Friday, November 11, 2016

Cirrus SR22, N606MF: Incident occurred November 11, 2016 in Conway, Marion County, South Carolina

ADMIRAL AVIATION HOLDINGS LP: http://registry.faa.gov/N606MF

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA West Columbia FSDO-13

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED ON A ROAD AND CAUGHT FIRE, NEAR CONWAY, SOUTH CAROLINA. 

Date: 11-NOV-16
Time: 13:35:00Z
Regis#: N606MF
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: CONWAY
State: South Carolina




MARION COUNTY, S.C. (WMBF) —

A single-engine plane with three people on board caught fire and had to make an emergency landing on Highway 378 in Marion County Friday morning.

Lavenia Jones says she watched the plane land outside of her home.

"I heard a loud noise. It sounded like metal beating really loud. I looked out the window and saw the plane coming down. The front of it was engulfed in fire. So he landed in front of my house. He hit my mail box. He rolled and he stopped here." said Jones.

The plane landed on the roadway near Brittons Neck at about 8:30 a.m. Friday, according to Joey Price with Marion County Emergency Management. It has since been moved off the roadway. Traffic was not affected.

The plane caught fire while in the air, and the pilot landed plane, Price said. Two pilots and one passenger were on board, and no injuries were reported.

After the plane landed, one of the pilots ran over to an 18-wheeler, grabbed a fire extinguisher, and put out the fire, according to officials.

The plane was reportedly making a commute from Mt. Pleasant to Raleigh, North Carolina.

The FAA was called out to inspect the plane.

The three occupants declined to be interviewed but did say the plane is unable to fly. All three have returned to Mt. Pleasant.

The fixed wing, single-engine plane was a 2011 Cirrus Design Corp SR22 registered to an Admiral Aviation Holdings LP out of Wilmington, Delaware, according to information from the FAA.

Cirrus Design Corp SR22 aircraft were involved in 13 accidents in 2016, including three that were fatal. That model was involved in seven accidents in South Carolina since 2009, two of which were fatal.


Source:   http://www.wyff4.com













Marion County, S.C. (WPDE) — A single engine Cirrus model plane has made an emergency landing at Highway 378 and 908 in the Gresham community of Marion County near the Park and Blow Handi Mart after a fire erupted on the plane, according to Marion County EMS Director Joey Price.

Price said there was one person on board who was able to get off safely. Price added he is headed to the scene and will have more information this morning.

Jim Peters, with the FAA, released a statement on the incident stating:

"A Cirrus SR22 aircraft made an emergency landing due to an engine related problem on a road near U.S. Highway 378 near Conway, SC at about 8:35 a.m. today. Check with local authorities on the condition of the three people on board. The aircraft was heading to Raleigh, NC from Mount Pleasant, SC. The FAA will investigate."

Mike Hatcher, a witness to the landing, said that the plane was coming in kind of low and smoking. He said that it landed on Highway 378.

Hatcher said that another person said the plane almost landed on the hood of his car.

He also said that there were two people on board who were able to land safely, but another woman who lives near the scene, Lavenia Jones, said there were three people on board, two pilots and a passenger, who were able to get out safely.

Jones said the plane's front engine caught fire and when the plane landed one of the pilots was able to grab a fire extinguisher from a passing 18-wheeler and put out the fire in the engine.

Hatcher submitted videos to us which show a plane in the middle of the highway and law enforcement officials on scene. The plane has since been moved off to the side of the road and traffic is reportedly moving through the area once again.

According to FlightAware.com, a flight tracking service, the plane departed from Mt. Pleasant Regional Airport at 7:11 a.m. Friday. It was scheduled to arrive at Raleigh Durham International Airport at 9:20 a.m. The flight is still listed as “en route” on the website.

According to the real time flight track log, the plane’s last documented altitude was 200 feet at 8:30 a.m. The planned altitude for that moment in the flight path was supposed to be 9,000 feet. After 8:30 a.m. there is no further track of the plane.

The plane is registered out of Wilmington, Delaware, to Admiral Aviations Holdings LP.


Source:   http://wach.com




MARION, SC (WBTW) – A single-engine Cirrus plane flying over the Gresham community in Marion County was forced to make an emergency landing on Highway 378 around 8:30 a.m. Friday, according to county officials.

Marion County Emergency Management Services Director Joey Price confirms a fire ignited on board the plane, forcing the pilot to land unexpectedly. There were three occupants on board, but no injuries were reported during the emergency landing. Price says once the plane was on the ground, the pilot was able to put the fire out with an extinguisher.

The plane was traveling from Mt. Pleasant to Raleigh, NC. Price explained to News13 that the plane is pulled from the highway, allowing vehicles to travel past.

It’s unknown what caused the fire, but Price says more details will be made available once emergency crews have a chance to investigate. The Federal Aviation Administration has been contacted.

Source:  http://wbtw.com





MARION, S.C. -- A single-engine plane with three people on board crash landed on US 378 in southern Marion County Friday morning.

Marion County EMS Director Joey Price said that a fire broke out inside plane about 8:30 a.m. and it landed on the highway in the Gresham Community.

Marion County deputies along with South Carolina Highway Patrol troopers managed to push the plane to the side of the road to free up the flow of traffic.

FAA Spokesman Jim Peters identified the plane as a Cirrus SR22 and said the plane landed after an engine related problem.

Peters said the plane was flying from Mt. Pleasant to Raleigh, N.C., when it was forced to land

The FAA spokesman said his agency was investigating.

Source:   http://www.scnow.com

Piper PA-28R-180 Cherokee Arrow, ArchAngel Services LLC, N3803T: Accident occurred September 21, 2016 in Ottumwa, Wapello County, Iowa

National Transportation Safety Board - Docket And Docket Items: http://dms.ntsb.gov

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Factual Report:  http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

ARCHANGEL SERVICES LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N3803T

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA501
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 21, 2016 in Ottumwa, IA
Aircraft: PIPER PA28R, registration: N3803T
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor reported that the pilot receiving instruction was demonstrating a power-off 180 degree landing. He further reported that as the airplane entered a close-in base to final approach, the airspeed slowed and the stall warning light started to flicker. The flight instructor reported that he stated to the pilot flying, "nose down, nose down," and waited for him to correct. Subsequently, the flight instructor took the flight controls, but as he did so, the airplane entered an aerodynamic stall and touched down hard on the runway. During the landing roll, the flight instructor reported that he lost rudder authority but was able to use differential braking to maintain directional control and taxi off the runway.

The right wing sustained substantial damage. 

The flight instructor reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Buddy Baby Lakes, N1028Q: Accident occurred November 10, 2016 near General Dick Stout Field Airport (1L8), Hurricane, Washington County, Utah

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

Aviation Accident Factual Report   -  National Transportation Safety Board:    http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/1028Q 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Salt Lake City FSDO-07


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA073
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, November 10, 2016 in Hurricane, UT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: CARTER RICHARD L BUDDY BABY LAKES, registration: N1028Q
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped biplane reported that during the takeoff sequence of a touch-and-go landing he decided to try a 2-point takeoff. He further reported that he was aware of the left turning tendency when raising the tail, however the "left turning factor happened much faster than [he] anticipated"; he was unable to recover with full right rudder inputs and the biplane veered to the left off the runway. During the runway excursion, the pilot brought the throttle to idle and the biplane impacted tumbleweeds. 

The biplane sustained substantial damage to both right wings.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

Federal Aviation Administration's Airplane Flying Handbook, FAA-H-8083-3B (2016), contains a section titled "Normal Takeoff Roll" for tailwheel airplanes which states:

It is important to note that nose-down pitch movement produces left yaw, the result of gyroscopic precession created by the propeller. The amount of force created by this precession is directly related to the rate the propeller axis is tilted when the tail is raised, so it is best to avoid an abrupt pitch change. Whether smooth or abrupt, the need to react to this yaw with rudder inputs emphasizes the increased directional demands common to tailwheel airplanes, a demand likely to be unanticipated by pilots transitioning from nosewheel models.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during takeoff, which resulted in a runway excursion.




HURRICANE — A pilot crashed his recently-purchased 2006 Buddy Baby Lake airplane Thursday while attempting to takeoff at the Hurricane City Airport located at 800 W. 2300 South.

Arthur Granger, of Hurricane City, was taking off for his fourth flight in his blue and yellow, fixed-wing, single-engine airplane at approximately 4:09 p.m.

“I decided to go out,” Granger said, “and get a little more experience with my newly-purchased airplane – it’s a homebuilt – a nice little airplane.”

Granger said he had decided to try to do a “main-wheel takeoff” – lifting the tailwheel.

“Normally, in a tailwheel airplane like this,” Granger said, “you would take off in 3-point attitude – that means the two main gear down and the tailwheel down. In a little larger-tail airplane, you want to lift the tail up a little bit first to allow the airplane to pick up speed a little faster.”

“When you do that, though, the propeller has a tendency to make the plane turn left, fast,” he added, “and, if you’re not ready for it – to put in opposite controls – it can get away from you.”

Granger said he wasn’t ready for the plane to veer left and he couldn’t correct for it, resulting in his 612-pound plane crashing and coming to rest approximately 50 yards off the runway.

Officers and medical personnel were dispatched to the scene after receiving a report of the plane crash, Hurricane City Police Sgt. Brandon Buell said.

Granger, who was the only occupant in the plane, was not injured.

“The pilot is very experienced and this helped avoid anything more major,” Buell said of Granger, who has been flying off and on for about 30 years.

As a result of the crash, the wooden propeller broke off the plane and the airplane sustained damage to its right wing, nose and two main landing gear.

“The good news is, of course, the airplane is repairable,” Granger said, “I’m fine, nobody got hurt and, you know, a little embarrassed to wreck my new toy.”

Per protocol, the FAA was notified and will investigate the crash, Buell said, adding that police were grateful it was a minor crash and no one was hurt.

“I was just practicing,” Granger said. “So, now, I’m going to have to put (the plane) back together and practice some more.”

Source:   http://www.stgeorgeutah.com





















HURRICANE, Utah — A small plane crashed into a dirt area near Hurricane Airport Thursday afternoon.

According to a news release from the Hurricane Police Department, a single-engine, fixed-wing plane took off from the airport around 4 p.m., but veered to the left as it did so. The pilot, who was the sole occupant of a 2006 “Buddy Baby Lake” plane, had to set the plane down in a dirt area, causing minor damage.

Officers and medical personnel were called to the scene at approximately 4:09, but there were no injuries.

Police said the pilot is very experienced, which “helped avoid anything more major.”

The Federal Aviation Administration has been identified and will conduct an investigation.

Source:   http://fox13now.com

Thursday, November 10, 2016

Grumman American AA-1C, N9556U: Accident occurred November 10, 2016 in Hemet, Riverside County, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA018
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, November 10, 2016 in Hemet, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/14/2017
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AMERICAN AVN. CORP. AA 1C, registration: N9556U
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot reported that the airplane was last refueled and operated about 1 month before the day of the accident. He added that, on the morning of the accident, he believed the airplane still had about 17 to 18 gallons of fuel for the flight. The pilot mentioned that the airplane’s fuel float gauges were not accurate; therefore, he looked inside of the left fuel tank from the filler cap and observed fuel. He did not check the right fuel tank because the style of tank restricted his view of any fuel. He departed the airport with the left fuel tank selected. After practicing standard maneuvers, the engine hesitated for a second. The pilot switched to the right fuel tank, which resolved the issue, but he turned back toward the airport. About 1 minute later, he switched to the left fuel tank and continued to fly at full power, which led him to believe fuel was in that tank. One to 2 minutes later, the pilot switched back to the right fuel tank and climbed to 8,000 ft, circled the town once, and then proceeded back toward the airport; the engine then suddenly lost power. The pilot attempted emergency procedures and troubleshooting to no avail. The pilot located a suitable field for the emergency landing; however, during the landing roll on the soft, dry, and rocky terrain, the airplane nosed over and then came to rest inverted. 

Recovery personnel removed a small amount of fuel from the left auxiliary fuel tank, but the right auxiliary fuel tank and the main fuel tanks were empty. In addition, there were no observable breaches in the fuel tanks nor smell of fuel at the accident site. Given the pilot knew the airplane’s fuel gauges were not accurate, he should have ensured that the airplane had sufficient fuel for the flight and his failure to do so led to the subsequent exhaustion of the fuel supply and total loss of engine power.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to ensure that sufficient fuel was available for the flight, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Riverside, California 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N9556U

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA018
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, November 10, 2016 in Hemet, CA
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AMERICAN AVN. CORP. AA 1C, registration: N9556U
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 10, 2016, about 1135 Pacific standard time, a Grumman American AA-1C airplane, N9556U, experienced a complete loss of engine power and landed on a field east of Hemet, California. The private pilot and pilot-rated passenger were not injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a local personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that originated from Hemet-Ryan Airport (HMT), at 1043.

The pilot reported that the airplane was last refueled, and operated, about one month prior to the day of the accident. The morning of the accident, he believed the airplane still had about 17-18 gallons of fuel for the flight. The pilot mentioned that the airplane's fuel float gauges are not accurate; therefore, he peered inside of the left fuel tank from the filler cap and observed fuel. He did not check the right fuel tank because the style of tank would restrict his view of any fuel. They departed the airport with the left fuel tank selected and practiced a few standard maneuvers; during which, the engine hesitated for a brief second. The pilot switched to the right fuel tank and they turned back towards the airport; about one minute later he switched to the left fuel tank and continued to fly at full power. After feeling confident there was fuel in the left tank, the pilot switched back to the right fuel tank and climbed to 8,000 feet, continuing the flight as normal. Shortly after, they proceeded back towards the airport when the engine suddenly lost power. The pilot attempted emergency procedures and troubleshooting, but to no avail. The pilot located a suitable field for the emergency landing, however, during the landing roll on the soft, dry, and rocky terrain, the airplane nosed over, coming to rest inverted. 

Recovery personnel reported that during the recovery process he removed very little fuel from the left auxiliary fuel tank, otherwise, the right auxiliary fuel tank and the main fuel tanks were empty. In addition, he mentioned that he did not observe any breaches in the fuel tanks, nor did he smell any fuel at the accident site.

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA018
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, November 10, 2016 in Hemet, CA
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AMERICAN AVN. CORP. AA 1C, registration: N9556U
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 10, 2016, about 1135 Pacific standard time, a Grumman American AA-1C airplane, N9556U, experienced a complete loss of engine power and landed on a field east of Hemet, California. The private pilot and pilot-rated passenger were uninjured; the airplane sustained substantial damage throughout. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that originated from Hemet-Ryan Airport (HMT), Hemet, at 1043.

The pilot reported that after takeoff he climbed to 5,000 feet when the engine lost partial power. The pilot switched fuel tanks and the engine operated normally. He continued the local flight and climbed to about 8,000 feet. While cruising, the engine suddenly lost complete power. The pilot attempted to restart the engine multiple times, however, to no avail. He landed the airplane uneventfully onto a nearby field; the airplane rolled along the rocky field and nosed over coming to rest inverted.




SOBOBA – At least two people were injured after a small plane crashed into a ravine off of Indian Truck Trail, southeast of Soboba Road Thursday morning, Nov. 10. The plane came to rest upside down at the end of a residence east of the Soboba Sports Complex, where Soboba Road comes to a dead-end at the dirt extension of Indian Creek Road.

The air emergency was reported to emergency dispatchers at 10:44 a.m. By 11:30 a.m., firefighters and other emergency first responders had extricated two victims from the wrecked aircraft and they were being transported by ground ambulances to local area hospitals. No information regarding the victim’s medical status had been provided.

The plane, a white and red, single-engine 1977 Grumman AA1, is registered to an Idyllwild area resident with an Idyllwild P.O. box listed.

The wrecked plane reportedly ran out of gas and attempted to make an emergency landing on or near the reservation, according to a CHP incident log. Other reports indicated the plane had possibly lost power. While landing, the plane flipped over and came to rest on it’s roof.

At least two occupants were inside the plane when it went down. It was not immediately known if there were additional occupants inside the plane.

Riverside Sheriff’s Aviation Unit “Star 9” responded to the area to guide rescuers in to the location the plane had come to rest, which was described as “rugged and inaccessible.”

Hemet/Ryan AirOps are en route to assist with the air emergency and crash investigation.

Federal Aviation Administration investigators have been notified and are also en route to the location to conduct a crash investigation.

Julie Jamison, a Hemet resident, said she heard what sounded like a plane in distress just moments before the plane went down. “I could tell something was wrong with the plane,” Jamison said. “After I stopped hearing the motor struggling, I was waiting to hear a crash.”

It was not immediately known where the plane had departed from or where it was traveling to.

Source:   http://myvalleynews.com




Two people suffered minor injuries during the forced landing of a small airplane on the Soboba Band of Luiseño Indians Reservation near Hemet on Thursday morning, Nov. 10.

The red and white, single-engine Grumman AA1 lost power about 10:30 a.m., landed in a field and flipped, said Ian Gregor, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration.

The pilot, David F. Pelham, of Idyllwild, said by phone from Riverside University Health System Medical Center in Moreno Valley that the engine cut out when it stopped receiving fuel. Why that happened, he said, is under investigation.

"I'm fine," he said. "They're poking and prodding and testing."

Pelham said his passenger will be OK as well.

Both had to be cut out of the plane, said Deputy Armando Muñoz, a Riverside County sheriff's spokesman. The plane was found in a rocky field to the east of a dry riverbed off Cedar Avenue.

Pelham said his plane is based at Hemet-Ryan Airport. He has been a pilot for 23 years.

Firefighters from the Soboba Department of Public Safety and Cal Fire/Riverside County Fire Department responded to the incident.

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate.

Source:   http://www.pe.com

North American Navion, N8849H: Fatal accident occurred November 10, 2016 (and) Incident occurred December 12, 2015 at Blairstown Airport (1N7), Warren County, New Jersey

Samuel Singer
~


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania 
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N8849H


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Blairstown, NJ
Accident Number: ERA17LA042
Date & Time: 11/10/2016, 0915 EST
Registration: N8849H
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN NAVION
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Ferry 

Analysis

The private pilot had not flown the accident airplane for almost 1 year while it underwent repairs following a gear-up landing. The purpose of the accident flight was to ferry the airplane to a nearby airport to receive an annual inspection after completion of the repairs. On the morning of the accident, a mechanic taxied the airplane and performed an engine run-up; he did not note any anomalies. The pilot fueled the airplane and started the engine for the flight. Upon starting, the engine went immediately to full power, where it remained as the airplane taxied at high speed about 1,000 ft into a tree. Witnesses reported that the pilot was awake and alert after the accident; thus, there was no evidence of pilot incapacitation. Examination of the wreckage did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or anomalies. Based on the positions of the throttle and mixture control, and the high speed taxi after engine start, it is likely that the pilot started the engine with the throttle lever accidently in the full-forward position. After the engine started, the pilot could have reduced or ceased engine power by retracting the throttle, retracting the mixture, or turning the magnetos off.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's improper engine start procedure, which resulted in a loss of control on the ground and collision with a tree. 

Findings

Aircraft
Surface speed/braking - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)
Use of equip/system - Pilot (Cause)
Incorrect action selection - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Standing-engine(s) start-up
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)

Taxi
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

On November 10, 2016, about 0915 eastern standard time, a North American Navion, N8849H, was substantially damaged following a loss of control during engine startup at Blairstown Airport (1N7), Blairstown, New Jersey. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned personal flight to Capital City Airport (CXY), Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

According to a mechanic who witnessed the accident, the pilot, who was the owner of the airplane, last flew the accident airplane in December 2015; it was damaged during a gear-up landing at 1N7. The airplane remained at the airport while the mechanic repaired the damage. The repairs were completed, and another pilot had planned to ferry the airplane to CXY for an annual inspection the day before the accident, but the flight was postponed due to poor weather. The other pilot was not available on the day of the accident, and the owner elected to fly the airplane to CXY himself.

On the morning of the accident, the mechanic taxied the airplane from the hangar to the fuel pump. During the taxi, he performed an engine run-up and did not notice any anomalies. The mechanic added that he had performed several run-ups while the airplane was at 1N7 and never experienced any anomalies with the throttle control or brakes. After fueling the airplane and completing a preflight inspection, the pilot started the engine and it went immediately to full power. The engine remained at full power and the airplane taxied about 1,000 ft at high speed into a tree. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 73, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/30/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/16/2015
Flight Time: 1478 hours (Total, all aircraft), 422 hours (Total, this make and model), 0 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

The pilot, age 73, held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate was issued on January 30, 2016. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 1,445 hours. The most recent entry in the pilot's logbook was dated February 1, 2016. According to the logbook, the pilot had accrued a total flight experience of about 1,478 hours. The pilot reported 422 hours in the accident airplane make and model on his most recent insurance application. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: NORTH AMERICAN
Registration: N8849H
Model/Series: NAVION UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1947
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: NAV-4-849
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/21/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2850 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 14 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2066 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C91A installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-520-BB
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 285 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  None

The four-seat, low-wing, retractable tricycle-gear airplane was manufactured in 1947. It was powered by a Continental IO-520, 285-horsepower engine, equipped with a constant-speed Hartzell propeller. The pilot purchased the airplane in 2009. Its most recent annual inspection was completed on August 21, 2015. At that time, the airframe had accumulated about 2,052 total hours of operation and the engine had accumulated about 417 hours since major overhaul. The airplane had been operated for about 14 hours between the time of the last inspection and the accident. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MPO, 1915 ft msl
Observation Time: 0853 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 305°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 1200 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 3°C / -1°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots, 310°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.02 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Blairstown, NJ (1N7)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Harrisburg, PA (CXY)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  EST
Type of Airspace: 

Pocono Mountains Municipal Airport (MPO), Mount Pocono, Pennsylvania, was located about 15 miles northwest of the accident site. The 0853 recorded weather at MPO included wind from 310° at 10 knots; visibility 10 miles; few clouds at 1,200 ft; temperature 3°C; dew point -1°C; altimeter 30.02 inches Hg. 

Airport Information

Airport: Blairstown (1N7)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 371 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used:  N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing:  None 



Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 40.971111, -74.997500 (est) 

Examination of the wreckage by an FAA inspector revealed substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. The inspector noted that the throttle, propeller, and mixture controls were all in the full-forward position. Additionally, the engine had separated forward of the airframe during the collision with the tree.

The wreckage was examined again by an NTSB investigator after recovery. The propeller remained attached to the crankshaft and all three blades exhibited rotational signatures, such as torn blade tips, chordwise scrapes, and leading edge gouges. The throttle body/fuel metering unit was separated from the engine and remained attached to the induction system inlet and wye plenum, which were also separated from the airplane. The throttle and mixture control levers were fractured and their respective shafts were bent. The fractured control lever ends remained attached to the control cable rod ends. Examination of the throttle body/fuel metering unit revealed that the throttle lever was loose on the throttle control shaft; however, it was displaced and bent. No preaccident anomalies were noted with the unit.

The airplane was equipped with push-button Vernier throttle, mixture, and propeller controls. The propeller control knob was fractured and its cable was cut. Examination of the throttle control knob in the cockpit revealed that it was stuck in the full forward position and could not be pulled aft by depressing the push-button release. Examination of the mixture control revealed that it was also in the full forward position. Manual manipulation of the mixture control (both the push-button rapid adjustment mode, and the rotational fine adjustment mode) resulted in normal movement of the control knob with no anomalies noted. The throttle and mixture control knobs and cables were removed from the airplane and forwarded to the NTSB Materials Laboratory, Washington, DC.

Computed Tomography (CT) scanning of the throttle and mixture controls revealed that the outer sleeve within the throttle control did not appear to be fully seated within the knob, consistent with the throttle cable being pulled forward during engine separation in the accident sequence (for more information, see Computed Tomography Specialist's Factual Report in the public docket for this investigation). 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Morris County Medical Examiner, Morristown, New Jersey, performed an autopsy on the pilot. The autopsy report noted the cause of death as "multiple injuries."

Toxicological testing was performed on the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Review of the toxicology report revealed:

5.172 (ug/ml, ug/g) Ketamine detected in Urine
2.634 (ug/ml, ug/g) Ketamine detected in Blood (Cavity)
1.834 (ug/mL, ug/g) Norketamine detected in Urine
0.736 (ug/mL, ug/g) Norketamine detected in Blood (Cavity)
Midazolam detected in Blood (Cavity)
Naproxen detected in Urine

Katamine, Norketamin, and Midazolam were consistent with emergency medical treatment that the pilot received after the accident. Naproxen is a non-sedating analgesic and not considered impairing. Additionally, according to an ambulance report, the pilot was awake and alert after the accident. 


December 12, 2015 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania 

Aircraft landed gear up.

Date:     12-DEC-15
Time:     15:45:00Z
Regis#:     N8849H
Aircraft Make:     NORTH AMERICAN
Aircraft Model:     NAVION
Event Type:     Incident
Highest Injury:     None
Damage:     Minor
Flight Phase:     LANDING (LDG)
City:     BLAIRSTOWN
State:     New Jersey


























NTSB Identification: ERA17LA042
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, November 10, 2016 in Blairstown, NJ
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN NAVION, registration: N8849H
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 10, 2016, about 0915 eastern standard time, a North American Navion, N8849H, was substantially damaged following a loss of control during engine startup at Blairstown Airport (1N7), Blairstown, New Jersey. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated by the private pilot as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned flight to Capital City Airport (CXY), Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

According to a mechanic who witnessed the accident, the pilot/owner last flew the accident airplane in December 2015, when it experienced a gear-up landing at 1N7. The airplane remained at the airport while the mechanic repaired damage from the gear-up landing. The repairs were completed and the airplane was supposed to be ferried to CXY for an annual inspection during the day prior to the accident. A different pilot was going to ferry the airplane, but poor weather postponed the flight. That pilot was not available on the day of the accident and the owner/pilot elected to fly the airplane to CXY himself.

During the morning of the accident, the mechanic taxied the airplane from the hangar to the fuel pump. During which, he performed an engine run-up and did not notice any anomalies with the airplane. The mechanic added that he had performed several run-ups while the airplane was at 1N7 and never experienced any anomalies with the throttle control or brakes. After fueling the airplane and completion of a preflight inspection, the pilot/owner started the engine and it went immediately to full power. The engine remained at full power and the airplane taxied at high speed into a tree.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. The inspector noted that the throttle, propeller, and mixture controls were all in the full forward position. The hydraulic and alternate air controls were in the retracted position. The wreckage was retained for further examination.

The pilot/owner, age 73, held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on January 30, 2016. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 1,445 hours.

The four-seat, low-wing, retractable tricycle-gear airplane, serial number NAV-4-849, was manufactured in 1947. It was powered by a Continental IO-520, 285-horsepower engine, equipped with a constant-speed Hartzell propeller. The pilot purchased the airplane in 2009. Its most recent annual inspection was completed on August 21, 2015. At that time, the airframe had accumulated approximately 2,052 total hours of operation and the engine had accumulated about 417 hours since major overhaul. The airplane had been operated for about 14 hours from the time of the last inspection, until the accident.
Samuel Singer


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania 
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety 
Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N8849H

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Blairstown, NJ
Accident Number: ERA17LA042
Date & Time: 11/10/2016, 0915 EST
Registration: N8849H
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN NAVION
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Ferry 

On November 10, 2016, about 0915 eastern standard time, a North American Navion, N8849H, was substantially damaged following a loss of control during engine startup at Blairstown Airport (1N7), Blairstown, New Jersey. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned personal flight to Capital City Airport (CXY), Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

According to a mechanic who witnessed the accident, the pilot, who was the owner of the airplane, last flew the accident airplane in December 2015; it was damaged during a gear-up landing at 1N7. The airplane remained at the airport while the mechanic repaired the damage. The repairs were completed, and another pilot had planned to ferry the airplane to CXY for an annual inspection the day before the accident, but the flight was postponed due to poor weather. The other pilot was not available on the day of the accident, and the owner elected to fly the airplane to CXY himself.

On the morning of the accident, the mechanic taxied the airplane from the hangar to the fuel pump. During the taxi, he performed an engine run-up and did not notice any anomalies. The mechanic added that he had performed several run-ups while the airplane was at 1N7 and never experienced any anomalies with the throttle control or brakes. After fueling the airplane and completing a preflight inspection, the pilot started the engine and it went immediately to full power. The engine remained at full power and the airplane taxied about 1,000 ft at high speed into a tree. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 73, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/30/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/16/2015
Flight Time: 1478 hours (Total, all aircraft), 422 hours (Total, this make and model), 0 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

The pilot, age 73, held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate was issued on January 30, 2016. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 1,445 hours. The most recent entry in the pilot's logbook was dated February 1, 2016. According to the logbook, the pilot had accrued a total flight experience of about 1,478 hours. The pilot reported 422 hours in the accident airplane make and model on his most recent insurance application. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: NORTH AMERICAN
Registration: N8849H
Model/Series: NAVION UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1947
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: NAV-4-849
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/21/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2850 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 14 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2066 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C91A installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-520-BB
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 285 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  None

The four-seat, low-wing, retractable tricycle-gear airplane was manufactured in 1947. It was powered by a Continental IO-520, 285-horsepower engine, equipped with a constant-speed Hartzell propeller. The pilot purchased the airplane in 2009. Its most recent annual inspection was completed on August 21, 2015. At that time, the airframe had accumulated about 2,052 total hours of operation and the engine had accumulated about 417 hours since major overhaul. The airplane had been operated for about 14 hours between the time of the last inspection and the accident. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MPO, 1915 ft msl
Observation Time: 0853 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 305°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 1200 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 3°C / -1°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots, 310°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.02 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Blairstown, NJ (1N7)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Harrisburg, PA (CXY)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  EST
Type of Airspace: 

Pocono Mountains Municipal Airport (MPO), Mount Pocono, Pennsylvania, was located about 15 miles northwest of the accident site. The 0853 recorded weather at MPO included wind from 310° at 10 knots; visibility 10 miles; few clouds at 1,200 ft; temperature 3°C; dew point -1°C; altimeter 30.02 inches Hg. 

Airport Information

Airport: Blairstown (1N7)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 371 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used:  N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing:  None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 40.971111, -74.997500 (est) 

Examination of the wreckage by an FAA inspector revealed substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. The inspector noted that the throttle, propeller, and mixture controls were all in the full-forward position. Additionally, the engine had separated forward of the airframe during the collision with the tree.

The wreckage was examined again by an NTSB investigator after recovery. The propeller remained attached to the crankshaft and all three blades exhibited rotational signatures, such as torn blade tips, chordwise scrapes, and leading edge gouges. The throttle body/fuel metering unit was separated from the engine and remained attached to the induction system inlet and wye plenum, which were also separated from the airplane. The throttle and mixture control levers were fractured and their respective shafts were bent. The fractured control lever ends remained attached to the control cable rod ends. Examination of the throttle body/fuel metering unit revealed that the throttle lever was loose on the throttle control shaft; however, it was displaced and bent. No preaccident anomalies were noted with the unit.

The airplane was equipped with push-button Vernier throttle, mixture, and propeller controls. The propeller control knob was fractured and its cable was cut. Examination of the throttle control knob in the cockpit revealed that it was stuck in the full forward position and could not be pulled aft by depressing the push-button release. Examination of the mixture control revealed that it was also in the full forward position. Manual manipulation of the mixture control (both the push-button rapid adjustment mode, and the rotational fine adjustment mode) resulted in normal movement of the control knob with no anomalies noted. The throttle and mixture control knobs and cables were removed from the airplane and forwarded to the NTSB Materials Laboratory, Washington, DC.

Computed Tomography (CT) scanning of the throttle and mixture controls revealed that the outer sleeve within the throttle control did not appear to be fully seated within the knob, consistent with the throttle cable being pulled forward during engine separation in the accident sequence (for more information, see Computed Tomography Specialist's Factual Report in the public docket for this investigation). 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Morris County Medical Examiner, Morristown, New Jersey, performed an autopsy on the pilot. The autopsy report noted the cause of death as "multiple injuries."

Toxicological testing was performed on the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Review of the toxicology report revealed:

5.172 (ug/ml, ug/g) Ketamine detected in Urine
2.634 (ug/ml, ug/g) Ketamine detected in Blood (Cavity)
1.834 (ug/mL, ug/g) Norketamine detected in Urine
0.736 (ug/mL, ug/g) Norketamine detected in Blood (Cavity)
Midazolam detected in Blood (Cavity)
Naproxen detected in Urine


Katamine, Norketamin, and Midazolam were consistent with emergency medical treatment that the pilot received after the accident. Naproxen is a non-sedating analgesic and not considered impairing. Additionally, according to an ambulance report, the pilot was awake and alert after the accident. 

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA042
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, November 10, 2016 in Blairstown, NJ
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN NAVION, registration: N8849H
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 10, 2016, about 0915 eastern standard time, a North American Navion, N8849H, was substantially damaged following a loss of control during engine startup at Blairstown Airport (1N7), Blairstown, New Jersey. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated by the private pilot as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned flight to Capital City Airport (CXY), Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

According to a mechanic who witnessed the accident, the pilot/owner last flew the accident airplane in December 2015, when it experienced a gear-up landing at 1N7. The airplane remained at the airport while the mechanic repaired damage from the gear-up landing. The repairs were completed and the airplane was supposed to be ferried to CXY for an annual inspection during the day prior to the accident. A different pilot was going to ferry the airplane, but poor weather postponed the flight. That pilot was not available on the day of the accident and the owner/pilot elected to fly the airplane to CXY himself.

During the morning of the accident, the mechanic taxied the airplane from the hangar to the fuel pump. During which, he performed an engine run-up and did not notice any anomalies with the airplane. The mechanic added that he had performed several run-ups while the airplane was at 1N7 and never experienced any anomalies with the throttle control or brakes. After fueling the airplane and completion of a preflight inspection, the pilot/owner started the engine and it went immediately to full power. The engine remained at full power and the airplane taxied at high speed into a tree.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. The inspector noted that the throttle, propeller, and mixture controls were all in the full forward position. The hydraulic and alternate air controls were in the retracted position. The wreckage was retained for further examination.

The pilot/owner, age 73, held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on January 30, 2016. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 1,445 hours.

The four-seat, low-wing, retractable tricycle-gear airplane, serial number NAV-4-849, was manufactured in 1947. It was powered by a Continental IO-520, 285-horsepower engine, equipped with a constant-speed Hartzell propeller. The pilot purchased the airplane in 2009. Its most recent annual inspection was completed on August 21, 2015. At that time, the airframe had accumulated approximately 2,052 total hours of operation and the engine had accumulated about 417 hours since major overhaul. The airplane had been operated for about 14 hours from the time of the last inspection, until the accident.


December 12, 2015 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania 

Aircraft landed gear up.



Date:     12-DEC-15
Time:     15:45:00Z
Regis#:     N8849H
Aircraft Make:     NORTH AMERICAN
Aircraft Model:     NAVION
Event Type:     Incident
Highest Injury:     None
Damage:     Minor
Flight Phase:     LANDING (LDG)
City:     BLAIRSTOWN
State:     New Jersey



Samuel Singer was a decisive man, a quality a former colleague said served him well in the business world.

So how the 73-year-old pilot could have failed to act in the small plane crash that took his life Thursday is a mystery to Rich Faherty.

The fellow aviator who worked with Singer for some 20 years was among the first to learn Singer's plane had crashed about 9:30 Thursday morning at a Blairstown Township airport in northern Warren County. Another pilot had called him, saying emergency officials needed his help to get in touch with Singer's family.

Authorities have said the plane finished refueling, then went full-throttle across the runways before crashing into trees. Singer, of Warren Township in Somerset County, was pulled from the wrecked aircraft and flown to Morristown Medical Center, where he later died.

"As a pilot, the first thing you think of is if the plane suddenly went full throttle, what would you do? ... I would assume Sam would have the same mental checklist," Faherty said Friday. "The fact that Sam didn't stop the plane before it struck the trees makes me believe that something else prevented him from going through the mental checklist."

Faherty is the executive vice president of administration at BioReference Laboratories, where Singer worked for 30 years. Under Singer's guidance as chief financial officer, the company based in Elmwood Park — which provides testing services for physicians, hospitals and other clinics — went from making $1 million a year to almost $1 billion by the time he retired in 2015, Faherty said.

Singer's family said that he served in the U.S. Army, both active duty and reserves, for about 20 years starting in the 1960s. He was a father to five and a grandfather to three, devoted to his local Catholic parish and other charities. Three of his children have or are working at BioReference, Faherty said.

Singer served for nine years as a trustee at Mount St. Mary Academy, a Catholic prep school for girls in Watchung.

"The death of Sam Singer is a profound and devastating loss for the Mount St. Mary Academy community," the school said in a statement Friday. "He demonstrated a steadfast devotion to the academy's mission and values and was deeply devoted to his Catholic faith. He was a loyal friend and member of our family who will always be appreciated and missed."

A post from October on the school's Facebook page congratulated him on his retirement from the board, noting that his four daughters all graduated from the school and a granddaughter is applying there.

Singer had gotten into flying later in life, Faherty said. Federal Aviation Administration records say he got his license in 2011, though Faherty said his colleague had been flying for 10 years, frequently logging hours in the sky.

FAA records also say Singer owned the plane that crashed Thursday, a North American Navion fixed-wing, single-engine craft manufactured in 1947. The same plane was involved in a crash last December at the airport.

Faherty said it is part of the piloting community to meet up at various airports — he had met Singer and others at Blairstown Airport before.

When he heard of the crash, Faherty got in touch with Singer's wife. At the time, he said, it sounded serious but not fatal.

It wasn't until Thursday night that Faherty said he found out from another former colleague that Singer was gone. The Warren County Prosecutor's Office on Friday said Singer died of blunt force trauma, and his death was ruled an accident.

"It's really sad," Faherty said. "This is a man who was a wonderful family man, a great business associate, someone I worked with for many years. ... I missed him because he had retired. I used to see him virtually every day.


"I know how much he loved to fly," he continued. "Certainly, no one would ever have expected this to happen to him. ... The last thing you want to do is have a car accident in your plane. And that's virtually what this was."

Story, comments and photo gallery: http://www.lehighvalleylive.com

---Fatal Plane Crash Update---

At 9:23 AM, police responded to the Blairstown Airport for a plane crash. Upon arrival police found the pilot, identified as Samuel Singer of Warren Township, entrapped with serious injuries. Blairstown Hose Company and police used the jaws of life to extricate the pilot from the aircraft. Atlantic Air 1 transported the pilot to Morristown Medical Center where the pilot later passed away from his injuries. A witness stated the plane had just been refueled and the plane went full throttle across both runways and into the trees. It's still unclear what caused the plane to be in full throttle. The FAA is still investigating the cause of the crash. Blairstown Ambulance Corps, Paramedics from Atlantic, Warren County Prosecutor's Office, Warren County Hazmat, and Blairstown OEM also assisted at the scene.






BLAIRSTOWN — The pilot injured when his plane went off the runway and struck trees at Blairstown Airport on Thursday morning died at the hospital Thursday evening, according to police.

Samuel Singer, 63, of Warren Township, Somerset County, died at Morristown Medical Center as a result of his injuries.

The North American Navion aircraft crashed around 9:30 a.m. Thursday.

The pilot had finished refueling the aircraft and was preparing to take off when the plane went full throttle, shot across the runway and hit trees on the outskirts of the runway, according to Lt. Scott Johnsen of Blairstown police. Investigators will determine if the issue was caused by mechanical or operator error.

Singer was extracted from the plane by Blairstown Police officer Paul Choe and a member of Blairstown Hose Company. He was flown to Morristown Medical Center. Johnson said the pilot suffered broken bones.

The Federal Aviation Administration, Blairstown Hose Company, Atlantic Health Systems, Blairstown EMS, Blairstown police and Warren County Hazmat responded to the scene.


Source: http://www.njherald.com





A pilot sustained major injuries during a runway mishap Thursday morning at Blairstown Airport that resulted in his single-engine aircraft leaving the runway and crashing into trees, according to Blairstown police.

Lt. Scott Johnson said the crash occurred while the pilot was taxiing onto a runway and the plane somehow "got stuck in full-throttle position."

An Associated Press article previously cited Federal Aviation Administration officials reporting that the plane struck trees and crashed while landing. The plane, in fact, crossed two runways while still on the ground and before crashing into nearby trees, Johnson said.

The injured pilot was airlifted to Morristown Medical Center by Atlantic Ambulance's Air 1 helicopter, according to Johnson. The pilot was not identified and his condition is unknown.

Township police and members of the Blairstown Hose Co. and Office of Emergency Management responded and extricated the pilot from the wreckage, according to Johnson. The Blaistwon Ambulance Corps, haz-mat unit and the FAA also responded to the scene.  The crash is still under investigation.

Source:   http://www.dailyrecord.com




























A small plane struck a tree while landing about 9:15 a.m. Thursday at Blairstown Airport, the Blairstown Township fire chief said.

The pilot survived and was being removed from the plane by medical personnel just after 9:30 a.m., Chief Darren Occhiuzzo confirmed by text.

The plane was leaking fuel and Warren County's hazardous materials team was called in, county Public Safety Director Frank Wheatley said.

The pilot was loaded into a medical helicopter just before 10 a.m., Occhiuzzo said. The pilot was taken to Morristown Medical Center, according to Wheatley.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration search based on the plane's registration number, N8849H, the North American Navion is owned by Sam Singer, of Warren, New Jersey, in Somerset County. 

The fixed-wing single-engine plane was built in 1947, according to the FAA.

It was not immediately confirmed that Singer was piloting the craft at the time of the crash. Calls to a number listed for his home went unanswered Thursday afternoon.

The same plane was involved in a incident last December at the airport.  Township police, fire and emergency medical personnel responded Thursday, as will the FAA, Occhiuzzo said.

Source:   http://www.lehighvalleylive.com




BLAIRSTOWN, N.J. - The pilot of a plane suffered multiple injuries when the aircraft crashed at an airport in Warren County, New Jersey, on Thursday.

The single-engine plane somehow got stuck in full throttle and went across two runways at the Blairstown Airport before hitting some trees around 9:30 a.m., according to Blairstown police Lt. Scott Johnsen, who said that the plane did manage to get a few feet off the ground before the crash.

"It was just like a weird sound like a crash,” said Blairstown resident, Chris Wester. “Thought it was a car accident."

The pilot was taken to a hospital with broken bones, but his injuries are not considered to be life-threatening, Johnsen said.

Police have not released the name of the pilot or where he was heading to.

The pilot was the only person on the four passenger, North American Navion aircraft and emergency crews used the jaws of life to remove him from the plane.

The Federal Aviation Administration is leading the investigation. 

Story and video:  http://www.wfmz.com