Monday, December 11, 2017

Mobile County, Alabama approves aerospace company incentives

Just in time for Christmas, hundreds of thousands of dollars in economic development incentives are being approved for two big Mobile aerospace projects announced earlier this year.

On Monday, the Mobile County Commission approved its part of incentives for Safran USA, which announced in August that it will open a new manufacturing operation in Mobile. Commissioners also approved the county share of an incentive package for Continental Motors, which announced in March that it was spending more than $60 million to build an entirely new facility to house its existing operations at the Mobile Aeroplex at Brookley.

The Mobile City Council's agenda for Tuesday includes sister measures related to the city's share of the two incentive packages. The council could approve both on Tuesday, although if it follows normal procedure with new resolutions, it will hold them over for a week's consideration before voting.

The county and the city each are giving Continental Motors $217,500, for a total of $435,000. Each is putting up $150,000 for the Safran, for a total of $300,000. That's aside from any other incentives, such as tax abatements.

The two projects are substantially different, as is the handling of the incentives.

Continental, which makes engines for small aircraft, has been based in Mobile for decades and has a workforce of more than 400 people in the area. Faced with a need to modernize, the company - and its parent, China-based AVIC Holding Company - also considered a move to one of several other locations in the United States, company officials said in March.

But it opted to remain in Mobile, and its "Project Blue Marlin" project has what Continental President and CEO Rhett Ross described as an aggressive three-year timetable. Officials hope to break ground this summer on a 225,000-square foot facility at the intersection of Broad Street and Michigan Avenue. They'll finalize the building's design by fall, install new manufacturing equipment in 2018 and be fully operational by the end of 2019, Ross said. Along the way it'll consolidate operations from 11 buildings into two. The economic development agreement pegs Continental's investment in the project at about $72 million.

County Attorney Jay Ross told the Commission that the incentive package was "more along the lines of a job retention agreement," since it helped keep the company in the area. Among other conditions, the company is required to employ at least 300 full-time employees with an average hours wage of at least $22.95, or face penalties.

Incentive payments will be paid directly to the company as reimbursement for "capital expenses incurred by the Company in developing, modernizing, expanding and equipping" the new site.

Safran, by comparison, is a smaller project but one that will be an all-new tenant at Brookley. The company will spend about $1 million to start up an operation that builds and installs jet engine nacelles, the components that wrap around a jet engine. It will hire about 20 employees.

The city and county money actually will be paid to the Mobile Airport Authority "to be applied towards tenant improvement credits, including parking lot improvements, or similar payments or incentives ... in support of the Project Site."

The company is obligated to maintain a workforce of 17 full-time employees for two years, within a larger agreement period of five years.

Story and comments ➤ http://www.al.com

Incident occurred December 11, 2017 in Corpus Christi, Texas



Two men flying in an ultralight had a close call this afternoon.

The men were flying just off of Padre Island, near the Gulf Stream Condos when the aircraft engine died shortly after takeoff. 

The pilot and passenger were able to land safely in the gulf, but had to wait about 30 minutes for rescue crews to get to them. 

Neither of the men were hurt, and lifeguards were there to help them pull their ultralight back to shore.

Story and video ➤ http://www.kristv.com

Studio to Transmitter Link (STL) Allegedly Caused Interference at McCarran International Airport (KLAS), Las Vegas, Nevada: Region Three Regional Director issued a Notice of Violation to Silver State Broadcasting on December 8th

Before the Federal Communications Commission 
Washington, D.C. 20554
In the Matter of Silver State Broadcasting LLC 
Licensee of Station WLI700
Las Vegas, Nevada
File No.:  EB-FIELDWR-17-00025445
NOTICE OF VIOLATION
Released: December 8, 2017

WASHINGTON — FCC Enforcement Bureau Region Three Regional Director Lark Hadley issued a Notice of Violation to Silver State Broadcasting on December 8.

According to the notice, aural studio to transmitter link station WLI700 in Las Vegas was found to be the source of alleged interference to aircraft and controllers at the Las Vegas Nevada McCarran International Airport.

Agents from the bureau’s Los Angeles and San Francisco Offices investigated a complaint from the Federal Aviation Administration that a spurious emission on 118.75 MHz was causing interference. The agents investigated from October 23–24 direction finding techniques and determined that the signal was transmitting from 6725 Via Austi Parkway in Las Vegas was the source of the reported interference.

At this time, the FCC seeks additional information concerning the violations and any remedial actions taken from Palm Desert, Calif.-based Silver State Broadcasting (WLI700’s licensee) but has not issued a Notice of Apparent Liability for Forfeiture.

Original article  ➤ http://www.radiomagonline.com

Supervisors hear airport success story from western New York official: Floyd Bennett Memorial Airport (KGFL)

Queensbury at-Large Supervisor Doug Beaty, with his arms raised, asks  Genesee County Highway Superintendent Tim Hens, facing camera, a question about about management practices during a meeting Monday. 



QUEENSBURY — Warren County leaders heard Monday from a western New York official who told how his county took over operations of its airport, cut its losses and essentially breaks even on the airstrip after years of losses.

Tim Hens, the highway superintendent in Genesee County, said the county has run its airport between Rochester and Buffalo for about 20 years and accrues a surplus of between $90,000 to $130,000 annually. That surplus covers the costs of debt for improvements at the facility near Batavia.

“We were losing $200,000 a year before the switch,” he said. “The airport was a very negative item.”

That changed after the county took over, allowing for investment in upgrades on the property and a runway extension, he told Warren County supervisors and regional economic development leaders.

Warren County supervisors are trying to determine whether to fully privatize the airport to cut costs, but some have questioned whether doing away with a private fixed base operator (Rich Air LLC) and taking over flight operations in addition to the facilities management that is done by the county could be more financially beneficial.




The county extended the airport’s runway by 1,000 feet, to 5,500 feet, in 2005 and has had success attracting more traffic, including jets based at the airport, he explained. The airport has 3.5 full-time equivalent employees, and the county DPW handles snowplowing, grass-cutting and other maintenance, with airport revenue paying the tab.

By being aggressive when seeking grants and taking all of the fuel sales revenue, the financial picture has improved significantly.

Hens said his experience has been that running an airport with some public and some private resources seems to be problematic.

“I think you have to be all one way or the other,” he said.

County supervisors and members of the local Airport Advisory Committee quizzed Hens on different issues. Queensbury at-Large Supervisor Doug Beaty, a proponent of fully privatizing Warren County airport, pointed out that the Batavia airport is “not making money. In a good year, you’re going to break even.”

Warren County supervisors asked Hens for more information about different aspects of the operation and also discussed potentially hiring him as a consultant as it moves forward seeking a potential privatization of the airport in Queensbury.

Glens Falls 1st Ward Supervisor Dan Girard, chairman of the county board’s Facilities Committee, said the Genesee County input was information to help Warren County “see what our avenues are.”

“The situation in Warren County may not line up on all fours with Genesee County, but it shows there are other options to take a look at,” said Ed Bartholomew, president of the EDC Warren County economic development organization.

Story and photos ➤ http://poststar.com

Duke Life Flight crash: Family members blame engine manufacturer, pilot in lawsuit

Eurocopter MBB BK 117C-2, N146DU, operated by Air Methods Corporation: Fatal accident occurred September 08, 2017 in Hertford, Perquimans County, North Carolina 




Durham, N.C. — The families of two people killed in a Duke Life Flight crash in September have filed a lawsuit, claiming the helicopter’s manufacturer knew there was a risk of engine fires and that the pilot was at fault for not following emergency procedures.

The helicopter, which was based at Johnston Regional Airport in Smithfield, was en route to Duke University Hospital on Sept. 8 when it went down.

Nurses Kris Harrison and Crystal Sollinger, pilot Jeff Burke and patient Mary Susan White Bartlett were all killed in the crash.

The lawsuit filed Monday by Bartlett’s husband and Harrison’s wife claims the cause of the crash was a failure of the No. 2 engine and that witnesses to the crash reported seeing smoke trailing behind the helicopter before it went down.

“All evidence points to a blocked engine drain line,” said Gary Robb, the attorney representing the families. “That blockage will lead to an engine fire and then complete shutdown of that engine. We believe that is exactly what happened in this crash.”

According to the lawsuit, an examination of the engine by the National Transportation Safety Board determined the engine’s rear turbine shaft showed discoloration consistent with overheating and that bearing roller pins were worn down.

The manufacturer of the helicopter’s engines- identified in the lawsuit as Safran Helicopter Engines- should have been aware of potential for engine failure after the Federal Aviation Administration issued a bulletin about another incident involving an engine problem on the same model helicopter that occurred on Jan. 26 in South Dakota, the lawsuit states.

“The engine and aircraft manufacturers knew at least since January 2017 how extremely dangerous this potential engine fire and failure situation was, yet they sat on their hands and did nothing,” Robb said.

The lawsuit also claims Burke was at fault in the crash for failure to perform proper emergency procedures when faced with the engine failure. Family members claim that he “did not continue in forward flight and failed to execute autorotation landing maneuver, which would have safety landed the helicopter.”

Story and video ➤ http://www.wral.com

Pilot Jeff Burke, Flight Nurses Crystal Sollinger and Kris Harrison, Patient Mary Bartlett.


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration; Washington, District of Columbia
Air Methods Corporation; Englewood, Colorado
SAFRAN Turbomeca; Grand Prairie, Texas
Airbus Helicopters; Grand Prairie, Texas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


  
http://registry.faa.gov/N146DU 

Location: Hertford, NC
Accident Number: ERA17FA316
Date & Time: 09/08/2017, 1120 EDT
Registration: N146DU
Aircraft: EUROCOPTER DEUTSCHLAND GMBH MBB BK 117
Injuries: 4 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled - Air Medical (Discretionary) 

On September 8, 2017, about 1120 eastern daylight time, a Eurocopter Deutschland GMBH MBB BK117-C2 helicopter, N146DU, was destroyed when it crashed on a wind turbine farm in Hertford, North Carolina. The commercial pilot, two flight nurses, and one patient were fatally injured. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and a company flight plan was filed for flight that departed the Sentara Albemarle Regional Medical Center Heliport (NC98) about 1108. The flight was destined for the Duke University North Heliport (NC92). The helicopter was operated by Air Methods Corporation under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135.

According to the operator, on the morning of the accident, the pilot and both medical crew flew from their base at the Johnston Regional Airport (JNX), Smithfield, North Carolina to the Elizabeth City Regional Airport (ECG), Elizabeth City, North Carolina for refueling. They arrived at ECG about 0924, and loaded 70 gallons of fuel. About 1011, the crew radioed the company operations center and advised they were departing for NC98, and had 2 hours of fuel on board. They arrived at NC98 about 1022. At 1108, the pilot radioed the company operations center and advised that that they were departing for NC92 with 2 hours of fuel and four people on board. There were no further communications with the helicopter.

Preliminary data transmitted from the helicopter showed that it departed NC98 to the northwest, climbed to about 1,000 ft mean sea level (msl) and then turned west. The helicopter climbed to about 2,500 ft msl and continued on a westerly track at a groundspeed of about 120 knots. About 8 minutes after takeoff, the helicopter began a turn toward the south. About 1 minute later, the transmitted data ended at an altitude of about 1,200 ft msl and a groundspeed of 75 knots, while the helicopter was on a southeasterly track.

Several witnesses reported observing smoke trailing behind the helicopter while it was in flight. The smoke was described by some witnesses as "heavy" or "dark", while others reported the color as "black", "dark blue" or "blue." One witness reported that the helicopter was "hovering" and "not travelling forward" while it was a "couple of hundred feet" above the wind turbine farm. Another witness reported hearing a "popping noise," he then observed the helicopter turn left, then right. It then descended quickly and appeared "in control" with the rotors turning before he lost sight of it.

The helicopter impacted a shallow turf drainage pathway, about 30 ft wide and 2,000 ft long, located between two fields of 8 ft tall grass, on a wind turbine farm. The fuselage came to rest in a 7 ft wide ditch in the center of the pathway, and was oriented on a heading of 261° magnetic. No ground scars were present leading toward or away from the main wreckage.

Examination of the wreckage revealed that all the major components of the helicopter were present at the accident site. The cabin had collapsed downward and was partially consumed by a postcrash fire. The tailboom remained largely intact. Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit area to the rotor systems and engines. All main and tail rotor blades remained attached to the rotor hubs. The No. 4 (red) main rotor blade was found rotated about 180° in the hub with its pitch links fractured and partially melted. None of the main or tail rotor blades exhibited leading edge damage, chordwise scratches, or other evidence of rotation. The outboard 4 ft of No. 1 (yellow) blade came to rest in the 8 ft tall grass adjacent to the drainage path. The grass on either side of the blade was undisturbed. The tail rotor shaft remained attached to the transmission. The transmission could not be rotated by hand.

No foreign object damage was found on the axial compressor blades of either engine. No damage was observed on the visible portions of the turbine blades at the rear of either engine. The gas generator of the No. 1 engine moved freely when rotated by hand, the No. 2 engine gas generator would not rotate. The No. 1 engine fuel shutoff valve was found in the open position. The No. 2 engine fuel shutoff valve was damaged and its position could not be determined during the field examination. The No. 2 engine rear turbine shaft bearing exhibited discoloration consistent with overheating and lack of lubrication. The bearing roller pins were worn down to the surface of the bearing race. The end of the turbine shaft aft of the nut exhibited rotational nonuniform damage.

The helicopter was equipped with an on-board audio and video recording system. The unit was thermally damaged; however, the memory device remained intact. The unit was sent to the NTSB vehicle recorder laboratory for examination.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airworthiness records and helicopter maintenance records, the helicopter was manufactured in 2011. The helicopter's most recent 30-hour engine inspection was completed on August 15, 2017. At that time, the helicopter and both engines had accrued 2,673 total hours of operation. Several additional inspections were completed during scheduled maintenance on September 1, 2017. At that time, the helicopter had accrued 2,710 total hours of operation. According to the operator, a daily airworthiness check is performed by a mechanic.

According to FAA airman records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for rotorcraft-helicopter and instrument-helicopter. His most recent second class medical certificate was issued on October 6, 2016, at which time he reported 4,362 total hours of flight experience. According to the operator, the pilot had accrued 1,027 hours of flight time in the same make and model as the accident helicopter, and had been employed with Air Methods Corporation since August 2009.

The helicopter was retained for further examination.



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: EUROCOPTER DEUTSCHLAND GMBH
Registration: N146DU
Model/Series: MBB BK 117 C2
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Air Methods Corporation
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KECG, 13 ft msl
Observation Time: 1154 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 12°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots, 350°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.18 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Departure Point: ELIZABETH CITY, NC (NC98)
Destination: DURHAM, NC (NC92)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 3 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: Both
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 4 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 36.290278, -76.487500

Nonstop flights to connect Albany, Buffalo: Service with regional jets begins February 1st



Colonie, Albany County, New York --  OneJet, a suburban Boston-based airline startup, will begin flying nonstop between Albany and Buffalo on Feb. 1, officials at both airports announced Monday.

While OneJet currently serves Pittsburgh from Albany with small corporate jets, the new service will use Embraer 135 regional jets that normally hold 35 passengers. Because OneJet operates under a charter license, it's limited to aircraft that have no more than 30 seats. Its solution was to remove five seats and give passengers more legroom.

Aircraft also will feature free 4G wifi service, free snacks and beverages including wine and beer, and streaming entertainment on the 50-minute gate-to-gate flights.

Fares will range from $150 to $170 each way, and the airline is targeting business travelers between the two cities. A number of financial institutions, including KeyBank and M&T Bank, have operations in both places. HealthNow New York also has a sizable presence in Albany and Buffalo, and there's plenty of state government-related traffic as well.

OneJet will offer two daily round trips on weekdays. Tickets will go on sale beginning Jan. 9.

Flights will leave Albany at 8:20 a.m. and 6:10 p.m., arriving in Buffalo at 9:20 a.m. and 7:10 p.m. Flights leave Buffalo at 7 a.m. and 4:50 p.m., arriving in Albany at 7:55 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. Tailwinds typically shorten flights from west to east.

Buffalo and Albany both offered incentives to OneJet to launch the service. At Albany, the airline will get two years of free terminal rent, said Albany airport CEO John O'Donnell.

"Air service between Buffalo and Albany was presented as a mission-critical route for the Upstate New York business community, and we are pleased to offer this new nonstop service to meet that demand," said airline CEO Matthew Maguire.

In Buffalo, Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul, who lives in that city and is a former vice president at M&T Bank, announced the new service at a Buffalo airport press conference held at the same time as Albany County Airport Authority Chairman Rev. Kenneth Doyle made the announcement at the Albany airport.

Albany lost its nonstop service to Buffalo back in 2010 and even then it was limited, with one daily round-trip on a turboprop geared more to Buffalo travelers than those in Albany.

It was a far cry from service on a route that once featured full-size jets and multiple daily trips.

"We've been looking for Buffalo for a couple of decades," O'Donnell said earlier this year. "We believe that's a profitable route if someone picks it up with a regional jet."

Last month, the Times Union reported that OneJet was studying the route and that it might use larger aircraft than the small corporate jets it flies to and from Pittsburgh.

Getting to Buffalo from Albany has been a challenge. It's a more than four-hour drive along the Thruway, where lake-effect snow squalls can quickly create near-blizzard conditions. The train takes even longer, between five and six hours.

And flying requires a change at an airport hub that can be in Newark or Detroit, or even Baltimore.

A check of Expedia.com Monday morning found itineraries that took three hours and 20 minutes or more and cost nearly $500 round tip during the week after Christmas.

Albany airport officials said they would meet with local chambers of commerce to enlist their help in marketing corporate contracts to businesses likely to use the new flights.

Story and photo gallery ➤ http://www.timesunion.com

Tehachapi Municipal Airport (KTSP), Kern County, California

Tehachapi City Council tackles reports vs. action items 

List it, and it could be up for action.

At the Dec. 4 Tehachapi City Council meeting, council member reports were handled differently than in previous meetings.

Items under the heading of "Council Member Reports" were not only discussed, but also voted on — something not previously done.

A statement added to the Dec. 4 agenda says, "If an item is listed below, the Council has the option to take action or refer the matter to staff for a later agenda."

At the Nov. 20 meeting, Councilman Kenneth R. Hetge said he sent in an email to city staff before the meeting to have them place three items on the agenda so they could be discussed and be up for a vote. They were not put on as agenda items for action; they could only be discussed at that meeting. At the same meeting, the council decided the items would be put on the next agenda for possible action.

The three items for discussion covered population signs; reversal of a City Council decision to work with the FAA, dated Feb. 21, 2017 to remove federal obligations for the event center and rodeo grounds; and requesting City Manager Greg Garrett to conduct an outside forensic audit for all documentation regarding the operation of Tehachapi Municipal Airport.

Hetge stressed these items as being very important on Nov. 20. but on Dec. 4, Hetge did not discuss two items, both having to do with the airport.

"After we get them now back on the agenda I've been requested to remove items 13 and 15, but I will continue to discuss number 14," Hetge said. Asked after the meeting who requested he remove these items and why, he declined to comment.

Hetge did, however, discuss item number 14, the updating of population signs at the Dec. 4 meeting.

Read more here ➤ http://www.tehachapinews.com

Charges dismissed against former Tehachapi Municipal Airport manager, assistant

Charges have been dismissed against a former manager of Tehachapi Municipal Airport and an assistant who were accused of submitting a fraudulent grant application for $17,860.

Thomas Glasgow, the former manager, and Gaston Patterson have maintained their innocence since the filing of charges in June of last year, said Jared Thompson, Glasgow's attorney.

"Ultimately, the evidence supported the conclusion that no crimes were committed, and all charges were dismissed against both men," Thompson said Wednesday. "Mr. Glasgow and Mr. Patterson are thankful to have their good names restored and feel vindicated by the dismissal of all charges."

Prosecutor Robin Wolfe said the case was dismissed in the interests of justice following further investigation by both the D.A.'s office and defense attorneys.

The charges, dismissed Nov. 21, stemmed from a grant application the two prepared to replace a high-emission city vehicle with a new lower-emission vehicle.

Several "disgruntled individuals" raised unfounded concerns about the grant application, Thompson said, resulting in an investigation and criminal charges.

Thompson said both he and H.A. Sala, Patterson's attorney, were able to demonstrate the grant application was completed correctly and with the best available information. The pickup that would have been bought with the grant money would have replaced a high-mileage 1984 GMC pickup.

"It completely achieved the purpose of the grant," Thompson said.

But after the allegations of wrongdoing were leveled, Glasgow and Patterson resigned, Thompson said. The city decided to withdraw the grant application.

Glasgow and Patterson had faced misdemeanor charges of conspiracy to defraud, presenting a false claim and attempting to obtain money by false pretenses.

At the time charges were filed, the District Attorney's office said it had received information a year earlier regarding a fraudulent grant application to purchase a new pickup.

The grant application of $17,860 was completed with the East Kern Air Pollution Control District in 2014. That amount was half the cost of the pickup Glasgow planned to purchase; it was not funded.

The charges were filed as misdemeanors rather than felonies, prosecutors said at the time, because there was no evidence Glasgow or Patterson would personally benefit from the truck other than using it for work.

Thompson said those close to the aviation community in Tehachapi held Glasgow and Patterson in high regard and supported the work they had done for the airport.

Glasgow still lives in Tehachapi and is working as a charter pilot.

"He just wants to move on," Thompson said.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.tehachapinews.com

Cessna 172RG Cutlass, N788KB, Attitude Aviation Inc: Incident occurred December 10, 2017 at Livermore Municipal Airport (KLVK), Alameda County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

Aircraft reported gear issue inbound. On landing, gear collapsed.

Attitude Aviation Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N788KB

Date: 10-DEC-17
Time: 22:51:00Z
Regis#: N788KB
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172RG
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: LIVERMORE
State: CALIFORNIA

Federal Express, Boeing 767-3S2F(ER), N125FE: Incident occurred december 10, 2017 at Oakland International Airport (KOAK), California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

Flight FDX540:  Birdstrike with possible damage. Landed without further incident.


Federal Express Corporation: http://registry.faa.gov/N125FE


Date: 11-DEC-17
Time: 01:25:00Z
Regis#: N125FE
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 767 3S2F
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: CARGO
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: FEDERAL EXPRESS
Flight Number: FDX540
City: OAKLAND
State: CALIFORNIA

Cessna 150J N50507: Incident occurred December 10, 2017 in Denver, Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Aircraft aborted takeoff.


5R Leasing LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N50507 


Date: 10-DEC-17
Time: 20:00:00Z
Regis#: N50507
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 150J
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
City: DENVER
State: COLORADO

Cessna 170, N4180V, Dragon Tail Aviation LLC: Incident occurred December 10, 2017 at Winter Haven's Gilbert Airport (KGIF), Polk County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aircraft lost control on landing. Ground looped on runway. Struck airport sign.

Dragon Tail Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N4180V

Date: 10-DEC-17
Time: 14:45:00Z
Regis#: N4180V
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 170
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: WINTER HAVEN
State: FLORIDA

Cessna 414A Chancellor, N113GL, LRA Express LLC: Incident occurred December 08, 2017 at DeKalb–Peachtree Airport (KPDK), Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aircraft aborted takeoff. Slid off end of runway.

LRA Express LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N113GL

Date: 08-DEC-17
Time: 17:27:00Z
Regis#: N113GL
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 414A
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
City: ATLANTA
State: GEORGIA

JetBlue, Airbus A321-231, N957JB: Incident occurred December 10, 2017 at Logan International Airport (KBOS), Massachusetts

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston, Massachusetts

JetBlue flight 51: Aircraft sustained winglet damage while deicing at gate.


JetBlue Airways Corporation: http://registry.faa.gov/N957JB 


Date: 10-DEC-17
Time: 07:55:00Z
Regis#: N957JB
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A321
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: STANDING (STD)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: JETBLUE
Flight Number: JBU51
City: BOSTON
State: MASSACHUSETTS

Piper PA-32R-301T Turbo Saratoga, N8220W: Incident occurred December 08, 2017 at Erie-Ottawa International Airport (KPCW), Port Clinton, Ottawa County, Ohio

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cleveland, Ohio

Aircraft on landing. Nose gear collapsed.

http://registry.faa.gov/N8220W

Date: 08-DEC-17
Time: 21:00:00Z
Regis#: N8220W
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA32R 301T
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PORT CLINTON
State: OHIO

Piper PA-22-150, N2626P: Incident occurred December 10, 2017 at Wakefield Municipal Airport (KAKQ), Sussex County, Virginia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Richmond, Virginia

Aircraft landed hard on runway. Landing gear broke off.

http://registry.faa.gov/N2626P

Date: 10-DEC-17
Time: 17:55:00Z
Regis#: N2626P
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 22 150
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: WADEFIELD
State: VIRGINIA

United Airlines, Boeing 737-924ER, N66803: Incident occurred December 10, 2017 at Spokane International Airport (KGEG), Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane, Washington

Flight UAL255: Aircraft on approach. Struck flock of birds. Unknown damage to wings and tail. Landed without incident.

United Airlines Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N66803

Date: 10-DEC-17
Time: 04:20:00Z
Regis#: N66803
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 737 924ER
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: UNITED AIRLINES
Flight Number: UAL255
City: SPOKANE
State: WASHINGTON

Cozy Mark IV, N85TT: Incident occurred December 08, 2017 at Paine Field (KPAE), Everett, Snohomish County, Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Seattle, Washington

Aircraft on landing. Nose gear not fully extended


http://registry.faa.gov/N85TT 


Date: 08-DEC-17

Time: 23:34:00Z
Regis#: N85TT
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: COZY MARK IV
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: EVERETT
State: WASHINGTON 

Paine Field crews were extra busy last week, with two plane crashes just days apart, and a landing incident involving an experimental plane.

The first crash occurred last Sunday, Dec. 3, when a small Cessna 152 aircraft crashed just seconds after taking off.

The plane was being flown by a certified instructor and a student pilot, and ended up crashing on Commando Road after crossing over 112th Street Southwest.

A similar incident occurred just days later on Friday, Dec. 8, when another Cessna aircraft failed to gain altitude while performing what Paine Field’s airport director Arif Ghouse called “touch and go” landings around 3 p.m.

“Basically, they would take off, come around to land and, instead of completely landing, they would touch the pavement and take back off,” Ghouse said. “During their landing phase on the smaller runway, once they touched down they couldn’t gain altitude for some reason and couldn’t lift off the runway.

“Once they realized that they couldn’t take off, they tried to veer into a grassy area near the runway. Once they got the plane to the grassy area, the plane kept going, and their momentum carried them through the security fence and onto the roadway.”

Ghouse said they don’t know the exact cause of the plane’s failure to launch, but that the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the cause of the problems.

Less than an hour after the crash, an experimental plane had an issue with its landing gear and had a hard landing.

“Calling it a crash is a little drastic,” Ghouse said. “The airplane landed on the main runway without having its landing gear down. There was no damage to the runway, and that issue was resolved pretty quickly.”

Ghouse said the FAA and NTSB are investigating the cause of the landing gear issue as well.

He said the first crash on Friday caused the roadway leading to Paine Field on 112th to be closed for a few hours, and the small runway was closed for even longer as a result of the crash.

“The smaller runway was closed until about 3 a.m. on Saturday,” Ghouse said. “I left around 7 p.m. on Friday, and they were starting to clear out the roadway and that opened up a little bit after I left.”

This all comes just months after a Cessna aircraft from Paine Field crashed on Harbour Pointe Boulevard in May. Footage from a dashboard camera on one of the nearby vehicles captured the plane crashing through power lines and causing two large fireballs.

In the three cases last week, just like in May, no pilots, passengers or pedestrians were injured.

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Cessna 172 Skyhawk, N8856B, owned and operated by a private individual: Accident occurred December 09, 2017 near Algona Municipal Airport (KAXA), Kossuth County, Iowa

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Ankeny, Iowa; Des Moines, Iowa

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N8856B

Location: Algona, IA
Accident Number: CEN18LA051
Date & Time: 12/09/2017, 0945 CST
Registration: N8856B
Aircraft: CESSNA 172C
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

Analysis 

After takeoff for an instructional flight, when the airplane reached 1,800 ft mean sea level, the student pilot began a left turn toward the destination. Shortly after, the engine went silent and stopped producing power. The flight instructor took control, slowed the airplane, and landed into the wind on a gravel road. During the landing roll, the left wheel caught the edge of the road, and the airplane veered into a ditch, which resulted in substantial damage to the wing and fuselage.

Examination of the airplane revealed that the engine's No. 1 cylinder head had separated at the cylinder head-to-barrel interface. The engine had accumulated 605.9 hours since the last engine overhaul, which was conducted over 23 years before the accident. The engine manufacturer's recommended time between overhaul for the accident engine was 1,800 hours or 12 years. However, it could not be determined if the lack of an overhaul within the manufacturer's recommended overhaul period led to the No. 1 cylinder head separating at the cylinder head-to-barrel interface. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The No. 1 cylinder head separating at the cylinder head-to-barrel interface and the subsequent total loss of engine power.

Findings

Aircraft
Recip eng cyl section - Failure (Cause)

Recip eng cyl section - Fatigue/wear/corrosion (Cause)

On December 9, 2017, about 0945 central standard time, a Cessna 172C, N8856B, collided with a ditch during a forced landing after a complete loss of engine power during initial climb from the Algona Municipal Airport (AXA), Algona, Iowa. The pilot, student pilot, and passenger were not injured; and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was owned and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed near the accident site at the time of the flight, and a flight plan was not filed. The flight departed AXA about 0945 and was en route to the Eagle Grove Municipal Airport (EAG), Eagle Grove, Iowa.

The flight instructor reported that the student pilot was flying during takeoff from AXA. When the airplane reached 1,800 ft above mean sea level (msl), the student pilot began a left turn on course to EAG. Soon after the turn, the engine went silent and stopped producing power. The flight instructor took control, slowed the airplane, and landed into the wind on a gravel road. During the landing roll, the left wheel caught the edge of the road, and the airplane veered into the ditch, which resulted in substantial damage to the wing and fuselage.

The examination of the airplane revealed that the No. 1 cylinder head had separated at the cylinder head to barrel interface.

The airplane was a Cessna 172C manufactured in 1958. The engine was a 145-horsepower Continental O-300-C, serial number 3156-D-3-C, manufactured in 1958. The last annual inspection was conducted on July 15, 2017. The airplane had a total time of 6080.8 hours, and the engine had a total time of 2,351.8 hours. The engine had 605.9 hours since the last engine overhaul conducted on July 4, 1994.

The Continental Motors Service Information Letter SIL98-9C issued on November 17, 1998, states that the time between overhaul periods for the Continental O-300-C engine is limited to 1,800 hours or 12 years. 

History of Flight

Initial climb
Loss of engine power (total) (Defining event)

Landing
Off-field or emergency landing

Landing-landing roll

Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 68, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/21/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 1800 hours (Total, all aircraft), 40 hours (Total, this make and model), 1620 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 89 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 35 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5.4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 54, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/27/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 12 hours (Total, all aircraft), 12 hours (Total, this make and model), 12 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 11 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N8856B
Model/Series: 172C
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1958
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 36556
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/15/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2299 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 6081 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:  as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: C91A installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-300-C
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 145 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: AXA, 1216 ft msl
Observation Time: 0935 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Temperature/Dew Point: -6°C / -10°C
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 2600 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 22 knots/ 28 knots, 330°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.08 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Algona, IA (AXA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Eagle Grove, IA (EAG)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0945 CST
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport: Algona Municipal Airport (AXA)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 1216 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 30
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3960 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None

Latitude, Longitude:  43.078056, -94.271944 (est)

Location: Algona, IA
Accident Number: CEN18LA051
Date & Time: 12/09/2017, 0950 CST
Registration: N8856B
Aircraft: CESSNA 172
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

On December 9, 2017, about 0950 central standard time, a Cessna 172, N8856B, collided with a ditch during a forced landing after a complete loss of engine power during initial climb from the Algona Municipal Airport (AXA), Algona, Iowa. The pilot, student pilot, and passenger were not injured; and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was owned and being operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulation Part 91 instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed near the accident site at the time of the flight, and a flight plan was not filed. The flight departed AXA about 0945 and was en route to the Eagle Grove Municipal Airport (EAG), Eagle Grove, Iowa.

At 0935, the surface weather observation at AXA was wind 330 degrees at 22 knots, gusting to 28 knots; 10 miles visibility; skies overcast at 2,600 feet; temperature -6 degrees C; dew point -8 degrees C; altimeter 30.06 inches of mercury. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N8856B
Model/Series: 172
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: AXA, 1216 ft msl
Observation Time: 0935 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -6°C / -10°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 22 knots/ 28 knots, 330°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 2600 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.08 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Algona, IA (AXA)
Destination: Eagle Grove, IA (EAG)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None
Latitude, Longitude: 43.078056, -94.271944 (est) The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Ankeny, Iowa; Des Moines, Iowa

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N8856B

Location: Algona, IA
Accident Number: CEN18LA051
Date & Time: 12/09/2017, 0945 CST
Registration: N8856B
Aircraft: CESSNA 172C
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On December 9, 2017, about 0945 central standard time, a Cessna 172C, N8856B, collided with a ditch during a forced landing after a complete loss of engine power during initial climb from the Algona Municipal Airport (AXA), Algona, Iowa. The pilot, student pilot, and passenger were not injured; and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was owned and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed near the accident site at the time of the flight, and a flight plan was not filed. The flight departed AXA about 0945 and was en route to the Eagle Grove Municipal Airport (EAG), Eagle Grove, Iowa.

The flight instructor reported that the student pilot was flying during takeoff from AXA. When the airplane reached 1,800 ft above mean sea level (msl), the student pilot began a left turn on course to EAG. Soon after the turn, the engine went silent and stopped producing power. The flight instructor took control, slowed the airplane, and landed into the wind on a gravel road. During the landing roll, the left wheel caught the edge of the road, and the airplane veered into the ditch, which resulted in substantial damage to the wing and fuselage.

The examination of the airplane revealed that the No. 1 cylinder head had separated at the cylinder head to barrel interface.

The airplane was a Cessna 172C manufactured in 1958. The engine was a 145-horsepower Continental O-300-C, serial number 3156-D-3-C, manufactured in 1958. The last annual inspection was conducted on July 15, 2017. The airplane had a total time of 6080.8 hours, and the engine had a total time of 2,351.8 hours. The engine had 605.9 hours since the last engine overhaul conducted on July 4, 1994.

The Continental Motors Service Information Letter SIL98-9C issued on November 17, 1998, states that the time between overhaul periods for the Continental O-300-C engine is limited to 1,800 hours or 12 years. 

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 68, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/21/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 1800 hours (Total, all aircraft), 40 hours (Total, this make and model), 1620 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 89 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 35 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5.4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 54, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/27/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 12 hours (Total, all aircraft), 12 hours (Total, this make and model), 12 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 11 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N8856B
Model/Series: 172C
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1958
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 36556
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/15/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2299 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 6081 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:  as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: C91A installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-300-C
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 145 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: AXA, 1216 ft msl
Observation Time: 0935 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Temperature/Dew Point: -6°C / -10°C
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 2600 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 22 knots/ 28 knots, 330°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.08 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Algona, IA (AXA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Eagle Grove, IA (EAG)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0945 CST
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport: Algona Municipal Airport (AXA)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 1216 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 30
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3960 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None

Latitude, Longitude:  43.078056, -94.271944 (est)

Location: Algona, IA
Accident Number: CEN18LA051
Date & Time: 12/09/2017, 0950 CST
Registration: N8856B
Aircraft: CESSNA 172
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

On December 9, 2017, about 0950 central standard time, a Cessna 172, N8856B, collided with a ditch during a forced landing after a complete loss of engine power during initial climb from the Algona Municipal Airport (AXA), Algona, Iowa. The pilot, student pilot, and passenger were not injured; and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was owned and being operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulation Part 91 instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed near the accident site at the time of the flight, and a flight plan was not filed. The flight departed AXA about 0945 and was en route to the Eagle Grove Municipal Airport (EAG), Eagle Grove, Iowa.

At 0935, the surface weather observation at AXA was wind 330 degrees at 22 knots, gusting to 28 knots; 10 miles visibility; skies overcast at 2,600 feet; temperature -6 degrees C; dew point -8 degrees C; altimeter 30.06 inches of mercury. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N8856B
Model/Series: 172
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: AXA, 1216 ft msl
Observation Time: 0935 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -6°C / -10°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 22 knots/ 28 knots, 330°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 2600 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.08 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Algona, IA (AXA)
Destination: Eagle Grove, IA (EAG)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None
Latitude, Longitude: 43.078056, -94.271944 (est)

Kossuth County, Iowa – According to the Kossuth County Sheriff’s Office, a plane crash Saturday didn’t result in any injuries but the plane was a total loss.

According to a press release, a pilot, student pilot, and passenger were taking off to the northwest in a Cessna 172 Skyhawk.

They were at about 600 feet when the engine quit.

The instructor turned back to the southwest in an attempt to land on a grass runway.

Due to the high winds, they were unable to land on the grass and landed on a gravel road on the east side of the airport at 100th Ave. 

The plane slid off the gravel road and into the ditch. 

Both pilots were able to walk away. 

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.kimt.com

No one is injured in a plane crash over the weekend in Kossuth County, Iowa.

Authorities say a pilot, student pilot, and passenger were taking off in a Cessna 172 Skyhawk when the engine quit at 600 feet.

The instructor turned back to the southwest to try to land on the grass runway, but high winds caused the plane to land on a gravel road near the airport.
The plane then slid off the road and ended up in the ditch.

Authorities say the plane was a total loss.

Both the flight instructor and student pilot were able to walk away from the scene without injury.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.keyc.com