Friday, October 7, 2016

Piper PA-32RT-300T Turbo Lance II, Ouachita Regional Anesthesia PLLC, N3049K: Incident occurred October 06, 2016 in Hot Springs, Garland County, Arkansas

OUACHITA REGIONAL ANESTHESIA PLLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N3049K

AIRCRAFT GEAR COLLAPSED ON LANDING. HOT SPRINGS, ARKANSAS.   

Date: 06-OCT-16
Time: 21:17:00Z
Regis#: N3049K
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA32
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: HOT SPRINGS
State: Arkansas

Backcountry Super Cub SQ2, N786AB: Incident occurred May 30, 2017 in Casper , Natrona County, Wyoming ; Accidents occurred October 06, 2016 in Boca Reservoir, Nevada County, California (and) September 15, 2015 in Truckee, Nevada County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;   Casper, Wyoming 

http://registry.faa.gov/N786AB

Aircraft on landing, wheel collapsed. 

Date: 30-MAY-17
Time: 18:14:00Z
Regis#: N786AB
Aircraft Make: BACK COUNTRY SUBERCUBS
Aircraft Model: SUPER CUB
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: CASPER
State: WYOMING
CASPER, WY

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA010
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 06, 2016 in Boca Reservoir, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/15/2016
Aircraft: JOE SALOMONE SUPER CUB SQ2, registration: N786AB
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane with tundra tires, reported that after landing off airport next to a reservoir, the tires became stuck in muddy terrain. He further reported that he decided to "use power and elevator to unstick the tires". The tires loosened from the mud, however, when he applied additional power the airplane nosed over. 

The airplane sustained substantial damage to its vertical stabilizer and rudder.

The pilot reported that there were no pre impact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's decision to continue the taxi on unsuitable muddy terrain, which resulted in a nose-over.

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

NTSB Identification: GAA15CA244
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, September 01, 2015 in Truckee, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/08/2015
Aircraft: JOE SALOMONE SUPER CUB SQ2, registration: N786AB
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped, tandem cockpit airplane, who was sitting in the rear seat, reported that during the takeoff roll, the airplane veered off the left side of the runway and ground looped. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing.

The pilot reported no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot reported that he did not have any experience piloting a tailwheel equipped airplane from the rear seat and he could not see the instruments with the passenger seated in the front seat.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's loss of directional control during the takeoff roll, which resulted in a runway excursion, ground loop, and impact with terrain. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's lack of experience from the back seat.

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N602ND, UND Aerospace Foundation: Accident occurred October 06, 2016 at Phoenix–Mesa Gateway Airport (KIWA), Mesa, Maricopa County, Arizona

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

UND Aerospace Foundation: http://registry.faa.gov/N602ND

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA014
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 06, 2016 in Phoenix, AZ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/05/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N602ND
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The operator reported that, during a training flight, the flight instructor attempted a go-around on runway 30 right. When power was applied, the airplane yawed to the left, struck a runway remaining sign, and bounced off the ground. The flight instructor moved the throttle to idle, and the airplane settled to the ground and rolled onto runway 30 center and then stopped. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the aft fuselage bulkhead and horizontal stabilizer.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The flight instructor’s delayed remedial action, which resulted in his failure to maintain directional control during a go-around and a runway excursion. 

Stinson 108-3 Voyager, N4210C: Accident occurred October 06, 2016 in Rifle, Garfield County, Colorado

http://registry.faa.gov/N4210C

AIRCRAFT CRASHED DURING LANDING. RIFLE, COLORADO  

Date: 06-OCT-16
Time: 16:20:00Z
Regis#: N4210C
Aircraft Make: STINSON
Aircraft Model: 108
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Substantial
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: RIFLE
State: Colorado

Piper PA-24-260, N8560P: Accident occurred October 06, 2016 in Hollywood, Jackson County, Alabama

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham, Alabama 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N8560P

Location: Hollywood, AL
Accident Number: ERA17LA006
Date & Time: 10/06/2016, 1015 CDT
Registration: N8560P
Aircraft: PIPER PA24
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On October 6, 2016, about 1015 central daylight time, a Piper PA-24-260, N8560P, was substantially damaged following a total loss of engine power and forced landing near Hollywood, Alabama. The commercial pilot and a flight instructor were not injured. The airplane was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated from Scottsboro Municipal Airport (4A6), Scottsboro, Alabama, about 1000.

The pilot reported that he was accomplishing a flight review and his flight instructor was in the right cockpit seat. Ground operations and the engine run-up were normal. The pilot performed the takeoff and continued on runway heading to 3,000 ft mean sea level. Once level at 3,000 feet, the pilot retarded the throttle to 22-23 inches of manifold pressure. Immediately after retarding the throttle, the engine lost all power. The electric boost pump was turned on; however, the engine did not recover. There was no pressure observed on the fuel pressure gauge. The flight instructor assumed the controls and established best glide speed. A field was chosen for a forced landing and the flight instructor landed the airplane. After touchdown, the airplane struck an embankment before coming to a stop on a dirt road. The pilot and flight instructor exited the airplane and were met by first responders.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. There was structural damage to the wings and the engine firewall. One propeller blade was straight and the other was bent aft.

The inspector examined the engine and found no evidence of a mechanical failure or anomaly. Internal engine continuity was confirmed. Compression and suction were observed on all cylinders and valve action was correct. There was an adequate supply of oil in the engine case.

All fuel tanks contained an adequate supply of fuel. Examination of the fuel selector valve revealed that the valve was stuck in the partially closed position, restricting fuel flow to the engine. Moving the tank selector handle did not open the valve. 

Pilot Information


Certificate: Commercial
Age: 47, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/05/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  946 hours (Total, all aircraft), 638 hours (Total, this make and model)

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 73, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s):
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/06/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/13/2015
Flight Time:  23000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 100 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N8560P
Model/Series: PA24 260
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1964
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 24-4017
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3201 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4076 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-540-D4A5
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 260 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: 4A6, 650 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1035 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 30°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 80°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.17 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 14°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:  No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Scottsboro, AL (4A6)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination:  Scottsboro, AL (4A6)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1000 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information


Airport: Scottsboro Municipal (4A6)
Runway Surface Type:
Airport Elevation: 650 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  34.692222, -86.010000 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA006

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 06, 2016 in Hollywood, AL
Aircraft: PIPER PA24, registration: N8560P
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On October 6, 2016, about 1030 central daylight time, a Piper PA-24-260, N8560P, was substantially damaged following a total loss of engine power and forced landing near Hollywood, Alabama. The commercial pilot and a flight instructor were not injured. The airplane was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated from Scottsboro Municipal Airport (4A6), Scottsboro, Alabama, about 1020.


The pilot reported that he was accomplishing a flight review and his flight instructor was in the right cockpit seat. Ground operations and the engine run-up were normal. The pilot performed the takeoff and continued on runway heading to 3,000 feet mean sea level. Once level at 3,000 feet, the pilot retarded the throttle to 22-23 inches of manifold pressure. Immediately after retarding the throttle, the engine lost all power. The electric boost pump was turned on; however, the engine did not recover. There was no pressure observed on the fuel pressure gauge. The flight instructor assumed the controls and established best glide speed. A field was chosen for a forced landing and the flight instructor landed the airplane. After touchdown, the airplane struck an embankment before coming to a stop on a dirt road. The pilot and flight instructor exited the airplane and were met by first responders.


An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. There was structural damage to the wings and the engine firewall. One propeller blade was straight and the other was bent aft. All fuel tanks contained an adequate supply of fuel. Internal engine continuity was confirmed.


The wreckage was retained for further examination.