Thursday, November 3, 2016

King Air B200, N87SA: Accident occurred January 10, 2016 in Carolina, Puerto Rico

Aviation Accident Final Report -National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board:  http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA348
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Sunday, January 10, 2016 in Carolina, PR
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/05/2016
Aircraft: BEECH B200, registration: N87SA
Injuries: 5 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that he parked the airplane and shut down the requisite systems, then proceeded to the back of the airplane to allow the passengers to disembark and set the wheel chocks. He reported that as he began to open the cabin door, he realized that the airplane was rolling backwards. The airplane rolled into the wall of the airport terminal and the left and right elevators sustained substantial damage. 

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical failures or anomalies with the airplane or any of its systems that would have prevented normal operation.

According to the manufacturer's pilot operating handbook and the operator, the accident airplane was equipped with a parking brake. The operator reported that their maintenance department inspected the parking brake system after the accident, and in accordance with the Beech B200 service manual and found no failures or anomalies.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to actuate the parking brake prior to leaving his seat, resulting in substantial damage.

The pilot reported that he parked the airplane and shut down the requisite systems, then proceeded to the back of the airplane to allow the passengers to disembark and set the wheel chocks. He reported that as he began to open the cabin door, he realized that the airplane was rolling backwards. The airplane rolled into the wall of the airport terminal and the left and right elevators sustained substantial damage. 

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical failures or anomalies with the airplane or any of its systems that would have prevented normal operation.

According to the manufacturer's pilot operating handbook and the operator, the accident airplane was equipped with a parking brake. The operator reported that their maintenance department inspected the parking brake system after the accident, and in accordance with the Beech B200 service manual and found no failures or anomalies.

LIBERTY AIR LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N87SA

Island Airlines, LLC (DBA: Island Airways)

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Factual Report:  http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA348
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Sunday, January 10, 2016 in Carolina, PR
Aircraft: BEECH B200, registration: N87SA
Injuries: 5 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that he parked the airplane and shut down the requisite systems, then proceeded to the back of the airplane to allow the passengers to disembark and set the wheel chocks. He reported that as he began to open the cabin door, he realized that the airplane was rolling backwards. The airplane rolled into the wall of the airport terminal and the left and right elevators sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical failures or anomalies with the airplane or any of its systems that would have prevented normal operation.

According to the manufacturer's pilot operating handbook and the operator, the accident airplane was equipped with a parking brake. The operator reported that their maintenance department inspected the parking brake system after the accident, and in accordance with the Beech B200 service manual and found no failures or anomalies.

Aviat A-1B Husky, N54HY: Accident occurred November 02, 2016 in Geneva, Seminole County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

 
Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

 
http://registry.faa.gov/N54HY


Location: Geneva, FL
Accident Number: ERA17LA037
Date & Time: 11/02/2016, 1100 EDT
Registration: N54HY
Aircraft: AVIAT AIRCRAFT INC A 1B
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Collision during takeoff/land
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Banner Tow 

On November 2, 2016, about 1100 eastern daylight time, an Aviat Aircraft Inc. A-1B, N54HY, was substantially damaged after it impacted a fence during a precautionary landing near Geneva, Florida. The commercial pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed for the banner tow flight that was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight originated from Massey Ranch Airpark (X50), New Smyrna Beach, Florida, around 1050, with an intended destination of Orlando Executive Airport (ORL), Orlando, Florida.

According to the pilot, he performed an engine run up prior to departing X50 with no anomalies noted. About 10 minutes into the flight, the engine began to "run rough." The pilot adjusted the throttle, propeller lever, mixture, and carburetor heat; however, the engine started to backfire and continued to lose power. About that time, he noted a race track below the airplane and elected to perform a precautionary landing. He made a spiraling descent from about 1,000 feet above ground level in order to warn the personnel on the track and maneuvered the airplane to land on a paved area. During the landing roll, the airplane came to rest after it struck a fence. The pilot stated that the engine continued to operate throughout the landing and landing roll until the airplane struck the fence.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the airplane was issued an airworthiness certificate 2001. It was equipped with a Lycoming O-360-A1P, a 180-hp, engine. According to the airframe maintenance logbook, the most recent annual inspection was performed on September 3, 2016, at a total time of 4,571.3 hours. The airframe total time at the time of the accident was 4,650.3 hours.

An examination of the airplane revealed substantial damage to the left wing. An undetermined amount of fuel was removed from the airplane during the recovery. Engine crankshaft continuity was confirmed from the propeller to the accessory drive section. The spark plugs were removed, and it was noted that the cylinder No. 1 top and bottom spark plug electrodes exhibited mechanical damage. The electrodes had become displaced and shorted to the center electrode. No mechanical damage was noted on the other spark plugs. Furthermore, the No. 1 piston looked like it was "sandblasted" when compared to the other cylinders. The left magneto generated spark on all towers. The right magneto generated spark on only one tower.

Maintenance was performed on the engine on October 31, 2016, to troubleshoot "hard starting, low static RPM, and a rough engine." The maintenance entry indicated that both No. 1 spark plugs were damaged. Subsequently, eight new spark plugs were installed on the engine, then "test runs show smooth mag[neto] drops, leak and op[erational] checks good."

Photographs of the No. 1 spark plugs removed during maintenance on October 31, 2016, revealed that part of the ceramic section around the massive spark plug electrode was absent and mechanical damage was noted on the center and ground electrodes. Furthermore, a comparison of the photographs between the spark plugs removed on October 31, 2016, and the spark plugs removed after the accident flight showed similar mechanical damage between the two sets of spark plugs from the No. 1 cylinder.

Further disassembly of the engine was performed under FAA oversight. The intake system, the carburetor box, the carburetor, the exhaust system, and the No. 1 cylinder were examined with no debris noted inside the components of the engine.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 41, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Unknown
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/01/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: AVIAT AIRCRAFT INC
Registration: N54HY
Model/Series: A 1B B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2001
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 2130
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/03/2016, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1800 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 79 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4650.3 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-360-A1P
Registered Owner: AERIAL MESSAGES OF DAYTONA & SALES INC
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: AERIAL MESSAGES OF DAYTONA & SALES INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  Certificate of Authorization or Waiver (COA)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: SFB, 55 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1053 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 265°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 3200 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 15 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 80°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.23 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 19°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: NEW SMYRNA BEACH, FL (X50)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: ORLANDO, FL (ORL)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1050 EST
Type of Airspace:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: None
Latitude, Longitude:  28.793333, -81.085556 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA037
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, November 02, 2016 in Geneva, FL
Aircraft: AVIAT AIRCRAFT INC A 1B, registration: N54HY
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 2, 2016, about 1100 eastern daylight time, an Aviat Aircraft Inc. A-1B, N54HY, was substantially damaged after it impacted a fence during a precautionary landing near Geneva, Florida. The commercial pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed for the personal flight that was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight originated from Massey Ranch Airpark (X50), New Smyrna Beach, Florida, around 1050, with an intended destination of Orlando Executive Airport (ORL), Orlando, Florida.

According to the pilot, he performed an engine run up prior to departing X50 with no anomalies noted. About 10 minutes into the flight, the engine began to "run rough." The pilot adjusted the throttle, propeller lever, mixture, and carburetor heat; however, the engine started to backfire and continued to lose power. About that time, he noted a driving track below the airplane and elected to perform a precautionary landing. He made a spiraling descent from about 1,000 feet above ground level in order to warn the personnel on the track and maneuvered the airplane to land on a paved area. During the landing roll, the airplane came to rest after it struck a fence. The pilot stated that the engine continued to operate throughout the landing and landing roll until the airplane struck the fence.

An examination of the airplane revealed substantial damage to the left wing. An undetermined amount of fuel was removed from the airplane during the recovery. Engine crankshaft continuity was confirmed from the propeller to the accessory drive section. The spark plugs were removed and it was noted that the cylinder No. 1 top and bottom spark plug electrodes exhibited damage. The left magneto generated spark on all towers. The right magneto generated spark on only one tower.

The engine was retained for further examination.








































AIRCRAFT:   2001 AVIAT A 1B Husky N54HY, s/n: 2130

Aircraft last annual inspection conducted June 28, 2016. Airframe total time 4460.9
                                                              
ENGINE:  Lycoming O-360-A1P, s/n: RL-37939-36E.  Installed on 01/30/2013 at Tach 2466.

Annual Inspection 28 June 2016 at Tach 4460.9, ETT 1,994.9

EQUIPMENT:  Garmin GMA 340 audio panel, GNS 430 radio, GTX 327 transponder
           
DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  Aircraft lost power during flight and performed an off field landing. During landing the aircraft struck a six foot cyclone fence

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:    Damage includes but may not be limited to the following:  

Propeller is damaged & engine experienced prop strike
Both wings are damaged
Wing struts are bent
Tubular frame appears to be bent

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:  Aviation One, Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, Florida


Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com/N54HY.html







SEMINOLE COUNTY, Fla. —   A small plane force landed at the Seminole State College driving track Wednesday while sheriff’s deputies were training.

Deputies noticed the plane flying over the driving track in Geneva at an unusually low altitude around 10:45 a.m.

The sheriff’s office helicopter was unable to make contact with the plane, but heard its engine sputtering, deputies said.

Everyone was ordered off the track and the pilot attempted to land, but was unable to bring the plane to a complete stop before crashing into a chain-link fence, deputies said.

Every Seminole County deputy getting tactical driving training Wednesday morning heard the radio call to get out of the classroom building.

"Clear the building, clear the building now, clear the building," the radio transmission said.

The plane came to rest yards away from a number of parked cars and the training facility building, deputies said.

Deputies said the plane sustained significant damage, but nobody was injured.

This is a very, very close call, the plane is descending and only moments to get our deputies off the track," Sgt. Celines Rios said.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash.

Story and video:   http://www.wesh.com

Mooney M20J 201, N201WW LLC, N201WW: Incident occurred November 02, 2016 in Sebring, Highlands County, Florida

N201WW LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N201WW

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Orlando FSDO-15

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, GEAR COLLAPSED, SEBRING, FLORIDA.  

Date: 02-NOV-16
Time: 16:54:00Z
Regis#: N201WW
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20J
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SEBRING
State: Florida

Cozy Mark IV, N232CZ: Incident occurred November 02, 2016 in Twin Falls, Idaho

http://registry.faa.gov/N232CZ

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Boise FSDO-11

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED, TWIN FALLS, IDAHO

Date: 03-NOV-16
Time: 00:02:00Z
Regis#: N232CZ
Aircraft Model: COZY
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: TWIN FALLS
State: Idaho

Piper PA-24-250 Comanche, Breeze Flying Club Inc., N5908P: Incident occurred November 02, 2016 in Hollister, San Benito County, California

BREEZE FLYING CLUB INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N5908P 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Jose FSDO-15

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, HOLLISTER, CALIFORNIA. 

Date: 02-NOV-16
Time: 21:45:00Z
Regis#: N5908P
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA24
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: HOLLISTER
State: California

Great Lakes-Based Documentary is Looking for Pilots Who Trained on Lake Michigan



A new documentary on a little-known chapter of the history of the Great Lakes will be screened next month near Cleveland.

Between 1942 and 1945, 17,000 pilots landed planes on the USS Wolverine and USS Sable, two aircraft carriers stationed on Lake Michigan. Among the pilots was President George H.W. Bush.

A new documentary called "Heroes on Deck" details that mission, says Christopher Gillcrist, executive director of the National Museum of the Great Lakes. The film features home videos captured by one of the pilots, as well as video from the National Archives.

"It’s the story of the operation of these aircraft carriers and what remains of their activities, which are essentially plane wrecks; almost 100 plane wrecks that occurred on Lake Michigan during training," Gillcrist said.

The film is making its way to Cleveland, and Gillcrist  is looking for pilots who trained on Lake Michigan. He wants them to be part of a December showing in Lakewood.

He estimates about 2,000 pilots are still alive, and fewer than 10 may be in Northeast Ohio.

The film’s director John Davies will speak at next month’s screening on Dec.2, from 7-10 p.m. at the Lakewood Civic Auditorium.

"At most of these screenings that I do around the country, sometimes somebody stands up in the audience and says, “I was a pilot, I flew off those carriers. They’re usually late 80's, early 90's,” said Davies.

Pilots or their families can contact the Great Lakes Museum at glhs1@inlandseas.org.

Story and audio:   http://wksu.org

Wednesday, November 2, 2016

Beech A36 Bonanza, N9093Q: Incident occurred November 02, 2016 at Victoria Regional Airport (KVCT), Texas

http://registry.faa.gov/N9093Q 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Antonio FSDO-17

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, VICTORIA, TEXAS 

Date: 02-NOV-16
Time: 22:35:00Z
Regis#: N9093Q
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 36
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: VICTORIA
State: Texas

Victoria County officials responded to an airplane distress call about 5:30 p.m.

The aircraft has landed, and there are no immediate reports of injuries, said Fred Watts, Victoria Regional Airport manager.

He said the pilot reported an issue with the plane's landing gear. He said the plane was not part of the Texas Sky operation.

Watts said he didn't know who owned the plane or how much damage it sustained when it landed on the runway.

The Federal Aviation Administration has been notified about the troubled landing, a standard procedure, he said. It's not clear when or if the Federal Aviation Administration will send any officials to investigate.

Source:   https://www.victoriaadvocate.com

Cessna 550 Citation: Incident occurred November 02, 2016 at Roanoke-Blacksburg Regional Airport (KROA) Roanoke, Virginia



ROANOKE (WSLS 10) – An eight-passenger plane traveling to Meridian, Miss. made an emergency landing at the Roanoke-Blacksburg Regional Airport on Wednesday afternoon.

The Cessna 550 left Teterboro, N.J., but the airport says low oil pressure caused one of the two engines to shut down and which caused the cabin to lose pressurization, according to Bradley Boettcher, with the Roanoke-Blacksburg Regional Airport.

When this happened, Boettcher said the plane was about five minutes away from ROA when it called the FAA Tower to declare an emergency. The plane landed safely, the airport’s fire department followed the plane down the runway and escorted it to a parking area where it was examined and the passengers deplaned.

No injuries were reported.

Boettcher said he did not know the number of people on board the plane.

Story and video:   http://wsls.com

Clovis Municipal Airport (KCVN), Curry County, New Mexico: Civil Aviation Board votes to ban alcohol at airport

The city of Clovis doesn’t want alcohol at its airport. But people who fly and rent hangars there think the city’s going too far in changing policy to address the issue.

The city’s civil aviation board sided with city officials.

The board voted Tuesday night to recommend changing policy to ban consumption of alcohol throughout the airport, including privately rented hangars on the airport grounds.

Current policy bans drinking alcoholic beverage at the city-owned airport, but only in public areas.

Clovis City Code 16.04.170 states, “No person shall drink any alcoholic beverages upon any portion of the airport open to the public, except in such restaurant or other place as shall be properly designated and licensed for dispensing alcoholic beverages.”

City Attorney David Richards said the code is at least 40 years old, and needed an update.

“It’s hard to say what the intent was because it’s so poorly written,” Richards said. “It infers there are some places alcohol shouldn’t be. It infers if the airport were big enough, a lounge would be possible. I’m not sure we are a lot closer than we were in 1984 to having a lounge at the airport.”

Richards noted trash receptacles at the airport are often full of empty containers, and said there are concerns about drinking on the city-owned airport with narrow and poorly lit exit roads.

Alcohol is allowed at two other city-owned properties, the golf course and the Clovis Civic Center. In each case, Richards said, the city owns a governmental liquor license and monitors its use, though both facilities are managed by contracted companies.

He offered an amended version of 16.04.170, which stated, “It is unlawful for any person to possess or consume alcoholic beverage at Clovis Municipal Airport.”

Board member Jim Jennings called the policy overreach, and noted a person should be able to enjoy a cold beer while working on their own plane in the privacy of their hangar.

Mark Myers said the new policy would expand the enforcement area to include rented hangars that aren’t open to the public, and didn’t like the idea of “changing things midstream” on people locked into rental agreements. Richards said rental contracts require renters abide by all city airport policies, and do not bar the city from changing policies.

Myers still saw no point in changing policy, and asked how it served the people who used the airport.

“Does the board represent civil aviation,” Myers said, “or is it another arm of the city? It doesn’t say Clovis airport board. It says civil aviation board.”

Chairman Tom Phelps said the board handled concerns for both the airport and civil aviation in general.

Pilot Robert Thorn noted he’s been on flights with Boutique Air where alcohol was served. Though Boutique no longer offers alcohol on its flights, Thorn and others had concerns the policy would dissuade commercial and private jets from using the airport.

Airport Director Kyle Berkshire said he had no plans to search planes.

“What someone does on their own plane is their own business,” Berkshire said. “When it spills out (beyond the runways), that’s the concern.”

Amanda Arias of Blue Sky Aviation told Richards a photo of empty alcohol containers in the trash doesn’t prove alcohol was consumed at the airport, and noted people frequently throw trash from their planes into those containers.

Board members had an issue with criminalizing possession. Board member Donald Sharer said a person could buy a bottle of wine on a trip, fly home to Clovis and violate city rules while walking to their car. Phelps agreed, and said he’s done that before.

Richards likened the scenario to a police officer writing a ticket for 31 mph in a 30 mph zone — illegal, but unlikely to be pursued.

A motion was made to amend the policy to only address consumption, and recommend it to the Clovis City Commission. Jennings cast the lone dissenting vote.

The earliest the item could come forward is as an ordinance introduction in the Nov. 17 meeting. If introduced, it could be approved as early as the Dec. 1 meeting.

In other business at the meeting:

• Richards said the city commission will consider final approval of the purchase of the fueling hangar for Blue Sky Aviation. If passed, the deal could be closed as soon as Friday.

The agreement, signed by Moby, LLC, which owns the hangar, provides a purchase price of $450,000 for the hangar, its associated structures, equipment, furniture and concessions. Moby would have a separate agreement for the Hoffman Hangar it leases from the city, and pay a prorated share of assessed property taxes.

• Thorn, a Clovis resident who rents a hangar at the airport, said he was troubled Blue Sky Manager Carlos Arias was effectively banned from a public meeting.

Arias was notified Oct. 4 that he was banned from the airport and would be arrested if he entered airport property — including the terminal, where the meeting was held.

Though he is complying with the ban, Arias said he is fighting it. He cites Cyr v. Addison Rutland Supervisory Union, a 2014 ruling that a Vermont school violated a man’s First Amendment rights by banning him from its board meetings.

His spouse, Amanda Arias, attended the meeting and asked if and when the ban would be lifted. Phelps said it was not a board matter.

Jennings said banning Arias was a bad decision, noting, “Carlos has been out here 13 years, and he’s done more for the airport than anybody else put together.”

Story and comments:   http://cnjonline.com

Cirrus SR22 GTS, Johnnie Burrows LLC, N454RK: Accident occurred October 31, 2016 at Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport / Ryan Field, (KBTR), Louisiana

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana 
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama
Cirrus Aircraft; Duluth, Minnesota 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report  - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Johnnie Burrows LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N454RK

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA034

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, October 31, 2016 in Baton Rouge, LA
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N454RK
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 31, 2016, about 1530 central daylight time, a Cirrus SR22 airplane, N454RK, experienced an engine fire while at the Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport, Ryan Field, (KBTR), Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The airline transport rated pilot was not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged during the accident. The airplane was registered to and operated by Johnnie Burrow, LLC, Longview, Texas, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 cross country flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that she had flown into the airport about 2.5 hours earlier, and then parked at the airport. Before departing for a return cross-country flight, the pilot conducted a normal preflight and engine start. About a minute after engine start, she heard a loud "pop", followed by the smell of smoke, an erratic engine sound, and the oil light illuminating. She shut down the engine and evacuated the airplane. Ground and fire department personnel responded and extinguished the engine fire.

Examination of the engine compartment was conducted by an inspector from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and a technical representative from Continental Motors, Inc.

The examination revealed small hole in the fuel drain line near an adel clamp. The fuel drain line assembly appeared consistent with the airframe manufacturer's assembly instructions.

Mustang II, N78RT: Incident occurred November 01, 2016 in Poteau, Le Flore County, Oklahoma

http://registry.faa.gov/N78RT

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oklahoma City FSDO-15

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING TAILWHEEL COLLAPSED, AND STRUCK A POLE AND RUNWAY LIGHT, POTEAU, OKLAHOMA.  

Date: 03-NOV-16
Time: 09:03:00Z
Regis#: N78RT
Aircraft Model: MUSTANG II
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: POTEAU
State: Oklahoma

Long-EZ, Dock Engineering Inc., N3745A: Incident occurred November 01, 2016 in Olathe, Johnson County, Kansas

DOCK ENGINEERING INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N3745A

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Wichita FSDO-64

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, NOSE WHEEL COLLAPSED, OLATHE, KANSAS. 

Date: 01-NOV-16
Time: 17:49:00Z
Regis#: N3745A
Aircraft Model: LONGEZ
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: OLATHE
State: Kansas

Beech 95, TD-67 LLC, N1876: Incident occurred November 01, 2016 in White Plains, Westchester County, New York

TD-67 LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N1876

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA New York FSDO-15

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, WHITE PLAINS, NEW YORK. 

Date: 01-NOV-16
Time: 23:30:00Z
Regis#: N1876
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 95
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: WHITE PLAINS
State: New York

Beech G58 Baron, N525, Baron 58 LLC: Accident occurred November 01, 2016 at DeKalb-Peachtree Airport (KPDK), Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA17CA047
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, November 01, 2016 in Atlanta, GA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/22/2017
Aircraft: HAWKER BEECHCRAFT CORP G58, registration: N525
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the commercial pilot, the multiengine airplane was about 5 miles from the airport when it was cleared to land on runway 3R. Then, about 1.5 miles from the airport, he accepted a landing clearance change from the air traffic controller to land on runway 3L instead of 3R. The pilot increased engine power and set up to land on runway 3L; however, the airplane was "fast" on final approach and landed "long." The pilot "stood" on the brakes, the left tire "blew out," and the airplane veered off the left side of the runway. After departing runway 3L, the airplane traveled through the grass and impacted asphalt of another runway, which was raised about 7 inches above the ground. When the nose landing gear struck the asphalt, it collapsed, and the airplane then came to rest. During the accident sequence, the fuselage and wings were substantially damaged. The pilot reported no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. The wind at the airport around the time of the accident was from 140°at 7 knots.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain the proper airspeed during final approach and his subsequent loss of directional control during landing, which resulted in a runway excursion.



Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Baron 58 LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N525

NTSB Identification: ERA17CA047
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, November 01, 2016 in Atlanta, GA
Aircraft: HAWKER BEECHCRAFT CORP G58, registration: N525
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the commercial pilot, the multiengine airplane was approximately 5 miles from the airport when it was cleared to land on runway 3R. Then, about 1.5 mile from the airport, he accepted a landing clearance change from the air traffic controller to land on runway 3L instead of 3R. The pilot increased engine power and set up to land on runway 3L; however, the airplane was "fast" on final approach and landed "long." The pilot "stood" on the brakes, the left tire "blew out," and the airplane veered off the left side of the runway. After departing runway 3L, the airplane traveled through the grass, and impacted the asphalt of runway 16, which was raised approximately 7 inches above the ground. When the nose landing gear struck the asphalt, the nose gear collapsed and the airplane came to rest on runway 16. During the accident sequence, the fuselage and wings were substantially damaged. The pilot reported no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. The wind at the airport around the time of the accident was from 140° true at 7 knots. Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Baron 58 LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N525

NTSB Identification: ERA17CA047
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, November 01, 2016 in Atlanta, GA
Aircraft: HAWKER BEECHCRAFT CORP G58, registration: N525
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.


According to the commercial pilot, the multiengine airplane was approximately 5 miles from the airport when it was cleared to land on runway 3R. Then, about 1.5 mile from the airport, he accepted a landing clearance change from the air traffic controller to land on runway 3L instead of 3R. The pilot increased engine power and set up to land on runway 3L; however, the airplane was "fast" on final approach and landed "long." The pilot "stood" on the brakes, the left tire "blew out," and the airplane veered off the left side of the runway. After departing runway 3L, the airplane traveled through the grass, and impacted the asphalt of runway 16, which was raised approximately 7 inches above the ground. When the nose landing gear struck the asphalt, the nose gear collapsed and the airplane came to rest on runway 16. During the accident sequence, the fuselage and wings were substantially damaged. The pilot reported no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. The wind at the airport around the time of the accident was from 140° true at 7 knots.




DEKALB COUNTY, Ga. - Channel 2 Action News has learned that a small plane has landed at DeKalb-Peachtree Airport without its landing gear.


WSB's Doug Turnbull tweeted an image of the Beech G58 Baron plane on the 3 Left runway at the airport. 

It appears the front landing gear did not drop from the plane upon landing. 

Source:   http://www.wsbtv.com

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Bell OH-58C, Helicopter Applicators Inc, N139RD: Accident occurred November 01, 2016 in Cameron, Moore County, North Carolina

http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

HELICOPTER APPLICATORS INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N139RD

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Greensboro FSDO-39


NTSB Identification: ERA17LA032
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Tuesday, November 01, 2016 in Cameron, NC
Aircraft: BELL OH 58C, registration: N139RD
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 1, 2016, about 1130 eastern daylight time, a Bell OH-58C, N139RD, operated by Helicopter Applicators Inc., was substantially damaged following a tailboom separation during the initial climb after takeoff in Cameron, North Carolina. The commercial pilot incurred minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned local aerial application flight. The helicopter was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137. 

According to the pilot, he stated he flew earlier in the day at a different field, spraying a herbicide and made approximately 12 landings on a truck to refill the herbicide spray. He subsequently flew to a different field and sprayed one load of herbicide, landed and waited for the loading crew to arrive at the new field. Once the loading crew arrived and loaded the helicopter with 80 gallons (720 pounds) of herbicide, he took off and climbed to about 50 feet. Approximately 200 yards away, he heard a loud bang and the helicopter fell to the ground. 

According to a witness, the tailboom moved to the left and then went straight-up into the main rotor system. He further stated that the helicopter then fell straight down to the ground and he ran over to help the pilot out of the helicopter. He added that it looked like the tailboom became loose at the main frame attachment points. 

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the tailboom separated and made contact with the main rotor blades. 

The helicopter was retained for further investigation.













CAMERON, N.C. (WNCN) — A helicopter crashed Tuesday in Moore County, injuring the pilot.

The chopper was an agricultural helicopter that was spraying the area. Helicopters of that type actually land on service trucks to load fuel and chemicals, said Frank Staples of Cypress Pointe Fire.

“I was told that it had just taken on a load of chemical and circled off the truck and apparently had a mechanical malfunction and crashed about three hundred feet from the road in a field that was a cutover with broken limbs and pieces of trees,” he said.

The craft was about 30 feet in the air when the problem happened, the pilot said.

“Crash, bang, boom, the thing just came apart,” said Andrew Stephen, the pilot. “They’re looking it right now, trying to figure out what happened, but I don’t know, I can’t say what happened to it right now.”

He said it was a marvel he was able to walk away from the crash.

“I got lucky, plain and simple,” he said.

The pilot suffered only a few bruises and is doing fine. He was the only person on board the helicopter, a 1971 Bell OH-58C the Federal Aviation Administration said.

The helicopter is registered to Helicopter Applicators Inc. of Gettysburg, Pa.

Story and video:  http://wncn.com