Tuesday, March 23, 2021

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N2164Z: Accident occurred March 23, 2021 near Paine Field (KPAE), Everett, Snohomish County, Washington

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle, Washington 

Boeing Employees Flying Association Inc


Location: Everett, WA 
Accident Number: WPR21LA140
Date & Time: March 23, 2021, 09:00 Local
Registration: N2164Z
Aircraft: Cessna 172S
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On March 23, 2021, about 0900 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 172S airplane, N216Z, sustained substantial damage when it was involved in an accident at near Everett, Washington.

The pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot stated that he departed Paine Field (PAE), Everett, Washington with the intended destination of Yakima, Washington. He arrived at the airport early in the morning and determined that the fuel tanks were about three-quarter full on each wing (looking at the fuel gauges). He then attempted to top off both tanks at the self-serve fuel station but determined that the tanks were nearly full.

During takeoff roll, the airplane accelerated to about 55 knots at which point he rotated and began the initial climb. Several seconds later, with the airplane about 100 ft above ground level, the engine began to sputter. The pilot transmitted to the control tower that he was experiencing an engine failure and made a left turn in an attempt to land on the smaller parallel runway to the east. At that time, the engine experienced a total loss of power and he was unable to maintain altitude.

During the emergency landing, the airplane collided with the trees and came to rest about 500 feet east of the threshold for runway 34L with the nose pointing in the opposite direction of travel. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N2164Z
Model/Series: 172S Aircraft
Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot school (141)
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting: 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor 
Latitude, Longitude: 47.907317,-122.28209 (est)
 
 






EVERETT, Washington -- A small plane crashed at Paine Field Tuesday morning but luckily no one was hurt.

The Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP crashed just after taking off from Runway 16 Right around 9 a.m., according to the FAA.

The pilot was able to walk away uninjured after the crash, according to Kent Patton, spokesperson for Paine Field Airport.

There is also no word yet what caused the crash. The FAA will be investigating.

New York City Helicopter Crash Exposes Deadly Loophole for Aerial Sightseeing

  


The five people who signed up for a helicopter sightseeing flight above New York City three years ago might have expected that aviation regulators were looking after their safety.

But the reality of that fatal flight on March 11, 2018, was very different. The operator had declared that it was an “aerial photography” flight that made it exempt from stricter commercial rules.

After the aircraft lost power and splashed down in the East River, all five drowned because they were tethered into the seats with restraints that hadn’t been approved for safety, investigators concluded.

They were among more than 40 people killed since 2016 in air tours and other flights-for-hire that are exempt from commercial aviation safety rules, the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board said at a meeting Tuesday. The NTSB issued six recommendations for tighter rules over such flights that operate commercially and reiterated three earlier recommendations.

Typically, carrying passengers for hire triggers more government oversight, said NTSB Chairman Robert Sumwalt, “that is, unless you get an exception, an exemption, an omission or an exploitation of a loophole in the regulations.”

The flights include World War II aircraft, hot-air balloons, planes carrying parachutists and some air tours, according to the NTSB.

“I think the public in general would be really surprised by what is required of these operations and not required,” NTSB board member Jennifer Homendy said.

Unlike typical commercial operations, these flights that fall through the regulatory cracks don’t have to have approved maintenance or pilot training programs. There also aren’t rules for drug and alcohol testing or limits on how long a pilot can work each day.

Paid sightseeing trips aboard gliders are treated as if they are lightly regulated private flights because there are no federal regulations governing them, the NTSB said.

In addition to the 2018 helicopter crash, multiple cases illustrate the loopholes, according to NTSB records:

On Oct. 2, 2019, a 75-year-old B-17 bomber crashed in Windsor Locks, Connecticut, killing seven people. Because it was a historic aircraft, the operator had an exemption from the normal Federal Aviation Administration commercial rules and had had little or no contact with agency inspectors in the two years before the crash.

A hot-air balloon crashed near Lockhart, Texas, on July 30, 2016, killing all 16 people aboard in the deadliest U.S. aviation accident since 2009. The pilot had multiple health problems that should have prevented him from flying and had taken prohibited drugs, but balloon pilots are exempt from receiving medical checks most others must get.

A turboprop carrying parachute jumpers slammed into the ground shortly after takeoff from an airport in Mokuleia, Hawaii, on June 21, 2019, killing all 11 people aboard. Even though the parachutists had paid for the flight, it was regulated as if it were being operated by a private pilot.

A pilot and his passenger died on Oct. 21, 2017, in Four Corners, California, after losing control during a “Top Gun” acrobatic demonstration. Normally, such flights would be considered commercial and subject to higher FAA scrutiny, but this one was being operated under an exception for “flight training.”

The FAA, which is charged with regulating the aviation industry and ensuring safety, is crafting new regulations to tighten oversight of balloon pilots and to require more rigorous internal safety organizations for all operators carrying passengers for hire, it said in an emailed statement. After the New York helicopter accident, it also imposed new restrictions on photography flights.

“The FAA has a number of initiatives under way to improve safety” and has worked closely with NTSB on the issue, it said.

The agency has at times faced challenges. A 2018 law setting policy for the FAA required the agency to “streamline” how it approves flights operated by private owners, which includes many of the cases being reviewed by NTSB.

The NTSB is calling on the FAA to take multiple steps to tighten its oversight of companies operating in the less regulated sphere while carrying passengers for hire.

The recommendations call on FAA to identify and close loopholes, develop standards for all operators carrying passengers for hire, give more training and guidance to its safety inspectors and create a database tracking such operations.

Investigators said they don’t want to force small tour operators to shut down or to become regulated as if they were a large commercial airline or charter group. Instead, the FAA should consider creating a new level of regulation appropriate for operations that currently fall through the cracks, said Elliott Simpson, an investigator who led the NTSB review.

The safety board also doesn’t want to add new oversight to flight schools or the thousands of private pilots, Simpson said.

The FAA and other entities receiving recommendations have no legal obligation to follow them, but they must respond and the suggestions often lead to changes.




Eurocopter AS 350B2 Ecureuil, N350LH:   Fatal accident occurred March 11, 2018  in  New York, New York  

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 

Federal Aviation Administration Accident Investigation & Prevention FAA / AVP-100; Washington, District of Columbia
Airbus Helicopters; Grand Prairie, Texas
SAFRAN Helicopter Engines; Grand Prairie, Texas
BEA; Le Bourget, FN
Liberty Helicopters Inc.; Kearny, New Jersey
NYONair; Kearny, New Jersey 
Dart Aerospace; San Diego, California 
Transportation Safety Board of Canada; Ottawa 
Transport Canada; Ottawa 
EuroTec Canada Ltd; Millgrove, Ontario 
European Aviation Safety Agency; Cologne, Germany 

Location: New York, NY
Accident Number: ERA18MA099
Date & Time: 03/11/2018, 1908 EDT
Registration: N350LH
Aircraft: AMERICAN EUROCOPTER CORP AS350B2
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Miscellaneous/other
Injuries: 5 Fatal, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Other Work Use - Sightseeing

Analysis 

The Safety Board's full report is available at http://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/AccidentReports/Pages/aviation.aspx. The Aircraft Accident Report number is NTSB/AAR-19/04.

On March 11, 2018, about 1908 eastern daylight time, an Airbus Helicopters AS350 B2, N350LH, lost engine power during cruise flight, and the pilot performed an autorotative descent and ditching on the East River in New York, New York. The pilot sustained minor injuries, the five passengers drowned, and the helicopter was substantially damaged. The FlyNYON-branded flight was operated by Liberty Helicopters Inc. (Liberty), per a contractual agreement with NYONair; both companies considered the flight to be an aerial photography flight operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. (During this accident investigation, the Federal Aviation Administration determined that Liberty operated the flight as a nonstop commercial air tour under 14 CFR Part 91.) Visual flight rules weather conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the intended 30-minute local flight, which departed from Helo Kearny Heliport, Kearny, New Jersey, about 1850. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
Liberty Helicopters Inc.'s use of a NYONair-provided passenger harness/tether system, which caught on and activated the floor-mounted engine fuel shutoff lever and resulted in the in-flight loss of engine power and the subsequent ditching. Contributing to this accident were (1) Liberty's and NYONair's deficient safety management, which did not adequately mitigate foreseeable risks associated with the harness/tether system interfering with the floor-mounted controls and hindering passenger egress; (2) Liberty allowing NYONair to influence the operational control of Liberty's FlyNYON flights; and (3) the Federal Aviation Administration's inadequate oversight of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 revenue passenger-carrying operations. Contributing to the severity of the accident were (1) the rapid capsizing of the helicopter due to partial inflation of the emergency flotation system and (2) Liberty and NYONair's use of the harness/tether system that hindered passenger egress.

Findings

Aircraft
Flight compartment equipment - Design (Cause)
Fuel selector/shutoff valve - Unintentional use/operation (Cause)
Emergency floatation section - Design (Factor)
Passenger compartment equip - Unnecessary use/operation (Factor)

Organizational issues
Safety - Operator (Factor)
Adherence to safety program - Operator (Factor)
Oversight of operation - Operator (Factor)
Safety - Other institution/organization (Factor)
Availability of safety program - Other institution/organization (Factor)
Oversight of operation - FAA/Regulator (Factor)
Regulatory requirements - FAA/Regulator (Factor)
Adequacy of policy/proc - FAA/Regulator (Factor)

Factual Information 

The Safety Board's full report is available at http://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/AccidentReports/Pages/aviation.aspx. The Aircraft Accident Report number is NTSB/AAR-19/04.

On March 11, 2018, about 1908 eastern daylight time, an Airbus Helicopters AS350 B2, N350LH, lost engine power during cruise flight, and the pilot performed an autorotative descent and ditching on the East River in New York, New York. The pilot sustained minor injuries, the five passengers drowned, and the helicopter was substantially damaged. The FlyNYON-branded flight was operated by Liberty Helicopters Inc. (Liberty), per a contractual agreement with NYONair; both companies considered the flight to be an aerial photography flight operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. (During this accident investigation, the Federal Aviation Administration determined that Liberty operated the flight as a nonstop commercial air tour under 14 CFR Part 91.) Visual flight rules weather conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the intended 30-minute local flight, which departed from Helo Kearny Heliport, Kearny, New Jersey, about 1850. 

History of Flight

Prior to flight
Miscellaneous/other (Defining event)

Maneuvering
Fuel starvation
Loss of engine power (total)

Emergency descent
Attempted remediation/recovery
Off-field or emergency landing

Landing
Roll over

After landing
Evacuation
Miscellaneous/other 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 33, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Helicopter; Instrument Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/27/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/21/2018
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 3100 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1430 hours (Total, this make and model), 3020 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 57 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 33 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: AMERICAN EUROCOPTER CORP
Registration: N350LH
Model/Series: AS350B2
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2013
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 7654
Landing Gear Type: Emergency Float; High Skid
Seats: 7
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/06/2018, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 4961 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 14 Hours
Engines: 1 Turbo Shaft
Airframe Total Time: 5510.2 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Turbomeca
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: Arriel 1D1
Registered Owner: MERIDIAN CONSULTING CORP INC
Rated Power: 712 hp
Operator: LIBERTY HELICOPTERS INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Certificate of Authorization or Waiver (COA); On-demand Air Taxi (135)
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code: OEMJ

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Dusk
Observation Facility, Elevation: LGA, 21 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1914 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 88°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 250 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 330°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.06 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 7°C / -6°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: KEARNY, NJ (65NJ)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Destination: KEARNY, NJ (65NJ)
Type of Clearance: Traffic Advisory; VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 1850 EDT
Type of Airspace: Air Traffic Control; Class B 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 5 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 5 Fatal, 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 40.775556, -73.940000

Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche, N7588Y: Accident occurred March 22, 2021 in Valparaiso, Porter County, Indiana

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Chicago, Illinois

J-Bird Flight Training LLC


Location: Valparaiso, IN 
Accident Number: CEN21LA171
Date & Time: March 22, 2021, 12:30 Local 
Registration: N7588Y
Aircraft: Piper PA-30
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On March 22, 2021, about 1230 central daylight time, a Piper PA-30 airplane, N7588Y, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Valparaiso, Indiana. The two commercial pilots were not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot was practicing instrument approaches with a safety pilot. While in cruise after 2.6 flight hours, the left engine rpm decreased and the pilot diverted toward Porter County Airport (VPZ), Valparaiso. The pilot subsequently feathered the left engine propeller to reduce drag. While the airplane was on final to VPZ, the right engine lost power and the pilot made a forced landing into a field, which damaged the fuselage.

Initial examination revealed both auxiliary fuel tanks were empty. When each engine lost power, the pilots recalled the respective fuel selector was in the auxiliary tank position and the respective fuel gage indicated more than ½ tank full. The airplane was retained for
examination of the fuel system.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper 
Registration: N7588Y
Model/Series: PA-30
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot school (141)
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: VPZ,770 ft msl
Observation Time: 12:56 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C /3°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 13 knots / 22 knots, 200°
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Valparaiso, IN (VPZ)
Destination: Valparaiso, IN (VPZ)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 41.451359,-86.93296 (est)



LaPorte County Sheriff's Office

This afternoon (03/22/21) at 12:45 PM, Deputies Jake Pisowicz and David Francis were dispatched to the area of US 421 and CR 1100 South, rural Clinton Township, reference an airplane that went down in the area.

Deputies arrived minutes later and located an airplane in a field on the northeast corner of US 421 and CR 1100 South. The airplane was located approximately 300 yards east of US 421.

The deputies met with the pilot and passenger, both of whom were uninjured. The pilot of the 1965 Piper Twin Comanche reported to the deputies that the aircraft’s engines failed, resulting in the emergency landing.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will continue the investigation.

Assisting: Captain Dallas Smythe, Sergeant Jeff Wright and Deputy Alex Pishkur.



CHICAGO (WLS) -- A plane force landed in the middle of a LaPorte County field in northwest Indiana Monday afternoon.

Chopper 7 flew over the scene, about 5 miles east of the Porter County Regional Airport, around 4 p.m.

So far, there are no reports of any major injuries.

The LaPorte County Sheriff's Office has responded to the scene.

Europa, N96EG: Incident occurred March 22, 2021 at Key West International Airport (KEYW), Monroe County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Aircraft landed gear up. 


Date: 22-MAR-21
Time: 13:28:00Z
Regis#: N96EG
Aircraft Make: EUROPA
Aircraft Model: EUROPA
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: KEY WEST
State: FLORIDA

Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub, N590DC: Incident occurred March 21, 2021 at Whittier Airport (PAWR), Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances and became disabled on runway. 

Majestic Mountain Outfitters Inc


Date: 21-MAR-21
Time: 23:00:00Z
Regis#: N590DC
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA18
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 91
City: WHITTIER
State: ALASKA

Bellanca 17-31ATC Super Viking, N8800V: Incident occurred March 20, 2021 at Four Corners Regional Airport (KFMN), Farmington, San Juan County, New Mexico

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque, New Mexico

Aircraft lost directional control after landing and veered off runway striking a runway light. 


Date: 20-MAR-21
Time: 19:45:00Z
Regis#: N8800V
Aircraft Make: BELLANCA
Aircraft Model: 17-31ATC
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: FARMINGTON
State: NEW MEXICO

Mooney M20K, N231NK: Incident occurred December 17, 2020 near Barwick Lafayette Airport (9A5), Walker County, Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Crashed in a field three (3) miles northeast of Barwick Lafayette Airport due to engine failure.


Date: 17-DEC-20
Time: 21:52:00Z
Regis#: N231NK
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20K
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: LAFAYETTE
State: GEORGIA





















AIRCRAFT: 1979 Mooney M20K N231NK, s/n: 25-0222, Current Total Time: 1904 

*THE AIRFRAME DATA TAG HAS BEEN REMOVED*

ENGINE: Continental TSIO-360-GB1  S/N 309228  TT 1,904   SMOH 214     

PROPELLER:  McCauley 2A34C216, s/n: 796042, TT 1904

EQUIPMENT:  
Garmin GNS 430
King KY 197
King KT 76C
King KN 53
Garmin GMA 340
(2) Garmin G5s
3M Stormscope
Garmin GFC 500 Auto Pilot

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:   On 12/17/20, N231NK made an emergency landing in a cow pasture after an engine failure. Fuel exhaustion was the suspected cause but that has not been confirmed.  There was not a catastrophic engine failure.

DAMAGE:  The damage includes, but may not be limited to: 

-The McCauley two blade propeller sustained damage to both blades

-Due to the propeller strike, the Continental TSIO-360 will require a tear down inspection

-The left and right nose gear doors were damaged

-The left and right cowl flaps were damaged

-There are several antennas mounted to the belly that were damaged

-There is a total of 7 belly sheet metal panels that were damaged

-The aerodynamic flap hangar covers were damaged

-The pitot tube and its mounting plate were bent

-The lower engine cowl will require repair

-There is some structural damage to the nose section of the aircraft

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:  Gann Aviation, Lafayette, GA

WARRANTY:  There is no warranty, express or implied for the information provided herein or the condition, usability, workability, operability or marketability of the aircraft salvage.  All times are approximate and the logbooks and aircraft should be inspected by each bidder BEFORE BIDDING.  Failure of the bidder to view the salvage or wreckage, or confirm any information provided is NOT grounds for a claim or withdrawal of bid after bid closing date.)

HOURS estimated from logbooks or other information - not guaranteed or warranted.

REMARKS: 
*THE AIRFRAME DATA TAG HAS BEEN REMOVED* 

*Insurer reserves the right to reject any and all bids. 

*Salvage is as is/where is. 

*The posting information is the best to our knowledge. 

*An inspection of the salvage is highly recommended. 

 *LOGS ARE NOT GUARANTEED TO BE ACCURATE OR COMPLETE

Read more here: http://www.avclaims.com

Taylorcraft BC12-D, N43300: Accident occurred March 03, 2021 in Copper Center, Alaska

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.


Location: Copper Center, AK
Accident Number: ANC21LA023
Date & Time: March 3, 2021, 15:50 Local 
Registration: N43300
Aircraft: Taylorcraft BC12-D
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Taylorcraft
Registration: N43300
Model/Series: BC12-D
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAAQ,230 ft msl
Observation Time: 15:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 48 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -7°C /-13°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.55 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Copper Center, AK
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 61.378994,-147.4821 

Sonex Waiex, N220JD: Incident occurred March 22, 2021 near Doylestown Airport (KDYL), Bucks County, Pennsylvania



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania


Date: 22-MAR-21
Time: 19:47:00Z
Regis#: N220JD
Aircraft Make: SONEX
Aircraft Model: WAIEX
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: DOYLESTOWN
State: PENNSYLVANIA




Doylestown Fire Company No. 1

Crews responded to Tactical Box 19025 in the 3600blk of Old Easton Road at 1550hrs for a small aircraft reported down. Investigation found a fixed wing single-engine aircraft short of Runway 5 at Doylestown Airport in Buckingham Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Fortunately, no injuries. We assisted the pilot as needed. Incident turned over to Airport Authority.



DOYLESTOWN, Pennsylvania (CBS) — A experimental aircraft  landed in a field near Doylestown Airport this afternoon. A truck towed it to the hangar area. There is no word on any injuries.