stiff deterrent jail sentences at the Old Bailey.

Judge Nicholas Cooke QC told them the amount they smuggled was “off the scale” and of “exceptional seriousness”.

“Big fish” Dowling was handed 24 years in jail and his right hand man Williams received 23 years.

Wright, who owned two Cessna light aircraft, used his aerial photography business Skyviews R Us Ltd as a cover for his illegal activities.

Original article can be found here: http://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk

http://registry.faa.gov/N55EU

Marine jet catches fire aboard Norfolk-based USS Kearsarge during takeoff



A Marine jet aboard the USS Kearsarge caught fire after experiencing catastrophic engine failure during takeoff in the Persian Gulf, according to the Navy.

The incident occurred on the flight deck of the amphibious assault ship on March 8 while the AV-8B Harrier was applying take-off power, according to the Norfolk-based Naval Safety Center.

No injuries were reported, and the fire was extinguished by the ship's crew within minutes, according to Navy spokesman Lt. Cmdr. Tim Hawkins. He said flights aboard the Norfolk-based ship in support of Operation Inherent Resolve were able to quickly resume.

Hawkins said it wasn't immediately clear Wednesday where in the jet the fire occurred. An investigation is ongoing, he said.

A Navy report says there was at least $2 million worth of damage to the Harrier, putting it in the Navy's most serious category. 

The jet is primarily used for close-air support and attack missions. In November, Harriers aboard the Kearsarge began conducting operations in Iraq against the Islamic State after about a monthlong absence by Navy aircraft in the region.

The Kearsarge Amphibious Readiness Group deployed from Norfolk in October. The Harrier that caught fire is assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 162, which is based at Marine Corps Air Station New River in North Carolina. Marines from the squadron are part of the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit, which is embarked with the Kearsarge and the amphibious transport dock Arlington and amphibious dock landing ship Oak Hill.

Original article can be found here:  http://pilotonline.com

Cessna 207 Skywagon, Yute Air, N1653U: Fatal accident occurred May 30, 2015 in Bethel, Alaska

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Factual Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -   National Transportation Safety Board:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N1653U

FAA Flight Standards District Office:     FAA Anchorage FSDO-03

NTSB Identification: ANC15FA032
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 30, 2015 in Bethel, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 207, registration: N1653U
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On May 30, 2015, about 1130 Alaska daylight time, a Cessna 207, N1653U, sustained substantial damage after impacting trees about 40 miles southeast of Bethel, Alaska. The airplane was being operated by Yute Air, Bethel, as a visual flight rules (VFR) post maintenance flight under Title 14 CFR Part 91 when the accident occurred. The commercial pilot, the sole occupant, sustained fatal injuries. Visual meteorological conditions were reported in the area of the accident, and company flight following procedures were in effect. The accident flight originated at the Bethel Airport about 0830, with an expected return time of 1200.

About 1415, flight coordination personnel from Yute Air in Bethel notified the director of operations (DO) that the accident airplane was overdue. About 1435, the DO notified the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) who issued an alert notice (ALNOT). About 1532, an aerial search was initiated by Yute Air, Alaska State Troopers, Alaska Air National Guard, as well as other air operators and Good Samaritans. On May 31, about 1730, searchers discovered the airplane's submerged and fragmented wreckage in a swift moving river slough.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION 

The pilot, age 47, held a commercial pilot certificate with an airplane single and multi-engine land rating. The most recent second-class airman medical certificate was issued on April 14, 2015, and contained no limitations. According to company records, the pilot had about 7,175 total flight hours; about 6,600 flight hours were accrued in the accident airplane make and model. 

In the preceding 90 and 30 days prior to the accident, the company listed the pilot's flight time as 362 and 94 hours, respectively. The pilot was hired on June 9, 2010. 

The pilot completed an airman competency/proficiency check flight under Title 14 CFR Part 135.293 (Initial and Recurrent Testing), and 135.299 (Pilot-in-Command Line Check), with the chief pilot for the operator in a Cessna 207 airplane on January 20, 2015. In the remarks section of FAA form number 401-07 (airman competency/proficiency check form), the chief pilot wrote: "IPC (instrument proficiency check) satisfactory." 

The accident flight was the pilot's first flight of the day, on the second day of a two-week on-duty rotation.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION 

The Cessna 207, a seven-seat high-wing, tricycle landing gear-equipped airplane, serial number (S/N) 20700253, was manufactured in 1974. It was powered by a Continental Motors IO-520-F engine, serial number 810024-R, rated at 300 horsepower. The airplane was also equipped with a Hartzell model PHC-C3YF-1RF, controllable pitch propeller. According to maintenance records, the last inspection performed on the airplane was a 100-hour inspection dated May 29, 2015; at that time the airframe had accumulated 28,211.4 total hours. The engine had accrued 6,296.9 hours, 537.8 hours since overhaul. 

In addition to the 100-hour inspection, all six of the engines cylinders were replaced just before the accident flight. The purpose of the flight was to break in the new cylinders in accordance with Continental Motors guidelines, which recommends a normal takeoff and a shallow climb to gain airspeed and cooling. Level flight should be at 75% power and richer mixture for the first hour of flight. The second hour power settings should alternate between 65% and 75% power, varying power every 15 to 20 minutes. Descents should be made at low cruise power settings, avoiding long descents with cruise power.

On September 23, 2013, a "Winter Heat Kit" was installed on the accident airplane. The modification included the installation of an additional air induction box on the right side of the engine, additional ducting and scat tubing, as well as a heat shroud on the right muffler, and a Y duct to join the airflow from the left and right heat shrouds to increase cabin heat. According to the operator's director of maintenance (DOM), the air induction box was fabricated onsite, the Y duct was a specialized order to accommodate the modification, and the right exhaust pipe was shortened to fit the larger muffler and heat shroud.

Examination of the exhaust system and records revealed that it was not in compliance with either the engine or the airframe manufacturer's specifications. This type of modification requires an FAA 337 Major Repair and Alteration per CFR 43, Appendix A. After a submitting a Form 337 describing the alteration, the Flight Standards District Office determines what data is needed to approve the alteration as a field approval or a supplemental type certificate (STC). Once the alteration is approved the 337 is signed by an FAA inspector and the airplane is considered airworthy.

Modifications for the accident airplane were not in compliance with the manufacturers, or any known STC, nor was there an accompanying FAA 337 Major Repair and Alteration documentation.

During an inspection of Yute Air maintenance operations in May 2013, a Cessna 207 with the exhaust modification was in the hangar and there was discussion between the PMI and DOM. Based on that discussion, the PMIs understanding of the modification was that it was a "work in progress" and the final product and required paperwork would be submitted for inspection and approval. The DOM believed that a verbal agreement had been made and that a logbook entry of the modification would meet the requirement.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION 

The closest weather reporting facility was Bethel, about 40 miles northwest of the accident site. At 1053, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) reported, in part: Wind 210 degrees at 10 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; clouds and sky condition few at 12,000 feet, scattered at 2,000 feet; temperature 16 degrees C; dew point 9 degrees C; altimeter 30.12 inHg.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION 

The main wreckage was submerged in the Kwethluk River, at 244 feet mean sea level (msl), and at latitude N60.20.123 and longitude W161.03.256. An area believed to be the initial impact point was marked by a broken treetop, atop an estimated 30-foot-tall birch tree. A portion of the right wing tip was found on the ground beneath the tree. The fuselage came to rest inverted on its left side, along the opposite side of the river, submerged in fast flowing water, about 270 feet from the initial impact point, on a magnetic heading of 010 degrees. The engine separated from the airplane; the engine and propeller were located submerged upstream and in the main river channel. 

On August 5, 2015, under the supervision of the NTSB investigator-in-charge (IIC), the wreckage was examined at a private hangar in Bethel. Flight control system cable continuity was established from each control surface to the point of impact-related damage.

The throttle, propeller, and mixture controls were in the full forward position. The cowl flaps were in an intermediate position. The fuel selector was selected to the left tank, the fuel valve was also indicating the left fuel tank. The fuel pump was in the off position. Both the left and right fuel tanks were bladder tanks. The vent system was unobstructed; the vented fuel caps were on and secure.

On August 19, the NTSB IIC, and the parties noted in this report, completed an engine teardown and inspection after it was retrieved from the river and transported to Palmer, Alaska. 

The engine was submerged in a river for 2 months and showed signs of water corrosion. The engine was placed on a stand for examination. The exam revealed impact damage to the oil sump, and a portion left exhaust system was missing. The right side exhaust system was removed and retained for leak testing. Only the risers remained of the left side exhaust system.

Rotational continuity was established throughout the engine and valve train. The crankcase, crankshaft, and camshaft did not show any signs of operational distress, and the bearings showed normal wear. 

An Aviation Supplies & Academics, Inc., (ASA) carbon monoxide detector was mounted on the instrument panel, the date opened was recorded as 09/2013. This type of detector is a spot detector, which turns dark in the presence of carbon monoxide. Instructions on the back of the detector include "Write date opened on front and replace every 90 days."

The examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunction or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION 

A postmortem examination was conducted under the authority of the Alaska State Medical Examiner, Anchorage, Alaska, on June 8, 2015. The cause of death for the pilot was attributed to blunt force, traumatic injuries.

The FAA's Civil Aeromedical Institute performed toxicological examinations for the pilot on August 10, 2015, which was negative for ethanol. The toxicological examination revealed 21 percent carboxyhemoglobin (carbon monoxide) in the pilot's blood. 

Carbon monoxide is an odorless, tasteless, colorless, nonirritating gas formed by hydrocarbon combustion. Carbon monoxide binds to hemoglobin with much greater affinity than oxygen, forming carboxyhemoglobin; elevated levels result in impaired oxygen transport and utilization. 

Nonsmokers may normally have up to 3 percent carboxyhemoglobin in their blood; heavy smokers may have levels of 10 to 15 percent. Family members and friends reported that the pilot was a nonsmoker. 

The NTSB's chief medical officer reviewed the pilot's autopsy, toxicology report, personal medical records, the FAA blue ribbon medical file, and the NTSB IIC's reports.

A copy of the NTSB's medical officer's factual report is available in the public docket for this accident.

SEARCH & RESCUE

When the airplane failed to arrive in Bethel, company personnel initiated a telephone and satellite phone search to see if the airplane had diverted to another village. Unable to locate the airplane, company management personnel contacted the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center, Anchorage to report the missing airplane.

The airplane was not equipped with, nor required to be equipped with, a digital, 406 MHz ELT that instantly transmits a distress signal to search and rescue satellites, thereby alerting rescue personnel within minutes of the location of the crash. As of February 1, 2009, analog, 121.5 MHz ELT's stopped being monitored by search and rescue satellites, and the installation of the 406 MHz has been voluntary.

The fragmented and submerged wreckage was spotted in a river on May 31, about 1730, by former Yute Air pilots who had volunteered to participate in the search and rescue efforts.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Portions of the right exhaust system were retained for further examination and testing. A pressure test was done on the right muffler/heat exchanger, which revealed no leaks or factures. As previously noted, the accident airplane had been retrofitted with an additional muffler/heat exchanger, but a search at the accident site failed to find the additional muffler/heat exchanger, and it remains missing. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

The accident airplane was equipped with automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) technology. In typical applications, the ADS-B capable aircraft uses an ordinary Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver to derive its precise position from the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) constellation, and then combines that position with any number of aircraft parameters, such as speed, heading, altitude, and aircraft registration number. This information is then simultaneously broadcast to other ADS-B capable aircraft, and to ADS-B ground, or satellite communications transceivers, which then relay the aircraft's position and additional information to Air Traffic Control (ATC) centers in real time. 

The data retrieved from the accident airplane's ADS-B information shows the airplane was operating at less than 500 feet msl for the majority of the approximate 3-hour flight. The last return signal from the accident airplane was when it was 23 miles southeast of the accident site, at an altitude of 1,075 feet msl. 

A flight track map overlay is included in the public docket for this accident.

NTSB Identification: ANC15FA032
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 30, 2015 in Bethel, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 207, registration: N1653U
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 30, 2015, about 1130 Alaska daylight time, a Cessna 207, N1653U, sustained substantial damage after impacting trees about 40 miles southeast of Bethel, Alaska. The airplane was being operated by Yute Air, Bethel, Alaska as a visual flight rules (VFR) postmaintenance flight under Title 14, CFR Part 91, when the accident occurred. The commercial pilot, the sole occupant, sustained fatal injuries. Visual meteorological conditions were reported in the area of the accident, and company flight following procedures were in effect. The accident flight originated at the Bethel Airport, Alaska about 0830, with an expected return time of 1200.

About 1415, flight coordination personnel from Yute Air in Bethel notified the Director of Operations (DO) that the accident airplane was overdue. About 1435 the DO notified the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) who issued an alert notice (ALNOT). About 1532, an aerial search was initiated by Yute Air, Alaska State Troopers, Alaska Air National Guard as well as other air operators and Good Samaritans. On May 31, about 1730 searchers discovered the airplane's submerged and fragmented wreckage in a river slough. 

On June 1, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), along with an additional NTSB investigator, an inspector from the Anchorage Flight Standards District Office (FSDO), and members of the Alaska State Troopers, traveled to the accident scene by helicopter and river boats. 

The main wreckage was located submerged in a fast flowing braided river that was surrounded by trees. An area believed to be the initial impact point was marked by a broken treetop, atop about a 30 foot tall birch tree. From the initial impact point the airplane traveled northbound, about 350 feet, coming to rest on its left side, and in the fast moving river water. The engine separated from the airplane and it was located submerged upstream and in the main river channel. The pilot's body was discovered still restrained within the submerged fuselage. 

An on-scene documentation of the debris field was completed, and a detailed wreckage examination is pending following recovery of the airplane. 

The accident airplane was equipped with automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) technology. In typical applications, the ADS-B capable aircraft uses an ordinary Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver to derive its precise position from the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) constellation, and then combines that position with any number of aircraft parameters, such as speed, heading, altitude, and aircraft registration number. This information is then simultaneously broadcast to other ADS-B capable aircraft, and to ADS-B ground, or satellite communications transceivers, which then relay the aircraft's position and additional information to Air Traffic Control centers in real time.

A preliminary NTSB review of ADS-B data archived by the Anchorage Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) showed that the accident airplane was transmitting data for portions of the accident flight. At the last recorded ADS-B position, which was about 6 miles southwest from the accident site, the airplane was flying at an altitude of approximately 475 feet mean seal level (msl), while traveling in an easterly-northeasterly direction. A detailed NTSB analysis of the archived ADS-B data is pending.

The airplane was equipped with a Continental Motors IO-520 engine. A detailed NTSB examination of the engine is pending.

The closest weather reporting facility was Bethel, about 40 miles northwest of the accident site. At 1053, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) was reporting, in part: Wind 210 degrees at 10 knots; visibility, 10 statute miles; clouds and sky condition, few at 12000 feet, scattered at 2000 feet; temperature, 16 degrees C; dew point, 9 degrees C; altimeter, 30.12 inHG.



A Washington pilot who died in the crash of a Yute Air plane during a maintenance flight near Bethel last year had moderate levels of a toxic gas in his system, which National Transportation Safety Board investigators believe came from the aircraft's engine.

Olympia, Washington, resident Blaze Highlander, 47, died when the Cessna 207 he was flying crashed into the Kwethluk River on May 30. The plane, reported missing on a 3 ½-hour flight out of Bethel that morning after recent engine maintenance, was found about 40 miles southeast the next day. Highlander, the pilot and sole occupant, was discovered dead in the wreckage by investigators.

The NTSB's June preliminary report on the crash found that GPS-based telemetry data being broadcast by the aircraft tracked it to an altitude of 475 feet before it struck a tree and plunged into the river. Clint Johnson, the NTSB’s Alaska chief, said it was unlikely weather -- visibility was reportedly “unrestricted” in Bethel on the day of the crash -- would prove to be a factor in the crash.

An NTSB toxicology examination of Highlander’s blood released Monday found a 21 percent saturation of carbon monoxide, a gas found in engine exhausts that can cause symptoms ranging from disorientation to death over time.

A fact sheet on carbon monoxide from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that carbon monoxide saturation greater than 2 percent in nonsmokers or 9 percent in smokers “strongly supports a diagnosis of CO poisoning.”

Millicent Hoidal, the NTSB investigator examining the Yute Air crash, said Tuesday the most likely source for the carbon monoxide in Highlander’s system was the plane’s Continental Motors IO-520 engine. Further details on how that happened are set to be released in a May factual report on the crash.

“What we know is that the carbon monoxide did come from the airplane,” Hoidal said. “It wasn’t something that he had before he got in the airplane.”

Hoidal said that despite the toxicology findings, it’s not clear how severely impaired by the gas Highlander may have been. She said typical blood saturation levels found in carbon monoxide poisonings range from 50 to 60 percent.

“CO affects different people in different ways,” Hoidal said. “He may have been feeling the effects of it, but to what degree it’s difficult to tell.”

Original article can be found here:   https://www.adn.com





The Yute Air crash is one of several fatal 2015 events being covered this year by the Smithsonian Channel series “Alaska Aircrash Investigations,” which has prompted the NTSB to release factual dockets of information on crashes ahead of the air dates for episodes involving them.

In addition to the toxicology report, the docket released for the Yute Air crash includes several photos of the wreckage and crash site, as well as a drawing of its engine exhaust system that includes a marked cabin heat outlet. A Continental Motors air safety investigator is among the company officials participating in the NTSB investigation.

The “Alaska Aircrash Investigations” episode covering Highlander’s death will air at 8 p.m. Sunday. It will also cover another fatal crash last summer, in which 54-year-old Michael Zagula died when his plane hit trees during low passes over his daughter’s Trapper Creek wedding reception. On Tuesday, the NTSB said marijuana and diazepam were found in Zagula’s system, but it couldn't determine whether they were a factor in that crash.

Benson Airport (6MN9) executor contests safety zone change

WHITE BEAR TOWNSHIP — The attorney for the late John Benson wants the Town Board to know amending the runway safety zone could spark the airport’s demise. 

“If houses are put right under low-flying aircraft, there will be complaints and the township and the airport will ultimately be sued,” warned Al Tschida, a North Oaks attorney who is the executor of Benson’s estate.

At that point, Tschida said, he’ll have to be the “unpopular guy” who exercises the right of reversion dictated in Benson’s will. “If the airport is closed because of what we’ve warned about and fought against, we may have to take some action.”

The attorney was referring to a clause in Benson’s will.

When he died in 1996, Benson gifted the airport to the township on the condition that it operate for at least 40 years. If the airport ceases to exist for whatever reason before that time, the executor can re-gift the land to the American Cancer Society.

The township is considering amending the land use safety zone as a result of a lawsuit filed by Scott and Nanci Stoddard, who own land next to the airport they wish to develop. Attorneys advised the change, claiming it’s in the township’s best interest financially to acquiesce. 

At a public hearing March 7, Planner Tom Riedesel reviewed the safety zones, which were adopted in 1985 based on a paved public airport model drafted by MnDOT Aviation. Benson is considered a private airport and has a grass strip runway. New land use safety zone models have been adopted since those standards that recommend a shorter safety zone. In this case, it means eliminating 200 feet of the zone. 

“The reconfiguration allows more housing units on the (Stoddard) property than under current zoning,” Riedesel said, adding that larger properties in or near the safety zones have developed in accordance with airport safety zoning.

The Stoddards, who now live in Lakeville, attended the public hearing but did not speak. The couple wants to develop 19 lots on about 6 acres at 5685 Portland Ave.

Thirty years ago, the MnDOT model was the standard, according to Tschida, who has been flying out of Benson Airport since 1976. “The safety zone has kept houses out of the open space where we have to fly. I guarantee you, if you allow houses in that open space you will get complaints and you will be sued.”

Tschida, who was a close friend of John Benson, also offered the board some legal advice regarding the four-year statute of limitations for “a taking of property.” 

“It’s too late for the Stoddards to sue,” he pointed out. “If there was a taking, and I don’t think there is since the township has the power to zone and regulate, but if the [ordinance] is overboard, it had to be sued upon within four years of the 1985 passage. And how is it the Stoddards can buy in 1990 and consider it a taking?”

In the lawsuit, the Stoddards claim the safety zone was an unconstitutional taking of their property “to benefit the airport’s private gain.”

Calling the League of Minnesota Cities an “insurance company in disguise,” Tschida told the board the League doesn’t care about Benson Airport and only wants to minimize its expenditures. As a League member, the township was provided an attorney to deal with the Stoddard suit, who recommended amending the zone.

With that, the airport spokesman urged the Town Board to say “no” to the recommendation and to bring a motion for summary judgment to dismiss the case.

“They bought the property 26 years ago,” Tschida said. “The taking occurred before they bought, how can they possibly complain now that something was taken from them? How can they claim their lawsuit was timely? The Stoddards walked into the property knowing there was a safety zone. They have not been deprived of anything.”

The board did not make a decision on the runway change at the March 7 hearing. Since all residents within 350 feet of the proposed rezoning were not notified on time, the public hearing was carried over to Monday, March 21.

Original article can be found here: http://www.presspubs.com

Senate Committee Approves Federal Aviation Administration Reauthorization Bill • Bill opens the door to enhanced screening of pilots with possible mental-health problems


The Wall Street Journal
By ANDY PASZTOR
March 16, 2016 11:46 a.m. ET


A U.S. Senate committee on Wednesday approved a bill mandating a big shift in how airlines treat passengers and the way aircraft are certified, while opening the door to enhanced screening of pilots with possible mental-health problems.

The bipartisan legislation, reauthorizing the FAA’s programs and powers through the end of September 2017, also includes other hot-button issues such as expanded use of small commercial drones across the U.S., potentially even at night and outside the sight of operators.

Adopted by the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation after barely an hour of discussion, the measure doesn’t follow the lead of House Republican leaders who favor shifting the entire air traffic control system under the control of an independent, nonprofit corporation.

But even without that divisive proposal, the package is studded with controversial provisions that could prompt tussles on floor of the Senate.

One of the most timely and closely watched parts of the bill calls for the FAA to consider enhanced testing of cockpit crews to identify psychological conditions, including depression and suicidal thoughts or tendencies, that could interfere with safe operation of an airplane. Aviators with previously diagnosed psychological disorders could be subjected to more detailed and frequent medical checks.

The provision comes less than a week after the release of the final investigative report detailing how a mentally unbalanced Germanwings co-pilot last year intentionally crashed his Airbus A320 into the French Alps, killing all 150 on board.

The measure also includes beefed-up consumer protection language requiring regulators to enact rules ensuring that airlines refund fees in the event baggage is lost or delayed beyond a specific period. In addition, the bill mandates greater transparency in disclosing other fees charged to passengers.

The committee narrowly rejected an amendment calling on the Transportation Department to determine what constitutes “unreasonable” fees to change tickets.

Sen. John Thune of South Dakota, the Republican chairman of the panel who led the fight against the amendment, said the bill already incorporates more consumer protection provisions “than any (FAA) bill we have considered in recent memory.”

Another section of the bill is intended to “bolster efforts to keep drones away from airports and other sensitive areas,” Sen. Bill Nelson of Florida, the panel’s ranking Democrat, said in opening up the hearing.

The committee voted 13 to 8 to mandate drone users to incorporate beefed-up privacy protections into their operations.

For the first time, the FAA would be specifically required to detail economic benefits derived by airlines and other users of the nation’s airspace from mandated installation of updated air-traffic control equipment. This issue also has been a point of contention for many years between regulators and industry officials.

The panel punted on the long-running issue of requiring cargo airlines to operate under the same pilot-fatigue rules as passenger carriers. But an amendment may be considered during debate by the full Senate.

Both the House and Senate are moving toward passing a separate, short-term extension of the FAA’s authority—perhaps only lasting a few months—before the agency’s current legislative authorization expires.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.wsj.com

Robinson R44, Hillsboro Aero Academy LLC, N441MR: Incident occurred March 15, 2016 in Hillsboro, Washington County, Oregon

Date: 15-MAR-16
Time: 20:35:00Z
Regis#: N441MR
Aircraft Make: ROBINSON
Aircraft Model: R44
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Portland FSDO-09
City: HILLSBORO
State: Oregon

N441MR ROBINSON R44 ROTORCRAFT, AUTO-ROTATED TO THE GROUND OFF THE RUNWAY, HILLSBORO, OR

HILLSBORO AERO ACADEMY LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N441MR

Maryland Senate's revised budget bill would bar use of aircraft for tax assessments

A Senate committee's version of Gov. Larry Hogan's budget would bar the state from using aircraft flights over people's land to assess their value for property tax purposes.

A provision in the budget bill, which is expected to be debated by the full Senate this morning and to receive a final vote in that chamber Friday, includes language inserted by the Budget & Taxation Committee telling the state Department of Assessments and Taxation it may not spend money on such flights.

The committee cut $2.2 million from Hogan's $42.3 billion budget that would have been used for that purpose.

The provision was one of dozens of tweaks senators made to Hogan's budget, which emerged from the committee mostly intact. The budget bill was approved by the committee unanimously.

Sen. Edward J. Kasemeyer, the committee chairman, said the assessments agency had already launched a pilot program using aircraft to conduct land tax assessments in Frederick and Anne Arundel counties.

Kasemeyer, a Democrat who represents Howard and Baltimore counties, said the Attorney General's Office said that while the department might be able to rely on existing rules to launch the program, it would be better for it to seek legislative permission.

The committee was reluctant to give it such a green light, Kasemeyer said.

"We just think it raises privacy concerns. It definitely raises taxes on people," he said. Kasemeyer said the pilot program showed the drone flights led to higher assessments.

Sen. Andrew Serafini, a Western Maryland Republican, said he could see a fiscal justification for using the technology instead of more costly methods. But he said committee members had some concerns about legal and judicial issues.

"There is a larger issue. How do we protect citizens' rights?" he said.

Matthew A. Clark, a spokesman for Gov. Larry Hogan, said the department was using conventional aircraft and not unmanned "drones." He said there were no plans to switch to unmanned aircraft.

Clark said the governor is generally pleased with the budget bill the Senate will consider, but the spokesman said the administration believes the aircraft program makes sense.

"From our point of view, the program will let the department do their job better," he said.

The department conducts assessments of homes and other real property to determine how valuable they are for purposes of computing property taxes, most of which go to local governments.

Clark said most of the photos being taken are images the state is already gathering for other purposes.

After the budget passes the Senate, it will go to the House of Delegates. The administration will have the opportunity there to persuade delegates to keep the program. If the two houses disagree, the matter would go to a conference committee to be resolved.

Original article can be found here: http://www.baltimoresun.com

Cessna 172D Skyhawk, N2567U: Accident occurred January 30, 2016 in La Junta, Otero County, Colorado

http://registry.faa.gov/N2567U 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Denver FSDO-03

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA150
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, January 30, 2016 in La Junta, CO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/03/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N2567U
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during a night takeoff, shortly after the airplane lifted off the runway, he "felt a force" on the tail. He further reported that the angle of attack changed to an "extreme angle", the airspeed decreased, and the stall warning horn was audible. Subsequently the left wing impacted the ground, which resulted in substantial damage to the left wing. 

According to the pilot there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

A review of recorded data from the automated weather observation station located on the airport revealed that, at the time of the accident, conditions were wind 30 degrees at 19 knots, wind gust 27 knots. The airplane was departing on runway 26.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's decision to take off with a tailwind, and exceed the critical angle of attack, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall and impact with the ground.

Cirrus Aircraft Expands Customer Experience and Strategic Planning Leadership Teams

DULUTH, Minn., March 16, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Cirrus Aircraft today announced the promotion of three Customer Experience team leaders and the appointment of two key senior leaders in moves that strengthen Cirrus' world-class customer experience and strategic planning capabilities and position the enterprise for future global growth. Cirrus announces the promotion of Rob Haig to Chief Pilot and Executive Director, Flight Training & Operations; Travis Klumb to Executive Director, Service & Support; and Carrie Oakland to Executive Director, Programs & Planning. Cirrus also welcomes Stephen Deucker, Vice President and General Manager of the Vision Center® in Knoxville, Tennessee; and Carroll Lane as Senior Vice President, Business Development to the Strategic Planning team.

Dale Klapmeier, Cirrus Aircraft Co-founder and Chief Executive Officer, noted the importance of these latest personnel moves. "There is no greater asset at Cirrus Aircraft than our people and our ongoing investment in leadership development. Our employees, customers and partners around the world join me in congratulating Rob, Travis and Carrie on their expanded roles, and in welcoming Carroll and Stephen as they bring their experience to new positions at Cirrus. Rob, Travis and Stephen will help grow what is already the best customer experience in the industry while Carroll and Carrie help us chart the course for an even broader products and services portfolio and global brand footprint. The talents of these five are just unparalleled and these promotions and additions at Cirrus are a most welcome development."

Rob Haig's role will expand to lead the on-going development of the Vision Jet and SR2X flight training programs, directing the creation of customer training material for Cirrus Approach™ and assuring the standardization of Cirrus pilots around the world. As Chief Pilot at Cirrus, Rob's experience spans over 11 years with the company with more than 4,000 flight hours and multiple ratings such as ATP, CFII, MEI and a Vision Jet LOA.

Travis Klumb will oversee activity related to the expansive global Service and Support Partner Network and parts program, Cirrus Direct™. Travis joined Cirrus in 2006 and has accumulated over 2,500 hours of experience flying and teaching in Cirrus aircraft, formerly serving as Manager of Flight Standards, Manager of the Cirrus Global Flight Training Network, and Director of Flight Training & Operations.

Carrie Oakland will lead programs and product planning initiatives on the Innovations and Operations team. She will also assist in defining and adopting program leadership and management processes as Cirrus continues to expand its global brand. Carrie joined Cirrus in 2004 and most recently served as Executive Director, Service & Support, with prior roles as Director of Field Support Services, Manager of Field Operations, and Warranty Supervisor.

Carroll Lane will lead strategic planning and business development to further position Cirrus for global growth. He will be focused on building long-term partnerships as Cirrus continues expanding in traditional and emerging markets to support both current as well as new products. Carroll brings extensive leadership and corporate strategy experience from within the commercial aviation, aerospace and defense industries. Most recently Carroll served as Senior Director of Customer Solutions at Pratt & Whitney's Commercial Engines Aftermarket organization. Prior to Pratt & Whitney, he served as Director of Corporate Strategy & Development at United Technologies Corporation and as a Director at CSP Associates, an Aerospace & Defense advisory firm. Carroll is a graduate of Harvard Business School, a former Naval Aviator with over 1,000 flight hours and an instrument-rated commercial pilot. 

Stephen Deucker will lead the creation and execution of Cirrus Aircraft's world-class customer experiences in his new role as Vice President and General Manager of the Vision Center. In addition to developing high internal and external customer service standards and training systems, Deucker will provide compass-thinking for delivering an unparalleled Cirrus Aircraft brand experience to customers that take delivery, receive training, service and more at the Vision Center. Stephen joins Cirrus after more than 25 years in leadership roles with The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, serving at multiple properties including their industry-leading Amelia Island, Dove Mountain, Sarasota and Orlando resorts. In addition to his most recent leadership roles, Stephen has experienced almost every aspect of the hospitality field, including developing one-of-a-kind guest experiences designed to impress and delight. A long time general aviation enthusiast, Stephen earned an MBA from The University of South Florida and will be residing in Knoxville, TN. 

As the flagship location for all Cirrus pilot, owner and customer activities, the Vision Center will be the home to the Customer Experience team and encompass Vision Jet and SR series training, sales, delivery, maintenance, support, personalization, fixed base operations and more. Groundbreaking of the Vision Center commenced in November 2015, with the grand opening of the Factory Service Center scheduled for mid-2016 and the complement of full services opening in 2017.

For more information regarding the Vision Center or career opportunities with Cirrus, visit http://cirrusaircraft.com/visioncenter/.

About Cirrus Aircraft

Cirrus Aircraft is a recognized leader in general aviation. Its all-composite line of personal aircraft - the SR20, SR22 and the turbocharged SR22T - incorporate innovative and advanced performance, electronic and safety technologies, including Cirrus Perspective™ by Garmin® avionics and the unique Cirrus Airframe Parachute System® (CAPS®). To date, total time on the worldwide Cirrus Aircraft SR-series fleet surpassed seven million flight hours with 127 people returned to their families as a direct result of CAPS being a standard safety feature on all Cirrus aircraft. The Cirrus Vision Jet, with over 550 production positions reserved, will provide a new personal and regional business transportation solution: the personal jet. The Vision Center in Knoxville, TN will be the flagship location for all Cirrus Aircraft Customer Experience activities including sales, delivery, training, maintenance, support, personalization, fixed base operations and more. All Cirrus aircraft are made in the U.S. with a direct sales force in North America and authorized sales agents covering export markets in 60 countries around the world. Cirrus Aircraft is wholly owned by China Aviation Industry General Aircraft Co., Ltd (CAIGA). Referenced Cirrus trademarks are owned by Cirrus Industries, Inc. or its subsidiaries. All other brands, product names, company names, trademarks and service marks are the properties of their respective owners. All rights reserved.

For additional information on Cirrus and its products please visit cirrusaircraft.com.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.prnewswire.com

Cessna 310I, Edson Aviation Group, N8151M: Incident occurred March 16, 2016 in Lake Charles, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana

Date: 16-MAR-16
Time: 00:23:00Z
Regis#: N8151M
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 310
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Baton Rouge FSDO-03
City: LAKE CHARLES
State: Louisiana

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, GEAR COLLAPSED, LAKE CHARLES, LA

EDSON AVIATION GROUP: http://registry.faa.gov/N8151M

Driver going 140 mph stopped with help of Nebraska State Patrol airplane

OMAHA, Neb. (WOWT) -- The Nebraska State Patrol credits the work of an NSP airplane in helping to track and stop a driver clocked going 140 mph on I-680 in Omaha.

On Tuesday morning, March 15th, a State Trooper clocked a blue Pontiac GTO traveling northbound on I-680 at a rate of 140 mph. When the trooper attempted a traffic stop near the Irvington exit, the car briefly stopped before driving through the median and heading southbound on I-680.

An Nebraska State Patrol airplane followed the car for about 15 minutes until the driver reached a residence near 48th Avenue and W Street. State troopers met the driver there and took him into custody.

21-year-old Jared Gooden faces charges of speeding, willful reckless driving, driving under suspension, flight to avoid arrest, no registration, and no insurance. He is being kept at Douglas County Corrections.

Original article can be found here: http://www.wowt.com