Thursday, September 24, 2015

Qatar Airways, Boeing 777, QTR778: Incident occurred September 15, 2015 at Miami International Airport (KMIA), Florida

 FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Miami FSDO-19

NTSB Identification: DCA15WA198 
14 CFR Part 129: Foreign Qatar Airways
Incident occurred Tuesday, September 15, 2015 in Miami, FL
Aircraft: BOEING 777, registration:
Injuries: 279 Uninjured.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has delegated the investigation of an incident involving a Qatar Airways Boeing 777-300, that occurred on September 15, 2015, to the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) of Qatar. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the CAA investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13 as the State of Manufacturer and Design of the airplane.

All investigative information will be released by the Qatar CAA.



Miscommunication among the flight crew and mistakes by the captain led to a Qatar Airways Boeing 777 hitting a set of runway lights in Miami in September, resulting in substantial damage to the aircraft, a preliminary report published by the Qatar Civil Aviation Authority (QCAA) has found.

The report, which was released yesterday, states that the aircraft entered the runway at intersection T1, which made the available runway 1,368m too short.

This was despite clear instructions stating that such a take off was forbidden for the Boeing 777, which was heavily laden with passengers and cargo.

As a result, the aircraft only became airborne at the very end of the runway, colliding with the Approach Lighting System, a series of masts located about 60m beyond the runway limits.

The report noted that the flight’s captain had realized that “something was not right” as the plane accelerated, passing markers that told the crew they only had 900m of runway left, but had “concluded (that) the safest course of action was to continue.”

The aircraft only started to take off within the final 300m of runway which is clearly marked by red lights, the report said.

It also stated that although the crew were aware of their close call, they were unaware that the aircraft had collided with the approach lights until they arrived back in Qatar.

Extensive damage

Although the flight continued to Doha as normal and landed safety, the report highlighted the scale of the damage caused by the collision.

Upon landing, an inspection revealed a 46cm tear in the fuselage behind the rear cargo door.

Data taken from the flight recorders shows that this tear forced the aircraft to compensate (successfully) to prevent a loss of cabin pressure during the flight.

There were also 90 dents and scratches across an 18 square meter area of the plane’s undercarriage, and some damage to a metal guard on the left landing gear.

Cockpit confusion

According to the report, a shared name – T1 – for the runway intersection and a completely separate reference in the crew’s pre-flight data is at the heart of the incident.

It stated the Qatar Airways flight crew had decided that it would be safe to take off from Intersection T1 on Miami’s Runway 09 because they had become confused by another mention of “T1” in the data given to them before the flight.

This reference, “Runway 09#T1,” actually referred to a temporary performance advisory for the runway, but not to the intersection in question, and the repeated use of “T1” was a coincidence.

The crew had seen this advisory while calculating the runway length required for takeoff, a calculation made using the plane’s onboard computers.

The report noted that during this calculation, the crew “understood” that they must use the full length of the runway, and that they had read information that said that intersection departures were not permissible.

However, as the aircraft was taxiing, the captain apparently decided that the aircraft could depart from the intersection, rather than from the beginning of the runway.

It noted that he “could not recall” why he made that decision, but that he believed it “may have been” because the printed information displayed Runway 09#T1 “in a compelling way.”

He then asked the first officer (FO) to advise Air Traffic Control of this decision. The report stated that the FO “glanced at his notes” and saw he had written “09/(T1)#” which he said made him believe that this was an acceptable line-up point for take-off.

Relief crew


There were two further pilots – another captain and first officer, the aircraft’s relief crew – in the flight deck during the incident.

The report stated that these two pilots questioned the captain’s decision to take off from the intersection, as it appeared to be different from what they had been briefed on before the flight.

The captain apparently “made a hand gesture” in reply, “and said something which he thought was seeking reassurance from the crew that everything was OK.”

The flight’s first officer replied that he was happy with the decision, the report stated.

Meanwhile, the relief crew misunderstood the captain’s response, thinking that he had just said that he was happy with the decision and that he had most likely recalculated the flight data, so they didn’t press the matter further.

The flight’s captain and first officer were both experienced pilots, but also both relatively new on the Boeing 777, with 996 and 234 hours on the aircraft, respectively.

It is not known if the flight crew have faced disciplinary proceedings following the incident.

Qatar Airways have not yet responded to a request for comment.

The QCAA said that its investigation is continuing, and that its final report will be published “in due course.”

Story, comments and photos:  http://dohanews.co

The FAA is looking into what multiple aviation experts told NBC 6 Investigators was a recent frightening near-miss at Miami International Airport.

The National Transportation Safety Board is also trying to find out exactly what happened. 

NBC 6 discovered the pilots of a Qatar Airways 777 didn't use the entire runway they had available and aviation experts said it almost caused a disaster. 
 
Surveillance video shows the huge jet getting airborne and a red flash.

An airport report shows the jet hit three aviation lights that stand about 15-feet tall and are up to 1,000-feet after the runway ends, not far from the airport fence line.

NBC 6 exclusively obtained images of the poles lying on the ground, and what it looked like when hours later, workers went out to inspect the damage.

"This is scary," said Jay Rollins, a former Navy pilot and retired American Airlines captain. "He took out the first two or three, so it's very serious. This aircraft should have never been in that position as it left the ground."

The Qatar Airways jet holds about 300 people. It was heading to Dohar, Qatar, in the Middle East. The damage to the 777 was discovered after it safely landed.

The FAA's initial report said: "Inspection revealed damage to underbelly of aircraft described as substantial."

"To be where he was and the position to actually hit the belly of the airplane, as he climbed out with approach lights for the other direction means that literally was going off the end of the runway as he got airborne and therefore, but for the grace of God, everyone would have been killed," Rollins said.


Just beyond the damaged lights is a public roadway, an employee parking lot and a fuel depot.

The Aviation Department said: "The runway was fully operational at the time of the incident."

But communications with the control tower indicate that instead of using the full runway, that's more than two miles in length, the pilot instead turned at an intersection known as T-1, leaving a 3,000-foot section of the runway unused.

Now investigators are using air traffic control audio to help determine why the pilots didn't use the full runway.

"It makes no sense for an airliner that big, that full of people, full of fuel, to take an intersection take off. He cut off the first quarter of the runway. So it's not surprising they wouldn't make it," Rollins said.

After striking the lights, the pilots continued on, apparently unaware their plane was damaged.

"I say that it's a near-tragedy and thank God that it didn't happen. It was very close. I mean it doesn't get closer," Rollins said.

NBC 6 emailed Qatar Airways multiple times, called them and spoke with their airport manager, but so far no official response from them on this incident.


The lighting system that was hit is going to be out of service until the middle of October.

Story and video:  http://www.nbcmiami.com 

Rockwell Commander 114, ZS-JRP: Mossel Bay, South Africa

Hans and Sharon Potgieter.


MOSSEL BAY NEWS - The morning of December 16, 2014 started like any normal day for Mossel Bay residents and newlyweds Sharon and Hans Potgieter, heading to the airfield to go on a breakfast flight down the coast of Mossel Bay.

They set off in a light aircraft, had breakfast at a small town along the way, stopped off at another small town and headed back home. On the flight back home, they experienced problems with the aircraft they were flying and had to force land on an open field.

Sharon sustained an injury in the accident that was a break in the T12 vertebra, which resulted in her being paralyzed from the waist down. Hans had minor injuries only.

She was airlifted from George to Cape Town and transported via ambulance to Grootte Schuur Hospital where they operated to repair any damage they could. The day after the operation, feeling had returned from her waist to her knees and slight movement in her legs. The return of feeling, movement and sensation from just below the knees has not returned. She was classified as a L1 Incomplete Paraplegic, meaning that only partial movement and feeling has returned.

The damage to the nerves which operate her feet, is too great. She spent three months in rehabilitation where she progressed to be able to walk with the aid of AFO's (splints) which support her ankles while holding on to objects.

Eventually she could walk with the AFO's and crutches. With the constant pressure under her feet, the threat of pressure ulcers is huge, and she developed one which took six months to heal. This threat will always be there.

Having to stay off her feet caused her tendons to shorten making her feet curl inwards and upwards. She now cannot use the AFO's either and basically is bedridden and the only way of moving about is in a wheelchair.

Sharon has decided to have her lower legs amputated and to get prosthesis. This will enable her to walk without the constant threat of pressure ulcers and to return to her passion which is flying/aviation. With no medical aid available, the cost of the operation, physiotherapy and prosthesis (which must be replaced every four years) will amount to about R250 000.

Sharon has created a Facebook page, Fly Sharon Fly, to help create a platform in order to raise funds. Their accountant, Abe Zwiegelaar, has opened a savings account for any donations. Abe can also be contacted at 082 851 8417.

The banking details are as follow: Nedbank Savings account number 2008 478 815 and branch code 147 205.

Source:  http://www.mosselbayadvertiser.com












Plane crash victim had been arrested in drug raid • Pilot's daughter disputes National Transportation Safety Board preliminary report

NEWBERRY SPRINGS — One of the passengers killed when a Cessna 310H out of Barstow-Daggett Airport crashed in Colorado on September 6 had been arrested just days earlier in a Newberry Springs drug raid, officials said Thursday.
 
Also, the National Transportation Safety Board released a preliminary report that said the pilot held a non-instrument, single-engine rating, although he was flying a twin-engine aircraft.

Steven Wilkinson, 59, of Newberry Springs was among 34 people arrested or cited Sept. 1 by San Bernardino County sheriff's deputies, authorities said. More than 11,000 marijuana plants and other contraband, including methamphetamine and mushrooms, were seized at 17 locations in Newberry Springs, according to sheriff's officials.

Wilkinson's body was among four recovered from Cessna wreckage in the Colorado mountains near Silverton. Harold Raggio, 72, the pilot, was a former Newberry Springs resident, but moved to Big Bear two years ago. Rosalinda Leslie, 57, of Hesperia, and Michael Lyle Riley, 59, of Barstow, also perished in the crash.

The plane was reportedly heading to Amarillo, Texas. It stopped in Flagstaff, Arizona to refuel before crashing.

Raggio's wife, Debra Raggio, told the Desert Dispatch on Monday that she speculates her husband ran into bad weather. She believes that might be the reason for the plane flying almost 200 miles off course.

"Well, we're flying in the clouds," Raggio said of what her husband told her by phone. He had just landed his plane in Flagstaff, Arizona, to refuel. "And I said, 'why don't you turn around and try it another day?' He said, 'We will be OK.' And that's the last I heard from him."

On Thursday, Harold Raggio's daughter, Reany Raggio, said her father was qualified to fly the twin engine aircraft. She said he purchased the plane a year ago and believes Federal Aviation Administration paperwork will eventually prove he logged the necessary flying hours for the required rating for twin engines. She is hoping the log book on board the plane also will help investigators establish her father's flying record.

"My father would never do that (fly without being rated for the twin engine aircraft)," Reany Raggio said.

Reany Raggio also said her family, including her father, knew of Wilkinson's criminal past. She said Wilkinson is the father of Harold Raggio's grandchild. She said the plan was to fly to Amarillo so Wilkinson could see a friend before facing a possible lengthy prison term. She said the trip also involved the sale of a rock shop.

"That was not a drug trip," Reany Raggio said. "Steve asked several times (to fly him to Amarillo) and dad finally said yes. They were to quickly fly there and quickly fly back. I was there when he asked him."

Reany Raggio rejected any possibility that Wilkinson would force her father to do something illegal.

"I don't think he would hurt my dad. I hope to God he wouldn't do something to my dad like that," she said.

Wilkinson's wife, Linda Underwood, said she supports Reany Raggio's stance. She said Wilkinson was going to Amarillo to help sell her rock shop.

"There were no drugs involved whatsoever," Underwood said. "He wouldn't do that to Raggio. He knew better than that."

Underwood, who is not related to Harold Raggio and is not the mother of Raggio's grandchild, blames "pure stupidity" for Wilkinson's Sept. 1 arrest. She said he was arrested because of a gun that was on the property. She said his prior criminal past prevented him from legally being around guns.

The San Bernardino County sheriff's report from the Sept. 1 raid names Underwood, 57, Wilkinson, 59, and Samuel Ogas, 33, as being arrested or cited during the raid at property located in the 32100 block of Newberry Road. Only Wilkinson was taken into custody, according to deputies, and he posted bail the following day.

Source:  http://www.desertdispatch.com


http://registry.faa.gov/N1099Q 

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA400
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 05, 2015 in Silverton, CO
Aircraft: CESSNA 310H, registration: N1099Q
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On September 5, 2015, about 1408 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 310H, N1099Q, impacted mountainous terrain at an elevation of about 11,500 feet mean sea level near Silverton, Colorado, based upon preliminary radar information consistent with the flight. Two non-instrument, single-engine land rated private pilots and two passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces. The airplane was registered to and operated by the registered pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan and was not utilizing flight following services by air traffic control. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight last departed from Flagstaff Pulliam Airport, Flagstaff, Arizona. and was destined to Amarillo, Texas.


FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Salt Lake City FSDO-07

Any witnesses should email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov


Members of the San Juan County and La Plata County search and rescue teams at the scene of the plane crash on September 7. The Colorado Air National Guard helicopter that airlifted them to the remote location is in the background.


The location where Harold Raggio kept his Cessna 310H.

de Havilland Canada DHC-8-311,N330EN: Incident occurred September 24, 2015 at Florence Regional Airport (KFLO), South Carolina



FLORENCE, S.C. -- Firefighters from Florence Regional Airport and Windy Hill Fire Department Thursday afternoon responded to an American Eagle plane in which an indicator light showed trouble.

No passengers were on the plane at the time.

Public Safety Chief Stephen Bailey said the flight crew was in the process of starting the plane ahead of its flight when an indicator light showed there was a problem with the plane's auxiliary power unit.

Bailey said the airport's fire department responded and that Windy Hill was called as a precaution for manpower and equipment.

A survey of the area with a thermal camera showed the presence of heat but there was no obvious fire damage, Bailey said.

No injuries were reported as a result of the incident, Bailey said.

Airport firefighters train monthly with both Windy Hill and Florence firefighters and that Thursday's response went off without a hitch.

Several passengers in line at the terminal indicated that the flight had been cancelled.

Calls to the airline were not immediately returned.

Source:  http://www.scnow.com


http://registry.faa.gov/N330EN 

Schempp-Hirth VENTUS 2CT, N710JC: Accident occurred September 24, 2015 in Blacksburg, Montgomery County, Virginia

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA375
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, September 24, 2015 in Blacksburg, VA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/21/2016
Aircraft: SCHEMPP-HIRTH VENTUS 2CT, registration: N710JC
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was flying the motor glider in an annual soaring competition. The pilot reported that the motor glider was towed to 2,500 ft and then released. He subsequently performed a routine test of the engine and observed no anomalies; he then shut down the engine and stowed it before beginning the first leg of the competition. About 20 miles from the departure airport, the motor glider began losing altitude due to a loss of thermal lift, and the pilot then prepared for an off-airport landing. He deployed the retractable engine and attempted to start it but was unsuccessful. The pilot set up for landing to a field. He did not see power lines bordering the approach end of the field, and the motor glider impacted the power lines and then descended to the ground in a nose-down attitude.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

A loss of thermal lift during a motor glider flight, which resulted in an off-airport landing. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s failure to maintain adequate clearance from power lines during the off-airport landing attempt.

On September 24, 2015, about 1452 eastern daylight time, a Schempp-Hirth Ventus 2CT motorglider, N710JC, was substantially damaged when it impacted a wire and trees during an off-airport landing in Blacksburg, Virginia. The commercial pilot was seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight, which originated from Virginia Tech/Montgomery Executive Airport (BCB), Blacksburg, Virginia. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, he was flying in an annual soaring competition. He departed from BCB about 1215 with a tow up to an altitude of 2,500 feet, then released from the tow plane. He subsequently performed a routine test run of the 20-horsepower engine and observed no anomalies. He then shut down and stowed the engine before beginning the first leg of the competition. About 20 miles from BCB, he had difficulty finding thermals for lift. The glider began losing altitude and he prepared for an off airport landing. He deployed the glider's retractable engine; however, as he attempted to start the engine, it "sputtered" and would not run. In a post accident statement, he postulated that he held the decompression valve open long enough for the engine to build rpm, but was not sure due to the circumstances of being low and preparing for an off airport landing. He set up for landing in a field, but did not see the power lines bordering the approach end of the field, and contacted the wires before impacting the ground.

According to a witness, they heard the motorglider fly over and "the engine was loud and seemed to be struggling or missing. It did not sound normal."

The pilot reported 2,500 hours of total flight experience and 255 of those hours were in the same make and model as the accident motorglider. He held a commercial pilot certificate for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. The pilot's last flight review was on May 2, 2015. He did not have a medical certificate, nor was he required to when operating a glider.

Examination of the wreckage at the accident site by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the motorglider struck a wire and trees and impacted the ground in a nose down attitude. The forward fuselage was crushed, and the right wing was fractured and separated about one-third span from the wing tip. The fuel shut off valve and the fuel pump switch were in the off position.

The 1455 recorded weather observation at BCB, located about 7 nautical miles southwest of the accident site, included wind from 100 degrees at 8 knots, visibility 10 statute miles clear skies, temperature 23 degrees C, dew point 12 degrees C; barometric altimeter setting of 30.28 inches of mercury.


NTSB Identification: ERA15LA375
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, September 24, 2015 in Blacksburg, VA
Aircraft: SCHEMPP-HIRTH VENTUS 2CT, registration: N710JC
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 24, 2015, about 1452 eastern daylight time, a Schempp-Hirth Vetnus, powered Glider, N710JC, was substantially damaged when it impacted a wire and tress during an off airport landing in Blacksburg, Virginia. The commercial pilot was seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight, which originated from Virginia Tech/Montgomery Executive Airport (BCB), Blacksburg, Virginia. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, he was flying in the annual Blue Ridge Soaring competition. The airplane began losing altitude and the pilot prepared for an off airport landing. He deployed the glider's retractable engine; however as he attempted to start the engine, it "sputtered" and would not run.

According to a witness, they heard the glider fly over and "the engine was loud and seemed to be struggling or missing. It did not sound normal."

Examination of the wreckage at the accident site by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the glider struck a wire and trees, and impacted the ground in a nose down attitude. The forward fuselage was crushed, and the right wing was fractured and separated about one third span from the wing tip. The fuel shut off valve and the fuel pump switch were in the off position.

The 1455 recorded weather observation at BCB, located about 7 nautical miles southwest of the accident site, included wind 100 degrees at 8 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear skies below 12,000 feet, temperature 73 degrees F, dew point 54 degrees F; barometric altimeter setting of 30.28 inches of mercury.

ROANOKE (WSLS 10) — Wharton Ramsey is in rehabilitation at South Roanoke Nursing Home, six weeks after his glider crashed in Montgomery County. 

Ramsey said he’s never spent a day in a hospital, never broken a bone or even been hurt until now.

“Oh my injuries. Oh my goodness, you want the litany,” he asked in jest.

He suffered a collapsed lung, broken ribs and vertebrae, pelvic fractures and two broken ankles.

“I was pretty far down for a long time but I think we’re out of immediate danger now,” he said.

The Roanoke dentist was nearing the end of a glider race with the Blue Ridge Soaring Society out of New Castle September 24 when he crashed.

“We were racing through over the hills the mountains valleys of southwest Virginia and I got a bit lower than I meant to,” he explained.

Dr. Ramsey was forced to land in a farmer’s field in McCoy but hit power lines first.

“I looked down and I said I’m going to die. And I meant it. I was pretty sure I was going to die.”

He survived. Saved, he says, by farmer Joe Broce.

“What saved my life right then was the farmer on whose land I landed. I scared his cattle. He saw his cattle running.”

Ramsey said he talked to Broce on the phone Wednesday when he learned Broce not only came to his rescue that day, but how Broce happened across something to use as a tourniquet when minutes mattered.

“He looked on the ground and there is a strip of cloth about 3″ x 2′ just happen to be right there. You figure the odds of having that there. I imagine if he had been five minutes later I would have bled out. We wouldn’t be here having this interview.”

During the next 40 minutes, Ramsey guesses he was conscious for three minutes.

“I remember the womp, womp, womp of the chopper coming in.”

Lifeguard flew him to Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital where he recalls seeing his wife, Ellen peering in as he was rolled into the hospital.

“I think my feet are beautiful,” he joked. “They’re my toes still.”

Ramsey praises all the doctors and nurses involved in his care. Doctors managed to save both his legs

“The ankles were terribly broken. But my son said, ‘Well Dad, at least you landed on your feet.’ Which wasn’t very funny,” he said laughing.

Ramsey hopes to start walking by December but says his 45 years of flying are done.

I’m going to take up new pursuits now. I probably won’t do anymore gliding. I’ve been there done that wonderful I had a great time doing it but there are other things to do.”

Until then, he continues rehabilitation, including a little K9 therapy with their dog, Rubin. He’s eager to get back to his dental practice in January.

Ramsey says he looks forward to meeting Broce, the man who first saved his life.

Story, video and photo:  http://wsls.com/2015



 Wharton Ramsey






BBA Aviation proposes to buy Landmark Aviation for $2.07 billion

British aircraft services company BBA Aviation Plc said it proposed to buy U.S. competitor Landmark Aviation for $2.065 billion, a deal that would make the combined entity the biggest fixed-base operator in the world.

The proposed deal would merge BBA Aviation's Signature Flight Support business, which has the highest number of fixed base operations (FBO) in the United States, with Landmark's, which has the third highest, in a market that continues to remain highly fragmented.

"This is the right time to buy this asset, it's the right price and we know the business very well," Chief Executive Simon Pryce said in a media call, terming the acquisition sizeable and relatively low risk.

Landmark Aviation, which is owned by private equity firm Carlyle Group LP, has been exploring a sale as the corporate jet market is slowly recovering from a downturn sparked by the global financial crisis, helping valuations for companies offering services in the industry.

"We remain concerned about the outlook for the business aviation market, and BBA is significantly increasing its exposure to it with this deal," Liberum analysts said in a note.

Pryce, however, shrugged away concerns over tardy growth and said the slow and steady recovery after a few relatively flat years, coupled with a long-term outlook for accelerated growth, looked exciting.

Shares in the company fell to a more than two-year low, ranking among the top percentage losers on the FTSE-250 Midcap Index on Wednesday.

THE DEAL


BBA Aviation said it expected the acquisition to add to its earnings in 2017 and the return on invested capital to exceed the weighted average cost of capital in 2018.

The acquisition will be funded via new debt facilities and a fully underwritten rights issue of 562,281,811 shares at an issue price of 133 pence per share, raising about 748 million pounds ($1.15 billion), the company said.

J.P. Morgan Cazenove, Jefferies International Ltd, Barclays Bank Plc and HSBC Bank Plc are the underwriters for the rights issue.

BBA Aviation expects to save $35 million annually in costs by 2017 and sees tax benefits of $240 million.

Reuters reported exclusively on Tuesday that BBA Aviation was in talks to acquire Landmark.

A peer of Landmark Aviation, Scottsdale, Arizona-based aircraft maintenance services company StandardAero, was sold by Dubai Aerospace Enterprise Ltd to buyout firm Veritas Capital Fund Management LLC in July for $2.1 billion.

Source:  http://www.reuters.com