Monday, January 11, 2016

Albany, Georgia: Aviation Commission searches for new board member

The Aviation Commission is looking to fill a vacant seat on its board



Albany, GA — The Aviation Commission is looking to fill a vacant seat on its board.

Officials said they have eight candidates, who may be fit for the position.

The board finalized a list of interview questions for each candidate Monday.

Keith Fletcher, board member, said he would like to see a candidate, who has an experienced background as a pilot, fill the position.

Fletcher said he looks forward to interviewing those persons interested and that the chosen candidate should contribute to the success of the Aviation Commission.

"I think it's important for us to have somebody on the commission that understands both a commuter or general aviation perspective and also having a pilot's perspective because we do serve both," said Fletcher.

Candidates will be interviewed toward the end of January.

Story and photo:  http://wfxl.com

Air North: Incident occurred January 11, 2016 at Whitehorse International Airport (CYXY), Yukon, Canada

Air North Old Crow-Dawson City flight makes emergency landing in Whitehorse

Flight was en route to Dawson City when it lost hydraulic fluid needed for retracting landing gear


Air North president Joe Sparling said the pilots of the Hawker Siddeley aircraft chose to divert to Whitehorse because the weather was better.



An Air North flight travelling from Old Crow to Dawson City made an emergency landing at the Whitehorse airport Monday afternoon after it lost hydraulic fluid on departure.

Air North president Joe Sparling said the pilots of the Hawker Siddeley aircraft chose to divert to Whitehorse because the weather was better.
 
"With a hydraulic loss you only have limited use of your brakes and ... there's a possibility of having to be towed off the runway," said Sparling.

"It's a better airport to deal with that sort of thing."

Sparling said that without hydraulic pressure, there's a limited ability to retract the undercarriage of the aircraft.

The plane landed without incident, with safety vehicles standing by. There were 15 passengers and three crew on board.

Sparling said another aircraft was sent to Dawson City to retrieve the passengers bound for Whitehorse.

He says flight schedules won't be affected by the incident as a back-up aircraft will be used while the plane in today's incident is being fixed.

Story and photo:  http://www.cbc.ca

Verne Latham: Federal Aviation Administration hiring changes endanger air safety

A passenger jet flies past the Federal Aviation Administration control tower at Washington's Ronald Reagan National Airport. 



A shortage of qualified air-traffic controllers caused by new Federal Aviation Administration hiring rules is creating dangerous conditions in American skies.

Currently, about 11,000 fully certified air-traffic controllers keep watch over about 87,000 daily flights, according to the National Air Traffic Controllers Association. The number of controllers should be 4,000 higher, and the current qualifying practices make the problem worse. (According to the controllers association, 32 certified air traffic controllers work at Houston Intercontinental, 19 work at William P. Hobby and 71 at Houston TRACON, also known as Houston Air Traffic Control.)

The FAA historically has preferred to hire military veterans or graduates from 36 schools certified to produce reliable air-traffic controllers. But about two years ago, the agency opened its application process to anyone off the street, provided they passed a new biographical assessment.

The questions initially, though no longer, used to screen those who may guide the fate of your next flight included: "What sports did you play in high school?" and "What magazines do you read?"

If the public knew, they'd do a lot more than review the emergency procedures in the seatback card.

In a field with no room for error - one mistake is catastrophic - passion counts. But the FAA's decision to throw its application process wide open is driving down the quality of applicants. Instead of those who are so dedicated that they devote years and thousands of dollars to a certified program, it now can be someone who is looking for a step up from checkout clerk.

The 100-plus-question biographical assessment was intended to create greater equality in the entrance requirements to join the FAA. However, an October 2014 study by the FAA admitted that "the evidence for using these biodata items for controller selection is weak."

Some of the best students in the air traffic management program at Arizona State University, where I'm a lecturer, have taken the test and not scored well. Some in our program have heard of working controllers who can't pass the test. Many who would have been snapped up before the changes have been shut out of the field.

But it's not just affecting air-traffic hopefuls. It's also costing taxpayers.

After being hired by the FAA, air-traffic controllers undergo two to three months of in-depth training at the FAA academy in Oklahoma City. After graduating from the academy, trainees have one to three years of on-the-job training at a tower or en route air-traffic facility at an annual cost in salary and benefits of about $93,000. About one-fifth of those who begin the training do not finish, according to an FAA report.

Congress is calling for an investigation into the new hiring practices. The Air Traffic Controllers Hiring Act of 2015 has been introduced by U.S. Rep. Randy Hultgren, R-Ill., and U.S. Rep. Matt Salmon, R-Ariz., among others, to reverse the changes. Hultgren's last bill, the Safe Towers Act, died in last year's Congress.

Let us hope that it does not take a tragedy to rouse Congress to action. And action is needed soon: Large numbers of the FAA's 11,000 certified air-traffic controllers are either retiring or eligible to retire. Mandatory retirement is age 56. To be fully staffed, the FAA must hire, on average, 1,240 candidates a year. But it hasn't been keeping pace.

Lower staff levels means demands will increase on air-traffic controllers, making it even more crucial that those jobs be filled with qualified, passionate professionals. In aviation there's no room for mistakes.

Latham is a lecturer in air-traffic management at the Polytechnic School, part of the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University.

Article, comments and photo: http://www.houstonchronicle.com/opinion

Mary Lanning Healthcare Helicopter Supplements Transport Services



HASTINGS, Neb. -- Mary Lanning Healthcare formed a partnership with Lifeteam in November, which has not only created good competition among transport services but has also provided more care to people in the area.

Hospital officials said they had been working on bringing the flight service to the hospital for about a year.

"Mary Lanning came to us and asked us to be part of their team, so they could provide a better approach to services for the community," Lifeteam base manager Katie Sparks said.

Lifeteam's helicopter has a 150 mile coverage radius and serves as a transfer service for the hospital.

"We are here. We are on scene. We can be up in the air very quickly for the community. So therefore, it's just providing that quick response," Sparks said.

However, Lifeteam isn't the first flight service in Hastings. In fact, Midwest Medical Transport Company also serves Mary Lanning Healthcare and responds to calls throughout the entire state.

"It has created competition in the area, but competition makes everyone better," Midwest Medical Transport Company's business development director Sean DeLancey said. "There's definitely going to be competition in the area, but we see competition in a lot of places we operate all across our service area, so it's something we're used to facing."

Lifeteam crews take on average about one to two calls a day, depending on the day.

Lifeteam flight crews said their flight services will only supplement what's already being offered in the area, and the fire department, Midwest Medical and Lifeteam will divvy up calls depending on who's not busy.

"We all service the community. We are here to help our patients and the community," Sparks said. "Being here on the pad, yes, we're a little bit quicker for Mary Lanning, but if we're on a call, other services will come in and provide that service also for that patient."

"We'll continue providing a premiere service to all of Nebraska," DeLancey said.

The unspoken collaboration is what the Hastings Fire Department said is needed in the community since the safety and care of a patient is the most important.

"They're important teams. They're teams the community needs. When it's an emergency and somebody needs help, it really isn't a matter of, 'Can you do this, or can I do this?' It's just important that it gets done," Hastings Fire Chief Kent Gilbert said.

Chief Gilbert added there will be times when both transport services will likely be used in a time of emergency, such as at large accidents.

Lifeteam and Mary Lanning will be adding ground transportation Friday, which will be the first and only ambulance at Mary Lanning.

Story, video and photo: http://www.nbcneb.com

Fatal accident occurred January 11, 2016 in Antarctica

David Wood, a Canadian helicopter pilot has died after fall in Antarctica.



A helicopter pilot has died at an Australian research station in Antarctica after falling down an icy crevasse and lying injured for at least two hours.

Canadian pilot David Wood, 62, fell 20m into the crevasse after landing on a remote ice shelf near Australia’s Davis station on Monday night. He was rescued by an emergency response team and flown to a medical facility at Davis station.

In a statement last night Australian Antarctic Division director Nick Gales expressed the group’s “sincere condolences” to Mr. Wood’s family.

Dr Gales called the pilot “a respected colleague and friend” to the program, which he had been involved with for many years.

He said Mr. Wood had more than 30 years experience as a pilot, and had worked extensively in both the Antarctic and Arctic.

Earlier in the day, Dr. Gales told reporters that working in such extreme environments brought risks.

“Working in Antarctica is always very dangerous, especially in the remote field,” he said in Hobart yesterday. “It is in the nature of the work that incidents can happen.”

The fall occurred when two helicopters were transporting fuel to a depot on the West Ice Shelf, 90 nautical miles northeast of Davis, in a technique called sling loading.

The two pilots had landed on the remote ice shelf after dropping the fuel drums at the depot site.

Mr. Wood fell down the crevasse after leaving his aircraft, while the second pilot, unable to offer assistance, contacted Davis station and flew back to get help.

Dr.  Gales’ statement said a response team of three specialist search and rescue officers was dispatched to the site and arrived about three hours after Mr Wood’s fall. They were able to retrieve Mr Wood from a depth of around 20 metres.

The statement said the Division has been in regular contact with Mr Wood’s family. It said the division was working to return his body to Australia at the earliest opportunity.

David Wood, 62, fell 20m into the crevasse after landing on a remote ice shelf near Australia’s Davis station on Monday evening. Mr Wood is a contracted employee with the Australian Antarctic program at Davis station.
The 62-year-old was rescued by an emergency response team after lying in the crevasse for at least two hours, before being flown to a medical facility at the nearby station.

Australian Antarctic Division director Nick Gales said Mr Wood was receiving the best possible medical care while the team assessed whether he should be flown to Australia for intensive treatment.

It is now understood Wood has died, according to media reports from the ABC.

The division employed highly trained doctors at each research station, which were supported by an “enormous” network of medical advice, he said.

“Working in Antarctica is always very dangerous, especially in the remote field,” he told reporters in Hobart.

“It is in the nature of the work that these incidents can happen.” The fall occurred when two helicopters were sling loading fuel to a depot on the West Ice Shelf, 90 nautical miles north east of Davis station.

The two pilots had landed on the remote ice shelf after dropping the fuel drums at the depot site.

Mr Wood fell down the crevasse after leaving his aircraft, while the second pilot, unable to help, contacted Davis station and flew back for help.

The 62-year-old, who had “extensive” Antarctic experience, remained down the crevasse for around two to three hours, Mr Gales said.

The division was preparing avenues for a possible medical evacuation to Australia.

“We’ll cover a broad range of options and we’ll use the one that best suits the needs of the patient,” Mr Gales said, adding an evacuation to Australia would take around 24 hours.

Story and photos:  http://www.news.com.au




A helicopter pilot critically injured in Antarctica on Monday when he fell 20 metres down a crevasse has died.

Canadian David Wood, 62, was working as a contractor with the Australian Antarctic Division (AAD) program at Davis Research Station.

He was in one of two helicopters which had landed on a remote West Ice Shelf late on Monday to offload fuel drums.

After disembarking, he walked away from his helicopter and fell down the crevasse.

He was left trapped for more than two hours as the other pilot flew back to Davis Station, 90 nautical miles away, to get help, AAD director Nick Gales said.

He was later winched to safety in a critical condition and taken to Davis station's medical facility, where an evacuation to mainland Australia was being considered for Wednesday, weather permitting.

But in a statement on Tuesday night Dr. Gales said Mr Wood had died.

He said the AAD was in regular contact with Mr. Wood's family and would work to return his body to Australia "at the earliest opportunity".

Mr. Wood had more than 30 years experience as a pilot and had worked in both the Antarctic and Arctic, Dr Gales said.

Source:  http://www.abc.net.au


A helicopter lands at Australia’s Davis station in Antarctica. A pilot is being treated at a medical facility there after he landed on an ice shelf and fell into a crevasse. 


An Australian helicopter pilot is in a critical condition after falling down a crevasse in Antarctica.

The pilot fell 20 metres after landing on a remote ice shelf near Australia’s Davis station on Monday evening.

The Australian Antarctic Division said the pilot had been rescued by an emergency response team and flown to a medical facility at Davis station.

Two helicopters were sling-loading fuel to a depot on the West Ice Shelf, 90 nautical miles north-east of Davis station, when the accident took place, according to the division.

The two pilots had landed on the ice shelf after dropping the fuel drums at the depot site. One of the pilots fell down the crevasse after leaving his rotorcraft, while the second, unable to help, contacted Davis station and flew back for help.

“The pilot involved in the incident has considerable Antarctic experience,” the division said on Tuesday.

Story and photo: http://www.theguardian.com



No pilot available, Air India flight delayed for nearly 2 hours

NEW DELHI: For want of a pilot, an Air India flight to Bhubaneswar was delayed on Monday for nearly two hours. This was the second time in four days when passengers of the state-owned carrier were left stranded for reasons other than bad weather.

Last Friday, one of Air India's flights to the Odisha capital was delayed by eight hours as the national carrier had reportedly assigned the aircraft and crew of that plane to its Bhopal flight.

Air India flight AI-75 was scheduled to depart for Bhubaneswar at 11 AM. But the passengers had to wait inside the aircraft for almost 1 hour and 45 minutes due to non-availability of flight crew, sources said.

"All the passengers including the NHRC delegation checked in on-time. However, it failed to take off as there was no pilot available to fly the plane. During this period, the passengers remained seated in the aircraft," the source said.

"Unfortunately, there was no word from the airline staff on the expected take off time," the source said, adding the flight could take off only at 2.45 PM after the passengers protested and demanded that the airline arrange the flight crew.

An Air India spokesperson declined to respond to questions on Monday's delay.

Story and comments:  http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com

Federal Aviation Administration orders checks on a handful of 777 engines

Following an uncontained engine failure and fire as a British Airways 777 jet took off in Las Vegas last September, the Federal Aviation Administration is initially mandating inspections of a small number of in-service engines. These are expected to be completed this week.


Following an uncontained engine failure and fire as a Boeing-built British Airways 777 jet took off in Las Vegas last September, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is initially mandating inspections of just six specific engines of similar age, configuration and usage flying in the U.S.

The FAA airworthiness directive, set to be published Tuesday in the Federal Register, requires an inspection of three metal disks in the innards of the six GE-90 engines, and replacement of the parts if any anomaly is found.

GE spokesman Rick Kennedy said only one of the six engines listed by the FAA remains to be inspected and that one will be done this week.

Kennedy said GE anticipates inspecting a second small set of engines once the first set of inspections is complete, and it expects another FAA airworthiness directive to make this mandatory.

The required ultrasonic inspections are conducted without removing the engines from the wings of the jets.

In the Sept. 8 incident, a metal disk in the high pressure compressor section of the engine core broke apart explosively on take-off, shooting out hot metal fragments that pierced the engine, the pod surrounding the engine and the wing of the airplane and igniting a serious engine fire.

The pilot aborted the take-off, slammed on the brakes and ordered an evacuation. All 157 passengers and 13 crew on board were able to exit safely on emergency-escape slides from the right side of the aicraft as fire engulfed the left side.

The engine involved in this first uncontained failure of any GE-90 was one of the first built for the initial 777s after 1995.

About 400 engines of this early GE-90 type are now in service on 167 airplanes. More recently built 777s have a different configuration.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), which is in charge of the accident investigation, has not released any information on whether the initial inspections turned up any anomalies.

A pre-publication copy of the FAA mandate states that the root cause of the initial crack in the disk that broke apart is still unknown but that once this is determined, “we might consider additional rulemaking.”

Original article can be found here:  http://www.seattletimes.com 


NTSB Identification: DCA15FA185
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 129: Foreign operation of BRITISH AIRWAYS PLC
Accident occurred Tuesday, September 08, 2015 in Las Vegas, NV
Aircraft: BOEING COMPANY BOEING 777-236, registration: G-VIIO
Injuries: 1 Serious, 5 Minor, 164 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 8, 2015, about 1613 pacific daylight time (PDT), British Airways flight 2276, a Boeing 777-200, equipped with two GE90-85B engines, registration G-VIIO, experienced a #1 engine uncontained failure during takeoff ground roll on runway 7L at McCarran International Airport (LAS), Las Vegas, Nevada. The #1 engine, inboard left wing, and a portion of the left and right fuselage sustained fire damage. Resulting fire was extinguished by airport rescue and fire fighting. The 157 passengers, including 1 lap child, and 13 crew members evacuated via emergency slides on the runway. There were 5 minor injuries and 1 serious injury as a result of the evacuation. The airplane was substantially damaged. The flight was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 129 and was en route to London - Gatwick Airport (LGW), Horley, England.

Gainesville Regional Airport (KGNV) breaks passenger record

After three years of growing passenger counts, Gainesville Regional Airport announced Monday that it reached an all-time high for enplanements in 2015, breaking the record set in 1990.

The airport reported 217,355 enplanements — or departures — an increase of 892 over the previous record of 216,463 in 1990 and a more than 2 percent increase over 2014.

Enplanements for all U.S. air carriers were up 3.9 percent for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2015, with 791,929 departures compared to 762,367 in the prior fiscal year, according to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics.

Gainesville enplanements hit a low of 133,437 in calendar year 2009 and have climbed every year since, with 63 percent more departing passengers last year.

Airport spokeswoman Laura Aguiar credited the growth to the economic recovery, the addition of American Airlines flights at the airport in late 2010, airfares that are more competitive with Jacksonville International Airport and “the good things going on in the business community.”

She sited recent pressure from the Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce to go after more destinations and more carriers as an indicator of growing demand from business travelers.

American added more flights and larger planes during the holidays, helping push the annual passenger count to the record.

In October, American/US Airways merged their booking systems. That led more of American’s loyal passengers to take a look at the Charlotte, North Carolina, route that previously belonged to US Airways, boosting traffic to that city, Aguiar said. American’s Miami route continues to be the weakest of the three destinations, she said.

For the fiscal year ending September 30, Delta flights to Atlanta accounted for 59.7 percent of the airport’s enplanements with flights 88 percent full. US Airways to Charlotte accounted for 28.7 percent of passengers with flights 85 percent full, while American to Miami accounted for 11.5 percent of the passengers with flights 76 percent full.

Silver Airways — a rideshare carrier for connecting United flights — stopped offering service to Orlando in August. The regional carrier previously accounted for about 4 percent of the airport’s traffic.

Gainesville Regional had seven carriers when it set the prior record in 1990. The former Eastern Airlines left in 1991 and US Airways left two years later. Aguiar previously told The Sun that passenger counts took another dip in 1997 when Delta moved from mainline jets to the less popular turboprops out of the airport.

With the American/US Airways merger, Gainesville now has two carriers offering three routes.

Airport officials will be trying to lure more carriers during an aviation conference in February, Aguiar said.

The passenger growth will help the airport make the case to carriers and in seeking grant funds to expand the terminal, CEO Allan Penksa said in a news release. Further growth could also help increase the number of agents assigned by the Transportation Security Administration.

That would help people get through security faster and hopefully provide enough female agents to handle requests for same-sex pat-downs that can slow down the line, Aguiar said. 

Original article can be found here: http://www.gainesville.com

Old Airport Smartens Up, Lets Pilots Practice

Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) is exploring various avenues to keep its airport in the heart of the city operationally efficient, especially after the recent High Court order ending any hopes of its reopening for civil flights.

Many private airlines have started using the infrastructure to train their pilots, while the defence PSU is also exploring the possibility of setting up aircraft maintenance, repair and  overhaul (MRO) facilities.

The once busy airport in the heart of the city was closed for civil flights in May 2008 when the new airport in Devanahalli commenced operations.

A PIL challenging the agreement between the Civil Aviation Ministry and private operators that led to closure of the HAL airport was dismissed by the High Court recently. The court refused to interfere in a policy decision.

“Private airlines, including Jet, IndiGo and Air Asia have recently started using the airport for training their pilots,” HAL Chairman and Managing Director T Suvarna Raju told Express.

“We are also exploring possibilities on MRO facilities. Our Bangalore Complex CEO is looking into it,” he said.

Airlines that pay charges per landing and take-off bring in some revenue for the PSU and also help keep the airport infrastructure, including the Air Traffic Control (ATC), operational.

Currently, the airport is used for conducting test flights by HAL, IAF and DRDO. Many VVIP flights including those of the President and the Prime Minister, apart from chartered aircrafts, land here. Private airlines training sorties are slotted between the test flights.

“Airlines train their pilots in landing and take-off. Besides the revenue it brings in, it helps keep the airport, which is a national asset, operationally efficient,” Raju said.

Air Pegasus Managing Director Shyson Thomas told Express they have been training pilots there as the airport is affordable.

“The charges are much lower compared to other airports,” he added.

‘Faster to Train Here’

Among other airlines, Air Asia has also been using the HAL airport to train its pilots over the past six months.

“Our focus has always been on safety and quality training, despite the cost. We are helping our pilots practise on empty aircraft at HAL to complete Base Training requirements,” Air Asia India spokesperson told Express.

According to her, it is faster to train pilots at HAL airport. Kempegowda International Airport is busy and because of that, they do not permit training at times. Sometimes, there is a delay in finishing training that leads to extra fuel burn and the cost goes up, she added.

‘Can Approach Govt Again’

On the High Court order that almost ended any hopes on reopening of the HAL airport for commercial operations, the HAL chairman said, “I think we can approach the government again.”

The PIL was filed in 2008 by Airport Authority of India Employees Union and Association of Outsourcing Professionals.

Infrastructure Put to Better Use
  • Airport used by airlines to train pilots
  • HAL exploring possibilities on setting up repair facilities
  • Airport with 1.3 km runway closed in May 2008
  • Chartered aircraft, VVIP flights operate from the airport
  • IAF, DRDO to use it  for conducting test flights 
Original article can be found here: http://www.newindianexpress.com

Council backs airfield businesses hit with eviction notices

Stratford District Council has pledged its support to businesses at Wellesbourne Airfield after they were issued with eviction notices.

The council has agreed to fund a feasibility appraisal of the site to assess the impact losing such businesses would have on the area and the options available to support those businesses.


In June last year as part of the Core Strategy documentation, the council agreed to maintain Wellesbourne Airfield in its current format.



Wellesbourne Airfield


Last week the Herald revealed that businesses on the airfield had received letters from landowners the Littler Family, informing them that they would have to leave by 24th December 2016.

The letters, said notice had been served on the airfield operator Radarmoor and without the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) licence held by them, flying businesses would no longer be able to operate.

The letter states: “All use of the property as an airfield will cease on the date on which Radarmoor gives up possession. In effect, therefore, any activities carried out by you which require the use of an operational airfield will have to cease at that time.”

Mat Timms, who runs the café at Wellesbourne Airfield, said: “It was a bit scary to get the letter to be honest and it’s a worry for us because this is a family business of two generations.

“It does make me worry about the future but this information is nothing new, me and my colleagues set up Wellesbourne Matters to keep the airfield up and running.”

The future of Wellesbourne Airfield has been in doubt since 2014 after the Littler family applied to include the airfield in Stratford District Council’s housing guide, used to steer developments in the district until 2031.

Gladman Developments have also expressed an interest in building up to 1,500 homes on the site.

John Hargis, chairman of the Walton and Wellesbourne Neighborhood Plan Team, said: “I am extremely disappointed with the position that has been taken. Wellesbourne is an integral part of the national network of airfields and it’s a source of tourism in the area which benefits the village. Many of the residents we have interviewed as part of the neighborhood plan have made it clear they are against developing the airfield site into housing.”

No application to build on Wellesbourne Airfield has been received by Stratford District Council, but a statement by Gladman Developments last week said: “Gladman Developments has an interest in the land. Wellesbourne Airfield is a previously developed site and can deliver a significant number of much needed new homes in addition to new jobs and a broad range of community and education facilities in an established sustainable location. Gladman is currently promoting the proposal through the Stratford-on-Avon Local Plan.”

Wellesbourne Matters has campaigned vocally to prevent the airfield being developed into housing, while Wellesbourne Parish Council unsuccessfully applied to get the airfield registered as a community asset last year.

Wellesbourne Airfield was praised last year after being named the Best Light Aviation Airfield in the UK by the Aircraft Owners’ and Pilots’ Association.

It is home to several flying clubs and flight training schools, a café and an aircraft maintenance business.

The airfield was established in 1941 after the Government placed a compulsory purchase order on several farms including Three Bridges Farm, owned by the Littler family.

During the Second World War it was home to No.22 Operational Training Unit which at its peak in 1944 turned out 113 aircrews a month.

After the war the airfield continued to train RAF pilots until it was sold back to the Littler family in 1965 and was used for vehicle testing, and as a base for aircraft and microlights.

In 1981 the airfield was granted its commercial operating license by the CAA and was opened by the Duke of Edinburgh.

The airfield’s most famous resident, Avro Vulcan XM655, arrived in 1984 and is now maintained on the site by the Vulcan XM655 Maintenance and Preservation Society.

A small museum is also located at Wellesbourne Airfield and the Wellesbourne Airfield Market, one of the biggest open-air markets in the country currently takes place every week.

It is understood that the market operator has not been told to leave and the market will continue to be held on a Saturday morning.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.stratford-herald.com

Beech 95-B55 (T42A), N870S: Incident occurred January 10, 2016 at Fort Worth Spinks Airport (KFWS), Fort Worth, Texas



Date: 10-JAN-16
Time: 20:55:00Z
Regis#: N870S
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 95
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Fort Worth AFW FSDO-19
City: FORT WORTH
State: Texas

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, FORT WORTH SPINKS AIRPORT, FORT WORTH, TX

http://registry.faa.gov/N870S

AgustaWestland AW139, Haughey Air Ltd, G-LBAL: Fatal accident occurred March 13, 2014 in Gillingham, Norfolk, United Kingdom

Lord Ballyedmond death: Pilots' insurers 'not contesting' crash

Summary: The helicopter departed from a private site with little cultural lighting at night and in fog. Although the commander had briefed a vertical departure, the helicopter pitched progressively nose-down until impacting the ground. The four occupants were fatally injured.


The helicopter crashed in heavy fog shortly after leaving Lord Ballyedmond's stately home.


Insurers for pilots of a helicopter that crashed killing them and two passengers including Lord Ballyedmond, are not contesting responsibility, a solicitor has said.

James Healy-Pratt is representing the family of the lord - who was one of Northern Ireland's richest men - at an inquest into the deaths in Suffolk.

He said the family believed the crash, in March 2014, was "preventable".

A crash report said the crew was unhappy about taking off in heavy fog.

The inquest into the deaths in the crash, which happened close to Lord Ballyedmond's home in Gillingham, near Beccles, is due to start on Tuesday.

The pilots of the Agusta AW139 G-LBAL helicopter, 36-year-old Capt Carl Dickerson, and Capt Lee Hoyle, 45, were killed instantly along with Lord Ballyedmond, 70, and his 42-year-old foreman, Declan Small, from Mayobridge, County Down.




An Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) said the crew were unhappy about taking off in heavy fog.

The report said the take-off from the peer's estate, Gillingham Hall, would not have been allowed from a licensed aerodrome.

It found the crew lacked visual cues, formal training and procedures to fly in the conditions on board.

Mr Healy-Pratt, of Stewarts Law and himself a qualified helicopter pilot, is also representing the Small family.

'Deliver clarity'

"Lord Ballyedmond entrusted the safety of his employee's life and also his own to the pilots on that foggy evening in March 2014, in a sophisticated helicopter full of safety equipment that Lord Ballyedmond had specifically chosen because of his commitment to crew and passenger safety," he said.

"The aviation insurers for both pilots this week have agreed not to contest responsibility for the death of Lord Ballyedmond or Declan Small.

"Both families expect the inquest to deliver clarity and truth about the causes of the crash, and... ensure that further innocent lives are not lost in similar preventable accidents.

"One possible recommendation is that, after significant delay, the Civil Aviation Authority should require pilots of privately-owned helicopters to follow the same requirements as pilots of commercially operated helicopters, which might well have prevented this accident."

Accident report: https://www.gov.uk

Story and photos:  http://www.bbc.com


NTSB Identification: CEN14WA171
Accident occurred Thursday, March 13, 2014 in Gillingham, Norfolk, United Kingdom
Aircraft: AGUSTAWESTLAND SPA AGUSTA AW139, registration:
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On March 13, 2014, about 1927 coordinated universal time, an Agusta/Westland model AW139 helicopter, United Kingdom registration G-LBAL, impacted terrain shortly after takeoff near Gillingham, Norfolk, United Kingdom. The four occupants were fatally injured. The Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) of the United Kingdom is investigating the accident. All inquiries concerning this accident should be directed to the AAIB: Air Accidents Investigation Branch Farnborough House Berkshire Copse Road Aldershot, Hampshire GU11 2HH, United Kingdom Website: http://www.aaib.gov.uk 

This report is for informational purposes only and contains only information released by, or obtained from, the Air Accidents Investigation Branch of the United Kingdom.

The Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) of the United Kingdom is investigating the accident. All inquiries concerning this accident should be directed to the AAIB:

Air Accidents Investigation Branch
Farnborough House
Berkshire Copse Road
Aldershot, Hampshire
GU11 2HH, United Kingdom
Website: http://www.aaib.gov.uk

FedEx McDonnell Douglas MD10, N554FE: Incident occurred January 09, 2016 in Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee

Date: 09-JAN-16
Time: 22:17:00Z
Regis#: N554FE
Aircraft Make: MCDONNELL DOUGLAS
Aircraft Model: MD10
Event Type: Incident
Damage: Minor
Activity: Cargo
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Aircraft Operator: FDX-Federal Express
Flight Number: FDX541
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Memphis FSDO-21
City: MEMPHIS
State: Tennessee

N554FE FEDEX FLIGHT FDX541 MCDONNELL DOUGLAS MD10 AIRCRAFT ON DEPARTURE NUMBER 3 ENGINE SUSTAINED A BIRDSTRIKE, NO INJURIES, DAMAGE MINOR, RETURNED AND LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, MEMPHIS, TN

FEDERAL EXPRESS CORP: http://registry.faa.gov/N554FE

Recruitment Of Foreign Pilots In China Leaves South Korean Airlines With Inexperienced Aviators



Two major carriers in South Korea, Korean Air and Asiana Airlines, have reportedly struggled to improve working conditions for their pilots.

Korean pilots are now seeking better opportunities with Chinese airline companies as rival carriers continue to recruit foreign pilots, leaving Korean Air and Asiana Airlines with inexperienced aviators, according to The Korea Times.

“China's aviation market has been expanding at a swift pace over the past few years," said an airline industry analyst.

“This means that Chinese carriers need more pilots capable of flying commercial jets, but there aren't many experienced aviators in the world's second-largest economy."

The number of pilots opting to work for Chinese carriers has increased drastically within the past couple years. In 2014, two pilots left Korean Air in order to work for Chinese carriers while 46 people quit last year, according to airline data.

61 pilots reportedly quit Asiana Airlines in 2015 after seeking opportunities with foreign carriers. This is nearly two times more than the number of pilots who left the company in 2014.

In an attempt to fill the void of experienced pilots, airlines in South Korea are recruiting pilots from all walks of life. Korean Air, which is run by president Chi Chang-hoon, has reportedly added retired Air Force pilots and recent training school graduates to its team.

The company has also hired more foreign pilots, reportedly recruiting a total of 77 non-Korean pilots last year alone.

While both Korean Air and Asiana are able to offer swift career advancement for their pilots, the benefits can’t be compared to those of Chinese carriers.

“A pilot with 15 years of flight experience at Korean Air receives about 150 million won a year. But many Chinese carriers reportedly offer twice as much, on top of free housing and education subsidies for their children," the analyst said.

“Lured by fat paychecks and attractive benefits, an increasing number of Korean pilots have moved to China."

Junior pilots are also reportedly choosing to go with smaller carriers in order to further their careers in less time.

“Pilots at budget carriers get paid less than those at flagship carriers, but they can become captains within four years while it takes about 10 years at
Korean Air and Asiana Airlines," the analyst said.

“When they become captains, they can move to foreign carriers and receive more pay. So to advance their careers more quickly, some junior pilots prefer to work at budget airlines."

Source:  http://en.koreaportal.com

Spirit Wings Airbus A319-132, N508NK: Incident occurred January 10, 2016 in Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio

Date: 10-JAN-16
Time: 23:50:00Z
Regis#: N508NK
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A319
Event Type: Incident
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: PUSHBACK/TOWING (PBT)
Aircraft Operator: NKS-Spirit Airlines
Flight Number: NKS251
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Cleveland FSDO-25
City: CLEVELAND
State: Ohio

N508NK SPIRIT WINGS FLIGHT NKS251 AIRBUS A319 AIRCRAFT ON PUSHBACK FROM GATE THE NUMBER 1 ENGINE STRUCK A TUG VEHICLE, NO INJURIES, PASSENGERS DEPLANED AT GATE, DAMAGE TO ENGINE TO BE DETERMINED, CLEVELAND, OH

http://registry.faa.gov/N508NK

Serve syrup, cendol instead of alcohol in line with Islamic identity, Malaysia’s airlines told

Chinese Muslim columnist Mohd Ridhuan Tee Abdullah lauded Rayani Air for their Islamic approach. 



KUALA LUMPUR, Jan 11 — All airlines in Malaysia should follow Rayani Air’s Shariah-compliant footsteps and take the Islamic route instead, controversial Chinese Muslim columnist Mohd Ridhuan Tee Abdullah said today, even suggesting that airlines substitute alcohol for “syrup and cendol.”

Tee lauded Rayani Air for their Islamic approach, adding that all other airlines could also learn from the example of the Royal Brunei Airlines which also touts itself as one of the first few Islamic-oriented airlines in the world.

“I’ve always been saying that we should follow the ways of Brunei Airlines. Isn’t it that only 30 per cent of them are Muslim. How come they can accept it? The answer is simple, the leaders there have willpower.

“What about us? Not insistent. Caught in the voting game,” he said in his column in Malay daily Sinar Harian.

He added that Malaysian companies ought to be Shariah-compliant simply because Malaysia was an “Islamic nation” and should be respected by everyone.

“Why should non-Islamic companies follow the rules of Shariah? The answer, firstly, Malaysia is an Islamic nation. Islam is the federal religion. It must be respected by everyone. Islam already respects other religions, as long as it doesn’t interfere with us,” he said.

Tee gave several other suggestions for airlines to be more halal, one of which includes opting to serve local beverages instead of alcohol which isn’t a Malaysian product to begin with.

“Fifth, why not take a lesson from the plane that had to turn around simply because of a drunk passenger. If alcohol is so good, just ask the pilot to drink it first. Why must pilots be checked for their sobriety, from drugs and alcohol, before flying a plane.

“Sixth, tourists come not to drink alcohol but to look at the country, the culture and our way of life. Their quality of alcohol is far better than ours. What we serve them is also alcohol we imported from them. Why serve that to them, and not a beverage of our own? We should serve syrup and cendol,” he said.

The lecturer at Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin also said that cabin crew uniforms should be made “less sexy” after having personally heard several grouses about having to work in the uniforms.

“Fourth, the issue of flight attendants crying because of sexy clothes and handling alcohol has been an ongoing complaint I’ve heard,” he said.

Rayani air began operations last month, with its maiden flight from klia2 to its home base in Langkawi.

Local broadcaster Astro Awani reported Rayani Air managing director Jaafar Zamhari as saying that the airline, which he said is full service like national carrier Malaysia Airlines, only serves halal food and does not serve alcohol.

- Source: http://www.themalaymailonline.com

Cessna 441 Conquest II, N779CC, Northern Meridian LLC: Accident occurred January 08, 2016 at Hector International Airport (FAR), Fargo, Cass County, North Dakota

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA098
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, January 08, 2016 in Fargo, ND
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 441, registration: N779CC
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airline transport pilot reported that the accident flight was the airplane’s first flight after a phase maintenance check, and that he was repositioning the airplane to an airport about 40 nautical miles away. While en route, the airplane experienced a series of avionics and fuel-related anomalies. The pilot eventually declared an emergency and was cleared to land at the destination airport. The first approach for landing in instrument meteorological conditions resulted in a missed approach. The pilot reported that, about this time, the airframe was accumulating ice and he cycled the deice boots. 

During the second approach, the airplane broke out of the clouds, and the pilot proceeded to land. The pilot reported that, before he initiated the landing flare, he reduced engine power to idle, fully extended the flaps, and flared the airplane.  He stated the airplane was shaking and shuddering, but no stall warning horn sounded, and then the “bottom fell out.”  The airplane landed hard, and the left engine’s propeller blades struck the runway. The airplane incurred wing spar and propeller damage.

A postflight examination of the airplane revealed between ½ to 1 inch of rime ice on the leading edge surfaces of both wings, the horizontal stabilizer, and the vertical stabilizer. The pilot’s operating handbook for the airplane stated that the deicing boots should be cycled as necessary when ice accumulation reached between ¼ and ½ inch. The amount of ice on the wing and empennage surfaces after the accident was consistent with the pilot not cycling the deice boots as prescribed, which resulted in an excessive ice accumulation on approach and a subsequent aerodynamic stall during the landing flare. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to cycle the surface deice boots during the instrument approach in icing conditions, which led to ice accumulation on the leading edges of the wings and empennage, and resulted in an aerodynamic stall and subsequent hard landing.

On January 8, 2016, about 0900 central standard time, a Cessna 441, N779CC, sustained substantial damage during a hard landing at the Hector International Airport (FAR), Fargo, North Dakota. The airline transport rated pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. The airplane was owned and operated by Northern Meridian LLC under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a positioning flight. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight departed from the Detroit Lakes Airport (DTL), Detroit Lakes, Minnesota, about 0830 and was destined for FAR.

The pilot reported that this was the first flight after a phase maintenance check and he was positioning the airplane to FAR which was about 40 nm from DTL. After departure, he climbed to 4,000 ft above mean sea level (msl) and engaged the autopilot in preparation for landing at FAR. He stated that he heard a "thumping" in the left rudder pedal and noted a 20-degree angle of bank to the left on the attitude indicator. He disengaged the autopilot, rolled wings level, and started to troubleshoot the problem. Then the left fuel pressure low light illuminated. Thinking it was an indication problem, he switched to the left AUX pump and then back to the main pump, and the light went out. 

The air traffic controller (ATC) cleared the flight to descend to 2,800 ft msl, but the pilot requested a climb to 5,000 ft msl to get out of icing conditions and "sort out the problems." During the climb, the pilot noticed a discontinuity message between the headings on the Avidyne Entegra flight displays. Once at 5,000 ft msl, the pilot engaged the autopilot and the airplane made a 180-degree turn to the right. The pilot disengaged the autopilot again and turned back towards FAR. The left fuel pressure low light and the left X-FER pump fail light illuminated. The pilot declared an emergency and ATC cleared the flight to descend to 2,800 ft msl and provided vectors for the ILS Runway 36 approach to FAR. The pilot stated that as the airplane was descending through 4,000 ft msl, the left engine started to surge. The pilot reported that the engine never failed during the flight, but he thought an engine failure was imminent. 

The pilot programmed his flight instruments for the approach and activated the vectors to final, but the discontinuity message light illuminated again. He flew through the localizer of the ILS Runway 36 approach, and he subsequently requested ATC to fly the RNAV (GPS) 32 approach instead. The pilot reported that about this time the airplane was picking up ice accumulation and he cycled the deice boots. The ATC controller vectored the airplane back to the southeast for the RNAV (GPS) 32 approach. 

The airplane intercepted the final approach course for the RNAV (GPS) 32 approach and was cleared by ATC for the approach. The airplane broke out of the clouds about 600 - 700 ft above ground level (agl) at 120 kts and less than a mile from the runway, and the pilot lowered the landing gear. The pilot reported that before he started the flare, he closed the throttle, selected the last notch of flaps, and flared at 110 kts. He stated there was shaking and shuddering, but no stall warning horn, and then the "bottom fell out." The airplane landed hard and the left propeller blades struck the runway. While taxiing to the ramp, the pilot noted that it was necessary to forcefully kick in the right rudder pedal to turn right. 

The pilot conducted a post-accident examination of the airplane stated that there was about 1/2 to 1-inch of rime ice accumulated on the leading edge surfaces of both wings. Photographs of the airplane on the ramp after the accident indicated that there was ice accumulated on the leading edge surfaces of the horizontal stabilizer and vertical stabilizer as well. The examination of the airplane revealed there was substantial damage to the wing spar and damage to the left propeller blades from the propeller strike. The stall warning horn was tested on the ground and it operated. 

The pilot stated that he normally enters the flare at 95 kts between 5 – 10 ft agl, and he just holds the nose off, and the airplane typically floats onto the runway.

The Cessna 441 Pilot Operating Handbook (POH) states that the stall speed for the airplane in the landing configuration at 9,360 lbs is 74 kts indicated airspeed. 

The Cessna 441 POH states that the following about the airplane's deice boot system:

"The deice boot system consists of pneumatic air operated boots, an annunciator light to monitor system operation and necessary hardware to complete the system. 

The deice boots are attached to the leading edges of the wings and horizontal and vertical stabilizers. The boots expand and contract, using pressure and vacuum generated by engine bleed air. Normally, vacuum is applied to all of the boots to hold them against the leading edge surfaces. When a deice boot is cycle is initiated, the vacuum is removed and bleed air pressure is applied to inflate the boots. The change in contour will break ice accumulation on the leading edges. Ice formation aft of this area will then be removed by normal in-flight air forces. A normal boot inflation sequence is 6 seconds for empennage boots followed by 6 seconds for the wing boots. The system should be cycled when ice accumulates to between 1/4 to 1/2 inch.

The deice boot are inflated each time that the deice boot switch is activated. The RESET position is used to stop the cycle, should it ever become necessary. A light on the annunciator panel, marked SURFACE DEICE, will illuminate when the tail boots become inflated to a pressure of 11 PSI or more, extinguishes momentarily and illuminates again when the wing boots inflate. If less than 11 PSI is available, the light will not illuminate, indicating that icing conditions should be avoided. Prior to flight in icing conditions, operation of the boots should be functionally checked on the ground or in flight with the OAT above -40 degrees Celsius." 

The Cessna 441 POH states that the following about the Surface Deice Boots Switch:

"Surface Deice Boots Switch – ON when ice accumulates between 1/4 to 1/2 inch. Repeat as necessary. Do not actuate prematurely. Monitor the SURFACE DEICE annunciator to assure proper system operation." 

The POH added this NOTE:

"Prestall buffet and stall speeds can increase when deice boots are actuated."

At 0853, the surface weather observation at FAR was: wind 340 degrees at 19 kts, 5 miles visibility, mist, overcast at 700 ft, temperature -7 degrees C, dew point -9 degrees C, altimeter 29.98 inches of mercury. 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Fargo FSDO-21

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Factual Report:   http://app.ntsb.gov

NOTHERN MERIDIAN LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N779CC 

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA098
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, January 08, 2016 in Fargo, ND
Aircraft: CESSNA 441, registration: N779CC
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On January 8, 2016, about 0900 central standard time, a Cessna 441, N779CC, sustained substantial damage during a hard landing at the Hector International Airport (FAR), Fargo, North Dakota. The airline transport rated pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. The airplane was owned and operated by Northern Meridian LLC under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a positioning flight. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight departed from the Detroit Lakes Airport (DTL), Detroit Lakes, Minnesota, about 0830 and was destined for FAR.


The pilot reported that this was the first flight after a phase maintenance check and he was positioning the airplane to FAR which was about 40 nm from DTL. After departure, he climbed to 4,000 ft above mean sea level (msl) and engaged the autopilot in preparation for landing at FAR. He stated that he heard a "thumping" in the left rudder pedal and noted a 20-degree angle of bank to the left on the attitude indicator. He disengaged the autopilot, rolled wings level, and started to troubleshoot the problem. Then the left fuel pressure low light illuminated. Thinking it was an indication problem, he switched to the left AUX pump and then back to the main pump, and the light went out. 


The air traffic controller (ATC) cleared the flight to descend to 2,800 ft msl, but the pilot requested a climb to 5,000 ft msl to get out of icing conditions and "sort out the problems." During the climb, the pilot noticed a discontinuity message between the headings on the Avidyne Entegra flight displays. Once at 5,000 ft msl, the pilot engaged the autopilot and the airplane made a 180-degree turn to the right. The pilot disengaged the autopilot again and turned back towards FAR. The left fuel pressure low light and the left X-FER pump fail light illuminated. The pilot declared an emergency and ATC cleared the flight to descend to 2,800 ft msl and provided vectors for the ILS Runway 36 approach to FAR. The pilot stated that as the airplane was descending through 4,000 ft msl, the left engine started to surge. The pilot reported that the engine never failed during the flight, but he thought an engine failure was imminent. 


The pilot programmed his flight instruments for the approach and activated the vectors to final, but the discontinuity message light illuminated again. He flew through the localizer of the ILS Runway 36 approach, and he subsequently requested ATC to fly the RNAV (GPS) 32 approach instead. The pilot reported that about this time the airplane was picking up ice accumulation and he cycled the deice boots. The ATC controller vectored the airplane back to the southeast for the RNAV (GPS) 32 approach. 


The airplane intercepted the final approach course for the RNAV (GPS) 32 approach and was cleared by ATC for the approach. The airplane broke out of the clouds about 600 - 700 ft above ground level (agl) at 120 kts and less than a mile from the runway, and the pilot lowered the landing gear. The pilot reported that before he started the flare, he closed the throttle, selected the last notch of flaps, and flared at 110 kts. He stated there was shaking and shuddering, but no stall warning horn, and then the "bottom fell out." The airplane landed hard and the left propeller blades struck the runway. While taxiing to the ramp, the pilot noted that it was necessary to forcefully kick in the right rudder pedal to turn right. 


The pilot conducted a post-accident examination of the airplane stated that there was about 1/2 to 1-inch of rime ice accumulated on the leading edge surfaces of both wings. Photographs of the airplane on the ramp after the accident indicated that there was ice accumulated on the leading edge surfaces of the horizontal stabilizer and vertical stabilizer a
s well. The examination of the airplane revealed there was substantial damage to the wing spar and damage to the left propeller blades from the propeller strike. The stall warning horn was tested on the ground and it operated. 

The pilot stated that he normally enters the flare at 95 kts between 5 – 10 ft agl, and he just holds the nose off, and the airplane typically floats onto the runway.

The Cessna 441 Pilot Operating Handbook (POH) states that the stall speed for the airplane in the landing configuration at 9,360 lbs is 74 kts indicated airspeed. 

The Cessna 441 POH states that the following about the airplane's deice boot system:

"The deice boot system consists of pneumatic air operated boots, an annunciator light to monitor system operation and necessary hardware to complete the system. 

The deice boots are attached to the leading edges of the wings and horizontal and vertical stabilizers. The boots expand and contract, using pressure and vacuum generated by engine bleed air. Normally, vacuum is applied to all of the boots to hold them against the leading edge surfaces. When a deice boot is cycle is initiated, the vacuum is removed and bleed air pressure is applied to inflate the boots. The change in contour will break ice accumulation on the leading edges. Ice formation aft of this area will then be removed by normal in-flight air forces. A normal boot inflation sequence is 6 seconds for empennage boots followed by 6 seconds for the wing boots. The system should be cycled when ice accumulates to between 1/4 to 1/2 inch.

The deice boot are inflated each time that the deice boot switch is activated. The RESET position is used to stop the cycle, should it ever become necessary. A light on the annunciator panel, marked SURFACE DEICE, will illuminate when the tail boots become inflated to a pressure of 11 PSI or more, extinguishes momentarily and illuminates again when the wing boots inflate. If less than 11 PSI is available, the light will not illuminate, indicating that icing conditions should be avoided. Prior to flight in icing conditions, operation of the boots should be functionally checked on the ground or in flight with the OAT above -40 degrees Celsius." 

The Cessna 441 POH states that the following about the Surface Deice Boots Switch:

"Surface Deice Boots Switch – ON when ice accumulates between 1/4 to 1/2 inch. Repeat as necessary. Do not actuate prematurely. Monitor the SURFACE DEICE annunciator to assure proper system operation." 

The POH added this NOTE:

"Prestall buffet and stall speeds can increase when deice boots are actuated."


At 0853, the surface weather observation at FAR was: wind 340 degrees at 19 kts, 5 miles visibility, mist, overcast at 700 ft, temperature -7 degrees C, dew point -9 degrees C, altimeter 29.98 inches of mercury. 

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA098
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, January 08, 2016 in Fargo, ND
Aircraft: CESSNA 441, registration: N779CC
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 8, 2016, about 1000 central standard time, a Cessna 441, N779CC, sustained substantial damage during a hard landing at the Hector International Airport (FAR), Fargo, North Dakota. The pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. The airplane was owned and operated by Northern Meridian LLC under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a positioning flight. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight departed from the Detroit Lakes Airport (DTL), Detroit Lakes, Minnesota, at an unknown time and was destined for FAR.

At 0853, the surface weather observation at FAR was: wind 340 degrees at 19 kts, 5 miles visibility, mist, overcast at 700 ft, temperature -7 degrees C, dew point -9 degrees C, altimeter 29.98 inches of mercury.