Thursday, April 27, 2017

Jet Airways expat pilot accused of assaulting woman passenger, derostered

Mumbai, Apr 27 (PTI): An expat pilot with Jet Airways has been accused of hurling "racist" comments and assaulting a woman besides abusing a physically challenged man on a domestic flight, prompting the airline to deroster him.

The incident aboard a Chandigarh-Mumbai Jet flight on April 3 came to light when cricketer Harbhajan Singh tweeted about it today.

Expressing regret over the incident, the airline said today that corrective action would be taken as per company policy, and after due investigation.

The pilot concerned remains derostered since the day of the incident, the airline said in a statement.

Harbhajan while giving details of the incident, however, said he was not on the flight. He said he learnt of it through an acquaintance.

"We are proud Indians, not 'bloody Indians'... I don't need apology, I want this captain to be out of India so no one dare to (sic) call us bloody Indians," Singh told PTI. The cricketer condemned the incident as "disgraceful".

In a series of tweets, the cricketer alleged that the pilot assaulted a woman and abused a physically challenged man.

"So called this Bernd Hoesslin a pilot with @jetairways called my fellow Indian (u bloody Indian get out of my flight) while he is earning here," he said.

"Not only was he a racist, but physically assaulted a lady and abused a physically challenged man... absolutely disgraceful and shame on @jetairways," the cricketer said but did not give details.

Demanding that strict action be taken and such things not be allowed or tolerated in the country, Singh tweeted "#proudtobeindian let's get together and sort this".

The incident involved passengers Puja Gujral and her wheelchair-bound friend Jitendra Shah.

Gujral, who claims to be close to Harbhajan's wife Geeta Basra, said when the plane landed in Mumbai there was a delay in arranging a wheelchair for Shah, which allegedly infuriated the pilot.

"The plane had to take off for Chennai on its next leg and there had been a delay of more than 20 minutes because of some confusion over a wheelchair for my friend. As a result the pilot got angry and came out of the cockpit and pushed me and said 'you bloody Indians just get out of my flight'," Gujral claimed.

"When my friend intervened the pilot told him 'you little one you get out first'," she added. Gujral also said that she approached the local police two days later to file a case. However, no FIR has been lodged yet, she added.

A Jet Airways statement said it has already issued an apology to the passengers concerned.

"The airline has as per policy initiated a full-fledged investigation, based on specific inputs from guests, concerned departments and agencies," it added.

The airline emphasised that it has zero tolerance towards any action of its employees that contravenes local or international laws prevalent in the countries of its operations.

"Additionally, we have a strict employee code of conduct which is based on the values and ethos of the airline."

The tweets from Singh also come at a time when Jet Airways' local pilots body NAG has raised concerns about the behavior of expat pilots with the airline.

Last week, the National Aviators Guild (NAG) had said the carrier is treating Indian pilots in a "step-motherly" manner compared to their expat counterparts on the rolls.

Demanding swift action against alleged racist approach of the expat pilots at the airline, the guild had called for disallowing such pilots in the cockpit.

NAG has also asked its members not to fly with the expats in the cockpit after one of the foreign pilots allegedly assaulted a trainer in Bengaluru recently.

Jet Airways has nearly 60 expat commanders who mainly operate its Boeing 737 and ATR fleet.

In response to NAG's allegations, the airline last week said it has a strict and common code for employees.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.daijiworld.com

Robinson R44 Raven II, N728CB, operated by Chesapeake Bay Helicopters: Accident occurred April 27, 2017 in Newton, Catawba County, North Carolina

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charlotte, North Carolina
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania 
Robinson Helicopter Company; Torrance, California 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms
  
Bulanov Galis LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N728CB

Analysis 

The commercial helicopter pilot and a crewmember were conducting a pipeline patrol when they noticed a right-of-way infraction (construction work) that they wanted to photograph. The pilot then entered a left circuit at 500 ft above ground level. The pilot reported that he subsequently felt a shudder in the controls and that the helicopter began to yaw right and spin. Although the pilot reported that he maintained an airspeed of 70 knots while maneuvering, GPS data revealed that the loss of yaw control occurred at the completion of the first left circuit and the beginning of the second left circuit as the helicopter slowed to a groundspeed of about 1 mph. Weather data indicated that, at this point, the helicopter was experiencing an 8-knot tailwind. The pilot lowered the helicopter's nose but was unable to correct the spin. He entered an autorotation and maneuvered to avoid residences and utility poles, and the helicopter then impacted the ground.

Examination of the helicopter did not reveal any evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation. It is likely that the low-airspeed condition combined with a tailwind during out-of-ground-effect maneuvering resulted in a loss of helicopter control due to a loss of tail rotor effectiveness. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain an adequate airspeed during out-of-ground-effect maneuvering at a low airspeed with a tailwind, which resulted in a loss of helicopter control due to a loss of tail rotor effectiveness.

Findings

Aircraft
Airspeed - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues

Tailwind - Effect on operation (Cause)



Location: Newton, NC
Accident Number: ERA17LA168
Date & Time: 04/27/2017, 1330 EDT
Registration: N728CB
Aircraft: ROBINSON R44
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of tail rotor effectiveness
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Aerial Observation 

On April 27, 2017, about 1330 eastern daylight time, a Robinson R44 II, N728CB, operated by Chesapeake Bay Helicopters, was substantially damaged during a collision with terrain while maneuvering near Newton, North Carolina. The commercial pilot and crewmember sustained minor injuries. The local aerial observation flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a company flight plan was filed for the flight that originated from Concord Regional Airport (JQF), Concord, North Carolina, about 1225.

The pilot reported that he was performing a pipeline patrol at 500 ft above ground level and an airspeed of 70 knots. During the patrol, the crew observed a right-of-way infraction and circled the location at the same airspeed and altitude. While extending the circling pattern, the pilot felt a shudder in the controls while at the same time, the nose of the helicopter yawed right and the helicopter began to spin. He immediately lowered the nose in an attempt to increase forward motion, but the rate of spin increased. He then attempted to set up for an autorotation and avoid residences and utility wires. The helicopter subsequently impacted the ground and the pilot was able to shut down the engine and exit the helicopter.

The crewmember reported that while on pipeline patrol, they circled to photograph construction work. While circling, the helicopter lost control and spun two or three times before impacting the ground.

Examination of the wreckage revealed substantial damage to the helicopter. Tail rotor driveshaft continuity was confirmed from the tail rotor blades to the main rotor. Continuity was also confirmed from the left anti-torque pedal to the tail rotor. A section of right anti-torque pedal control tube was found bent and separated. The separated section of control tube was retained for metallurgical examination, which revealed that the separation was consistent with overstress due to impact forces. No preimpact mechanical malfunctions were identified.

The helicopter's most recent 100-hour inspection was completed on March 10, 2017. At that time, the airframe and engine had accumulated 1,873.6 total hours of operation. The helicopter had flown an additional 43.6 hours from the time of the inspection, until the accident flight.

The recorded wind at an airport located about 10 miles northwest of the accident site, at 1253, was from 190° at 8 knots.

Review of GPS data provided by the operator revealed that after completion of the first left circuit and the beginning of the second left circuit, the helicopter's ground speed slowed to about 1 mph at a GPS altitude of 1,223 ft (about 500 ft above ground level). At that time, the GPS track was indicating a northerly course, with an approximate 8-knot tailwind. The track subsequently indicated transition from a left circuit to a right turn.

The Federal Aviation Administration issued advisory circular (AC)-90-95, Unanticipated Right Yaw in Helicopters during February 1995. The AC stated that the loss of tail rotor effectiveness (LTE) was a critical, low-speed aerodynamic flight characteristic which could result in an uncommanded right yaw rate that did not subside of its own accord and, if not corrected, could result in the loss of aircraft control. It also stated, "LTE is not related to a maintenance malfunction and may occur in varying degrees in all single main rotor helicopters at airspeeds less than 30 knots."

Paragraph 9 of the AC covered reducing the onset of LTE. It stated:

"In order to reduce the onset of LTE, the pilot should: ... c. When maneuvering between hover and 30 knots: (1) Avoid tailwinds. If loss of translational lift occurs, it will result in an increased high power demand and an additional anti-torque requirement. (2) Avoid out of ground effect (OGE) hover and high power demand situations, such as low speed downwind turns. (3) Be especially aware of wind direction and velocity when hovering in winds of about 8 - 12 knots (especially OGE). There are no strong indicators to the pilot of a reduction of translation lift... (6) Stay vigilant to power and wind conditions."

Paragraph 10 of the AC addressed recovery techniques. It stated:

"a. If a sudden unanticipated right yaw occurs, the pilot should perform the following:
(1) Apply full left pedal. Simultaneously, move cyclic forward to increase speed. If altitude permits, reduce power. (2) As recovery is effected, adjust controls for normal forward flight. b. Collective pitch reduction will aid in arresting the yaw rate but may cause an increase in the rate of descent. Any large, rapid increase in collective to prevent ground or obstacle contact may further increase the yaw rate and decrease rotor rpm. c. The amount of collective reduction should be based on the height above obstructions or surface, gross weight of the aircraft, and the existing atmospheric conditions. d. If the rotation cannot be stopped and ground contact is imminent, an autorotation may be the best course of action. The pilot should maintain full left pedal until rotation stops, then adjust to maintain heading."

Additionally, Robinson Safety Notice SN-34 addressed aerial survey and photography flights, and provided cautions about such flights below 30 knots airspeed. 



Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 34, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane; Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/29/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/22/2016
Flight Time:  1529 hours (Total, all aircraft), 207 hours (Total, this make and model), 111 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 14 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 9 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: ROBINSON
Registration: N728CB
Model/Series: R44 II
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2010
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 12899
Landing Gear Type: Skid;
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/10/2017, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 43 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1917 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: IO-540-AE1A5
Registered Owner: BULANOV GALIS LLC
Rated Power: 245 hp
Operator: Chesapeake Bay Helicopters
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Rotorcraft External Load (133)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: HKY, 1186 ft msl
Observation Time: 1253 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 310°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 13°C
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 4600 ft agl
Visibility:  8 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots, 190°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.88 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Concord, NC (JQF)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Destination: Concord, NC (JQF)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  1225 EDT
Type of Airspace:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  35.633333, -81.243889


NTSB Identification: ERA17LA168
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, April 27, 2017 in Newton, NC
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R44 II, registration: N728CB
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 27, 2017, about 1330 eastern daylight time, a Robinson R44 II, N728CB, operated by Chesapeake Bay Helicopters, was substantially damaged during a collision with terrain while maneuvering near Newton, North Carolina. The commercial pilot and crewmember incurred minor injuries. The local aerial observation flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a company flight plan was filed for the flight that originated from Concord Regional Airport (JQF), Concord, North Carolina, about 1225.

The pilot reported that he was performing a pipeline patrol at 500 feet above ground level and an airspeed of 70 knots. During the patrol, the crew observed a right-of-way infraction and circled the location at the same airspeed and altitude. While extending the circling pattern, the pilot felt a shudder in the controls while at the same time, the nose of the helicopter yawed right and the helicopter began to spin. He immediately lowered the nose in an attempt to increase forward motion, but the rate of spin increased. He then attempted to set up for an autorotation and avoid residences and utility wires. The helicopter subsequently impacted the ground and the pilot was able to shut down the engine and exit the helicopter.

The observer reported that while on pipeline patrol, they circled to photograph construction work. While circling, the helicopter lost control and spun two or three times before impacting the ground.

Examination of the wreckage revealed substantial damage to the helicopter. Tailrotor driveshaft continuity was confirmed from the tailrotor blades to the main rotor. Continuity was also confirmed from the left anti-torque pedal to the tailrotor. A section of right anti-torque pedal control tube was found bent and separated. The separated section of control tube was retained for metallurgical examination.

The helicopter's most recent 100-hour inspection was completed on March 10, 2017. At that time, the airframe and engine had accumulated 1,873.6 total hours of operation. The helicopter had flown and additional 43.6 hours from the time of the inspection, until the accident flight.

The recorded wind at an airport located about 10 miles northwest of the accident site, at 1253, was from 190° at 8 knots. The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charlotte, North Carolina
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania 
Robinson Helicopter Company; Torrance, California 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms
  
Bulanov Galis LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N728CB

Location: Newton, NC
Accident Number: ERA17LA168
Date & Time: 04/27/2017, 1330 EDT
Registration: N728CB
Aircraft: ROBINSON R44
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of tail rotor effectiveness
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Aerial Observation 

On April 27, 2017, about 1330 eastern daylight time, a Robinson R44 II, N728CB, operated by Chesapeake Bay Helicopters, was substantially damaged during a collision with terrain while maneuvering near Newton, North Carolina. The commercial pilot and crewmember sustained minor injuries. The local aerial observation flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a company flight plan was filed for the flight that originated from Concord Regional Airport (JQF), Concord, North Carolina, about 1225.

The pilot reported that he was performing a pipeline patrol at 500 ft above ground level and an airspeed of 70 knots. During the patrol, the crew observed a right-of-way infraction and circled the location at the same airspeed and altitude. While extending the circling pattern, the pilot felt a shudder in the controls while at the same time, the nose of the helicopter yawed right and the helicopter began to spin. He immediately lowered the nose in an attempt to increase forward motion, but the rate of spin increased. He then attempted to set up for an autorotation and avoid residences and utility wires. The helicopter subsequently impacted the ground and the pilot was able to shut down the engine and exit the helicopter.

The crewmember reported that while on pipeline patrol, they circled to photograph construction work. While circling, the helicopter lost control and spun two or three times before impacting the ground.

Examination of the wreckage revealed substantial damage to the helicopter. Tail rotor driveshaft continuity was confirmed from the tail rotor blades to the main rotor. Continuity was also confirmed from the left anti-torque pedal to the tail rotor. A section of right anti-torque pedal control tube was found bent and separated. The separated section of control tube was retained for metallurgical examination, which revealed that the separation was consistent with overstress due to impact forces. No preimpact mechanical malfunctions were identified.

The helicopter's most recent 100-hour inspection was completed on March 10, 2017. At that time, the airframe and engine had accumulated 1,873.6 total hours of operation. The helicopter had flown an additional 43.6 hours from the time of the inspection, until the accident flight.

The recorded wind at an airport located about 10 miles northwest of the accident site, at 1253, was from 190° at 8 knots.

Review of GPS data provided by the operator revealed that after completion of the first left circuit and the beginning of the second left circuit, the helicopter's ground speed slowed to about 1 mph at a GPS altitude of 1,223 ft (about 500 ft above ground level). At that time, the GPS track was indicating a northerly course, with an approximate 8-knot tailwind. The track subsequently indicated transition from a left circuit to a right turn.

The Federal Aviation Administration issued advisory circular (AC)-90-95, Unanticipated Right Yaw in Helicopters during February 1995. The AC stated that the loss of tail rotor effectiveness (LTE) was a critical, low-speed aerodynamic flight characteristic which could result in an uncommanded right yaw rate that did not subside of its own accord and, if not corrected, could result in the loss of aircraft control. It also stated, "LTE is not related to a maintenance malfunction and may occur in varying degrees in all single main rotor helicopters at airspeeds less than 30 knots."

Paragraph 9 of the AC covered reducing the onset of LTE. It stated:

"In order to reduce the onset of LTE, the pilot should: ... c. When maneuvering between hover and 30 knots: (1) Avoid tailwinds. If loss of translational lift occurs, it will result in an increased high power demand and an additional anti-torque requirement. (2) Avoid out of ground effect (OGE) hover and high power demand situations, such as low speed downwind turns. (3) Be especially aware of wind direction and velocity when hovering in winds of about 8 - 12 knots (especially OGE). There are no strong indicators to the pilot of a reduction of translation lift... (6) Stay vigilant to power and wind conditions."

Paragraph 10 of the AC addressed recovery techniques. It stated:

"a. If a sudden unanticipated right yaw occurs, the pilot should perform the following:
(1) Apply full left pedal. Simultaneously, move cyclic forward to increase speed. If altitude permits, reduce power. (2) As recovery is effected, adjust controls for normal forward flight. b. Collective pitch reduction will aid in arresting the yaw rate but may cause an increase in the rate of descent. Any large, rapid increase in collective to prevent ground or obstacle contact may further increase the yaw rate and decrease rotor rpm. c. The amount of collective reduction should be based on the height above obstructions or surface, gross weight of the aircraft, and the existing atmospheric conditions. d. If the rotation cannot be stopped and ground contact is imminent, an autorotation may be the best course of action. The pilot should maintain full left pedal until rotation stops, then adjust to maintain heading."

Additionally, Robinson Safety Notice SN-34 addressed aerial survey and photography flights, and provided cautions about such flights below 30 knots airspeed. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 34, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane; Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/29/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/22/2016
Flight Time:  1529 hours (Total, all aircraft), 207 hours (Total, this make and model), 111 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 14 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 9 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: ROBINSON
Registration: N728CB
Model/Series: R44 II
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2010
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 12899
Landing Gear Type: Skid;
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/10/2017, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 43 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1917 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: IO-540-AE1A5
Registered Owner: BULANOV GALIS LLC
Rated Power: 245 hp
Operator: Chesapeake Bay Helicopters
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Rotorcraft External Load (133)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: HKY, 1186 ft msl
Observation Time: 1253 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 310°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 13°C
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 4600 ft agl
Visibility:  8 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots, 190°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.88 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Concord, NC (JQF)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Destination: Concord, NC (JQF)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  1225 EDT
Type of Airspace:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor

Latitude, Longitude:  35.633333, -81.243889




NTSB Identification: ERA17LA168
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, April 27, 2017 in Newton, NC
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R44 II, registration: N728CB
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 27, 2017, about 1330 eastern daylight time, a Robinson R44 II, N728CB, operated by Chesapeake Bay Helicopters, was substantially damaged during a collision with terrain while maneuvering near Newton, North Carolina. The commercial pilot and crewmember incurred minor injuries. The local aerial observation flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a company flight plan was filed for the flight that originated from Concord Regional Airport (JQF), Concord, North Carolina, about 1225.

The pilot reported that he was performing a pipeline patrol at 500 feet above ground level and an airspeed of 70 knots. During the patrol, the crew observed a right-of-way infraction and circled the location at the same airspeed and altitude. While extending the circling pattern, the pilot felt a shudder in the controls while at the same time, the nose of the helicopter yawed right and the helicopter began to spin. He immediately lowered the nose in an attempt to increase forward motion, but the rate of spin increased. He then attempted to set up for an autorotation and avoid residences and utility wires. The helicopter subsequently impacted the ground and the pilot was able to shut down the engine and exit the helicopter.

The observer reported that while on pipeline patrol, they circled to photograph construction work. While circling, the helicopter lost control and spun two or three times before impacting the ground.

Examination of the wreckage revealed substantial damage to the helicopter. Tailrotor driveshaft continuity was confirmed from the tailrotor blades to the main rotor. Continuity was also confirmed from the left anti-torque pedal to the tailrotor. A section of right anti-torque pedal control tube was found bent and separated. The separated section of control tube was retained for metallurgical examination.

The helicopter's most recent 100-hour inspection was completed on March 10, 2017. At that time, the airframe and engine had accumulated 1,873.6 total hours of operation. The helicopter had flown and additional 43.6 hours from the time of the inspection, until the accident flight.

The recorded wind at an airport located about 10 miles northwest of the accident site, at 1253, was from 190° at 8 knots.



CATAWBA COUNTY, N.C. -- The pilot of a helicopter that crashed inches from a Catawba County house will be released from a Charlotte hospital on Friday.

The pilot, whose name has not been released, was flown to Charlotte after suffering serious injuries when investigators said his helicopter began having mechanical issues and slammed into the ground.

A clean-up crew spent about an hour Friday afternoon collecting the wreckage outside of a house on Killian Avenue near Newton in Catawba County.

The crew will take it to a facility where NTSB investigators can go through the wreckage to determine the cause of the crash.

The pilot and the passenger inside work for Chesapeake Bay Helicopters in Virginia.

In a phone interview, the company's safety and compliance officer, Kristen McDaniel, said both men are doing fine and will soon be heading home.

"We're just extremely grateful that both the pilot and the observer are okay," McDaniel said. "We are fully cooperating with the NTSB, and we know it'll be a process through the investigation, but we are fully ready to do what we can to help them."

She said the company is not yet releasing the two men's identities.

NBC Charlotte obtained the radio traffic between paramedics and Frye Regional Medical Center in Hickory as the pilot was being transported to the hospital.

"This is Medic 10. We're enroute to your facility with a 34-year-old male pilot of a helicopter crash," the paramedic said.

"What's the patient's injuries?" a Frye employee asked later in the radio traffic.

"Patient's complaining of severe back pain," the paramedic responded.

NBC Charlotte also got the helicopter's tail number. According to the FAA, the helicopter was deemed "airworthy" in 2010 and has no record of maintenance issues.

The NTSB said its still in the preliminary stages of the investigation and hope to have an update next week.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.wcnc.com




CATAWBA COUNTY, N.C. -- Two people were injured in a helicopter crash near Newton in Catawba County on Thursday afternoon.

Catawba County Emergency Management Director Karyn Yaussy said the helicopter was doing survey work on a new gas line for Piedmont Natural Gas when it began to have engine trouble.

Highway Patrol spoke to witnesses who said the chopper spun around three times before the engine sounded, as if it cut off.

The chopper crashed inches from Nino Gonzalez's house on McKay Road; its rotor blades clipped a section of his home's roof.

"I'm just like, 'What the heck's going on?'" Gonzalez said. "Me and a couple of the neighbors tried to help the pilot get out because the pilot was crushed up underneath."

Lakea Cromwell lives a few homes down from where the crash happened. She was impressed the pilot was able to maneuver the chopper away from the homes.

"It's a miracle," Cromwell said. "There's too much that could've went wrong."

Yaussy said the pilot suffered critical injuries and was taken to Frye Regional Medical Center in Hickory before being airlifted to a hospital in Charlotte. NBC Charlotte is working to confirm which hospital the pilot was flown to.

A passenger in the helicopter was also taken to Frye Regional Medical Center, but that person is expected to be okay.

Investigators with the NTSB are expected to arrive at the site within the next 24 hours.

Story and video:  http://www.wcnc.com


Nino Gonzalez describes how he asleep in bed when the helicopter crashed into his home.


NEWTON – A helicopter crashed near the corner of Sigmon Dairy Road and McKay Farm Road in Newton on Thursday afternoon.


The helicopter nearly collided with a house at about 1:50 p.m. Although the house was missed directly, the rotors clipped the roof and foundation resulting in some damage.

The pilot and passenger were both injured and transported by Catawba County Emergency Medical Services. The pilot is in critical condition and may be flown to another facility.

The helicopter was surveying a route for a natural gas line before experiencing engine trouble.

The Newton Police Department, Newton Fire Department, Catawba County EMS, and North Carolina State Highway Patrol all responded to the scene.

Officials are waiting for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to arrive from Charlotte to lead the investigation.

While waiting, the local authorities are leaving the helicopter unmoved for the FAA’s assessment.

Original article can be found here: http://www.hickoryrecord.com

Nanchang CJ-6A, N192NG, G&C CJ6 LLC: Fatal accident occurred April 27, 2017 in Keene, Kern County, California

  
Gutierrez, Gilbert

 
Gilbert Gutierrez was a successful registered professional engineer and philanthropist who passed away at age 75 on April 27, 2017. Gilbert was born in Gallup, NM and raised in Albuquerque, NM and Winslow, AZ working at his father's service stations. He joined the army in 1963 and was later honorably discharged. From the military he attended Arizona State University and received both a BSE and MSE in chemical engineering. After getting married and having two sons, he founded and operated a successful engineering business in 1980 that still is in operation today. During his professional career he served on several boards including but not limited to the EPA, Selective Service, and the Professional Engineering Review Board of the State of Arizona. He has been involved in Rotary for over 20 years and started flying, his dream in 2001. He passed away following his dream. He loved his family and did everything he could to help and be there for them. That love and assistance extended beyond his family through his charity work, friendships, and stopping for the random person on the street that needed a helping hand. Always proud and humble, never wanting to draw attention to himself, he will be missed dearly. He is survived by his wife, Candice; sons, Gilbert (Eugenia) and Andrew (Christine); grandchildren, Summer, Jack, and Jayla; exchange student daughters, Geziely, Melinda, and Gealle; and 2 brothers and 2 sisters. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the International Rotary Foundation (rotary.org) using the donation button on the bottom of their Web page. A public memorial will be held May 12, 2017 at 2:30pm at Calvary Community Church, 12612 N Black Canyon Hwy, Phoenix, AZ 85029.

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fresno, California

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

G&C CJ6 LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N192NG


 


NTSB Identification: WPR17FA091
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, April 27, 2017 in Keene, CA
Aircraft: NANCHANG CJ6A, registration: N192NG
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 27, 2017, about 1350 Pacific daylight time, a Nanchang CJ6A, N192NG, was destroyed when it impacted terrain near Keene, California. The private pilot, sole occupant of the airplane, was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to G&C CJ6 LLC, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The cross-country flight originated from the Apple Valley Airport, Apple Valley (APV), California, about 1255, with an intended destination of Porterville, California.

Information provided by friends of the pilot, who were part of a four-airplane formation flight revealed that the flight originally departed from Phoenix, Arizona earlier in the morning, with a fuel stop at APV. Following lunch and a brief delay for weather, the flight of four departed APV, enroute to Porterville. As the flight neared Tehachapi, California, they were at an altitude of about 7,500 feet mean sea level (msl), maintaining separation from an overcast to broken cloud layer throughout the area. As they passed Tehachapi, the flight began a shallow descent. During the descent, the lead pilot lost sight of the accident pilot, who was positioned in the number two position (left of the lead pilot, in a diamond formation) and asked the accident pilot if he was ok. The accident pilot responded to the lead pilot that he was ok.

A short time later, the lead pilot asked the accident pilot a second time if he was ok, in which the pilot responded he was. Subsequently, the pilot who was in the slot position (in trail of the lead pilot) reported that the accident pilot was behind his position and lower, and eventually lost sight of him and maneuvered to reestablish visual contact unsuccessfully. The pilot who was flying in the number 3 position (right side of lead), reported shortly after that the pilot in the slot position lost sight of the accident pilot, he observed the accident pilot fly into a cloud layer while in a wings level, slightly nose low attitude, behind and lower than his position. The formation flight never reestablished radio or visual contact with the accident pilot.

A witness who was in a vehicle nearby the accident reported that they observed an airplane descend from a cloud layer in an almost vertical attitude until they lost sight of it behind a mountain.

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane impacted hilly terrain about 5.5 miles northwest of the Tehachapi Airport. The airplane came to rest in an almost vertical attitude on a heading of about 249 degrees magnetic. All of the major structural components of the airplane were located within about 100 feet of the main wreckage. The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



 
PORTERVILLE, Calif. (KFSN) --  Authorities have identified the Phoenix pilot who crashed his plane in Kern County Thursday night as 75-year-old Gilbert Gutierrez.

As pilots prepared to take off and land at the Porterville Municipal Airport, what happened to one of their own raced across the runway with them.

"It's a brotherhood," one pilot said. "And we're obviously sad to hear of the passing of one of the pilots."

Gutierrez was traveling from Phoenix to the Central Valley when his single-engine, older model plane went down in Kern County. He was less than a hundred miles away from his destination."

"We were expecting that particular aircraft to show up for this event for this clinic and when we heard the news we put two and two together," pilot Gal Lipaz said.

Lipaz says he and Gutierrez not only flew the same aircraft but were both participating in basic military formation training at an event called All Red Star.

It is here that pilots learn safe maneuvering techniques while also having a little fun.

"He has been flying with us for many years," he said. "Very likable guy, and, you know, it's very sad."

It's especially tragic since he was not able to park his aircraft on the tarmac and reconnect with the guys on his annual trip. So, a group of men held a moment of silence for Gutierrez Thursday night.

"We will miss him," Lipaz said. "We feel for him and mostly we feel for the family."

Now the FAA and the NTSB are both investigating, it is unknown at this time what caused the plane to crash. But the FAA says any plane, especially ones like these that are restored, has to get an airworthiness certificate before going up into the air.

Story and video:    http://abc30.com



KEENE, CA -  A 75-year-old pilot has died while heading to a California gathering of vintage Soviet airplanes.

Kern County coroner's officials say Gilbert Thomas Gutierrez of Phoenix, was killed in Thursday's crash.

His Nanchang CJ-6A aircraft went down near the town of Keene, about 75 miles north of Los Angeles.

The plane was on its way to an event called "All Red Star" in Porterville. It's an annual gathering of enthusiasts of former Soviet and Communist Bloc aircraft.


Original article can be found here: http://www.abc15.com




A 75-year-old Phoenix man was killed Thursday when the plane he was piloting crashed near Tehachapi.

The Kern County Coroner’s office said Gilbert Thomas Gutierrez, 75, was found dead at the scene of the crash in the 22800 block of Broome Road, near the historic Tehachapi Loop rail line. The coroner’s office said it would conduct a postmortem autopsy on May 1.





KEENE — One person died in a plane crash Thursday afternoon, Kern County Fire Department Capt. Jason Knaggs said near the crash site.

A passerby reported seeing a Nanchang Yak-18A plane go down on the side of the mountain northeast of Highway 58, about a mile from the highway, Knaggs said, and reported it to officials at 1:56 p.m.

"The Nanchang CJ-6A crashed under unknown circumstances near Keene," Allen Kenitzer from the FAA Office of Communications wrote in an email to Tehachapi News and The Bakersfield Californian. He added that one person was on the plane.

Firefighters from Keene searched the area by helicopter and found the crash site at 2:40 p.m. They lowered a firefighter to the scene in a hoist operation and secured the area, Knaggs said.

The plane was in pieces. There was no indication of a fire, Knaggs said.

A command post for responding agencies was set up at Highway 58 and Broome Road, firefighters said.

In addition to the fire department, California Highway Patrol and Kern County Sheriff's Office personnel were at the scene. Later in the evening, deputies were awaiting the FAA to arrive and take over the investigation, sheriff's Senior Deputy Pat McNeal.

Both the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board will investigate, Kenitzer wrote.

Original article can be found here: http://www.tehachapinews.com




KEENE, Calif. - We now know the name of the man killed in a plane crash near Keene. The coroner identified him as Gilbert Thomas Gutierrez, 75, from Phoenix, Arizona.

Officials got a report from a passerby who said she saw a plane hit the side of a mountain around 2 p.m. Thursday afternoon near Keene, California.

A Kern County Fire helicopter spotted the wreckage at 2:40 p.m. after performing a hoist operation. The firefighter who was lowered to the ground confirmed one person was dead in the crash.

The plane was confirmed as a Nanchang CJ-6A, FAA officials confirmed.  The plane appears to be registered out of Phoenix, Arizona.

A command post was being set up at Broome Road and Highway 58, between Keene and Tehachapi, a KCFD official said.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.kerngoldenempire.com
   
















BAKERSFIELD, Calif. - UPDATE (9:03 a.m.): The Kern County Coroner's Office has identified the man killed in Thursday's plane crash as 75-year-old Gilbert Gutierrez of Phoenix. 

One person is dead after a plane crashed near Keene on Thursday afternoon, the Kern County Fire Department said.

"A Nanchang CJ-6A crashed under unknown circumstances near Keene," Federal Aviation Administration Public Affairs Manager Ian Gregor said.

KCFD received the call about the possible crash at 2:08 p.m. and launched a helicopter to search for the plane; the aircraft was later found in a remote area. The Kern County Sheriff's Department is searching the area for any other potential casualties.

KCFD crews have a command post set up in the area of Highway 58 and Broome Road, and the FAA and NTSB are also investigating.  It wasn't immediately clear what may have led up to the crash.

Story and video:   http://www.turnto23.com