Friday, December 06, 2019

Runway Excursion: Cessna 525B CitationJet CJ3+, N518AR; accident occurred October 13, 2016 at North Central State Airport (KSFZ), Smithfield, Providence County, Rhode Island


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston, Massachusetts

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.govN518AR 

Location: Pawtucket, RI
Accident Number: ERA17LA014
Date & Time: 10/13/2016, 1000 EDT
Registration: N518AR
Aircraft: CESSNA 525
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Runway excursion
Injuries: 6 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

On October 13, 2016, about 1000 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 525B, N518AR, was substantially damaged during a runway excursion at North Central State Airport (SFZ), Pawtucket, Rhode Island. The commercial and airline transport pilots, and four passengers were not injured. The airplane departed Allegheny County Airport (AGC), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, about 0900. The airplane was registered to A R Wings LLC and operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 business flight. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed for the personal flight.

According to a written statement provided by the commercial pilot (pilot flying), they departed from AGC around 0900. The reported weather conditions at SFZ included a 200-foot ceiling, ½ to 1-mile visibility. They elected to conduct an instrument approach to runway 5. Upon breaking out of the clouds at an altitude of 850 feet, the flight crew "…saw runway could not stop. Brakes and tires not gripping the runway. Hit a fence and went into the ground."

During a postaccident interview the pilot stated that the weather at SFZ was below approach minimums, but the crew elected to fly the instrument approach to and see if they could break out of the clouds. The airplane subsequently broke out of the clouds at an altitude of 800 to 850 ft mean sea level (msl). The pilot further stated that during the approach the airplane's airspeed was, "a little too fast" at 130 to 135 knots. After touching down he "slammed on the brakes" and the anti-skid system engaged. The pilot felt like the brakes were not working as they were supposed to and said that they felt, "a little spongy."

The non-flying pilot stated that during the landing, both pilots were applying the brakes. He stated it appeared that the brakes and the anti-skid system were working.

A witness, who was also a pilot, was at SFZ on the morning of the accident. Between 0900 and 1030, he was standing in the main hangar at the airport waiting for the fog to lift in order to depart in his single-engine airplane for an IFR flight. He estimated that the airport weather observation-reported ceiling of 200 feet agl was accurate by watching another airplane depart. He watched as the accident airplane broke out of the clouds on approach to runway 5. He thought that the airplane appeared "high" as it crossed the runway threshold and estimated that the airplane was "well above the surface" as it passed the touchdown zone of the runway. As the airplane passed directly in front of his location, located about 2,100 feet down the runway, the airplane's wheels were about 20 to 30 feet above the surface. He then began shouting, "Go around! Go around!," knowing that only half of the runway remained. The airplane touched down on the runway near the B4 taxiway, or with about 2,000 feet of runway remaining. He did not hear the sound of thrust reversers, screeching brakes, nor an impact. As he started to look for the airplane he saw an airport vehicle as it proceeded to the accident site.

Runway 5 at SFZ was 5,000 feet-long by 100 feet-wide, and the airport was located at an elevation of 441 msl.

Based on data from the Aircraft Flight Manual the airplane's calculated landing distance would have been 2,650 ft. The calculated approach speed, Vapp, would have been 114 knots indicated airspeed (KIAS). The Vref speed, or threshold crossing speed, would have been 105 knots KIAS. These calculations were based on zero wind conditions and the use of the ground flaps after touchdown.

Postaccident examination of the airplane by an FAA inspector revealed that it had struck several localizer antenna located beyond the departure end of runway 5, the came to rest is trees and bushes located about 20 feet down an embankment. The airplane's wings and fuselage sustained substantial damage to the right aileron and wing tip, left wing leading edge, and nose landing gear. Cursory examination of the brakes and hydraulic brake lines revealed no evidence of any preimpact anomalies. Additionally, the inspector observed intermittent tire skid marks near the departure end of the runway.

The pilot held a commercial certificate with single-pilot type ratings for the Cessna CE-525 airplane. His most recent third-class medical certificate was issued on January 2, 2015. The pilot reported 8,000 hours of flight experience, of which 400 hours were in the accident make and model.

The airline transport pilot in the right seat held single-pilot type ratings for the Cessna CE-525 airplane. He was the non-flying pilot for the accident flight and described that generally his role was to be primarily responsible for flight planning and would fly alternate flying legs with the pilot. He reported 6,000 hours of flight experience, and 700 hours in the accident airplane make and model. His most recent third-class medical certificate was issued on June 19, 2016.

At 1023, the weather reported at SFZ included wind calm; visibility 3 statute miles in mist, an overcast ceiling at 200 feet; temperature, 15° C; dew point, 14° C; and a barometric altimeter setting of 30.09 inHg. 



Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Private
Age: 79, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/02/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/09/2015
Flight Time:  8000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 400 hours (Total, this make and model), 8000 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft)



Co-Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Commercial; Military; Private
Age: 44, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s):  Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/19/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/01/2016
Flight Time:  6000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 700 hours (Total, this make and model), 2500 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 50 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 30 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N518AR
Model/Series: 525 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2014
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Commuter
Serial Number: 525B0412
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats:8 
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/07/2016, Continuous Airworthiness
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 13750 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Turbo Fan
Airframe Total Time: 748 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: WILLIAMS
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: FJ44-3A
Registered Owner: A R WINGS LLC
Rated Power: 3000 lbs
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSFZ, 441 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1423 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 206°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  3 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 200 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 15°C / 14°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: Moderate - Mist
Departure Point: Pittsburg, PA (AGC)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Pawtucket, RI (SFZ)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 0900 EDT
Type of Airspace: 



Airport Information

Airport: NORTH CENTRAL STATE (SFZ)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 440 ft
Runway Surface Condition:Dry 
Runway Used: 05
IFR Approach:RNAV 
Runway Length/Width: 5000 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 4 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 6 None
Latitude, Longitude: 41.929167, -71.485278

Loss of Control in Flight: Rans S7, N6271X; accident occurred July 30, 2016 at Wittman Regional Airport (KOSH), Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N6271X


Location: Oshkosh, WI

Accident Number: CEN16LA293
Date & Time: 07/30/2016, 1147 CDT
Registration: N6271X
Aircraft: BOAM LARRY RANS S 7
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 30, 2016, about 1147 central daylight time, a Rans S7 airplane, N6271X, impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from the Wittman Regional Airport (KOSH), Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the wing struts and fuselage, and the sport pilot was not injured. The airplane was privately registered and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan was filed.

The pilot stated that after camping for a few days at the Experimental Aircraft Association's AirVenture, he decided to head to Ames, Iowa. He finished packing and preflighted the outside of the airplane, but not the inside. After the preflight and engine start sequence, he ground maneuvered his airplane to indicate he was ready to depart, and a flight line marshal came to his airplane to escort him out of the parking area. The pilot stated that during taxi, the tailwheel of the airplane seemed to have some trouble tracking, giving the brakes "a real workout, and causing his airplane to run slower than the other aircraft." The pilot stated that while taxiing, he was also trying to get the airplane set-up for takeoff.

The pilot was cleared for takeoff from runway 36, and he accelerated the engine to full throttle. He reported that during the takeoff roll, "the tail came up, the gear got soft," and he put back pressure on the stick. He reported that "something was very wrong" as the nose pitched up into a high attitude that was indicative of a stall. The pilot pushed forward on the stick, and the airplane began to drift left. He saw the people on the flight line, airplanes on the taxiway and made the decision to make an abrupt turn to the right to cause an aerodynamic stall. The airplane impacted the ground on the west side of the runway.

The pilot reported feeling very rushed and anxious because of all the timing issues given the number of people trying to land and takeoff. He reported that it would have been helpful to complete an "in cabin" preflight checklist prior to takeoff.

Examination of the airplane after the accident by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge and a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed flight control continuity was established to all controls. The elevator trim was found in the takeoff position. All items in the airplane were weighed, and the airplane weight and balance was calculated with a takeoff weight of 1,049 lbs; the maximum takeoff weight was 1,200 lbs. The airplane center of gravity was 77.8 inches; the airplane's center of gravity envelope was 74 to 81-inches. The baggage area weight was 60 lbs which was above the placarded "maximum baggage 50 LBS."

The pilot reported and the examination revealed there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot was color blind, and had been diagnosed with Crohn's disease, low back pain, insomnia as well as Parkinson's disease. His last FAA airman medical certificate was issued in 1972. According to his personal medical records, his medications at the time of the accident included baby aspirin, a combination of diphenhydramine and acetaminophen at night for sleep, mesalamine for the Crohn's disease, rasagiline mesylate, pramipexole, a combination of carbidopa and levodopa, and amantadine for his Parkinson's disease. Sudden periods of sleep may be caused by 4 of these medications. Finally, he was using a 1% solution of atropine orally to treat excessive drooling as needed. The musculoskeletal symptoms including tremor and rigidity of his Parkinson's were somewhat alleviated but not eliminated by his use of medications; in April 2016, his score on the motor portion of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale was 18. In addition, his health care provider documented that his tremors became worse when he was nervous and that he was beginning to have some mild cognitive issues. No post-accident toxicology testing was performed.

Two of the pilot's medications were medically disqualifying for an FAA airman medical certification because they depress the central nervous system. However, a sport pilot is not required to hold a FAA airman medical certificate and can use a U.S. driver's license to meet the medical requirements. When using a U.S. driver's license, the sport pilot must self-certify that they "do not know or have reason to know of any medical condition that would make that person unable to operate a light-sport aircraft in a safe manner." Therefore, the FAA is not involved with medical disqualification when a U.S. driver's license is used in lieu of an FAA airman medical certificate. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Sport Pilot
Age: 72, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/18/2016
Flight Time:  464 hours (Total, all aircraft), 291 hours (Total, this make and model), 464 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 33 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 25 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BOAM LARRY
Registration: N6271X
Model/Series: RANS S 7
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1997
Amateur Built:Yes 
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 0196170
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats:2 
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/10/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1191.7 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 912UL
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 80 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KOSH, 782 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1653 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 6°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 80°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 14°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Oshkosh, WI (OSH)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Ames, IA (AMW)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1145 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: WITTMAN RGNL (OSH)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 808 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 36
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 8002 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 43.980278, -88.557500 (est)

Loss of Engine Power (Total): Glasair II, N67WH; accident occurred July 06, 2016 in Maynardville, Union County, Tennessee

View of airplane resting in ditch.
Federal Aviation Administration

Front left quarter view of airplane showing bent propeller and gear. 
Federal Aviation Administration

Top of engine showing hole in case.
Federal Aviation Administration

View of road and powerlines leading up to accident site. 


Google Earth


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville, Tennessee

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N67WH

Location: Maynardville, TN
Accident Number: ERA16LA272
Date & Time: 07/06/2016, 1530 EDT
Registration: N67WH
Aircraft: HARRITY WILLIAM V GLASAIR (SH2F)
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On July 6, 2016, about 1530 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Glasair, N67WH, was substantially damaged following a forced landing following a total loss of engine power near Maynardville, Tennessee. The private pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Mainpro Inc. under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed about the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed for the flight that was destined for Clermont County Airport (I69), Batavia, Ohio.

The pilot flew from I69 to DKX earlier in the morning without incident and he was returning to I69 when the accident occurred. He reported that the preflight inspection, taxi, and runup were normal and the climb to 5,500 ft mean sea level (msl) was uneventful; however, while passing through 5,500 ft msl the engine oil temperature was getting high, so he elected to level off for a few minutes to let it cool down. About 5 minutes later, he resumed his climb to 7,500 ft msl and while passing through 6,000 ft msl, the engine "blew." He stated that the engine "broke" and started to shudder "like it was out of balance." In addition, smoke started filling up the cockpit. The pilot declared an emergency, shut down the engine and scanned the area for a suitable place to land. While descending through 4,000 ft msl, he reported the terrain was hilly and unsuitable for landing to the north, but to the south it was less congested and a better option for landing; the road was a two-lane state highway.

After turning and getting established on a final approach to the southbound lanes of the highway, the pilot noticed electrical transmission wires crossing the road about 80 feet above ground level. The pilot pushed the stick forward and flew under the wires by going into an abrupt descent, then attempted to flare for landing, but the airplane "pancaked" onto the road, collapsing the main gear and shearing off the nose gear. The airplane skidded about 200 feet before coming to rest on a business property adjacent to the road.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. His last flight review was completed on July 20, 2014. He held a third-class airman medical certificate issued on April 21, 2015. The pilot reported 2,055 hours total time with 1,320 of those hours in the same make and model as the accident airplane. In addition, he reported 42 hours and 24 hours in the previous 90 and 30 days, respectively.

According to FAA airworthiness and aircraft maintenance records, the two-seat, low wing, retractable tricycle landing gear airplane was manufactured in 1991 and was issued a special airworthiness certificate for experimental amateur-built aircraft. It was powered by a Lycoming IO-360, 200-hp engine and equipped with a Hartzell two-blade constant speed propeller. The engine had accumulated 680 hours of operation since overhaul and 25 hours since the last condition inspection on April 15, 2014.

DKX was located about 15 miles south of the accident site. The DKX weather at 1353 included wind from 240° at 10 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, few clouds at 3,400 ft, temperature 31°C, dewpoint 19 ° C, and the altimeter setting was 30.03 inches of mercury.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. The airplane and all major components were accounted for at the scene. There was substantial damage to the underside of the fuselage where the landing gear had collapsed. Both blades of the propeller were bent aft and that engine case was breached. Oil streaks were observed on the underside of the engine cowling and fuselage.

Subsequent examination of the engine revealed engine case was breached above the No. 4 and No. 3 cylinders. Fragments of the case material were discovered in the engine baffle. Some corrosion was present on the mounting surface of the cylinders. The No. 3 cylinder exhibited damage to the connecting rod where it attached to the crankshaft and had fractured off completely near the wrist pin. The No. 3 cylinder skirt base was damaged at two points perpendicular to the wrist pin. The remainder of the connecting rod sustained damage and was deformed and bent back toward the crankshaft. The No. 4 cylinder was jammed and canted several degrees and could not be removed from the case but a visual inspection from the opposing cylinder revealed internal damage to parts of the connecting rods and engine case. The No. 1 and No. 2 cylinders showed no damage to the piston, rods, cylinders or surrounding case. Automotive spark plugs and a wiring harness were observed on the bottom cylinders and no engine data plate was found on the engine.



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 63, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/21/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/20/2014
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 2052.8 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1320 hours (Total, this make and model), 1957 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 42 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 24 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: HARRITY WILLIAM V
Registration: N67WH
Model/Series: GLASAIR (SH2F) FT
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 1020
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/15/2014, Continuous Airworthiness
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2150 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C91 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-360
Registered Owner: MAINPRO INC
Rated Power: 200 hp
Operator: MAINPRO INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDKX, 833 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1353 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 170°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 3400 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 240°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: 
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 22°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: KNOXVILLE, TN (DKX)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: BATAVIA, OH (I69)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1345 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 36.170000, -83.905556

Fuel Related: Piper J3F-65 Cub, N29042; accident occurred June 27, 2016 near Comanche Airfield LLC (CO38) in Strasburg, Colorado



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.
 
Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N29042

Location: Strasburg, CO
Accident Number: CEN16LA239
Date & Time: 06/26/2016, 1950 CDT
Registration: N29042
Aircraft: PIPER J3F 65
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel related
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On June 26, 2016, about 1950 central daylight time (CDT), a Piper J3F-65 airplane, N29042, experienced a partial loss of engine power on climb out from Comanche Airfield LLC Airport (CO38) in Strasburg, Colorado. The pilot conducted a forced landing into a wheat field where during the landing the airplane nosed over. The airline transport pilot, the sole occupant, suffered minor injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage to left-wing strut and fuselage longerons. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan.

The pilot reported he departed from Front Range Airport (FTG), in Watkins, Colorado, about 1900 with full (11 gallons) gas. After takeoff from FTG, he departed the traffic area to the east. He lined up for runway 17 at CO38 and conducted a touch and go landing. During climb out, the pilot reported "the airplane made enough power to clear an interstate roadway and some powerlines, but never really seemed to perform." The pilot stated he advanced the throttle to full power; however, the airplane started to descend. He checked the mixture and magnetos but neither stopped the descent. The airplane "settled into a wheat field," nosed over and came to rest inverted.

The routine aviation weather report at FTG, taken at 1854, about the time of takeoff, recorded a temperature of 27ºC and a dewpoint temperature of 10ºC. Per the "Carburettor icing-probability chart" in an article on carburetor icing published by Flight Safety Australia, dated November-December 2004, revealed that the airplane was operating in an area favorable for the formation of serious icing at a descent power setting. Further, the article stated that if ice forms in the carburetor of a fixed-pitch propeller aircraft, the restriction to the induction airflow would reduce power and force a drop in rpm. According to the FAA Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, under certain conditions, carburetor ice can build unnoticed until power is added. 



Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 51, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Rear
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/29/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 10000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 300 hours (Total, this make and model), 2000 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 15 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N29042
Model/Series: J3F 65 65
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1940
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 6013
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/10/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Continental Motors
ELT: C91 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: C-85-RF
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 85 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: FTG
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 0152 UTC
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  30 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 9000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots / 16 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 180°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.21 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 10°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Strasburg, CO (CO38)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Denver, CO (FTG)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1930 MDT
Type of Airspace:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 39.736111, -104.328611 (est)

Fuel Exhaustion: Sonex, N97GR; accident occurred April 08, 2016 at Jesup-Wayne County Airport (KJES), Georgia


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N97GR


Location: Jesup, GA
Accident Number: ERA16LA151
Date & Time: 04/08/2016, 1105 EDT
Registration: N97GR
Aircraft: GRANGER MICHAEL D SONEX
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel exhaustion
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On April 8, 2016, about 1105 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Sonex, N97GR, was substantially damaged during a forced landing while on approach to Wayne County Airport (JES), Jesup, Georgia. The private pilot was seriously injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the cross-country flight that departed Vero Beach Municipal Airport (VRB) Vero Beach, Florida, at 0820.

A family member stated that the pilot did not remember any of the events leading up to the accident nor did he remember any of the events after.

The pilot had just purchased the airplane, and according to the airplane's previous owner, prior to the accident he examined the airplane with the pilot, and explained everything he knew about its operation, performance, and maintenance. On the day of the accident, the pilot and the previous owner conducted a preflight inspection and the pilot asked the owner to fly around the airport traffic pattern with him a few times. The previous owner stated that they conducted 3 stop-and-go landings at VRB. After the third landing, the pilot said that he was satisfied and ready to depart.

The previous owner asked the pilot where he planned to stop for fuel, and he replied he planned to stop at Vidalia Regional Airport (VDI), Vidalia, Georgia, which was about 2 hours away. The previous owner advised him that he typically used 2 hours as a maximum flight leg time and that the airplane had a 16 gallon fuel capacity and consumed around 6 gallons of fuel per hour, and that generally 2 hour flight legs leave about 4 gallons of fuel remaining for at least a 30 minute reserve. The previous owner also pointed out that one should never rely completely on fuel gauges, no matter how accurate. He told the pilot that they had used some fuel during the flight that morning, and that he likely would not have enough to make VDI with an adequate reserve. The pilot said he realized that and would look for a fuel stop prior to VDI.

Later that day, the JES airport manager received a report that an airplane had crashed adjacent runway 29. He confirmed the registration number and contacted the authorities.

Vandalia Regional Airport was located about 290 nautical miles northwest of VRB. Wayne County Airport was located about 10 nautical miles northeast of a direct course line between VRB and VDI, and about 250 nautical miles from VRB.

Postaccident examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the fuselage of the airplane was crushed. The cockpit section of the airplane was separated from the fuselage. The fuel system was not breached, and no fuel was discovered in the wing tanks or the header fuel tank.

An examination of the engine revealed that there was impact damage on the bottom of the case. The engine mount was bent forward and was crushed against the flywheel. The carburetor was separated from the intake manifold, and the air filter was crushed. The oil system was intact, and the oil dipstick an oil quantity up to the fill mark. Due to impact damage the engine could not be test run. The spark plugs were removed, and the electrodes were gray in color. The crankshaft was rotated by hand and compression was observed on all cylinders. The valve covers were removed and when the crankshaft was rotated, valve train continuity was observed on all rocker arms. The distributors were not damaged, and the rotor turned when the distributor was rotated. Due to the magneto ring damage the distributors could not produce spark.

The airplane was equipped with a MGL Avionics Stratomaster Ultra-X recorder monitoring system. Download and examination of the data from the unit revealed that it did not capture data relevant to the accident flight.

The airplane was also equipped with an Appareo Stratus device , which began recording at VRB about 0816. The data showed that the airplane departed VRB about 0839 and proceeded uneventfully until the groundspeed reached near zero around 1104 while maneuvering over runway 6/24 at JES. Over the final 10 seconds of the flight, the recorded groundspeed decreased from about 75 knots to below 30 knots, and the GPS altitude decreased from about 250 to 0 feet. 



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 50, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/10/2014
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 16 hours (Total, all aircraft), 3 hours (Total, this make and model)




Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: GRANGER MICHAEL D
Registration: N97GR
Model/Series: SONEX NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2006
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 0611
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/25/2016, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 657 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 6 Hours
Engines:  Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 346 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Jabiru
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 3300A
Registered Owner: GRANGER MICHAEL D
Rated Power: 107 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: JES, 107 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1235 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 11 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 320°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 29.92 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 11°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Vero Beach Muni, FL (VRB)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: VIDALIA, GA (VDI)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0820 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G



Airport Information

Airport: Wayne County Airport (JES)
Runway Surface Type: Dirt
Airport Elevation: 107 ft
Runway Surface Condition:Rough 
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 31.552222, -81.870278 (est)