Friday, August 31, 2012

Aircraft expo to feature latest private planes


Some of Arizona’s leading aircraft dealers will show off their latest planes next week at the 4th Annual Arizona Aircraft Expo in Tucson.

The event, aimed at business aircraft owners and prospective owners, is scheduled from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. next Friday (Sept. 7) and Saturday (Sept. 8) at the Million Air private-plane facility at Tucson International Airport, 1840 E. Valencia Road.




The free expo, one of three held annually in Arizona, will feature the latest models of general-aviation aircraft from Cessna, Cirrus, Beechcraft, Pilatus, Piper, Lancair, Quest, CubCrafters, Aviat, and more. A similar expo was held near Lake Havasu City in May, and another one is slated for Scottsdale in November.

The event also will highlight ownership services needed in acquiring aircraft, including representatives from Aviation Tax Consultants, AirFleet Capital, Pinnacle Aviation Insurance and Airport Property Specialists.

An ownership seminar will be held on the Friday of the event at 11 a.m., focusing on subjects including insurance, financing and tax implications for ownership.

For more information and to register online, go to www.azaircraftexpo.com

http://azstarnet.com

Toronto, Canada: For aviation devotees at Pearson, it’s all about the airplanes

 It’s warm, it’s sunny and it’s Wednesday — perfect conditions for plane spotting in Toronto.

Warm is good because, well, warm is good.

Sunny is good because that means you can see a long way.

And Wednesday is good because Emirates airline flight EK-241 will be sailing in from Dubai at about 3:45 p.m. — which is excellent.

“It should be here in about two hours,” says Ben Rotem, 15, who is what you might call a plane-spotter’s plane spotter.

The Thornhill high school student is a purist, even by the exacting standards of a rare and unusual breed — aviation zealots who like nothing better than to gather at airports and watch flying machines as they take off and, especially, as they land.

“Most people, they see a machine,” says Rotem, who will enter Grade 10 this fall at Stephen Lewis Secondary School in Thornhill. “For us, we see the power behind it. For my age, I have a rather deep understanding of aircraft.”

Dressed in a grey T-shirt, plaid shorts and dark sneakers, Rotem intends to be an airline pilot. Just now, however, he seems to be every mother’s idea of an ideal son — clean-cut, courteous, a bit precocious maybe and, above all, passionate about what he loves to do.

It’s just that what he loves to do might strike some people as being a wee bit compulsive.

“My parents, they do sort of think it’s a bit weird,” he admits. “I’m the weird one in the family.”
 http://www.thestar.com

Opinion » Editorial: Eagle cam stars need a new home - Norfolk, Virginia

 


Opinion » Editorial: Eagle cam stars need a new home

None of the outcomes Norfolk faces to reduce the likelihood of another collision between plane and eagle holds much appeal.

Moving the eagles from their nests at the Norfolk Botanical Garden, adjacent to the airport, slams a hammer on the heartstrings of thousands who have watched eaglets hatch and followed episodes of the male eagle's efforts to court a new mate via the eagle cam.

Leaving the eagles at the garden could bring a fresh round of mourning if another of the endangered birds - a female eagle died after hitting a plane last year - meets its demise near a runway. And the potential for a more catastrophic result - a fatal plane crash, rather than $150,000 in damage - looms with every takeoff and landing.

That's by far the worst possible scenario. That risk means Norfolk must bear the sadness and make the effort to move the birds.

The danger is not far-fetched. Last week, an audit from the U.S. Inspector General criticized the Federal Aviation Administration's paltry efforts to monitor bird strikes at airports. Such incidents have soared in the past two decades, from 1,770 reported in 1990 to 9,840 reported last year.

But reporting is voluntary, which means the FAA has no idea of the real magnitude of the problem. An assistant inspector general said the office examined 40 of 209 airports and found that 21 of those did not know whether the FAA had reviewed their bird strike assessments and plans, or even whether they were required to conduct assessments or develop plans.

That's lackadaisical oversight of an issue that challenges safety at every airport in the country.

Twenty-four people have died as a result of birds colliding with planes since 1988, according to the report, and 235 have been injured. The toll on planes has been catastrophic: According to the FAA, 54 planes have been destroyed or damaged beyond repair. The FAA puts the annual cost of losses due to wildlife strikes at $600 million in the United States.

And the FAA ranks eagles as the sixth most damaging species in strikes to aircraft in an assessment that tallies the damage caused and its effect on flight.

Geese also pose problems - they rank third on the list, after deer and vultures, and caused one of the most famous examples of the terrible potential for calamity when birds and planes meet. U.S. Airways Flight 1549 lost both engines when it struck geese shortly after take-off from LaGuardia Airport in January 2009; the pilot famously landed the plane safely in the Hudson River.

Techniques to scare birds away - loud propane cannon blasts, recordings of predators' calls - must be used in conjunction with other methods, including making the area around airports less inviting to birds. And they must include another threat - in some cases, actual killing of birds like geese or ducks to avoid habituating wildlife to irritating sounds.

That's not an option with eagles, nor should it be. Eagles have been endangered for many years but have rebounded. Even in greater numbers, their symbolic importance to our nation means killing them is a crime.

Find the eagles a nice new neighborhood away from the airport's runways. Move the camera, too.

Source:  http://hamptonroads.com

 

Why Planes Crash: An insider’s take on the aviation industry

 
David Soucie, former FAA investigator and author of the bestselling memoir, ‘Why Planes Crash: An Accident Investigator Fights for Safe Skies,’ is currently at work on his next book. 
Summit Daily/Erica Marciniec



Friday, August 31, 2012

By Karina Wetherbee
Summit Daily

Anyone who has ever been in an airplane, high over farmland tapestries or turbulent ashen gray waters, knows that unique feeling of surrender, when one gives over one’s fate to another, trusting in the skills of a well-trained pilot and the safety of a masterfully-built aircraft. At the same time, given this same scenario, a frequent flier knows the occasional feeling of doubt about whether or not all the pertinent mechanical systems have been checked and all airline employees well rested.

Some say that ignorance is bliss, that too much information can lead to increased anxiety, but others are firm believers that information and transparency are what keep systems running smoothly.

They’re goals that David Soucie, former aviation industry executive and author of “Why Planes Crash: An Accident Investigator Fights for Safe Skies,” spent a career fighting for, in an effort to ensure aviation safety.

A Colorado native and current resident of Summit County, David Soucie knows a bit about things that fly and even more about things that should fly, but fail to. In his memoir, the author documents his own trajectory from cocky and youthful airplane and helicopter mechanic to an airline safety inspector for the Federal Aviation Administration, an organization that, according to Soucie, has often been its own worst enemy when it comes to efficiency and effectiveness.

“Airplane safety — what people don’t know could kill them,” Soucie determined after 30 years in the industry, an opinion supported in his book by numerous stories of outdated decisions, cut corners and overlooked errors that led to dramatic accidents with tragic outcomes.

After watching several colleagues perish due to preventable hazards, Soucie made the conscious decision that what the aviation industry needed was more inter-agency collaboration. In “Why Planes Crash,” he claims that the Federal Aviation Administration suffers from the age-old problem that the right hand doesn’t know what the left hand is doing, and often doesn’t care.

Soucie documents the steps he took to increase safety, which too often is pushed aside for profit. While struggling to maintain a normal family life with a new wife and a young child, Soucie’s career took him far afield from Colorado to Oklahoma, Washington D.C. and Hawaii. Through a series of tragedies and his efforts to determine their root causes, he ultimately came to develop a technology-based information-sharing network to help airlines, mechanics and regulating bodies utilize data for informed decision-making.

Despite the heavy use of mind-numbing acronyms so rampant in government agencies, the book makes for a good layperson’s read, with important messages hung on Soucie’s captivating life stories.

In a world where air travel is cheaper and more commonplace than ever before, Soucie’s “Why Planes Crash” reminds us that our watchdog agencies often walk a fine line between operational tools benefiting society’s needs and bloated departments bent on justifying their own existences.

As Soucie states, “I came to believe that the willingness of airlines and manufacturers to sacrifice safety for profit was the root cause of accidents. There was a nonprofit version of this insight as well, as practiced by the FAA. The FAA routinely sacrificed aviation safety in favor of promoting aviation.” Think on that the next time you head to airport — or not. After all, ignorance is bliss.

A Denver Post bestseller, “Why Planes Crash: An Accident Investigator Fights for Safe Skies” was authored by Soucie with Ozzie Cheek and released in October, 2011. Soucie lectures on the topic of choice in corporate and organizational decision-making. He is currently at work on a new book. For more info, visit www.whyplanescrash.com.

Read more:   http://www.summitdaily.com

Wings Field Airport (KLOM), Blue Bell, Pennsylvania: Wings and Wheels to touch down next weekend

Planes, trains and automobiles will be hitting the tarmac for what promises to be a day of food, fun and entertainment, all for a good cause.

The 22nd annual Wings and Wheels Show and Family Fair will be held Sept. 8 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Wings Field, 1501 Narcissa Road, Blue Bell. Tickets are on sale for $8, and there is no charge for infants and children in strollers.

The event will feature classic planes and cars, a steam engine locomotive, a presentation from the Franklin Institute’s traveling science show “Flight,” live animals from the Elmwood Park Zoo and the return of the popular “Wing-Off”chicken wing tasting contest.

Additionally, many pilots will provide flights in their planes for $25 and $50 for those who want to fly on a vintage bush plane featuring glass sides that offer a spectacular view from the air. All pilots are certified by the FAA before they are allowed to take passengers up for a ride, event officials said.

The Wings and Wheels Show has evolved over the years into a well-known “community event,” said Ellen Spoehr, executive director of Angel Flight East (AFE), the nonprofit behind the event.

Last year, work had been done to the field, forcing the event to be postponed, she said, but this year promises a return to form. Featuring 60 unique cars, including the Model A and military vehicles, a steam engine locomotive and children’s activities like a moonbounce, Spoehr said the event will be a hit.

All proceeds from the event benefit AFE.

AFE is a volunteer pilot organization started in 1989 that provides all expense paid flights for medical patients who lack financial resources to travel commercially or have a condition that makes it impossible to use public transportation, according to Kristinia Luke, mission coordinator for AFE. The organization travels as far as 1,000 nautical miles to help patients get to where they need to go, she said.

“All travelers must be ambulatory and medically stable, able to board an aircraft with little assistance and able to fly in light aircraft without on-board medical support,” according to an AFE publication.

In addition to helping medical patients and their families get to the medical care they need, Spoehr said, AFE provides disaster relief and compassionate flights. After the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and Hurricane Katrina in 2005, pilots representing the organization flew in supplies to help. Additionally, compassionate flights are given to people who have special circumstances such as a person dying who wants to spend their remaining days with their family members who happen to live on the opposite side of the country.

All funding for AFE is provided through private donations, said Jim Devine, chairman of the events committee, which allows for more than 400 missions to be flown each year. Many pilots “adopt” a patient or family and fly them to wherever they need, which Luke said is “great to see.”

While the organization has been running for more than 20 years, the most difficult task, Spoehr said, has been community awareness.

“Our job is to get the word out. We exist,”she said.

Devine said fundraising efforts have helped spread the word but social workers are the people the organization tries to make aware of the program the most. He said oftentimes their clients are the type of people AFE are able to help the most, they simply may not have known it existed.

Along with the private donations, events similar to Wings and Wheels are held to raise money, Devine said. The organization also makes appeals to donors and supporters and regularly applies for grants, which he said can be a rigorous qualification process.

For more information about AFE, visit www.angelflighteast.org or call 215-358-1900. 


Source:  http://www.montgomerynews.com

Fort Wayne workers see fruits of their labor with visit from fighter jet demonstration team

 
An F-22 comes in for a landing Thursday morning at Fort Wayne's Air National Guard base. Two of these high-tech stealth fighters are in town for the air show this weekend. Only one jet will fly; the other is for backup. BAE Systems global defense and aerospace company helped sponsor their visit for the air show. BAE employs 97,500 worldwide and its sales in 2011 exceeded $31.4 million. The plant in Fort Wayne makes vehicle management systems, 33 different modules, that help the plane fly. (Photo by Ellie Bogue of The News-Sentinel)


 


FORT WAYNE, Ind. — Although the average air-show spectator may not know it, the world's most advanced fighter jet relies on a sophisticated flight computer system largely built in Fort Wayne when performing its awe-inspiring stunts.

Members of the U.S. Air Force's F-22 Raptor Demonstration Team - in town for the Fort Wayne Air Show - visited employees of BAE Systems on Thursday, giving workers a rare firsthand glimpse at the important role their product plays in the Raptor's overall performance and the safety of its pilots.

About 50 BAE employees met the F-22 demo team - comprised of one pilot and half a dozen crew members - when it arrived Thursday with two Raptors at the Fort Wayne Air National Guard base on Ferguson Road. The visit came as a big morale-booster for employees who make critical parts for the F-22 but rarely, if ever, see the finished product, said Thomas Le, a BAE engineer who helped organize the event.

"It's just neat to see all your work going into a portion of the fighter jet," Le told The News-Sentinel (http://bit.ly/OFtVsU ). "You get to see the finished product, and it's really cool."

F-22 demo pilot Maj. Henry "Schadow" Schantz and his crew also toured the BAE plant, 2000 Taylor Street, spoke to employees about the Raptor and held an hour-long question-and-answer session.

While BAE builds primarily commercial products, military work represents about 20 percent of the Fort Wayne plant's business, said company spokesman Jeff Benzing. The plant employs more than 1,100 people, including at least 100 directly involved with military programs, he said.

The plant makes circuit cards that comprise much of the Raptor's "brain," transmitting data from the pilot's control stick to guide the plane's movements, said Corin Beck, director of the company's fixed-wing avionics division. The plant also builds computer flight systems for the F-18 Super Hornet fighter jet and the UH-60 Black Hawk and CH-47 Chinook helicopters.

The F-22 can hit Mach 2 - or between 1,200 and 1,300 miles per hour - and pull off dizzying maneuvers safely because of the Fort Wayne-built system, which essentially thinks for itself and adjusts the pilot's commands based on current conditions, Schantz said.

"This aircraft is very, very, very smart," he said. "It will go where it thinks the pilot wants to go, in a very efficient manner."

Although pilots consider each of the Raptor's parts important, the aircraft could fly safely without some of its components, Schantz said. But without the circuit cards produced at BAE, Schantz said, he could never get off the ground.

Beck said BAE prides itself on its reliable products, noting that the last F-22 - production of new Raptors ended earlier this year - came out of assembly without a single defect. Schantz also thanked workers Thursday for making quality parts, saying the digital flight system helps him focus on missions and land safely.

"Thank you guys so much for what you do, bringing us home safe each and every day," Schantz told workers.

Le, the BAE engineer, said he sensed a mutual respect between the Raptor crew and the local workers who help build the aircraft.

"They get to see the people who build the products, and we get to see the people who fly and maintain the F-22," he said. "I think there's a lot of respect there."
___
Information from: The News-Sentinel, http://www.news-sentinel.com/ns

(Story distributed by The Associated Press)

Thursday, August 30, 2012

Living history flying days Saturday

CHINO -- Planes of Fame Air Museum will present "Korean Conflict" for its Living History Flying Day event on Saturday.
 

Open to the public, the museum presents a speaker panel of distinguished aviation experts, historians and veterans.

The event will feature the Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15. from 10 a.m. to noon at 7000 Merrill Ave., Chino.

The prototype of the Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15 - NATO code name "Fagot" - made its maiden flight on 30 Dec. 30, 1947.

The first production aircraft flew exactly one year later. It was in the frozen skies of Korea that the MiG-15 proved one of the most formidable fighters of its generation, being far superior to straight-wing aircraft like the F-80 and the Navy's F9F Panther. F-86 Sabres clashed with MiGs in the Korean conflict for the first time in December 1950.

For 2 1/2 years MiGs and Sabers in the skies over the Yalu River in an area called MiG Alley. At the end of the Korean War, Saber pilots claimed a 14:1 (later revised to 7:1) kill ratio over their opponents. This lopsided total is usually attributed to the superior training given to USAF pilots.

More than 17,000 MiG-15 aircraft were built in the USSR, Poland and Czechoslovakia. Thousands more were built in China.

Planes of Fame owns three MiG-15s, one airworthy and two on static display.

The presentation on Saturday is followed by a question and answer period then a flight demonstration of the MiG-15 by one of the museum's pilots. On display will be  the featured aircraft, the museum doors open at 9 a.m.

Source:   http://www.dailybulletin.com

Why we deployed Dreamliner to Lagos, by airline

AFRICA’S most profitable airline, Ethiopian Airways has said that the decision that necessitated the airline to deploy its new Dreamliner aircraft on the Nigerian route was because the country ranks as one of its top destinations in the world for the past 52 years.

An ecstatic general manager of the airline who received the newly built composite airplane last weekend, Solomon Begashaw said, “ having  serviced the country for that long, we believe that Nigeria should be the first to deserve this aircraft to enhance our customer service and reinforcing the fact that we are the reliable airline in the industry”.

Explaining why the aircraft is different from other types of aircraft, he said the Boeing B787 aircraft is very distinct with the state of the art equipment and facilities that have never been there in the aviation world before”.

According to the airline chief, “now, flying has become very simple and tireless because of the advanced technology system installed in the aircraft. The altitude inside the aircraft is 600 meters from the other jetliners, which will make it more comfortable for the passengers. We have high humidity in the aircraft, which will make it easier for passengers to travel, and there is no dryness that you will feel inside like in the other commercial aircraft,” he added.

The aircraft is the first of commercial aircraft that will have a large window; that one can see the inside, outside, and has features on it which are controlled electronically that you can use to dim it according to one’s requirements.

The airplane is the first aircraft out of the five the carrier has received, just as it plans to be rotate to most of its major routes in the continent in before the end of this year.

He, however, assured that Lagos will be served with B787 in the near future.

Meanwhile, the Nigerian Aviation Handling Company Plc (nahco aviance), has expressed delight at last week’s epoch-making flight of Ethiopian Airline Dreamliner B787 to Lagos, describing it as a big boost to the nation’s aviation industry.

Managing Director of NAHCO Aviance, Mr. Kayode Oluwasegun-Ojo described the acquisition and eventual maiden flight of the Dreamliner to Nigeria as the impetus required to strengthen the company’s plans in making Nigeria the hub of cargo and passenger handling in Africa.

NAHCO Aviance Plc as the ground handling company for the Airline in Nigeria “is proud to be associated with Ethiopian Airline on this laudable achievement,” Oluwasegun-Ojo said, and pledged the company’s  commitment to sustaining its world class services at all times.

The Ethiopian Airline super plane Dreamliner Boeing 787, is the first of its kind in Africa and is technically advanced with the capacity of 290 passengers.

NAHCO Aviance recently commissioned a huge ultra-modern warehouse, as well as, procured several new generation Ground Support Equipment, which analysts believed was to position the company for airlines’ deployment of bigger and modern aircraft to Nigeria.

The company’s initiative was also aimed at making Nigeria a cargo hub for sub-Sahara Africa.

Source:    http://www.ngrguardiannews.com

New Jersey man indicted for alleged sexual abuse of woman on Newark-bound flight

Bail was set at $100,000 for Bawer Aksal.
A North Bergen man was indicted by a federal grand jury on Thursday on a charge that he sexually abused a passenger while she slept on a cross-country flight to Newark Liberty International Airport last month.

Bawer Aksal, 48, was indicted the same day that a federal judge set his bail at $100,000. But he will remain in the Essex County Jail while his attorney prepares a bail package for the court explaining how Aksal plans to secure bail — by way of property, cash or a bail bond company.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Elizabeth Harris had asked that Aksal be held without bail because his three passports — one from his native Turkey and two issued by the United States under the names Bawer Aksal and Jonathan Aksal — indicated that he was a flight risk.

“I think what’s appropriate is some kind of bond where the family has said we’ll put up our money to convince you he’s not a flight risk,” U.S. Magistrate Judge Madeline Cox Arleo said during a hearing in federal court in Newark on Thursday.

Arleo also set conditions on the bail if Aksal is freed. He must be confined to his home with electronic monitoring, surrender any passports and not travel out of the state, she said.

Aksal was arrested by FBI agents last week and was charged with sexually abusing a woman who was seated next to him on a flight to Newark from Phoenix on Aug. 20.

The woman told authorities she awoke in her seat to find Aksal groping one of her breasts under her shirt with one hand, and his other hand in her shorts. She told him to get off her, slammed down the armrest between them and told a flight attendant what had happened, authorities said.

When interviewed later by authorities, Aksal admitted penetrating the woman with his fingers but said she forced his hand, investigators said. Aksal’s lawyer, Robert DeGroot said earlier this week that his client denies making that statement to police.

Arleo continued the bail hearing from Tuesday because she wanted more information about Aksal’s U.S. and Turkish passports.

Harris, the assistant U.S. attorney, objected to his release, arguing that he initially failed to disclose to authorities his extent of his travel and that he owned a Turkish passport. They also said Aksal used different names for the passports. Prosecutors have maintained Aksal is a flight risk with strong ties to Turkey.

DeGroot has said that Aksal, a Kurd, does not wish to return to Turkey, which he fled to escape an oppressive government. He also said the passports listed different first names because he hanged his name to Jonathan and then resumed using Bawer, and that his actions were not underhanded.

“I have no evidence before me that he obtained either [passport] fraudulently or was using an old passport when he shouldn’t have,” the judge said. “But I’m concerned about the risk of flight to the extent he has nothing holding him here. He has no money here, no job here and no home with equity here.”

Aksal owns properties in North Bergen and Florida, but he appears to owe more on those properties than they are worth, the prosecutor has said.

DeGroot said he would begin working on the bail package, which he hopes to present to the court by next week.


Source:  http://www.northjersey.com


Airbus A380 Production Squeeze Lifts Value of Financier’s Fleet

The Airbus A380 wing-crack debacle may turn out to be a blessing in disguise for the largest financier of the super jumbo.

“It will, in a strange way, be positive long term because it has slowed down production,” said Mark Lapidus, managing director of Doric Asset Finance Ltd, which has financed 13 of the world’s largest passenger aircraft so far. “Anything that slows down the production rate increases the value of the existing fleet we have.”

Airbus SAS’s flagship model has struggled with cracks that emerged in wing components, disrupting production that will drop in 2013 and is trailing behind the annual goal of 30 deliveries this year. Airbus is working with regulators on a long-term fix for the cracks, and the company has cautioned that reaching its goal of 30 new orders this year is a stretch.

Doric has financed eight A380s for Emirates Airline, the biggest operator of the double-decker jet, and five for Singapore Airlines (SIA), the A380’s first customer in 2007. There are 80 A80s in operation around the world today, and customers have ordered 257 of the double-decker, according to Airbus’s tally at the end of July.

The London-based financing company will see its fleet grow to 18 A380s by the end of April 2013, Lapidus said in a telephone interview. Doric is in financing talks with other A380 customers, including China Southern Airlines Co. (1055), Korean Air Lines Co. (003490) and Malaysian Airline System Bhd. (MAS)

‘Underappreciated’

“It is not that we are fascinated with the A380,” Lapidus said. “We see it as an underappreciated aircraft by both the lessor community, about which we are very happy, and by some of the airlines that have not tasted the aircraft in their fleet yet.”

One case where product familiarity may lead to additional A380 orders is British Airways (IAG), Lapidus said. The International Consolidated Airlines Group SA unit is scheduled to receive the first of 12 of the aircraft it has on firm order next year.

“They will have to operate more,” Lapidus said, pointing to the carrier’s network and service to major cities such as Hong Kong or New York. On flights to the New York area alone, British Airways “would need less crewing and fewer pilots and their costs would improve significantly” by using the A380, he said.

Doric’s portfolio now includes $4.6 billion in aviation assets under management. The company yesterday took delivery of its 13th A380 to bring its total fleet to 30 aircraft placed with nine airlines. The A380 was acquired under the Sky Cloud IV fund that has leased the aircraft for 12 years to Emirates.

In addition to A380s, Doric has financed six Boeing 777 wide-bodies, two Airbus A340-600s, one A330-200 and eight A320s.

The company has also bid on financing Boeing 787 Dreamliners, Lapidus said, though so far failed to win a customer. Financing more 777s is also on the agenda.

To help with aircraft financing at a time when many banks have withdrawn access to debt, Doric this year used a first of its kind U.S. corporate bond offering for four Emirates A380s, selling $587.5 million in secured debt. More such deals are being looked at, Lapidus said.

Doric wants to expand its investor base beyond its core German and U.K. market, Lapidus said.

“We are definitely looking into the U.S. and we are very interested in developing something in Japan,” he said. Those efforts are likely to materialize next year, Lapidus said.

Source:  http://www.businessweek.com

Rain Forecasted For Quad City Air Show Weekend



Everything is set for the big weekend, but with rain in the forecast for both Saturday and Sunday, the air show's perfect record of great weather might be in jeopardy. 

Pilots and airport officials say they have a plan B if it does rain.

Director of Vendor Operations Dave Schumacher has been at the air show every year for 26 years. He says they've never been rained out, but have had some close calls. 

"We've had wet seasons and we've had rain right before the show and the show starts, the rain stops, and everybody has a good time," Schumacher says.

In years past, the rain has put a damper on the day, trapping cars in the grassy lot. Organizers say the lack of rain this summer is working to their advantage.

"The ground is so hard, we can drive on it," Schumacher says, "Parking on the grass is not a problem, we've had in years past our parking lot is grass, but this year there's nothing to worry about, it's like driving on cement."

If it does rain, the show can be adjusted to the weather.

"We'll try to ride it out, we're hoping the rain stays south of us," Airport Manager Tom Vesalga says, "If it does stay south and we do get some cloud coverage in here, all the performances are capable of doing a low performance."

"There's certain things I can add in my performance to actually make them better, when I use the wind to my advantage and there's certain things you can't do," Pilot Kirby Chambliss says. 

But certain conditions can still make it tough to fly.

"Here at the airport, if we have low visibility, less then five miles visibility, airplanes have issues with performing," Director of Flight Services Dick McGarry says, "Obviously rain is a concern a little bit of mist and stuff is not a problem, but a pretty good rain that would make the farmers happy would probably temporarily shut the show down until that passes."

So everyone is keeping their fingers crossed, hoping for a clear day. 

"It's one of those things we'll just have to play it by ear and see how everything unfolds on Saturday," Vesalga says.

For those of you headed to the show, gates open at 8 a.m. both days with the main show starting at 11:30. 

If you haven't gotten your tickets yet, they're still available at the air show office, online, or other outlets. More info here: http://www.quadcityairshow.com/2012/index.html

Source:  http://www.kwqc.com

Northwest Arkansas Regional (KXNA), Fayetteville/Springdale, Arkansas: Airport Warns Of Possible Flight Cancellations

Flights at Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport may be delayed or canceled if weather from Tropical Depression Isaac is intense enough, officials said Thursday. 

Kelly Johnson, airport director, said airlines themselves decide cancellations. She suggested flyers look out to for their flights when weather fallout from the storm hits Northwest Arkansas on Friday.

Customers can check their flights’ status by using links on Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport’s website or browsing airlines’ own websites, Johnson said.

“You can also go to arrivals, click on ‘Flight Tracker’, and you can see the inbound flights. You can see what’s been canceled, what’s on time,” Johnson said. 


http://5newsonline.com

Piper PA-23-150 Apache, N1486P: Accident occurred August 29, 2012 in Canton, Missouri

http://registry.faa.gov/N1486P 
 
NTSB Identification: CEN12FA586
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 29, 2012 in Canton, MO
Aircraft: PIPER PA-23-150, registration: N1486P
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On August 29, 2012, about 1800 central daylight time, a Piper PA-23-150, N1486P, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing when it impacted trees and terrain about 5 miles southwest of Canton, Iowa, after a partial loss of power. The pilot and passenger received fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight, which was not on a flight plan, departed from Pinckneyville, Illinois, about 1600, and was en route to the Antique Airfield, a private airstrip near Blakesburg, Iowa.

At 1754, the surface weather observation at the Quincy Regional Airport-Baldwin Field (UIN), Quincy, Illinois, located about 20 miles southeast of the accident, was: wind calm; visibility 10 miles; sky clear; temperature 33 degrees Celsius; dew point 15 degrees Celsius; altimeter 30.02 inches of mercury.


 Photo: http://addins.whig.com/betweenthelens/plane-crash

IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 1486P        Make/Model: PA23      Description: PA-23-150/160 Apache
  Date: 08/29/2012     Time: 2245

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: CANTON   State: MO   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES, THE 2 PERSONS ON BOARD WERE 
  FATALLY INJURED, NEAR CANTON, MO

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   2
                 # Crew:   2     Fat:   2     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: ST. LOUIS, MO  (CE03)                 Entry date: 08/30/2012 
 

Aircraft MFG & Development Company, CH 2000, N651AM:Accident occurred August 30, 2012 in Nephi, Utah

NTSB Identification: WPR12FA378
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 30, 2012 in Nephi, UT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/12/2013
Aircraft: AIRCRAFT MFG & DEVELOPMENT CO CH 2000, registration: N651AM
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Witnesses observed the airplane operating in the airport traffic pattern. As the airplane turned from a crosswind to a downwind leg, witnesses estimated that the airplane was about 150 feet above ground level at a slow speed when it suddenly pitched downward and descended into the ground. Witnesses further stated that at the time of the accident, thunderstorms with strong wind, heavy rain, and lightning were arriving in the area.

A regional radar mosaic for about the time of the accident depicted several scattered weather echoes with one defined cell of moderate-to-strong intensity just over the accident site. Archived lightning data for the time revealed seven in-cloud and cloud-to-ground lightning flashes within a 50-mile radius of the accident site; however, no cloud-to-ground lightning strikes were detected within 15 miles. The detection of lightning confirmed the presence of a cumulonimbus cloud in the area.

Wreckage and impact signatures were consistent with a right-wing-low and nose-low impact. Postaccident examination of the airframe, flight control system, and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. Based on the witness observations and recorded weather data, it is likely that, as a result of the approaching thunderstorm, the airplane encountered a microburst or downdraft that exceeded the airplane's climb performance and resulted in a loss of airplane control.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's inability to maintain airplane control due to an encounter with a microburst/downdraft that exceeded the climb performance capabilities of the airplane.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 30, 2012, about 1615 mountain daylight time, an Aircraft MFG & Development Company, CH 2000, N651AM, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain while in the traffic pattern at the Nephi Municipal Airport (U14) near Nephi, Utah. The airplane was registered to private individuals and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The certified flight instructor (CFI) and private pilot receiving instruction were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the instructional flight. The local flight originated from the Provo Municipal Airport near Provo, Utah, about 1500.

According to witnesses located adjacent to the accident site, the airplane was observed on a southerly heading south of U14 before it turned left to a northerly heading at an altitude of about 150 feet above ground level (agl). Multiple witnesses reported that the airplane seemed to be traveling at a slow speed when it suddenly pitched downwards and descended into the ground. One witness stated that prior to the sound of impact the engine seemed to be at a high power setting. Witnesses further stated that at the time of the accident, a thunderstorm with strong wind, heavy rain, and lighting were present in the area.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The flight instructor, age 45, held a commercial pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane ratings. He also held a flight instructor certificate with airplane single-engine land and instrument ratings. A second-class airman medical certificate was issued on April 16, 2012, with no limitations stated. The pilot reported on his most recent medical certificate application that he had accumulated 950 total flight hours.

The pilot receiving instruction, age 59, held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating, which was issued on August 29, 2012, based upon his Canadian private pilot certificate, which was issued on February 19, 2011. A third class airman medical certificate was issued to the pilot on March 23, 2010, with the limitation of "glasses must be worn." Review of the pilot's logbook revealed that as of the most recent logbook entry dated March 12, 2012, he had accumulated a total of 94.8 hours of flight time.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The two-seat, low-wing, fixed-gear airplane, serial number (S/N) 20-1021, was manufactured in 2003. It was powered by a Lycoming O-235-N2C engine, serial number L-255755-15, rated at 116 horse power. The airplane was also equipped with a Sensenich fixed pitch propeller. The airplane was recently purchased by the pilot receiving instruction and another individual.

Review of the airplane’s maintenance log books revealed an annual inspection was accomplished on August 17, 2012 with a tachometer time of 215.7 hours. The airplane underwent an export control examination by an FAA designated airworthiness representative on August 22, 2012 with a tachometer time of 216.0 hours and a hobbs/airplane total time of 242.5 hours. The tachometer indicated 217.6 hours at the accident site.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

A National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) staff meteorologist prepared a factual report for the area and timeframe surrounding the accident.

The National Weather Service Surface Analysis Chart for 1500 depicted the synoptic conditions over the region prior to the accident, which included a low pressure system over Wyoming with a cold front extending southwestward into northern Colorado and was a stationary front into Utah and Nevada. A high pressure system was located immediately west of the low and north of the front over western Wyoming. The station models surrounding the accident site depicted north-northwest wind at 10 to 15 knots, scattered clouds, with temperatures ranging from 88 degrees to 89 degrees Fahrenheit (F), with dew points between 45 degrees and 48 degrees F.

The NWS Storm Prediction Center's Convective Outlook expected a general risk of thunderstorms over the region during the period. A review of the NWS regional radar mosaic for 1615 depicted several scattered weather echoes over the region southeast through south of Provo, Utah, with one area over the Nephi area with the maximum reflectivity’s near 45 dBZ. The accident site was located under the area of echoes.

Nephi Municipal Airport (U14) is equipped with an Automated Weather Observation System (AWOS) for broadcasting local weather, however, it does not disseminate the observations to the FAA or NWS. The data obtained from MesoWest surrounding the period indicated that prior to the accident at 1559, Nephi reported a westerly wind from 260 degrees at 6 knots gusting to 19 knots, with scattered clouds at 11,000 feet, a temperature 88 degrees F, dew point 43 degrees F, relative humidity of 21 percent, altimeter 29.97 inches of mercury. The calculated density altitude was 8,029 feet.

After the accident at 1659, the wind had shifted to the east and was reported from 080 degrees at 12 knots with gusts to 19 knots. There was also a 6 degree F decrease in temperature during the hour with rising dew point temperature, and falling pressure and subsequent rising pressure.

The sounding parameters were for a warm dry low–level environment with a Lifted Index of -0.9, indicating a conditionally unstable environment favorable for scattered high based thunderstorm development. The Vertical Totals (VT) index of 37.1 indicated the potential for strong thunderstorms. The WINDEX or microburst potential measure of the downdraft instability estimated outflow winds near 37 knots, while the GOES Hybrid Microburst Index (HMI) algorithm of 29 indicated a strong potential for dry microbursts. Other indices such as the Microburst Day Potential Index (MDPI) of 0.3 indicated a low potential for microburst activity. The gust potentials ranged from 54 to 57 knots.

The sounding wind profile indicated a surface wind from 345 degrees at 8 knots, with wind from the north through 4,000 feet agl, with winds backing to the southwest with height.

Review of the observations and the satellite images from Provo at 1600 indicated that they were on the edge of the clouds with lightning being detected to the southeast. As the system moved northward with time, rain showers were reported from these cumulus congestus type clouds. Delta, Utah was also located under some high level cloud cover during the period, but not from the cloud mass that was identified over the accident site. Delta reported cumulonimbus type clouds in all quadrants during the period with blowing dust to the south and west, and rain showers after the accident. Price, Utah also on the eastern edge of the cloud area reported lightning activity to the west prior to the accident, and also indicated convective clouds

WSR-88D base reflectivity images of the 0.5° elevation scan were completed at 1610:35, 1613:46, 1616:57, 1620:08, and 1623:20 respectively. The images depicted several scattered echoes develop across the region with one defined cell immediately south of the airport and over the accident site, that moved northeastward during the period around the time of the accident. The echoes observed were of moderate to strong intensity.

Archived lightning data from 1600 through 1620 identified 7 in-cloud and cloud-to-ground lightning flashes within a 50 mile radius of the accident site. No cloud-to-ground lightning were detected within 15 miles of the accident site during the period. In-cloud lightning is typically observed during the towering cumulus or cumulus congestus stage of a developing thunderstorm, and continues into the dissipating stage. The detection of lightning confirms that the area of weather encountered by the accident airplane was associated with a cumulonimbus cloud, although a low topped one without the defined anvil outflow.

For further information, see the Weather Study report within the public docket.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The Nephi Municipal Airport (U14) is a non-towered airport that operates under class G airspace. The reported field elevation for the airport was 5,022 feet msl. The airport is equipped with one asphalt runway (17/35). Runway 17/35 is 6,300 feet in length and 100-feet wide with a 0.7 percent negative gradient. The standard traffic pattern for runway 17 is oriented for left turns.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane impacted terrain about 1.7 miles southeast of U14 at an elevation of 4,867 feet mean sea level (msl). The aft section of the fuselage and empennage was partially separated and came to rest inverted. The forward part of the fuselage, left and right wings, and engine were found upright. The main wreckage came to rest on a magnetic heading of about 326-degrees. The wreckage debris remained within an approximate 50 foot radius of the main wreckage.

The first identified point of contact (FPIC) with terrain was a ground scar impression of about a foot in width and about 12 feet in length. The first portion of the ground scar contained fragments of green lens material, consistent with the right wing navigational light. Extending from the end of the impression, a deep ground scar was contained to an area of about 4 by 4 feet with disturbed dirt, which contained plexiglass and fiberglass. The main wreckage came to rest about 8 feet beyond the FPIC. The right main landing gear wheel assembly separated from its strut and was located between the FPIC and the main wreckage.

Examination of the wreckage revealed that the engine, firewall, and instrument panel had impact damage and was distorted forward of the leading edges of both wings. A section of the instrument panel separated.

The left and right wings remained partially attached at the fuselage area. The ailerons and flaps remained attached to the wing structure. The leading edges of both wings were crushed aft and upwards. The outboard portion of the right wing was crushed upward from about mid span. Additionally, the wing exhibited approximate 45-degree crush angles from mid-span to the wingtip.

The cabin and fuselage area were partially consumed by fire. Both wing tanks were crushed and torn open.

Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit controls to all primary flight controls.

The engine was partially attached to the airframe, and the mounting assembly exhibited impact damage. The exhaust assembly was crushed and partially separated. The right magneto, vacuum pump, oil filter housing cap, and oil dip stick assembly were separated from the engine. The crankshaft was rotated by hand through the upper accessory gear; cylinder compression and valve continuity were obtained on all four cylinders.

Both the left and right magnetos produced spark on all posts respectively when the magneto driveshafts were rotated by hand. The top spark plugs exhibited normal operating signatures.

The propeller remained attached to the engine crankshaft and exhibited "S" bending and was curled opposite the direction of rotation. Additionally, the blade exhibited leading edge polishing in the outboard 8 to 10 inches of the blade. The opposing propeller blade exhibited a slight aft bend originating from about 8 inches inboard of the blade tip.

For further information, see the Accident Site, Airframe, and Engine Exam Summary Report within the public docket for this accident.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Utah State Medical Examiner conducted an autopsy on the CFI on August 31, 2012. The medical examiner determined that the cause of death was “...blunt force injuries.”

The FAA's Civil Aeromedical Institute (CAMI) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology tests on the CFI. According to CAMI's report, carbon monoxide, cyanide, volatiles, and drugs were tested, and had negative results.

The Utah State Medical Examiner conducted an autopsy on the pilot receiving instruction on August 31, 2012. The medical examiner determined that the cause of death was “...blunt force injuries.”

The FAA's Civil Aeromedical Institute (CAMI) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology tests on the pilot receiving instruction. According to CAMI's report, carbon monoxide, cyanide, volatiles, and drugs were tested, and had negative results.


http://registry.faa.gov/N651AM

NTSB Identification: WPR12FA378 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 30, 2012 in Nephi, UT
Aircraft: AIRCRAFT MFG & DEVELOPMENT CO CH 2000, registration: N651AM
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 30, 2012, about 1615 mountain daylight time, an Aircraft MFG & Development Company, CH 2000, N651AM, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain while in the traffic pattern at the Nephi Municipal Airport (U14) near Nephi, Utah. The aircraft was registered to private individuals and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The certified flight instructor and private pilot receiving instruction were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the instructional flight. The local flight originated from the Provo Municipal Airport near Provo, Utah, about 1500.

According to witnesses located adjacent to the accident site, the airplane was observed on a southerly heading south of U14 before it turned left to a northerly heading at an altitude of about 150 feet above ground level. Multiple witnesses reported that the airplane seemed to be traveling at a slow speed when it suddenly pitched downwards and descended into the ground. One witness stated that prior to the sound of impact the engine seemed to be at a high power setting. Witnesses further stated that at the time of the accident, a thunderstorm with strong wind, heavy rain and lighting were present in the area.

Examination of the accident site by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) revealed the airplane impacted an open field about 1.7 miles southeast of U14. Wreckage debris was found within about 50 feet of the main wreckage. All major structural components were located within the wreckage debris area. The wreckage was relocated to a secure location for further examination.



 
Robert Lamb, of Woodland Hills, was killed in a Juab County plane crash Thursday Aug. 30, 2012
 (Facebook.com)

 Woodland Hills man died in plane crash helping stranger, friend says

NEPHI — A Utah County man killed in a plane crash Thursday had agreed to accompany a pilot he didn't know for free so he could obtain enough training to fly the plane home, a friend said Friday. 

 Robert Lamb, 45, a flight instructor from Woodland Hills, and Peter Morwiec, 58, of Ontario, Canada, died in the plane crash near Nephi.

Family and friends of Lamb are devastated by this accident, but say they find some comfort in knowing he was doing what he loved and, more important, was helping someone out.

Lamb’s friend Andrea Anaya said he loved two things in life: his family and aviation.

“His love and his passion was flying,” she said. “He loved to fly, so he died doing exactly what he loved.”

Lamb didn't know Morwiec, but offered — without charge — to give him five hours of training in the plane, so he could be qualified to fly it home to Canada. Lamb told his wife he felt he had to help Morwiec.

“She asked why he was going, since he wasn’t getting paid and didn’t know him, and he said, ‘If I was stranded and couldn’t get home, I would hope someone would help me,' and that’s why he went,” Anaya said.

The Alarus CH2000 aircraft went down about 4:30 p.m. west of state Route 132 and north of the Nephi Municipal Airport, at about the same time a thunderstorm hit the area.

Reid Jarrett was working in his ranch when he watched the plane drop out of the sky.

“A really, really hard gust of wind was blowing right then, and a storm was coming in and the plane just literally went up and turned and came straight down and hit,” he said. “I’m sure nobody survived past the point of impact.”

Professionally, Lamb was a successful contractor. He obtained his pilot's license more than 20 years ago, but in just the past couple of years had become a certified flight instructor and started a flight training business at the Spanish Fork Airport.

He walked away from another plane crash in southern Utah just four months ago.

As Lamb's family and friends mourn for him, they also realize another family is hurting, too. “Our hearts go out to the family of the other man,” Anaya said.

Lamb is survived by his wife and five children, including a son on an LDS mission in South America. Those who would like to share their memories of Lamb for his children, can do so on the Facebook page "Letters for Robert Lamb."

It will likely be several months before investigators issue a final report on the cause of the crash, but bad weather is believed to be a leading factor in the crash.

Woodland Hills man died in plane crash helping stranger, friend says


Prominent Thunder Bay lawyer killed in plane crash 

A prominent Thunder Bay lawyer, Peter Mrowiec, 58, was killed Thursday in a plane crash while flying in bad weather in Utah.

Mrowiec was one of two people killed when a single-engine aircraft crashed and burst into flames late Thursday afternoon near the town of Nephi.

Juab County sheriff Alden Orme told CBC News the plane crashed in bad weather.

"Some real heavy, strong winds, and accompanied by some heavy rainstorms. Information we obtained from witnesses -- they believe the plane was trying to make a turn, and the winds affected the flight and it crashed," Orme said.

Orme said Mrowiec was in the process of buying the aircraft, and had hired an instructor to gain experience with it.

The city's legal community is shocked and saddened by the news, said Roy Karlstedt, president of the Thunder Bay Law Association.

"Initially, I didn't believe it, and then I was just aghast at the whole idea. Mr. Mrowiec was a marvelous person. He was a very well respected member of our local bar. As far as I can see, there's been a hole rent in the fabric of our community," Karlstedt said.

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the accident.


Canadian, Utahn dead in Nephi small plane crash; sheriff says weather may have played role 

 NEPHI, Utah — Authorities say a man from Canada and a flight instructor from Utah were killed when their single-engine airplane crashed and burned in an alfalfa field near Nephi.

Officials have identified the men killed in the Thursday afternoon crash as 45-year-old Robert Marion Lamb of Woodland Hills in Utah County, and 58-year-old Peter John Mrowiec of Ontario, Canada. Deputies believe Mrowiec was in Utah to purchase the plane, and had hired Lamb as an instructor.

Investigators are trying to determine why their Alarus CH2000 went down about a mile southeast of the Nephi Airport.

Juab County Sheriff Alden Orme says heavy winds and rain showers around the time of the crash likely played a role.

Nephi is in central Utah, about an hour and a half south of Salt Lake City.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 651AM        Make/Model: CH20      Description: CH-200 ZĂ©nith
  Date: 08/30/2012     Time: 2355

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: NEPHI                       State: UT   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  WITNESS REPORTED AIRCRAFT NOSED OVER AND WENT STRAIGHT DOWN. THUNDERSTORM 
  REPORTED IN THE AREA.

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   2
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   1     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    

WEATHER: KPVU 302348Z 31008KT 15SM -RA BKN080 BKN100 28/14

OTHER DATA

  FAA FSDO: SALT LAKE CITY, UT  (NM07)            Entry date: 08/31/2012


 

NEPHI — Two men are dead after they crashed their plane in an alfalfa field west of Nephi Thursday afternoon.

 The plane went down about 4:30 p.m.,west of Highway 132 and north of Nephi Municipal Airport. The identities of the men were not released, pending notification of family.

Reid Jarrett was working on his ranch Thursday afternoon, when he watched a small plane drop out of the sky.

"(A) really, really hard gust of wind was blowing right then, and a storm was coming in, and the plane just literally went up and turned and came straight down and hit. I am sure no one survived past the point of impact," Jarrett said.

By the time he could run to the plane, it was engulfed in flames.

"We had some pretty good explosions, and it was burning pretty good," Jarrett said. "There was nobody outside of the wreckage."

After the flames were extinguished, the local sheriff found two victims inside the  aircraft.

"From eyewitnesses, we believe (the plane's occupants) were trying to go back to the airport here in Nephi and try to land," said Juab County Sheriff Alden Orme.

One of the men in the plane wanted more flight time in this particular model, so he could qualify to purchase one. He was flying with an instructor from Utah.

"It's a tragic accident, very sad," Orme said. "Our thoughts and prayers go out to the families."

The crash is an image Reid Jarrett would like to forget.

"When you see a plane fall out of the sky like that, it really leaves an impression on you," he said. "The poor guys."

http://www.ksl.com



 Juab County Sheriff’s Office confirms two men were killed when their plane crashed in Nephi. 

 The accident occurred at about 4 p.m. Authorities are at the crash scene located along Highway 132 and Airport Road.

A FOX 13 viewer at the scene says the plane was demolished and appeared to have caught fire and burned after the crash.

Authorities say the plane was from Utah County. They are not releasing the identities of the men until next of kin is notified.


Nephi fatal plane crash. Credit: Michael Paskett

 Nephi fatal plane crash. Credit: Michael Paskett

 Nephi fatal plane crash. Credit: Michael Paskett

 Nephi fatal plane crash. Credit: Michael Paskett

Nephi Plane Crash (Sam Penrod)

Photo Credit:  Sam Penrod

Photo Credit:  Sam Penrod

Photo Credit:  Sam Penrod

 Photo Credit:  Sam Penrod


Police are in the process of contacting families and have not released the names or other details.


NEPHI — Two men are dead after they crashed their plane in an alfalfa field west of Nephi Thursday afternoon.

The plane went down about 4:30 p.m.,west of highway 132 and north of Nephi Municipal Airport. The identities of the men were not released, pending notification of family.

Reid Jarret, a resident of Nephi, witnessed the crash. He said by the time he could run to the plane, it was already engulfed in flames.

"Really, really, hard gust of wind was blowing right then and a storm was coning in and the plane just went up and turned and came straight and hit," he said. "I am sure nobody survived past the point of impact.

"When you see a plane fall out of the skyline that really leaves an impression on you. The poor guys."

It was not known if the plane was taking off or landing. But eyewitnesses said the plane was trying to return to the airport to land when it crashed in the field, Sheriff Alden Orme of the Juab County Sheriff's Office said.

"It's a tragic accident, very sad. Our thoughts and prayers go out to the families," Orme said.

There was a thunderstorm in the area, but it is not known if it contributed to the crash.

http://www.deseretnews.com
(KUTV) A plane crashed in the area of highway 132 and Airport Road near the Nephi airport.    Two people died in the crash.
Weather could have been a problem. There was a thunderstorm in the area around the time of the crash.

2News will keep you updated.


 


A plane crash landed in an alfalfa field west of Nephi on Thursday, August 30. 
 
A thunderstorm occurred at the same time of the crash, but Juab County officials have not confirmed if the severe weather was the cause of the accident. 

Two fatalities were confirmed as a result of the plane crash. 

No names have yet been released. 

More information will be posted as it becomes available. 

NEPHI, Utah (ABC 4 News) - A small plane crashed near the Nephi airport in the area of highway 132 Thursday afternoon.  

According to Juab County officials, the amount of passengers, as well as the condition of the individuals is not known at this time.

A representative of the FAA says the plane was an AMD Alarus CH2000.

Stay tuned to ABC 4 News and ABC4.com for details on this developing story.


No Nose Wheel Touch and Go in a Cessna 152 with GoPro

 

Aircraft flipped over; Flight instructor and student pilot suffer minor injuries - Wood County Airport (1G0), Bowling Green, Ohio

 


Ohio plane lands, flips; 2 suffer minor injuries

BOWLING GREEN, Ohio (AP) -- The State Highway Patrol says two Michigan men suffered minor injuries when their small plane crashed in northwest Ohio as they were attempting a touch-and-go landing at a small airport.

The patrol's Bowling Green post says the aircraft's nose struck the ground, flipping the plane on its top Thursday morning.

The patrol said the two men on board the small Cessna plane were student pilot Christopher L. Sackett and instructor Daniel C. Walker, both from Michigan. A patrol dispatcher said the hometowns for 46-year-old Sackett and 49-year-old Walker were not immediately available.

The dispatcher says the two men were treated at the scene for minor injuries.

The crash is under investigation.


http://wwmt.com

A small plane crashed today at the Wood County Regional Airport. 

Authorities say after a small plane had landed and was taxiing on the runway the brakes on the plane stuck causing the plane to flip over.

The two men on board of the plane managed to walk away from the plane with no injuries. The crash did not cause the airport to close at any point. Ohio Highway Patrol is looking into the incident.


Bellanca 14-19-3 Viking, N1299R: Accident occurred August 30, 2012 in Healdsburg, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N1299R
 
http://www.meetup.com

NTSB Identification: WPR12LA394
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 30, 2012 in Healdsburg, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/23/2013
Aircraft: BELLANCA 14-19-3, registration: N1299R
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.


NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during cruise flight, the engine lost power, and he performed the emergency procedures; however, the engine would not restart. The pilot then performed a forced landing to an open field. During the landing roll, the nose gear collapsed. Postaccident examination of the engine revealed that the fuel pump would not pump fuel when the driveshaft was actuated. Further, during testing, the fuel pump did not produce adequate pressure without the test bench priming pump in operation. The fuel pump was removed and disassembled, and unidentified pliable debris was found in the vapor return jet. The debris was removed from the vapor return jet, and the fuel pump was reassembled. Following reinstallation on the test bench, the fuel pump was found to operate and produced pressure in excess of the manufacturer specifications. It is likely that the debris restricted the fuel flow and the engine subsequently lost power. Due to the compromise of the fuel system during the accident, the source of the debris could not be determined.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The loss of engine power during cruise flight due to the failure of the engine-driven fuel pump as a result of unidentified debris within the vapor return jet.


On August 30, 2012, about 1200 Pacific daylight time, a Bellanca 14-19-3, N1299R, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Healdsburg, California. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The commercial pilot and passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The local flight originated from Santa Rosa, California at about 1130.

In a written statement to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge, the pilot reported that during cruise flight, the engine lost power. The pilot performed emergency procedures, however, the engine would not restart, and he initiated a forced landing to an open field. During the landing roll, the nose gear collapsed.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the right wing sustained substantial damage. The inspector noted that the throttle and mixture controls were full forward, the magnetos and battery were in the off position, flaps up, and the landing gear handle was in the “down” position. The inspector further noted that the fuel selector valve was in the left main position and the fuel pump was in the off position. The inspector stated that when he asked the pilot if the fuel boost pump was used following the loss of engine power, the pilot replied that he could not remember.

The FAA inspector examined the airplane in a hangar once it was recovered from the field. Rotational continuity was established throughout the engine and valve train. Fuel was observed throughout the fuel system. Both the left and right magnetos produced spark when rotated by hand. The inspector removed the engine driven fuel pump and connected a hand drill to the drive shaft, with a fuel inlet line submerged within a container of fuel. When the drill was actuated, no fuel expelled from the fuel pump outlet. The fuel pump was retained for further examination.

Examination of the fuel pump at the facilities of Continental Motor’s Inc., Mobile, Alabama, under the supervision of an NTSB investigator revealed that the drive coupling and drive shaft were severely worn. Manual manipulation of the fuel pump drive coupling while installed in the drive shaft resulted in free rotation with no binding and no internal resistance noted.

The fuel pump was placed on the test bench and run through a variety of RPM/Fuel Flow/Fuel Pressure tests. The fuel pump did not produce pressure without the test bench priming pump in operation. Fluid originally poured from the vapor return line during original bench test, but then turned sporadic, before stopping completely. The fuel pump was removed from the test bench and disassembled; pliable debris was observed on the vapor return jet. The debris was removed and the jet was cleaned. The fuel pump was again placed on the test bench and ran through the same tests. The pump produced adequate pressure, but then displayed the same characteristics as it did during the first test.

The vapor return jet was removed from the fuel pump while the pump was installed on the test bench. Additional debris was found on the jet orifices. The vapor return jet was cleaned and the pump was run on the test bench without the vapor return jet installed to flush out any additional debris. After a few minutes of flushing the fuel pump, the vapor return jet was reinstalled and the pump was run through the entire set of RPM/Fuel Flow/Fuel Pressure tests. With the debris removed, the pump provided pressures in excess of that required by specifications.

The source of the debris was not identified. The airplane maintenance records were not obtained during the investigation.

NTSB Identification: WPR12LA394
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 30, 2012 in Healdsburg, CA
Aircraft: BELLANCA 14-19-3, registration: N1299R
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.


This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 30, 2012, about 1200 Pacific daylight time, a Bellanca 14-19-3, N1299R, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Healdsburg, California. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The commercial pilot and passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The local flight originated from Santa Rosa, California about 1130.

The pilot reported that during cruise flight, he noticed a loss of fuel pressure followed by a loss of engine power shortly after. Despite the pilot’s attempts, the engine would not restart and he initiated a forced landing to an open field. Subsequently, the airplane landed gear up and came to rest upright.
Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the right wing sustained substantial damage. The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

FAA IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 1299R        Make/Model: BL17      Description: 17 Viking, Super Viking, Turbo Viking
  Date: 08/30/2012     Time: 1910

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Minor     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Substantial

LOCATION
  City: HEALDSBURG   State: CA   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT LANDED IN A FIELD DUE TO ENGINE PROBLEMS.

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   1     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    

OTHER DATA

  FAA FSDO: OAKLAND, CA  (WP27)                   Entry date: 08/31/2012


 

The passenger of a small plane wipes his brow as he talks on the phone as the pilot gives information to the Sonoma County Sheriff after the single-engine plane they were flying lost power and made an emergency landing in a field outside Healdsburg on Thursday, August 30, 2012.




  A single-engine plane made an emergency landing in a field outside Healdsburg on Thursday, August 30, 2012. 



  A single-engine plane made an emergency landing in a field outside Healdsburg on Thursday, August 30, 2012.


A plane lost power and made an emergency landing Thursday in a field outside Healdsburg, coasting under a series of power lines before crash-landing at about 90 mph.

A passenger, Nicholas Counter of Fulton, said the aircraft's engine failed shortly before noon. The plane hit the ground forcefully, hopscotching around the field off West Dry Creek Road, hitting a tree with its wing and swinging wildly until it came to a stop.

The pilot, who was not identified, struck the dashboard with his face, causing a severe nosebleed, firefighters said. Both men declined medical help.

Counter declined to identify the pilot, who owned the plane and was his friend and instructor.

The landing gear and the underside of the plane were badly damaged in the crash-landing, Counter said.

"I was fine, just a little shaken," he said. "I'm glad I'm alive."

Plane makes emergency landing in field near Healdsburg


 
At the scene outside Healdsburg on Thursday, August 30, 2012. 


A small plane lost power and made an emergency landing in a field outside Healdsburg on Thursday afternoon.

Two people were inside the plane, which set down around noon in a small open field on the east side of West Dry Creek Road, just north of Westside Road. Both declined medical treatment.

Healdsburg Fire Chief Steve Adams said the owner if the plane and a passenger lost power outside Healdsburg, coasting to the field under a power line. The pilot suffered a bloody nose.

Crews from Cal Fire, the Healdsburg Fire Department and Sonoma County Sheriff's Office were at the scene, waiting for National Transportation Safety Board to investigate.

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HEALDSBURG (CBS SF) – A small plane lost power and landed in a field outside Healdsburg around noon Thursday, Healdsburg Fire Chief Steve Adams said.

The two-person plane glided onto a field between two vineyards near the 400 block of West Dry Creek Road, a half-mile north of Westside Road, Adams said.

Two men were on board, and the pilot suffered a bloody nose, Adams said.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said the single-engine Bellanca plane was heading to the Charles M. Schulz-Sonoma County Airport when it made the landing seven miles northwest of the airport because of engine problems.

The pilot was slightly injured, and the passenger was not hurt, Gregor said. The plane sustained minor damage.

According to the FAA registry, the plane, manufactured in 1968, is registered to Gerald W. Vess, of Livingston, in Polk County, Texas.

Cal Fire and the Windsor Fire Protection District also responded to the emergency landing, Adams said.

The FAA is investigating the incident.