Saturday, July 8, 2017

Skydive Spaceland Houston: Fatal accident occurred July 08, 2017



HOUSTON - One person was killed and another injured in a skydiving accident at Skydive Spaceland Houston on Saturday. 

The company confirmed two skydivers collided mid-air during a group skydive at the facility.

The skydiver who was killed has been identified as world-renowned voice actor Randy Schell. The second jumper has not yet been identified but was treated for a leg injury.

Both skydivers were licensed, experienced jumpers and had each made at least one successful skydive earlier in the day on Saturday.

The company said in a statement the jumpers collided after deploying their parachutes normally but the collision caused Shell's parachute to collapse.


World-renowned voice actor Randy Schell.


Many may not recognize Schell’s face, but his voice has been heard my millions of people around the world.

He was the voice of commercials for AMC’s hit TV show The Walking Dead and had also done work for major brands including 20th Century Fox, McDonalds, Geico, Coco Cola, Nike, and several others.

Houston talent agent and Schell’s long time representative Jenny Josby, told KHOU 11 News, Schell was loved by everyone he worked with. 

She added Schell had a remarkable voice and was an all-around great person.

"He had a golden voice, he knew what to do with it. He was a constant professional. Everyone loved working with him. He was also a brilliant producer and engineer. He was a great friend, a great man and a great client." said Josby.

http://www.khou.com

Robinson R44 Raven I, N7224U, J R Aviation Inc: Accident occurred July 08, 2017 in Ireland, Madison Township, Dubois County, Indiana

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Indianapolis, Indiana

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 


J R Aviation Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N7224U

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA267 
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Saturday, July 08, 2017 in Ireland, IN
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER R44, registration: N7224U
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 8, 2017, about 1040 eastern daylight time, a Robinson R44 helicopter, N7224U, impacted the ground following a loss of control while conducting an aerial application flight near Ireland, Indiana. Following the impact with the ground, a fire erupted and the helicopter was destroyed. The pilot received serious injuries. The aircraft was registered to and operated by JR Aviation , Inc., under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight originated from an unconfirmed location at an unconfirmed time.





The pilot in the helicopter crash out of Dubois County has been identified.

We are told that at 10:44 a.m. Saturday, Keith Windsor, 42, of Charlestown was crop dusting in a single-occupant helicopter over fields near County Road 450 North.

Authorities say for some unknown reason, Windsor experienced mechanical issues and crashed into a bean field that was approximately one quarter of a mile south of 6720 West County Road 450 North.

We are told Windsor was able to exit the helicopter prior to it catching on fire.

Authorities say the helicopter was a total loss and destroyed as a result of the crash and fire. Windsor was flown by Air Methods medical helicopter to Saint Vincent Hospital in Evansville where he was treated for a broken leg and chest pains.



 Around 10:45 Saturday, a man piloting a small helicopter crashed in a bean field near 450 North in Jasper. 

The man escaped with injuries. 

Neighbors say they didn't hear the crash, but when they saw the smoke, they knew something went terribly wrong. 

"Well, the wife's in the house. She looked out the back window, she seen the [helicopter] on the ground,” Tony Hoffman said. 

“From here you can't really see what's all back there and if he's ok, or if he was still inside the helicopter or anything,” Tony’s daughter Emily Hoffman said.

It's not everyday someone sees a helicopter crash just beyond your backyard, but when the Hoffmans did, their first reaction was to help. Luckily for 42-year-old Keith Windsor, he made it out before the fire started. 

"We actually blocked the flames from the helicopter to the victim, because he couldn't move anymore, he had lower back pain. We wasn't gonna touch him,” Hoffman said. “We just told him to lay still, you know. He wanted to keep moving, keep moving; we don't know what the extent of his injuries are.” 

Indiana State Police have a better idea. 

"The pilot was airlifted to a hospital in Evansville. He suffered a broken femur, and had a complaint of chest pain. So given the circumstances of the crash, he came away pretty well,” Sergeant Phil Hensley said. “Had this been a deal where he had been trapped inside, this would've been a grave situation." 

ISP said Windsor was crop dusting the bean field near the Hoffman home. As to what happened, authorities are unsure. 

"Why exactly, we don't know. The FAA is currently en route to the scene from Indianapolis. They're gonna be the lead on this investigation,” Sergeant Hensley said. 

"You know it wasn't like he was doing anything crazy, so he didn't, and when we talked to him, he didn't know what happened to the plane,” Hoffman said. 

Windsor was airlifted to St. Vincent, but the hospital has not yet confirmed his condition.

http://www.tristatehomepage.com

Piper PA-28-181 Archer III, N793MA, RAJ Airlines Inc: Fatal accident occurred July 08, 2017 in Waterford, Ohio



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbus, Ohio

RAJ Airlines Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N793MA

Aircraft crashed while enroute into a retention pond. The two (2) souls on board were fatally injured. Subject of an alert notice wreckage located near Waterford, Ohio.

Date: 08-JUL-17
Time: 13:45:00Z
Regis#: N793MA
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: DESTROYED
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
City: WATERFORD
State: OHIO

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov


WIND AND FLYING
SKY IS THE LIMIT.....
May 26, 2017
Umamaheswara Rao Kalapatapu

I came to know more about the power of wind since I started learning to fly in Late 1990s. On the ground all the locomotion happens with touching / kissing the ground, which also helps to resist the movement by wind currents.

However in the air, it is totally different. Same applies when the object is on / or in the water.

Taking off and landing with wind coming towards the plane - headwind or we call it flying into the wind - is much more efficient. Tail wind on the other hand helps the plane to get to the destination faster and saves fuel. My plane at its maximum speed in no wind situation can go 120 nautical miles per hour ( knots) but with a 30 knot headwind it can drop to 90 knots: if it is the same strength tail wind, I will be going at 150 knots.

Winds are predominantly westerly for USA. So if some one goes to Europe or Asia their trip will be an hour or two longer when they come back to USA.

South and west winds in northern hemisphere of earth are considered usually favorable. south winds bring warmth.

North and east winds in northern hemisphere are a sign of possible bad weather. North arctic winds are strong in winter and bring all the snow.

Although pilots wish always to fly with tail wind, some times " it is always the head wind " . It is not the pilot's or even plane's greatness, but when you arrive sooner than the Estimated Time of Arrival ( ETA) the credit should go to the tail wind.

Pilots always fly at the maximum speed unlike cars (my Mercedes Benz can go 160 MPH but the rules won't let me go beyond 70 MPH). this is one place you can confidently tell your spouse that you are flying at the maximum speed and if you want more speed " time to get me a faster plane ! "

I live on a lake and the ducks always take off and land into the wind. They must be watching the water waves also to determine the head wind direction???

Runways are build after monitoring and recording the winds for about a year or so to determine the predominant winds for that area. If place is a small town or the budget is tight, only one runway will be built.

But in bigger cities more than one runway particularly to have at least 4 different directions: if not 6, of possible take offs and landings are built.

Water landing is actually convenient but the gear you needed to land has to be carried with the water plane all the time which causes less favorable aerodynamic situation to be flying efficiently in the air.

But what if in one runway airport if strong wind is coming at right angle to the runway? These winds are " crosswinds " , which make it difficult for the air crafts to land or take off. The strength of wind that can cause problems is usually directly proportional to the size of the plane. If my plane can handle only 21 knots of crosswind, a jumbo jet would be able to handle even 50 knots. Early in my flying days, my instructor Sam wanted me to land in nearby Peru airport which has North/ south runway than Logansport which has East / West runway due to strong north winds that day. Recently when I am flying from Fort Wayne In to Logansport, Radar services advised of severe turbulence in the pathway and they diverted me around the bad weather.

Some times depending on the direction of the cross wind it may also act as head wind or tail wind.. so pilots choose the closest heading to the direction of the cross wind.

To get the plane land in cross wind the aileron of the the wing has to be turned in the direction of cross wind and with the foot opposite rudder has to be pushed to the floor.

Some times also use a " crab angle " until the near end of the runway before the final adjustment to align with runway...

In Sweazy, IN there is a half mile concrete circular runway, used by military operations at one time. A plane can land in any direction depending on the wind direction.
On warships the runways are not numbered for obvious reasons, the runway direction depends on the orientation of the ship.

There are two types of winds: Surface winds and Winds aloft. The later is the wind in atmosphere. Usually pilots are briefed 3 levels : 3, 6 and 9,000 ft. Above 8,000 ft usually the winds get thin.

So the jets go 20 to 30,00 ft so travelers will have little discomfort. The pilot can chose the altitude where winds become more favorable.

Pilots on the ground watch the flags, and wind socks to know wind direction, little above smoking stacks of factories and up above, their instruments tell the power of wind..when I was looking at smoke one day Sam said " I know you are thinking like a pilot " during training...

During day time sun heats the surface of the earth and consequently hot air goes to the higher altitude and cold air comes below and gets heated and thus churn like boiling water and create turbulence. So big planes choose red eye or flights close to midnight to avoid panic in passengers. . Sam used to tell me when he saw uncomfortable feeling in "choppy " weather during day time training, " you must be used to this.. roughness .. by now "

However every plane big or small has a yielding point to the force of wind. No plane is immune to the wind force. So the stormy weather makes cancel the flights, go around the weather etc.

But still I get amazed to see weather people going in to the eye of the hurricane where wind is calm... they have mighty machines which are super pricey..
When a big jet leaves the runway , it creates quite a bit of disturbance in the airmass behind which willcause the next plane behind, especially if it is a small plane to crease what is called " wake turbulence " So small plan has to wait a few minutes to let the winds die down before taking of.

What is mind boggling to me is to see a small sparrow in a storm with 70 knot wind landing on a branch of a violently moving tree...

One time I was flying with my wife near Morgan Town West Virginia after a storm cleared. it was a bright sunny day. Suddenly the plane started climbing on its own and I gained 2,000 ft altitude. Soon I started losing altitude fast with our doing anything.. lost like 3,000 ft this time. Radar staff announced that I should either maintain the altitude or land somewhere. Soon I got the control of the plane. These are dangerous " updrafts " and " downdrafts "

commercial pilots dread about. Imagine a 747 is in landing configuration and 3000 ft above the ground. a strong down draft can cause a plane crash....

When flying over mountains such as Appalachians, or Rockies, one may experience serious sudden weather changes.

One time I was landing at Meig's airport in Chicago ( when it was still in operation - I miss it terribly.. you can land your plane, walk to famous Chicago Michigan Avenue for shopping and walk back to airport... the closure was due to real estate people who felt it is waste of gold mine to use as a airstrip in the heart of Chicago ). On final approach the tower announced change of runway... I was almost landing, needed to go round and land on the opposite side of the run way. Sudden change - " wind shear " makes the wind velocity and direction different with in a matter of minutes,.... It is also common near a large body of water .. in this case the mighty Lake Michigan..

I watch the weather now to fly my kite too....

I get amused seeing the parent eagles training their little ones in the mid air. The parent carries on the back the little one for just a short while and suddenly dive down so the young one will fly and let them land on their back by going straight up: toss them into air and repeat this feat for quite some time to learn them fly....

Equally amazing and unimaginable is mid-air refueling of planes especially in the military operations.

Man learns constantly from the birds about flying... designs the wings of the plane similar to the wings of the birds... always keeps raising the bar.......

SKY IS THE LIMIT.....
May 26, 2017
Umamaheswara Rao Kalapatapu





BEVERLY, Ohio— Authorities have identified an Indian American couple from Indiana as having died when a small plane crash crashed into a retention pond in southeastern Ohio.

The State Highway Patrol said July 10 that the 63-year-old pilot, Umamahesware Kalapatapu, and his 61-year-old wife, Sitha-Gita Kalapatapu, were the only ones on the Piper Archer PA-28. The plane carrying the Logansport, Indiana, couple crashed July 8 near the Washington County village of Beverly, about 75 miles southeast of Columbus.

Umamaheswara Kalapatapu was a contract psychiatrist at the Bowen Center in Warsaw, Indiana. He has worked there since 1993, according to The Bowen Center’s website.

The Bowen Center replied to a NewsChannel 15 tweet to offer condolences to the Kalapatapu family: “It is with great sadness we have been informed about the loss of Dr. Kalapatapu and his wife. We offer our condolences to friends & family.”

Authorities said the last contact with the plane headed to an airport near Parkersburg, West Virginia, from Cass County, Indiana, was around 10:30 a.m. July 8 morning. It was reported missing about noon.

Searchers found the wreckage in the afternoon of the same day.

There was no word on what caused the crash. The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.




WATERFORD, Ohio (WTAP) - UPDATE: 7/9/2017 5:42 P.M.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the accident, which involved a Piper PA-28-181 aircraft.

Divers spent Sunday recovering parts of the plane.

The number of people on board and their identities have not been released.

ORIGINAL STORY: 7/8/17

The Air Force Rescue Coordination Center has requested assistance from the West Virginia Wing Civil Air Patrol for its search of an aircraft reported missing Saturday morning.

The aircraft was in route from Logansport, Indiana to Parkersburg.

Radar lost contact with the aircraft at 9:43 a.m.

A Civil Air Patrol aircrew has been searching in a pond near the AEP Waterford Facility since approximately noon.

The Marietta Fire Department, Ohio State Highway Patrol, Beverly Volunteer Department, Little Hocking Fire and Rescue Dive Team, and Washington County Sheriff's Office are on scene.


http://www.thenewscenter.tv


A small plane crashed into a retention pond Saturday, killing two people near Beverly in northern Washington County.

The remains of an unidentified man and woman have been recovered.

A dive team from Little Hocking was still combing the underwater crash site Sunday, which is located near a defunct American Electric Power plant, according to Sgt. Garick Warner of the Ohio State Highway Patrol’s Marietta Post.

The crash occurred sometime Saturday morning.

The private plane is believed to be a missing plane carrying two people that was headed to Parkersburg, West Virginia, from an airport north of Indianapolis. It never arrived at its scheduled time of 10:30 a.m., Warner said.

Highway Patrol was notified and a search began at about 12:45 p.m., he said. The wreckage was discovered at about 2 p.m. with help from Beverly-Waterford Rescue Squad. The West Virginia Wing Civil Air Patrol said the plane lost radar contact at about 9:45 a.m. Saturday.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

http://www.dispatch.com

BEVERLY — Crews have found occupants of a plane that crashed at a retention pond Saturday at a former power plant in Beverly, according to the Ohio Highway Patrol.

The number of people recovered was unavailable late Saturday night. The type of plane also was unavailable.

A county coroner was dispatched to the power plant located along the Muskingum River, said Washington County Sheriff Larry Mincks, who earlier said at least a pilot and a passenger were on board the plane.

The plane was flying from the Indianapolis area to Florida and was going to stop at the Mid-Ohio Valley Regional Airport in Wood County, Mincks said.

An Ohio Highway Patrol airplane found debris at the retention pond, a wing, and a visual sighting from a boat launched by the Beverly-Waterford emergency squad found a plane was in the water, Mincks said.

Divers from Little Hocking were at the scene Saturday night searching the water, Mincks said. Representatives of the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the plane crash, he said.

The West Virginia Wing of the Civil Air Patrol reported the airplane was flying from Logansport-Cass County Airport in Indiana, north of Indianapolis, when radar contact was lost at 9:43 a.m.

Assistance from the West Virginia Wing was requested by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center, a release from Lt. Col. Jeffery Schrock, public affairs officer for the West Virginia Wing.

A nearby Civil Air Patrol crew was getting ready for a training sortie and alerted to perform a search of the route from the last known radar position, the release said.

“We were the closest,” Schrock said.

At 2:33 p.m. the Civil Air Patrol crew made a find at the pond of the former plant. The coal-fired power plant was shut down by American Electric Power about two years ago and the property sold to Commercial Liability Partners LLC, redevelopment company from Missouri, which is demolishing the facilities,

Also on scene are units from the Marietta Ohio Fire Department and the Ohio Highway Patrol.


http://www.mariettatimes.com

BEVERLY, Ohio - Multiple people are dead after a plane crashed near Beverly, Ohio in Washington County on Saturday according to the Marietta post of the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

OSHP said they received a call around 12 p.m. that a plane headed from Indiana to Parkersburg, West Virginia had not landed yet.

The West Virginia Wing Civil Air Patrol said they assisted the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center in helping to find the plane after radar contact was lost around 9:45 a.m.

The wreckage was found around 1:30 p.m. in a retention pond near Beverly, according to OSHP.

The Civil Air Patrol said the plane was coming from Logansport/Cass County airport, about 70 miles north of Indianapolis.

OSHP said there were no survivors.

The names of the victims have not been released.

http://www.10tv.com

Ohio State Highway Patrol has confirmed multiple fatalities after a plane crash in Washington County, OH near Beverly.

According to OSHP the plane crashed just after noon today in a property near Clark Hill Road and Hayesville Road.

The FAA is on scene investigating. 

The number of passengers on the plane has not been released. 

The cause of the accident is under investigation.

http://wtov9.com

UPDATE 11:10 p.m. 

The Ohio State Highway patrol tells 7News there are reports of multiple fatalities in connection to the plane crash in Washington County, OH. They also tell us the FAA is on scene working the investigation.

We'll continue to update you as we learn more.

A plane crash north of Beverly in Washington County, Ohio has been confirmed by the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

According to the Cambridge post, a call came in around 12:03 p.m. Saturday that a plane had gone missing mid-flight. They then located the 4-seater plane about an hour later in Washington County.

The Ohio State Highway Patrol tell us they're unsure how many people were aboard the aircraft when it went down, and that it's still under investigation.

http://www.yourohiovalley.com


WASHINGTON CO., OH (WCMH) — The Cambridge post of the Ohio State Highway Patrol says multiple people are dead after a plane crash in Washington County, WTRF reports.

Officials got a call that a plane went missing mid-flight around 12pm.

The four-seater plane was found around 1pm north of Beverly, in Washington County.

The State Patrol reports they’re unsure how many were on board when the plane crashed.

The Ohio State Highway Patrol and FAA are investigating.

http://nbc4i.com

BEVERLY – A plane carrying a pilot and a passenger Saturday crashed into a retention pond at the former power plant in Beverly, officials said.

The plane was enroute between Indianapolis to Florida and was going to stop at the Mid-Ohio Valley Regional Airport in Wood County, Washington County Sheriff Larry Mincks said.

An Ohio Highway Patrol plane found debris at the retention pond, a wing, and a visual sighting from a boat launched by the Beverly-Waterford emergency squad found a plane was in the water, Mincks said.

“We believe there is a pilot and another (passenger) on board,” Mincks said Saturday night.

Divers from the Little Hocking were at the scene Saturday night searching the water, Mincks said.

The West Virginia Wing of the Civil Air Patrol reported the airplane was flying from Logansport-Cass County Airport in Indiana, north of Indianapolis, when radar contact was lost at 9:43 a.m. Assistance from the West Virginia Wing was requested by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center, a release from Lt. Col. Jeffery Schrock, public affairs officer for the West Virginia Wing.

A Civil Air Patrol crew was getting ready for a training sortie and alerted to perform a search of the route from the last known radar position, the release said.

“We were the closest,” Shrock said.

At 2:33 p.m. the Civil Air Patrol crew made a find at the pond of the former plant. The coal-fired power plant was shut down by American Electric Power about two years ago and the property sold to Commercial Liability Partners LLC, redevelopment company from Missouri, which is demolishing the facilities,

Also on scene are units from the Marietta Ohio Fire Department and the Ohio Highway Patrol.

http://www.newsandsentinel.com

Cessna 210L Centurion, N2246S, Coastal Flight Surgeons Inc: Incident occurred July 08, 2017 on Ossabaw Island, Chatham County, Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Coastal Flight Surgeons Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N2246S

Aircraft force landed on a beach.

Date: 08-JUL-17
Time: 13:36:00Z
Regis#: N2246S
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C210
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: OSSABAW ISLAND
State: GEORGIA



OSSABAW ISLAND (WTOC) -  The Coast Guard rescued three people after their aircraft was forced to make an emergency landing on Ossabaw Island in Georgia.

Watchstanders at the Coast Guard Sector Charleston Command Center were notified of a mayday call from the aircrew of a Cessna 210 that came in at 9:35 a.m. from Air Traffic Control. 

An MH-65 Dolphin helicopter and accompanying crew were dispatched from the Coast Guard Air Station in Savannah at 9:52 a.m. to help the three crewmembers. 

The helicopter arrived on the beach at 10:09, loaded all three passengers and safely transported them back to the air station. 

No injuries were reported. 

The aircraft is registered to Coastal Flight Surgeons Inc, who are based in Townsend, Georgia. They are a small organization made up of doctors.

http://www.wtoc.com

Incident occurred July 08, 2017 at McCarran International Airport (KLAS), Las Vegas, Nevada

A Delta Air Lines flight this afternoon landed safely at McCarran International Airport after it was diverted to Las Vegas due to a possible mechanical issue, according to airport spokesman Michael Oram.

Flight 1728, a McDonnell Douglas MD-90 carrying 158 passengers, landed about 4:15 p.m. and taxied to the gate with its own power, airport spokesman Michael Oram said. There was a possible issue with a generator of one of the airliner’s two engines.

The flight was heading to Minneapolis from San Diego when crew elected to divert after “receiving an indication in the flight deck of a possible issue with one of the aircraft’s onboard systems,” a Delta spokesman said.

The airplane had to burn fuel before it landed, Oram said.

Delta released the following statement about the incident: 

"The flight crew of Delta flight 1728 from SAN Diego to Minneapolis elected to divert to Las Vegas after receiving an indication in the flight deck of a possible issue with one of the aircraft's onboard systems. The McDonnell Douglas MD-90 is expected to land in Las Vegas shortly where maintenance technicians will evaluate the aircraft. The safety of Delta's customers and crew is always our top priority."

https://lasvegassun.com

Piper L21B Super Cub, N99031, Bryans Machine Shop LLP: Accident occurred July 08, 2017 near Big Timber Airport (6S0), Sweet Grass County, Montana

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA145 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 08, 2017 in Big Timber, MT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/14/2017
Aircraft: PIPER L 21B, registration: N99031
Injuries: 2 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot reported that, after departure, he followed the course of a river at an altitude about level with the treetops. Although the pilot was aware of powerlines in the area, he did not see them before the airplane collided with the powerlines about 90 ft above ground level. The airplane subsequently nosed down and impacted the river, resulting in substantial damage.

According to the manager of the airport from which the airplane departed, it is not uncommon for pilots to fly at low altitudes in that area to avoid turbulent air in the summertime. He further reported that the power lines were not equipped with aerial marker balls. Following the accident, the airport manager agreed to install signage in the fixed base operator at the airport to caution pilots of the presence of power lines in that area. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's decision to fly at low altitude in the vicinity of power lines, which resulted in a wire strike.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena, Montana

Aviation Accident Factual Report -National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Bryans Machine Shop LLP: http://registry.faa.gov/N99031 

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA145
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 08, 2017 in Big Timber, MT
Aircraft: PIPER L 21B, registration: N99031
Injuries: 2 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 8, 2017, about 1045 mountain daylight time, a Piper L-21B, N99031, was substantially damaged during a wire strike and subsequent impact with the Yellowstone River in Big Timber, Montana. The private pilot and his passenger were seriously injured. The airplane was owned by a private individual and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight. The flight departed Big Timber Airport (6S0), Big Timber, Montana about 1030.

According to the pilot, he departed the airport to the north with a family member onboard. The pilot then turned east to follow the river and look for his sister who was participating in a water sport. The airplane was about at tree level when it collided with a set of power lines and then immediately impacted the water. The pilot reported to his father that he observed sparks and wires before the airplane entered a nose-down dive. 

The 1055 recorded weather observation at 6S0 included wind 220° true at 11 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear skies, temperature 25° C, dew point 11° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.20 inches of mercury. According to the U.S. Naval Observatory, the sun azimuth at the time of the accident would have been 116°.

The airplane came to rest near an eyot approximately 4 nm northeast of 6S0. Photographs from the Federal Aviation Administration revealed that the airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings, empennage, and fuselage.

The pilot reported that the airplane was on a southeast course at the time of the accident. He noted that the sun was on the horizon, but did not obstruct his vision. The pilot further remarked that he was aware of the presence of these power lines from a previous experience flying over the Yellowstone River, several years ago. 

A law enforcement representative stated that he observed a broken residential power line near the accident site and that he received reports of a disruption in power service from nearby residents around the time of the accident. The silver colored power line was one of a three phase power configuration that ran between two distribution towers on both sides of the river from a height of approximately 90 feet. The towers were about 4 nm east of the airport. 

According to the pilot's father, who is also the 6S0 airport manager, transient pilots frequently fly at low altitudes over this particular portion of the Yellowstone River to avoid turbulent air in the summertime. The airport manager further reported that the power lines were not equipped with aerial marker balls for identification. At the request of the NTSB Investigator-in-Charge, the airport manager agreed to install signage in the local fixed based operator office at 6S0 to caution pilots of the presence of power lines over the Yellowstone River.

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA145
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 08, 2017 in Big Timber, MT
Aircraft: PIPER L 21B, registration: N99031
Injuries: 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 8, 2017, about 1000 mountain daylight time, a Piper PA-L21B, N99031, was substantially damaged during an impact with the Yellowstone River in Big Timber, Montana. The private pilot and his passenger were seriously injured. The airplane was owned by a private individual and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight. The personal flight departed Big Timber Airport (6S0), Big Timber, Montana about 0945. 

The pilot's father composed a recount of the accident flight from his son who is currently recovering from his injuries. According to his father, the pilot and a family member were flying over the river during a boating event at the time of the accident. The airplane suddenly struck a three phase power line that traversed the water and then impacted the river. At the time of the collision the pilot observed sparks and wires before the airplane entered a nose down dive. He did not observe any power lines before the airplane made contact with the power line. According to the pilot's father, who is also the 6S0 airport manager, this particular three phase power line is very thin and can be obscured by the sun depending on an airplane's direction of flight. 


A representative of the Sweet Grass County Sheriff's Office stated that he observed a broken residential power line near the accident site and that he received reports of a disruption in power service around the time of the accident.




BIG TIMBER - The Sweet Grass County Sheriff's Office received a report of an aeronautics accident at 11:05 a.m. on Saturday.

The Piper L21B Super Cub clipped a power line at the Otter Creek Fishing Access Site where the annual Yellowstone Boat Float was occurring and landed mid-stream in the Yellowstone, according to the Sweet Grass County Facebook page.

There were two occupants in the plane at the time of the crash.

A 60-year-old male and 75-year-old female were transported to Pioneer Medical Center.

The female was later life flighted to Billings.

No boaters were injured.

The plane is currently completely submerged in the river except for the tail.

The Sweet Grass County Sheriff's office is in contact with the Department of Environment Quality.

The Sweet Grass County Sheriff's Office, Sweet Grass Ambulance, Big Timber Volunteer Fire Department, and Search and Rescue all responded.

There have been some reports of loss of power in the area.

The cause of the crash is under investigation.


http://www.kbzk.com

Update to original Press Release
July 8, 2017
1735 Hours

The original 911 call came into Sweet Grass County Dispatch at 1105 hours on July 8th. Search and Rescue was able to meet up with a civilian boat that had assisted the two passengers of the plane out of the water and into their boat where the Search and Rescue boat crew was able to meet up with them and transfer care of the two patients to the Sweet Grass County Ambulance crew where they were later transported to the Pioneer Medical Center. 

A 75 year old local female resident was transported to a Billings hospital via Help Flight almost immediately and later a 53 year old local male resident was flown to a Billings hospital via Billings Clinic fixed-wing. 

The investigation is ongoing with involvement from The Sweet Grass County Sheriff’s Office, the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board.

Original Release
July 8, 2017
1300 Hours

Sweet Grass County Sheriff's Office received a report of a aeronautics accident this morning. SGSO, SG Ambulance, BTVFD, and SAR all responded. The plane clipped a power line at Otter Creek Fishing access where the annual start of Yellowstone Boat Float was occurring and landed mid-stream in the Yellowstone. There were two occupants in the plane, both were rescued and are being transported to Pioneer Medical Center. No boaters were injured. Further updates will be posted when available.

BILLINGS -  The Sweet Grass County Sheriff's Office received a report of the crash of a small plane at 11:05 a.m. on Saturday.

The plane, a Piper L2B, clipped a power line near the Otter Creek Fishing Access Site where the annual Yellowstone Boat Float was occurring and landed mid-stream in the Yellowstone, according to the Sweet Grass County Facebook page.

There were two people in the plane at the time of the crash.

A 60-year-old man and 75-year-old woman were taken to Pioneer Medical Center.

Both were later airlifted to Billings for more extensive treatment; the woman is said to be in serious condition at St. Vincent's Healthcare.

No boaters were injured.

The plane is currently completely submerged in the river except for the tail.

Passing rafters were the first to respond to the scene.

Paramedics came to the site of the crash in a boat and exited with the victims at the Otter Creek Fishing Access Site.

It is unknown how the plane will be taken out of the water, but the plane will likely stay in the water overnight, according to Undersheriff Ronnenberg.

The Sweet Grass County Sheriff's Office, Sweet Grass Ambulance, Big Timber Volunteer Fire Department, and Search and Rescue all responded.

There have been some reports of loss of power in the area.

NorthWestern Energy employees were at the scene repairing the power line on Saturday afternoon.

The cause of the crash is being investigated, and the Sheriff's office will be working with the National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration as well.

http://www.kxlh.com

BIG TIMBER, Mont. - Authorities say a single-engine plane has clipped a power line and crashed into the Yellowstone River, but both people aboard have been rescued.

The plane crashed Saturday morning near Big Timber.

There was no immediate word on whether the plane's occupants were injured.

The Sweet Grass County Sheriff's Department says the cut power line left some Big Timber residents without electricity. 

Sheriff's deputies say utility crews were working to restore service.

Officials say boaters participating in the annual Yellowstone Boat Float were in the river but none were injured.

More than 100 people were in the river nearby at the time.

Sheriff's spokeswoman Brooke Osen says a civilian boat picked up the plane's occupants.

The cause of the crash was under investigation.

http://www.nbcmontana.com

Cessna 150E, N3583J: Incident occurred July 08, 2017 near Ukiah Municipal Airport (KUKI), Mendocino County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N3583J

Aircraft force landed on a highway near the airport.

Date: 08-JUL-17
Time: 18:25:00Z
Regis#: N3583J
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C150
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: UKIAH
State: CALIFORNIA




Press release from the California Highway Patrol:

On July 8, 2017 at approximately 1215 hours, Ukiah CHP Communications Center began receiving reports of a plane landing on US-101 near Gobbi St. in Ukiah.

The Communications Center immediately dispatched all available CHP units and Fire/Rescue personnel. Upon CHP arrival, it was confirmed that a solo piloted small aircraft made an emergency landing on northbound US-101, south of Talmage Rd., after experiencing a mechanical malfunction. After landing, the pilot managed to park the plane on a wide shoulder and away from the traffic lanes.

No injuries were reported by the pilot and he elected to make arrangements for a mechanic to respond. With assistance from the fire department, the freeway perimeter fence was removed and the aircraft was pushed into an adjacent field for the safety of all involved and so freeway traffic would not be impacted. The CHP is documenting the incident and has notified the Federal Aviation Administration and will provide information to the National Traffic Safety Board.






The pilot of a small single-engine airplane made an emergency landing on Highway 101 in Ukiah this afternoon after experiencing engine problems.

Engineer Waylon Hockemier of the Ukiah Valley Fire Authority told the Daily Journal from the scene that the pilot lost a cylinder in his engine before safely putting the plane down in the northbound lane of the highway.

“Everybody’s okay,” Hockmier said. “He got it off the highway, and it was a textbook emergency landing.”

According to the FAA registry for the plane’s tail number, the Cessna 150E is owned by Lee Barlow of Fort Bragg.

According to a California Highway Patrol press release sent to kymkemp.com, the pilot made an emergency landing at 12:15 p.m. near Gobbi Street, and successfully maneuvered his plane out of traffic.

“No injuries were reported by the pilot and he elected to make arrangements for a mechanic to respond,” the CHP press release reads. “A freeway perimeter fence was removed and the aircraft was pushed into an adjacent field for the safety of all involved and so freeway traffic would not be impacted.”

https://lostcoastoutpost.com





A Fort Bragg man was forced to land his airplane on Highway 101 Saturday shortly after taking off from the Ukiah Municipal Airport.

“I’m a bit shaken,” said Tony Barlow, who had just taken off from the Ukiah airport around 11:30 a.m. July 8, when he started having engine troubles.

“I couldn’t gain altitude, and I knew I couldn’t make it back to the runway,” said Barlow, who then landed his Cessna 150E in the northbound lane of Hwy. 101 just south of the Talmage Road exit.

“The vehicles just made room for me,” he said, adding that he looked at the southbound traffic as he was nearing the road and saw many people with their eyes bugging out and mouths open.

Since his plane is so light, Barlow was able to push it out of the traffic lanes and onto the shoulder of the highway shortly after landing safely with no collisions, damage or injuries.

“It was a textbook emergency landing,” said Waylon Hockemier of the Ukiah Valley Fire Authority, who had just been released from battling five fires along the highway a couple of miles south of the landing site when he saw the plane going down. “I told my passenger to look out for the plane and we called it in.”

Officers from the California Highway Patrol responded to the incident, asking Barlow for his license and registration as if he were any other freeway driver.

Firefighters then cut through the barbed wire fence along the freeway so they could push the plane onto Hastings Road, where the mechanic Barlow contacted could hopefully repair it.

The CHP is notifying the Federal Aviation Administration and will inform the National Traffic Safety Board.

Barlow said he has been flying for 40 years, but has only had the Cessna for the past three.

“I was heading out to practice my landings,” he said.

His wife, who is also a pilot, said, “this is what you train for.”

http://www.ukiahdailyjournal.com