Monday, November 30, 2020

Loss of Control on Ground: Cessna 120, N1926N; accident occurred July 17, 2020 at L O Simenstad Municipal Airport (KOEO), Osceola, Wisconsin






Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

Nordic Ventures LLC


Location: Osceola, WI
Accident Number: CEN20CA317
Date & Time: 07/17/2020, 1115 CDT
Registration: N1926N
Aircraft: Cessna 120
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

The flight instructor and the pilot receiving instruction reported that during tailwheel transition training, the airplane drifted to the right of the runway while performing a wheel-landing. They reported that left rudder was applied to counteract the drift, but the airplane did not respond as expected. The pilot receiving instruction stated that the airplane exited the runway, the left wheel caught the terrain, and the airplane nosed over. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing, vertical stabilizer, and rudder. Neither pilot reported any mechanical failures or malfunctions of the airplane that precluded normal operation. Both pilots reported the wind condition as light and variable.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 65, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/18/2020
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 2180 hours (Total, all aircraft), 58 hours (Total, this make and model), 2082 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 48 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 23 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 43, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/01/2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 3000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2 hours (Total, this make and model), 2965 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 140 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 65 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N1926N
Model/Series: 120 No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1947
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 12170
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/01/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1451 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed
Engine Model/Series: C85 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 85 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KOEO, 906 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1615 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 210°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: 
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 22°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Osceola, WI (OEO)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Osceola, WI (OEO)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: L O Simenstad Municipal Arpt (OEO)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 906 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 10
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5006 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 45.309444, -92.690000

Loss of Control on Ground: Cessna Ector 305A, N86WM; accident occurred July 17, 2020 at Glenwood Springs Municipal Airport (KGWS), Garfield County, Colorado




Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

Pangaea Air Services Inc


Location: Glenwood Springs, CO
Accident Number: CEN20CA289
Date & Time: 07/17/2020, 0800 MDT
Registration: N86WM
Aircraft: CESSNA 305
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The airline transport pilot reported he was on a cross-country flight with a passenger. On approach, he followed an airplane established on a left downwind for the runway. The pilot extended the airplane's downwind to allow space for the landing airplane to clear the runway. The pilot elected to use the paved runway instead of the 800-ft grass landing area adjacent to the paved runway because of the clearing airplane. He subsequently lost directional control during the landing and the airplane exited the paved surface. A "juggle" of the pilot's feet on the rudder pedals occurred during the excursion, which resulted in "overbraking" and the airplane subsequently nosing over. The airplane sustained substantial fuselage and empennage damage. The pilot indicated that there were no mechanical malfunctions during the flight and his safety recommendation was, "Never underestimate a tailwheel airplane!" 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 60, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/07/2020
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/31/2019
Flight Time: 7857 hours (Total, all aircraft), 750 hours (Total, this make and model), 6782 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 47 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 17 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N86WM
Model/Series:305 A 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:1967 
Amateur Built:No 
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number:2017 
Landing Gear Type:Tailwheel 
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/17/2020, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2300 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6248 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: PPA-O-470-50
Registered Owner: Pangaea Air Services Inc
Rated Power: 275 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KEGE, 6535 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 20 Nautical Miles
Observation Time:0756 MDT 
Direction from Accident Site: 64°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:None 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.41 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 12°C / 6°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Aspen, CO (ASE)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Glenwood Springs, CO (GWS)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0730 MDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: GLENWOOD SPRINGS MUNI (GWS)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 5916 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 32
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3305 ft / 50 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire:None 
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 39.506111, -107.309167 (est)

Loss of Control on Ground: Seele XPA-18 Super Cub, N113MX; accident occurred July 18, 2020 at Reno/Stead Airport (KRTS), Nevada



Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Reno, Nevada
Accident Number: WPR20CA230
Date & Time: July 18, 2020, 07:50 Local 
Registration: N113MX
Aircraft: Seele XPA-18
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground 
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private 
Age: 35,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: September 25, 2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 136.1 hours (Total, all aircraft), 31.3 hours (Total, this make and model), 79.9 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 72.6 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 28.8 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3.7 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Seele
Registration: N113MX
Model/Series: XPA-18 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2015
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental (Special)
Serial Number: 002
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: June 17, 2020 100 hour 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 100 Hrs 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 373.8 Hrs at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated Engine Model/Series: IO-360
Registered Owner: Rated Power: 190 Horsepower
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRTS,5053 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 15:15 Local
Direction from Accident Site: 48°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.21 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 3°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Redding, CA (RDD)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Reno, NV (RTS)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 06:15 Local
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Reno/Stead RTS 
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 5050 ft msl
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 08 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 7608 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Straight-in

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger
Injuries:
1 None Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A Aircraft
Explosion:
None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 39.663055,-119.881668(est)

Nash retiring, proud of efforts as Tupelo Regional Airport (KTUP) director

Cliff Nash


TUPELO – Cliff Nash's last day as executive director of the Tupelo Regional Airport is December 1st, ending a 5 1/2-year tenure that saw the return of reliable air service and a much improved financial situation.

Nash has served in his role since May 2015.

He had originally planned to retire next March when he turned 65, but other opportunities cropped up. After talking to his wife, he decided it would be an ideal time to step down.

“Things just accelerated, and I just really want to thank the board for the opportunity to come here and work with the city to get air service back,” Nash said.

Tupelo Airport Board chairman Eric Gibens said airport operations director Mel Pomfrey, who came aboard in 2017, will serve as interim director while the board searches for a new permanent director.

“We don’t have a firm date set on conducting the search for a new director, but we do hope Mel will consider applying for the position,” Gibens said.

When Nash arrived, SeaPort Airlines was in its death throes. The company finally pulled out of Tupelo Regional Airport in October 2015 after nearly two years of inconsistent service. Tupelo was without air service for five months, until Contour Airlines took over in April 2016.

Until the coronavirus pandemic stifled air travel nationwide, passenger boardings at Tupelo’s airport had increased annually under Contour, reaching at least 10,000 boardings for three consecutive years. That benchmark was last seen in the mid-2000s, when Tupelo was served by two airlines.

“We’ve gotten all our facilities leased and gotten everything back operationally, and we’ve done a lot of improvements,” Nash said. “Financially, we’re on good footing. The CARES Act money helped, but even without it, we have amassed a five-year capital improvement plan that in theory we can go the next six years we can do everything we want to do with AIP (federally funded Airport Improvement Plan) grant money, providing we assume we continue to receive the entitlement money.”

The 10,000-passenger threshold allows airports to receive $1-million in AIP money that can be used for only airport infrastructure projects such as runways, taxiways, airport signage, airport lighting and airport markings.


“We can do things beyond pure need, it allows us to do day-to-day maintenance and other things to attract more revenue,” Nash said. “There are a lot of things we can still do better … but I think I’m leaving the airport in better shape than when I got here.”

Nash has put in motion a two-year roadmap that will bring more improvements to the airport. The first project is renovating the tower, which hasn't had any major work done to it since it was built 20 years ago. Also arriving soon is a new fire truck, replacing a 25-year-old model.

The new fire truck, Nash said, will allow Tupelo Regional to continue supporting the Ole Miss athletic teams' charter flights and other sports charter flights that take advantage of Tupelo's 7,150-foot runway.

"Those charter not only affect the airport with landing and fuel, but they'll come in and stay here at the hotels and eat, and so it has a tremendous economic impact," he said.

Another project coming to fruition is the installation of an ADS-B ground transmitter that will aid planes landing when the tower is closed.

"Those are things that need to be done and will be done in the coming year," Nash said. "So we have a road map to follow, and we can adjust it if necessary.The satisfying thing we can do these things in-house, using our own money."

Nash came to Tupelo after playing an instrumental role in developing the Tunica Airport, where he had worked since 2002. Before that, he served as airport director in Greenville from 1995 to 2002.

Nash served in the U.S. Air Force as an air traffic control officer in both fixed and mobile facilities and performed air space management duties that included redesigning the airspace used by the Joint Readiness Training Center in Louisiana.

An Oxford native, he received his Bachelor of Engineering degree from the University of Mississippi in 1982 and earned his Master of Aeronautical Science degree from Embry-Middle Aeronautical University.

Air ambulance calls spike amid COVID-19 pandemic



OMAHA, Nebraska (WOWT) - Doctors warned of a dangerous milestone approaching in Nebraska as COVID-19 cases surge; compromised quality healthcare. That milestone is here.

As record-breaking virus numbers threaten the availability of hospital beds and as healthcare workers explain, the pandemic continues to push them to physical and mental exhaustion. The irony though, as things get worse, they’re needed more, and that goes for all first responders, including a group often overlooked: flight paramedics.

In Nebraska, on any given day, a dream team of healthcare heroes from Air Methods could be called to life flight a person in need of critical care.

Joshua Kendrick is a flight paramedic who works alongside Alisha Ponser, a flight nurse. Together with the expertise of a pilot, who humbly referred to himself as “just an Uber driver,” the group springs into action as the first and last resort for someone in need of life-saving medical attention.

“If they’re critical and they need advanced life-support, ventilatory support, or medication support — that’s where we would come in,” Kendrick said, adding that a patient doesn’t have to be a certain age or fit a profile to be a candidate for this service. If a hospital calls, sounding their alarm, they dispatch — no questions asked. If critical need of care is eligible for this service, there’s no set profile for a person or group of people

Air Methods is often called in by small hospitals who don’t have the specialized tools needed in emergencies.

“Rural areas are actually underserved from an advanced-care standpoint,” Kendrick said.

But during this pandemic, their calls have more than doubled. In October alone, they transported 90 COVID-positive patients.

“Sometimes their lungs are so damaged, and their bodies have been fighting so hard for so long, so we have to completely sedate them,” Ponser said.

This air ICU has just about everything: IV pumps, meds, blood, needles, and ventilators.

And when the alarm sounds, the crew has about 15 minutes to properly pack supplies, garb up in PPE, communicate with each other, watch for other aircraft and — most importantly — care for someone while flying nearly 200 miles per hour.

“If we hit the button and the ventilator stops, that’s not good for the patient. So we gotta be very careful to get that done appropriately, safely,” Kendrick said.

It’s intensely detailed work that requires a rare set of skills and vast training — out of sight and mind for many who don’t even know they rely on this crew to make sure their loved one comes home.

“What these guys do day in a day out is nothing short of heroic,” said Kevin Hallam, an Air Methods executive whose connection to this resource runs much deeper.

“At 16 years old, my dad had a heart attack. He had to be life-flighted to Omaha, and I got an extra 25 years with him because of it,” Hallam said.

The critical care on these flights doesn’t just end after a patient is dropped off.

They also “offload (patients) onto another bed, follow them all the way down to the receiving unit, whether that’s an emergency room or ICU; give a full bedside report,” Kendrick said.

But this care is becoming a challenge to maintain. On average, Air Methods completes up to five flights a week. Now, they’re at 10 — and this crew needs your help.

“As a community, we gotta step up and wear our masks,” Hallam said. “It is getting to a point of a little bit of worry that these bigger hospitals are starting to get really full.”

Reclassification looms big for Seaside Municipal Airport (56S): Federal funding pipeline has vanished




Maintenance and hangar space remain the Seaside Airport Advisory Committee’s top priorities. After a national airport regulatory group reclassified the airport, the airport lost a pipeline to Federal Aviation Administration grant funds to cover major repairs and infrastructure.

“Previously it was $160,000 per year, which could be banked for up to three years for larger projects,” committee chairman Randall Henderson said. “We’re definitely in a ‘not being funded’ phase.”

The FAA funds helped pay for major projects like runway lighting, resurfacing and striping, taxiway improvements, an electrical shed and fencing.

Those funds are gone. Today the airport operates on an $8,000 budget from the city of Seaside. More than two-thirds of that covers maintenance, leaving little room for additions or upgrades.

“We are still are in need of paving repairs on the ramp, new tie-down anchors and chains, a dedicated internet connection for the weather station and cameras, and the other things we've asked the port to help with,” Henderson said.

The airport relies on small grants and donations, including $1,000 from the city of Gearhart to help pay for extras like bicycles, locks and helmets for visitors. They hope to receive funds from the Seaside Tourism Grant Program, a request that was previously denied.

The Port of Astoria does not share tax revenues with the Seaside Airport, though Seaside Airport Committee members plan to make new requests once in-person Port commission meetings resume.

Meanwhile, the Public Works Department and volunteers mow and perform other maintenance, including clearing driftwood on the south end of the runway after high tide or flood events — especially after king tides — that could pose danger to travelers.

Reclassification sought

The airport’s five current hangars were constructed in 2007. They are privately owned and may be sold or rented.

The need for more space comes from an increase in usage at the airport as a result of the local uptick in real estate, the availability of real-time weather and cameras, word of mouth and an overall recent rise in the amount of general aviation hours flown, Henderson said.

If the airport could accommodate 10 aircraft, whether through added hangars, shared space or outdoor tie-downs, that would get them moved up from “unclassified” to “basic” in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems, making make the airport eligible for federal grant funding.

New hangars would most likely be placed along the western edge of the existing tie-down ramp, clear of the Federal Emergency Management Agency flood zone and shown on the airport’s FAA approved layout plan, he said. Along the northern edge is also a possibility.

The number of on-site based aircraft isn’t the only criteria, he added. “We could get there in other ways, say more military, commercial or training use or simply a higher traffic count altogether. But we have been told that 10 based aircraft would do it and that seems the most likely path.”

Another option could be through private funding initiatives to to construct hangars. “That’s how our existing hangar bank came about,” Henderson said.

The developer, a retired airline pilot with a plane and a place in Gearhart, took deposits on all of the bays before committing.

The developer has moved out of the area, but is doing similar projects at other small airports.

“I’ve had conversations with a few people who could be in a position to do it,” Henderson said. “There is some interest but nothing concrete at this point.”

Henderson believes new economical hangars would be filled up without much trouble.

There's only so much market for this sort of hangar but I believe if we had some more economical hangars here they'd be filled up without much trouble.

Henderson remains optimistic that the airport will successfully address FAA reclassification.

“Fifteen years ago I wouldn’t have thought we’d have five hangars here with planes in them and interest for more,” he said. “So yes, I believe it’s possible. But it’s also an uphill battle. We’ll just keep persevering.”

Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport (KAVP) tunnel gains a runway






The local airport’s director wanted a passenger tunnel with flair — with a bit of takeoff, so to speak.

So Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport maintenance staff painted the tunnel floor to match the appearance of 4-22, the airport’s 7,501-foot main runway.

Now, before travelers jet off to their destinations on a real runway, they stroll over its baby cousin.

“I’ve never seen it in another airport,” airport Director Carl Beardsley Jr. said. “In fact, not only do we have a runway, but we have runway lights on either side.”

Business travelers who fly out of the airport know the above-ground tunnel especially well. It connects the garage and lot where they park to an escalator that climbs into the terminal where they check their luggage.

“We’re always looking at ways of improving the customer experience at the airport,” Beardsley said. “We’ve had this tunnel to the terminal building … and although it’s very functional, it’s never really been something that is pleasing to the eye. So working with our airport maintenance department, we came up with an idea to paint a runway on the floor of the tunnel … It’s exactly what the runway would look like to scale from the airfield at the airport.”

Beardsley said he’s seen children put their arms out and run through the tunnel like they’re taking off. Near the baggage claim, the airport keeps a mobile mini-airplane that it offers for local parades. Some kids ask about taking that plane into the tunnel, Beardsley said.

“And there’s been talk of seeing whether or not it’ll fit in there, (maybe) take some pictures of it taxiing down the runway,” he said.

The indoor runway adds to a series of features the airport has incorporated to distinguish itself the past few years. Others include a lactation room for nursing mothers, an updated meditation room meant for nervous travelers or worried waiting families and a military waiting room.

Beardsley promises others.

“We haven’t put our finger on it as of yet,” he said. “But we’ll have some more tricks for you down the road.”

Agnes Huff, who owns a Los Angeles, California-based marketing and public relations firm that serves the aviation industry, said touches like the tunnel runway make people smile and get more comfortable in an airport and potentially create a memory.

At Heathrow Airport in London, she said, she walked along a path with no stairs to reach an upper level with walls covered with “these amazing airplane pictures and travel pictures throughout that whole area.”

“I mean if you’re talking about millennials and social media opportunities and Instagram, and if you’re standing there and you’re having your selfie taken or a picture taken, that highlights your trip, your experience,” she said.

Ryan ST-A, N14984: Incident occurred November 28, 2020 at Modesto City–County Airport (KMOD), California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fresno, California

Aircraft experienced a propeller strike on landing.


Date: 28-NOV-20
Time: 21:48:00Z
Regis#: N14984
Aircraft Make: RYAN AERONAUTICAL
Aircraft Model: ST-A
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MODESTO
State: CALIFORNIA

Piper PA-32RT-300T, N132CH: Incident occurred November 28, 2020 at Bentonville Municipal Airport (KVBT), Benton County, Arkansas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Little Rock, Arkansas

Aircraft ran off side of the runway. 


Date: 28-NOV-20
Time: 19:56:00Z
Regis#: N132CH
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA32
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: BENTONVILLE
State: ARKANSAS

Beech 1900C, N127AX: Incident occurred November 28, 2020 at Yakutat Airport (PAYA), Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Juneau, Alaska

Aircraft incurred propeller strike on landing. 

Alaska Central Express Inc


Date: 28-NOV-20
Time: 13:23:00Z
Regis#: N127AX
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 1900
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: ON DEMAND
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Aircraft Operator: ALASKA CENTRAL EXPRESS
City: YAKUTAT
State: ALASKA

Piper PA-28-181, N890G: Incident occurred November 29, 2020 at Morristown Municipal Airport (KMMU), Morris County, New Jersey

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Teterboro, New Jersey

Aircraft landed and slid off runway into the grass. 


Date: 29-NOV-20
Time: 13:45:00Z
Regis#: N890G
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MORRISTOWN
State: NEW JERSEY

Piper PA-44-180 Seminole, N711AV: Incident occurred November 29, 2020 at Essex County Airport (KCDW), Caldwell, New Jersey

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Teterboro, New Jersey

Aircraft landed, gear collapsed and incurred a propeller strike. 

AA Aero Inc


Date: 29-NOV-20
Time: 19:15:00Z
Regis#: N711AV
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA44
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: CALDWELL
State: NEW JERSEY

Cessna 210A, N9530X: Incident occurred November 29, 2020 in Portland, Oregon

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Aircraft landed gear up. 


Date: 29-NOV-20
Time: 22:38:00Z
Regis#: N9530X
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 210
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: PORTLAND
State: OREGON

Champion 7FC Converted to 7EC, N7596B: Accident occurred November 28, 2020 at Delaware Coastal Airport (KGED), Georgetown, Delaware

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

https://registry.faa.gov/N7596B

Location: Georgetown, DE
Accident Number: ERA21LA058
Date & Time: November 28, 2020, 11:45 Local 
Registration: N7596B
Aircraft: Champion 7FC Converted to 7EC 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted
Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Champion 
Registration: N7596B
Model/Series: 7FC Converted to 7EC NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGED,46 ft msl
Observation Time: 11:54 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 15°C /5°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / 16 knots, 280°
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Lancaster, PA (LNS) 
Destination: Georgetown, DE

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 38.686587,-75.360774 (est)

Falcon 900EX, N382KU: Incident occurred November 27, 2020 at Flying Cloud Airport (KFCM), Minneapolis, Minnesota

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota

Aircraft returned to airport after a thunk and vibration. Post flight inspection revealed damage to #3 engine cowling. 

Bond Aire LLC


Date: 27-NOV-20
Time: 14:57:00Z
Regis#: N382KU
Aircraft Make: DASSAULT
Aircraft Model: FALCON 900
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: INITIAL CLIMB (ICL)
Operation: 91
Aircraft Operator: BOND AIR
City: MINNEAPOLIS
State: MINNESOTA

Sunday, November 29, 2020

Fuel Starvation: Piper PA-22-150 Caribbean, N4816A; accident occurred July 18, 2020 in Loveland, Clermont County, Ohio

 






Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cincinnati, Ohio

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Loveland, Ohio 
Accident Number: CEN20LA290
Date & Time: July 18, 2020, 17:30 Local
Registration: N4816A
Aircraft: Piper PA22
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel starvation 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal Factual Information

On July 18, 2020, about 1730 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-22 airplane, N4816A, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Loveland, Ohio. The pilot was not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

According to the pilot, before adding fuel, both fuel gauges read ¼ tank and he added about 7.5 gallons to each tank, for an additional 15 gallons of fuel. He then departed the Wadsworth Municipal Airport (3G3), Wadsworth, Ohio, en route to the Cincinnati Municipal Airport-Lunken Field (LUK), Lunken, Ohio. About an hour and half after departure, the engine lost power, had a momentary gain of power, and then lost power again. The pilot selected a road for a forced landing. During the landing, the airplane impacted several mailboxes and a light pole before coming to stop in a residential yard.

The pilot reported that he typically switches fuel tanks every 10-15 minutes but did not recall if he did it on this flight. He also did not switch fuel tanks after the initial loss of engine power.

Examination of the airplane found substantial damage to the left wing, damage to the right horizontal stabilizer and elevator, and right-side engine cowling. The fuel selector was in the off position. The right-wing fuel tank was then drained and about 5.5 gallons of fuel was recovered, the left-wing fuel tank did not contain any useable fuel. The carburetor float bowl was checked and no contaminates were found. The left fuel gauge read about ¼ and the right fuel gauge read zero. The examination did not confirm the accuracy of the gauges or if the wires were swapped from the left and right fuel tanks.

During the examination, fuel was added to right wing fuel tank, and the engine started. The engine was operated from idle to a high power setting with no abnormalities noted.

The pilot reported on the NTSB Form 6120.1 that he thought the reason for the engine failure was due to fuel exhaustion.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 31
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land 
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: Lap only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 
Last FAA Medical Exam: March 1, 2016
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: April 30, 2019
Flight Time: 528 hours (Total, all aircraft), 168 hours (Total, this make and model), 383 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N4816A
Model/Series: PA22 150
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: 22-3969
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: March 4, 2020 Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: 
Engine Model/Series: O-320-A2B
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 150 Horsepower
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLUK
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 16:53 Local
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Visibility: 7 miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 5500 ft AGL
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 230° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 21°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Wadsworth, OH (3G3)
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Destination: Lunken, OH (KLUK) 
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 14:50 Local
Type of Airspace:

Airport

Runway Surface Type:
Airport Elevation:
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used:
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 39.267501,-84.26583(est)  
 










Nose Over: Cessna 180, N2929C: Accident occurred July 19, 2020 in Bear Valley, Alaska





Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Bear Valley, AK
Accident Number: WPR20CA233
Date & Time: 07/19/2020, 1930 AKD
Registration: N2929C
Aircraft: Cessna 180
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Nose over/nose down
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot of a tailwheel equipped airplane reported that, after landing on a gravel runway, he was taxing with speed to the turnaround point. He applied brakes, the tail of the airplane came up and the airplane nosed over.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing and vertical stabilizer.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 22, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/11/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/01/2020
Flight Time: (Estimated) 637 hours (Total, all aircraft), 152 hours (Total, this make and model), 583 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 42 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 12 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N2929C
Model/Series: 180 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1954
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 30829
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/29/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2550 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5689 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C126 installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-520
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 265 hp
Operator:On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Unknown
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAMR, 138 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Observation Time:0153 UTC 
Direction from Accident Site: 339°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 4000 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 12000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 270°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.81 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 11°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Girdwood, AK (AQY)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Anchorage, AK (MRI)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0700 AKD
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Bear Valley (PVT)
Runway Surface Type: Gravel
Airport Elevation: 2200 ft
Runway Surface Condition:Dry 
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 61.057500, -149.730000 (est)