Saturday, May 6, 2017

Lawsuit casts pall over Planes of Fame Airshow at Chino Airport (KCNO), San Bernardino County, California




CHINO >> More than 50 historic planes were in the air and thousands of people were on the ground Saturday for the first day of the 60th annual Planes of Fame Airshow at the Chino Airport.

The show had briefly appeared in jeopardy, after a group of five tenants at the airport, including Yanks Air Museum and Flying Tigers Aviation, sued to stop it.

The tenants dropped their motion for a preliminary injunction to stop this year’s show, but said they plan to continue their legal action to stop future air shows unless changes are made.

The lawsuit alleges that the air show physically blocks and obstructs businesses at the airport from operating by erecting fences and other barriers that keep would-be customers from accessing their businesses, creating traffic jams that keep customers away. It further alleges that the show hurts their businesses by shutting down the air space, which grounds flight schools and other businesses not affiliated with the show.

The show is presented by Planes of Fame Air Museum, which is also located at the Chino Airport.

Indeed, Yanks Air Museum was blocked off Saturday. Drivers shuttling attendees from the front gate to the air show pointed out Yanks as they drove by and noted its regular hours — 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays — but did not mention the lawsuit.

Most attendees, though, said they were familiar with the dispute — and saddened by it.

“They should support each other — one hand can’t clap,” said James Claude ‘J.C.’ Stoughton. “These businesses that are suing, did they not know about the air show when they started their businesses?”

Stoughton, a retired lieutenant colonel in the Marine Corps, was visiting with 31 other veterans of the VMF 215 Aero Club.

“I’ve come here every year since 2004,” he said. “We stop by Flo’s Cafe (at the airport) — the best chicken-fried steak in the West — watch the show and reminisce.

“Then we find the Budweiser tent and can’t remember it the next day,” joked Stoughton, of Lebec, in Kern County.

The air show included multiple aircraft on the ground available for tours, ranging from planes just slightly longer than a person to the C-130J, which is 113 feet long and has a wingspan of 133 feet.

A panel discussion with veterans, military vehicles, a ‘kids zone,’ and food and drink were also available.

And in the air, as many as a dozen planes at a time circled spectators and did acrobatics, while announcers gave running commentary and sometimes played the radio traffic from pilots as they flew.

“Even though Rob is 67,” an announcer said as Rob ‘The Tumbling Bear’ Harrison flew his yellow Zlin 50 LX straight up, “he sometimes acts like he’s 7 or 6.”

The advancing age of many attendees is a concern for air shows and the industry generally, said Dave Francis, 67.

“Just about everyone here looks like us,” said Francis, who drove up from Lakeside, in San Diego County, with his wife to meet a good friend from Huntington Beach and spend the day at the air show. “That’s why it’s disappointing they couldn’t work out the lawsuit. I’m sure there’s more going on behind the scenes that we don’t know about, but it seems like it should be an opportunity for synergy.”

Francis said he’s been coming to this air show since the 1980s. He hasn’t noticed any major changes, but he thinks the closing of other air shows has increased attendance in Chino.

The lawsuit’s plaintiffs, who couldn’t be reached Saturday, have previously said they support the air show in theory, but want it run in a way that makes their businesses accessible.

“We feel it’s important to clarify that we are not anti-air show,” Yanks Air Museum said in an earlier Facebook post. “We are against the way that this air show is being operated. Our invitation to Planes of Fame to sit down at the table and resolve this is still open but they have made no attempts to talk with us and our counsel.”

The lawsuit alleges that even though the event lasts two days, the setup and takedown extend the event’s impact to an entire week.

Slight rain did not deter Saturday’s show, and organizers say Sunday will also go on regardless of weather.

Gates re-open at 8 a.m. Sunday, with a flying show from 10:40 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gates close at 5 p.m.

General admission is $25, with free admission for children under 12.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.sbsun.com

Incident occurred May 06, 2017: Shed containing airplanes, plane parts goes up in flames near Phoenix Deer Valley Airport (KDVT), Arizona



PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -  Phoenix firefighters battled a fire in a shed containing airplanes and airplane parts near Deer Valley Airport on Saturday afternoon.  

Crews had to battle strong wind and had trouble accessing the shed which is tucked away in the neighborhood near Beardsley and 30th Street.

"So it didn't extend to some of these mobile homes," says Capt. Troy Caskey.  "Which is another thing, you've got the wind pushing that fire and flame."



Caskey says the call came in as an explosion.  Firefighters were concerned about what type of chemicals would be inside the work shed.

"You have solvents, cleaners, oils different things like that," says Caskey.  "So there were things that can burn in there, some wood shelving. Stuff like that we're looking into."

Caskey says this is a reminder how important it is for homeowners to clear 30 feet of defensible space around their homes.  Homeowners are encouraged to get rid of dead brush and leaves and keep flammables at a distance.



"You have oleanders, you have dried palm fronds, all kinds of things that can really accentuate the amount of fire and the speed in which it travels," says Caskey.

Smoke could be seen from Loop 101 and Cave Creek Road.  The cause of the fire is under investigation.

The shed was located near 2900 Walhalla Lane. According to Phoenix FD, the cause of the fire is still under investigation.

Story and video:   http://www.azfamily.com

Cirrus SR22 G3, N271TS, Eagle Flyers LLC: Fatal accident occurred May 05, 2017 at Clearwater Air Park (KCLW), Pinellas County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Tampa, Florida
Cirrus Aircraft; Duluth, Minnesota 
Continental Motors Inc; Mobile, Florida 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Eagle Flyers LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N271TS

NTSB Identification: ERA17FA174
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 05, 2017 in Clearwater, FL
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N271TS
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 5, 2017, about 1925 eastern daylight time, a Cirrus SR22, N271TS, impacted terrain while attempting to land at the Clearwater Airpark (CLW), Clearwater, Florida. The private pilot was fatally injured and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to a private company and operated as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the airport at the time of the accident. No flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Plantation Airpark (JYL), Sylvania, Georgia, about 1711, and was destined for CLW.

A preliminary review of air traffic control (ATC) communications revealed the flight originated about 1103 from the Groton-New London Airport (GON), Groton, Connecticut, and was destined for the Hagerstown Regional Airport - James A. Henson Field (HGR), Hagerstown, Maryland. While en route, the pilot diverted to JYL. After departing JYL, the pilot requested flight following services from ATC. When the airplane was about 8 miles north of CLW, about 1918, radar services were terminated and the pilot proceeded to CLW.

Another pilot was entering the traffic pattern at CLW when he heard the accident pilot announce over the airport's common traffic advisory frequency frequency that he was west of the airport and inbound for landing. The other pilot told the accident pilot that there was a noise restriction on the west side of the airport and that he would need to enter the traffic pattern from the east. The accident pilot acknowledged and told the other pilot that he would follow him in. The other pilot said he could see storms approaching the airport. When he crossed over the approach end of the runway to try and land, the winds became increasingly strong and gusty. The pilot said it took him a long time to get the airplane on the ground and he had to use full aileron deflection to maintain control. He said there was wind shear, but he could not estimate the speed or direction of the shear; however, he estimated the wind was between 240 and 270 degrees at a velocity of about 40 knots.

The pilot said that he saw the accident airplane on downwind, while he was on final approach, and was aware that he was close behind him in the pattern, so he cleared the runway quickly. He then radioed the accident pilot and told him the wind was "snotty" at the approach end of the runway and to be careful. The accident pilot acknowledged. The other pilot then taxied to his parking spot and did not see the accident airplane land. The pilot said that after he parked his airplane the wind was blowing so hard that it was struggle to get the canopy cover on his airplane. It had also started to rain. The pilot was unaware that the accident airplane had crashed until he heard sirens on the airport and responded to the location of the accident.

An airport employee observed the accident airplane on a final approach for runway 16. He said it was very windy and gusty, and storms were approaching the airport. The employee said the airplane appeared to make a normal approach to the airport before it disappeared from his view. The employee then heard the airplane's engine go to full power. He said the airplane entered a vertical climb before it rolled left onto its back. The airplane then descended while traveling toward the east inverted before it disappeared from view. The witness said he knew the airplane was going to crash and started yelling for someone to call 911. He then responded to the accident site and saw fuel draining from the airplane.

The airplane came to rest inverted on a magnetic heading of 073° in a dry retention pond just east of the runway. The initial impact point was a ground scar. Embedded in the scar were pieces of the left wing tip. The main wreckage, which include the empennage, fuselage, the right wing, portions of the left wing, and the engine and propeller, were located about 50 ft east of the initial impact point. The left wing was fractured just outboard of the flap, and the wing tip had separated. There was no post-impact fire and the onboard ballistic recovery system (parachute) was not deployed. The roof of the airplane had collided with an elevated storm drain that was made of concrete. A section of the airplane's roof and door were found at the base of the drain. Propeller marks were also observed on the aluminum guard-rail that was attached to the drain. Flight control continuity was established for all major flight control surfaces to the cockpit area. The flap actuator indicated the flaps were fully extended. The pitch trim motor was found near the neutral trim position and the roll trim motor was found in an approximate full left roll position. Both front seats were equipped with airbags and both bags were deployed. The pilot's four-point seat belt/shoulder harness assembly had been cut by rescue personnel.

The engine remained partially attached to the airplane and the three-bladed propeller remained attached to the engine. All three blades were bent aft and exhibited polishing at the tips. The spinner exhibited only minor damage. Examination of the engine revealed it had sustained some impact damage, but the accessories remained on the engine. The fuel pump was removed and some fuel was observed in the chamber. The fuel coupling was not broken. The engine was manually rotated and valve train continuity and compression were established on each cylinder. The top spark plugs were grey in color consistent with normal wear per the Champion Check-A-Plug chart. Spark was observed to each ignition lead when the engine was rotated. The fuel manifold valve was removed and disassembled. Some fuel was noted in the manifold chamber and the screen was absent of debris. Honey-colored oil was observed throughout the engine. The oil pump was pumping oil when the engine was rotated. The oil filter was removed and opened. The filament was absent of debris. No mechanical deficiencies were observed with the engine that would have precluded normal operation at the time of impact.

The airplane was equipped with an Avidyne electronic primary flight display (PFD) and a multi-function display (MFD). The PFD unit and the solid-state memory card from the MFD were recovered from the wreckage for examination and download.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. Review of his logbook revealed that as of April 26, 2017, he had a total of about 244 flights hours, of which, 23.6 hours were in the accident airplane. His last Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical was issued on July 14, 2015, with no waivers or limitations.

Recorded weather at CLW, at 1935, included wind from 280° at 14 knots with gusts to 23 knots, visibility 10 miles, scattered clouds at 3,200 ft, a broken ceiling at 4,500 ft, an overcast ceiling at 6,000 ft, temperature 21° C, dew point 12° C, and an altimeter setting of 29.79 inHg.

Recorded weather at St. Petersburg-Clearwater International Airport (PIE), St. Petersburg, Florida, located about 6 miles southeast of CLW, at 1953, included wind from 270° at 16 knots with gusts to 32 knots, 9 miles visibility, light rain, few clouds at 4,700 ft, a broken ceiling at 5,500 ft, an overcast ceiling at 8,000 ft, temperature 21° C, dew point 13 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.80 inHg. A peak wind was recorded from 260° at 32 knots at 1947 and rain began at 1950.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov


James R. Fink 
November 12, 1972 - May 5, 2017 
Born in Stuttgart, Germany 
Resided in Exeter, Rhode Island 


We are deeply saddened to announce the sudden passing of James R. Fink, 44, of Exeter, RI on May 5, 2017. He was the President of Kleinholz, Inc, a forensic engineering and consulting firm. He is survived by his wife Nicole Arcand, MD, and two fabulous girls, Adalyn and Sydney. He was beloved by his parents, Dr. Theodore and Mrs. Jan Fink, of Shelburne, VT, his brother Michael Fink and his wife Kelsey Barrett Fink, his sister Kathleen Fink Cheeseman and her husband Gareth Cheeseman, his parents-in-law, Dr. Alfred and Mrs. Louise Arcand, of Coventry, RI, Nicole's siblings, their spouses and many nieces and nephews.

Visiting hours are 4:00 - 7:00 P.M. on Friday, May 12, 2017 at the Potvin-Quinn Funeral Home, 45 Curson St., West Warwick, RI 02893.

On Saturday, May 13, 2017 there will be a Celebration of Jim's Life starting at 11:00 A.M., followed by lunch at the Quidnessett Country Club, 950 North Quidnessett Rd, North Kingston, RI 02852.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society (www.nationalmssociety.org) or March of Dimes.






CLEARWATER, Fla. (WFLA) — Clearwater officials have identified a pilot killed in a plane crash Friday night at the Clearwater Airpark.

James R. Fink, 44, of Rhode Island was coming to town for a business conference. Officials say he was flying a 2007 Cirrus fixed wing, single-engine plane when he crashed at the airport.

Landing gear pointed to the sky, the fuselage crumpled, the Cirrus SR22 G3 aircraft sat near a secondary taxiway.

It’s intended point of touchdown was about 50 feet away.

“Somebody here at the airport heard something, heard the crash and called 911. So, that’s when our paramedics and police both responded to the scene,” said Rob Shaw, with the Clearwater Police Department and Fire Rescue.

They pulled the pilot, the only person aboard, out of the cockpit, but there was nothing they could do. He died on the scene.

Eagle 8 HD shows where this accident happened. It’s on the north side of the field, just east of the main runway.

While the FAA and the NTSB will now take over the official investigation to determine what went wrong, weather appears to be a factor.

“I think one of the theories, the plane was landing on runway 16, and about the same time, there’s a lot of gusty winds out here, so about that same time, a gust of wind might have caused it to flip and overturn on its top,” said Shaw.

It appears the plane may have touched down and immediately got caught in the wind, hurling it to the east in a violent toss.

Video taken from the airport office did not catch the plane as it lost control.

“We’re actually gonna appeal to the public is, if you live around this area and you saw or heard anything unusual, please call the Clearwater Police Department.”

Story and video:  http://wfla.com







CLEARWATER (FOX 13) - The NTSB and FAA will lead an investigation into what caused a deadly plane crash at the Clearwater Airpark on Friday night.

Officials identified the pilot as James R. Fink, 44 ,of Exeter, Rhode Island. 

Fink was the only person on board a Cirrus SR22 G3 plane when it crashed around 7:30 p.m. Friday.

An employee at the Airpark called for help after spotting the wreckage in a grassy median beside an airstrip where planes typically take off.

Paramedics pulled Fink from the wreckage, but he died on scene. Clearwater Police said they have reason to believe the victim is not a resident of Tampa Bay.

"From all indications, the aircraft is registered from out of state, so we're not thinking that the person is local, but that's still way up in the air,” said Rob Shaw, spokesperson for Clearwater Police and Fire.

Police said an initial investigation shows the plane may have flipped in the air due to strong winds, causing it to crash upside down before making it to the landing strip.

“We’re waiting on the NTSB and the FAA to come here and take over the official investigation. I think one of the theories is that the plane was landing on runway 1-6, and about the same time, there are a lot of gusty winds out here, so about that same time, a gust of wind might have caused it to flip and overturn on its top,” said Shaw.

The Clearwater Airpark is a popular place for plane enthusiasts and owners of private planes.

Clearwater Police are hoping someone who witnessed the crash or recorded any video, will reach out to them to shed some light on what may have led up to the tragic accident. The NTSB and FAA are expected to arrive in Clearwater at 3 p.m. Saturday to take over the investigation. Clearwater Police said until then, the airstrip will remain closed.

Story and video:  http://www.fox13news.com

Short SD-330, N334AC, Air Cargo Carrier - ACC Integrated Services Inc: Fatal accident occurred May 05, 2017 at Yeager Airport (KCRW), Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charleston 

ACC Integrated Services Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N334AC 

NTSB Identification: DCA17FA109 
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Friday, May 05, 2017 in Charleston, WV
Aircraft: SHORT BROS. & HARLAND SD3 30, registration: N334AC
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 5, 2017 at 6:51 a.m. eastern daylight time (EDT), Air Cargo Carriers flight 1260, a Shorts SD3-30, N334AC, crashed during landing on runway 5 at the Charleston Yeager International Airport (CRW), Charleston, West Virginia. The airplane was destroyed and the two pilots suffered fatal injuries. The flight was operating under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 135 as a cargo flight from Louisville International Airport (SDF), Louisville, Kentucky. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Bill English 
 Bill English is a National Transportation Safety Board Investigator in Charge in the Major Aviation Investigations Division.




Anh Ho

Anh K. Ho
October 21, 1985  -  May 5, 2017

It is with heavy hearts that we announce the passing of our beloved daughter, sister, aunt, and friend, First Officer Anh K. Ho. Anh died at 8:34am on Friday, May 5, 2017 from injuries sustained in a plane crash in Yeager Airport, West Virginia. 

Anh was born on October 21, 1985 in Vietnam, and became an American citizen. From the very first day she could, Anh walked, if not ran, to the beat of her own drum. She was a vibrant soul, one who literally lit up the room whenever she entered. 

Anh also had a spunky and sassy ''edge'' to her, a quality that we all loved and aspired. She loved to explore the world, from the busy streets of Korea to the emerald Isles of Ireland, to the tulips in Amsterdam, and to the wonders of South America. Anh left not just an imprint, but everlasting joy in the hearts of those she met, loved, and befriended. 

Anh had numerous hopes and dreams, but what set Anh apart from others was that those hopes and dreams did not remain simply so. The amazing truth is, once Anh set her mind to something, these hopes and dreams became reality. From the east coast to the west coast for college at the University of California, Irvine, from continent to continent, whatever new interest or hobby came to Anh would be happily pursued, like her love of flying. 

Anh was a researcher, teacher, wanderlust traveler, and fearless pilot, but her most important role was a loyal, dedicated, and committed daughter, sister, aunt, and friend. She will be dearly missed and survived by her mother, Nga Thi Bui, six brothers, four sisters, and over seventeen nieces and nephews. She was also preceded in death by her beloved father Thanh Van Ho.

Service will take place at Mobile Memorial Gardens Funeral Home, 6040 Three Notch Road, Mobile, Alabama 36619 at 9:00 AM.  Contributions in memory of Anh K. Ho may be made to http://www.gofundme.com/anh-ho in lieu of flowers. 

http://www.mobilefuneralservice.com



A cargo plane that crashed Friday at Yeager Airport could be removed as early as Monday, according to a press release from the airport. 

As soon as investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board finish examining the crash site, a wooded area on a slope near the airport, a recovery company will remove the plane.

The plane will be cut into pieces, with each section lifted out of the site by helicopter or crane. Remnants of the plane will be loaded onto flatbed tractor trailers, then removed from the airport.

A wing that was already removed from the crash site is currently in a hangar at the airport. Yeager Airport spokesman Mike Plante said the NTSB is checking every detail of the plane to determine a cause of the crash, from looking at where switches were set to where the pilots were sitting during the crash. They use various methods, including sending a drone to capture footage of the crash scene.

The NTSB is also investigating other factors including how long the two crew members who were killed in the crash were on board the plane.

Plante said the removal process will not affect airport operations. The plane was owned and operated by Milwaukee-based Air Cargo Carriers, a contractor for UPS. After the NTSB’s investigation is complete the plane’s remnants will be released to Air Cargo Carriers’ insurance company.

The two people on the plane, Anh K. Ho, 31, of Cross Lanes, and Johnathan Pablo Alvarado, 47, of Stamford, Texas, died in the crash.

The airport was closed for 30 hours after the crash. According to airport officials, about 1,136 outbound passengers and 1,200 inbound passengers were affected by the airport’s closure.

After the airplane is removed, Clean Harbor, the airport’s environmental contractor, will clean the site to clear any leftover fuel or hydraulic fluid.

West Virginia American Water said water sampled from a creek near the crash site was not contaminated. The creek flows into the Elk River.

NTSB will continue to investigate the cause of the crash.

Plante said a preliminary report of the crash should be released in about a month.

- Original article can be found here:  http://www.wvgazettemail.com



CHARLESTON, W.Va. — The names of the two pilots who died Friday morning in a cargo plane crash at Yeager Airport were released Saturday evening.

Johnathan Pablo Alvarado, 47, of Stamford, Texas, and Anh K. Ho, 31, of Cross Lanes, were working for Air Cargo Carriers. Company president Steve Altnau said their families had been notified.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with the families and friends of Mr. Alvarado and Ms. Ho,” Yeager Airport Police Chief Joe Crawford said.

Meanwhile, the NTSB held its second and final media briefing in Charleston Saturday where investigator-in-charge Bill English told reporters the cargo plane wasn’t required to have a black box.

“This aircraft is not equipped with black boxes, flight data recorder or CVR. It’s not required to by their regulations,” English said during the briefing at Yeager Airport. “Our initial information is that there are no other electronic devices on board that record any significant information.”

English previously said there was no distress call from the crew.




The Short 330, owned by Air Cargo Carriers, struck the runway 340 feet after the beginning of the runway threshold. From that first contact point it skidded a total of 650 feet off the left of the runway and down the hillside, English said.

“It’s in a very thick-wooded area. It’s low brush but very tangled and hard to get at. It’s also very muddy in there, a very slippery clay-type of mud so it’s very slow-going,” he said.

But investigators were able to reach the cockpit Saturday where they began checking instruments and controls.

“All major components have been accounted for,” English said.

Investigators are months away from determining what caused the crash at just before 7 o’clock Friday morning. Those who have viewed a pair of videos said it appeared the plane was coming in hot as it arrived from Louisville filled with UPS packages. Those videos showed it was titled to the left, they said. English said it was too early to began analyzing the information collected so far.

“We’ll be working on that,” he said.

The operations side of the NTSB investigative team is building a history of the pilots including what they were doing 72 hours before the crash along with their training history, English said.

The left wing that separated from the plane shortly after impact was taken to the West Virginia Air National Guard earlier Saturday. The rest of the wreckage will be moved off the hillside in the coming days but that will be a challenge, English said.

“Our plan for the next few days is to finish the documentation of the aircraft and begin the recovery of the aircraft from the woods. It’s going to be quite a difficult process. It’s very difficult to get in there with the dirt road, very slippery mud to get up in there to get the heavy equipment working to get the aircraft out. I’m starting to do that process now. I’ve got a couple of different options to get that out,” English said.

The main fuselage, tail and right wing are all together about 100 feet down the slope from the runway in a hollow of trees. The front part of the aircraft is pointing down the hill toward Barlow Drive. It’s laying on its left side with the right wing folded over the top.

U.S. Senator Shelley Moore Capito attended Saturday’s briefing and said she had confidence in the NTSB to find out what happened.

“You can tell by the professionalism and the way that this has been handled that they know their job, they know what they’re doing and we’re going to get the right answers,” Capito said.

A statement from U.S. Senator Joe Manchin was read at the briefing expressing his thoughts and prayers for the families of the victims.

The airport reopened Saturday afternoon after about a 30-hour shutdown.

The packages on the plane could be turned back over to UPS in the near future, English said.

English said Saturday’s briefing would be the final one in Charleston. He said all other information would come through the NTSB’s media relations office.

Story and video:  http://wvmetronews.com

Ryan Navion B, N5294K: Accident occurred July 30, 2016 at Manitowoc County Airport (KMTW), Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Continental Motors, Inc.; Mobile, Alabama 


Rapier Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N5294K




NTSB Identification: CEN16LA296

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 30, 2016 in Manitowoc, WI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: RYAN NAVION B, registration: N5294K
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the private pilot, the engine run-up, taxi to the runway, and takeoff were normal. After establishing a positive climb rate, the pilot retracted the landing gear. Shortly after the gear retraction, the engine lost total power. The pilot quickly tried to restart the engine without success and then conducted a forced landing on the remaining runway. The airplane impacted the side of the runway and came to rest upright.

An examination of the engine revealed no anomalies. No fuel was found in the fuel lines from the firewall to the engine fuel system components. The fuel selector valve and gascolator were removed for further examination and testing. A vacuum test of the fuel selector valve revealed no anomalies. The gascolator exhibited fuel staining on the top of the casting. A vacuum test of the gascolator revealed that it leaked severely due to degraded rubber gaskets. It is likely that the leaks in the gascolator allowed air to enter the fuel system and resulted in the loss of engine power. The pilot stated that he typically needed to use the electric fuel boost pump in the low position to keep the engine running smoothly during the run-up and taxi until the engine reached normal operating temperature, which was contrary to the airplane checklist that was provided by the pilot.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A leak in the gascolator due to degraded rubber gaskets, which allowed air to enter the fuel system and resulted in fuel starvation and a total loss of engine power during takeoff.

On July 30, 2016, at 1230 central daylight time, a Ryan Navion B single-engine airplane, N5294K, impacted the runway during a forced landing following a loss engine power during initial climb from the Manitowoc County Airport (MTW), Manitowoc, Wisconsin. The private pilot sustained minor injuries, the passenger was not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing. The airplane was registered to Rapier Aviation LLC, Lewes, Delaware, and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

According to the pilot, prior to takeoff, the engine run-up, taxi to the runway, and takeoff were normal with no anomalies noted. After establishing a positive rate of climb, the pilot retracted the landing gear. Shortly after the gear retraction, the engine lost total power. The pilot quickly tried to restart the engine without success. The pilot performed a forced landing back to the remaining runway surface. The airplane impacted the side of the runway and came to rest upright.

Post-accident examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector showed the left wing and forward fuselage were bent. The airplane was recovered to the pilot's hangar for further examination.

On August 8, 2016, the airplane and airplane records were examined at the pilot's hangar by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge, a FAA inspector, and a representative from Continental Motors, Inc (CMI). During the examination, the airplane was resting on its fuselage with the landing gear retracted. Visual examination of the engine showed the fuel system throttle body and fuel metering unit, located on the underside of the engine, were damaged due to the impact. The throttle and mixture control arms were intact and operational. The engine fuel pump was removed and manually rotated with no anomalies noted. No fuel was expelled when the pump was rotated. The fuel pump drive coupling was intact. The engine fuel pump hoses were removed and no fuel was found in the inlet and outlet hoses. The fuel manifold valve was disassembled and a small amount of fuel was present. The fuel nozzles were removed and clear of contaminants. The six engine cylinders were examined with a lighted borescope. The examination did not reveal any damage or unusual wear issues in the cylinders. The engine was manually rotated and continuity of the crankshaft and valve train components was verified. Thumb compression was achieved on all cylinders. Both magnetos produced spark at the individual ignition leads when the engine was manually rotated. During the examination, the fuel selector was observed in the off position. When the fuel selector was selected to each tank position (main, left tip, right tip), fuel drained from the airplane.

During conversations with the pilot, he stated that he started the engine using normal airframe electric fuel boost pump operation (high position to fuel flow peak) and needed to leave the fuel boost pump in the "low" position to keep the engine running after start. The pilot added that the low position was necessary to keep the engine running smoothly during taxi and engine run-up. He stated that after the engine reached normal operating temperature, the fuel boost pump could be turned off and was not required for a smooth running engine. After the accident, the airplane was recovered by local airport personnel to the pilot's hangar. Fuel was noted to be leaking from the airplane and the fuel selector was turned to the off position. The position of the fuel selector prior to being turned off was not determined. The pilot stated he only used the main tank fuel selector position for takeoff and landing phases of flight.

A review the airplane checklist provided by the pilot showed the following related to the fuel boost pump:

Starting Engine:

Fuel Pump On High to Fuel Flow Peak

Fuel Pump Off

The checklist did not indicate any other uses for the fuel boost pump for airplane operation. The source of the checklist was not determined.

On September 15, 2016, the airplane was examined at the pilot's hangar by the NTSB investigator-in-charge and a FAA inspector. An airplane recovery service was used to access the underside of the airplane to examine the fuel system components. The airframe electric fuel boost pump outlet and inlet lines were removed. No fuel was found in the pump outlet line (which connected to engine fuel pump), and fuel drained from the the boost pump inlet line when the fuel selector was moved to each tank position (main, left tip, right tip). Forced air was applied to all fuel lines within the fuel system, and the lines were clear of debris and contaminants. Fuel flowed freely from all tanks to the gascolator to the electric fuel boost pump, and to the engine fuel pump. Approximately 11 gallons of fuel was drained from the main tanks, and an unmeasured amount (more than several gallons) was drained from each tip tank.

The fuel selector and gascolator were removed and vacuum tested for leaks. The gascolator exhibited fuel staining on the top of the casting. Koehler 2201B, ASSY K22 0B was cast in the top cover of the gascolator. The fuel selector vacuum test revealed no leaks or anomalies. The gascolator vacuum test revealed air leaking from the top seal and the gascolator could not achieve a vacuum of 24" (only get to 20") and the bleed down exceeded 5" in less than one minute. The top and bottom seals were comprised of rubber gaskets which were meshed to a wire screen by a glass cylinder. When assembled, the glass cylinder was tightened between two caps which each contained the rubber gaskets and wire mesh. The gascolator was disassembled and the rubber gaskets were hard and immalleable.

On October 26, 2016, at the facilities of Continental Motors, Inc., under the supervision of a NTSB investigator, the engine fuel pump was examined and functionally tested. The fuel pump had been field overhauled as indicated by the non-CMI impression on the lead seal. The fuel pump turned freely and there were no abnormalities present. The fuel pump was flowed on a CMI test bench and functioned through its full range of operation. No adjustments were made to the fuel pump during the test. At 2,600 RPMs, the specification fuel flow (PPH) and specification fuel pressure (PSI) were 149.00 - 150.00 PPH and 33.70 - 34.30 PSI, respectively. The observed PPH and PSI were 149.69 and 29.84, respectively. CMI noted the following for the functional test:

"Fuel System Component Flow/Pressure Test: The "Observed" fuel flows and/or pressures are recorded without adjustment (unless noted) of the fuel system component. The additional values in each table are engineering specifications for the original calibration of the component to insure desired performance within the full range of operation. These tests and adjustments are carried out in an environment of controlled fuel supply pressures and calibrated test equipment.

When engines are installed in aircraft, they are subjected to a different induction system, fuel supply system and operating environment and may require further adjustments to compensate for these differences. It is these differences that may be present in the following test bench recorded values and CMI flow/pressure specifications. These tests are conducted to confirm that the fuel system components will function adequately within its' designed limitations."

CMI's analytical report stated, "The fuel pump assembly was intact and demonstrated the ability to function normally on the test bench."

Sierra Hotel Aero, Inc. (SHA) currently holds the type certificate for the Ryan Navion. In May of 2007, SHA issued Navion Service Bulletin (SB) 106A - Fuel System - Inspection of the fuel system continued safe operation. The purpose of the SB was to require accomplishment of one time inspection of entire fuel system. This included from firewall aft for condition of all fuel lines installed including tip tanks, metal lines, fittings, hoses, vent system, vapor return, boost pump, and fuel strainer. The SB further states, inspect fuel strainer for evidence of fuel staining and leaking. Disassemble strainer and clean fuel screen. Inspect for damage and reassemble. Perform vacuum test of gascolator to include: connect hand operated vacuum pump and apply 24" of vacuum, verify bleed down does not exceed 4" over one minute, replace gaskets, fuel drain and/or gascolator as needed to ensure proper operation.

In April of 2008, the FAA issued an AD 2008-05-14 Sierra Hotel Aero, Inc. The purpose of the AD is to "detect and correct fuel system leaks or improperly operating fuel selector valves, which could result in the disruption of fuel flow to the engine. This failure could lead to engine power loss." The AD allows the owner/operator to follow the SB's issued by SHA or the field service bulletin number one issued by the American Navion Society.

A review of the aircraft records revealed the most recent annual inspection was completed on July 7, 2016, at a hobbs time of 88.9 hours, 3,033.0 total airframe hours, and 1,019.3 total engine hours. According to a major repair and alteration form (FAA Form 337), on June 19, 2009, the original fuel shut off valve was removed and replaced with a new ANS Ltd. fuel valve (part number 145-48000-ANS3) in accordance with the American Navion Society, Ltd, instructions ANS 201 as an alternate means of compliance for airworthiness directive (AD) 2008-05-14. There was no record of compliance with SB 106A.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA296
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 30, 2016 in Manitowoc, WI
Aircraft: RYAN NAVION B, registration: N5294K
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 30, 2016, at 1230 central daylight time, a Ryan Navion B single-engine airplane, N5294K, impacted the runway during a forced landing following a loss engine power during initial climb from the Manitowoc County Airport (MTW), Manitowoc, Wisconsin. The private pilot sustained minor injuries, the passenger was not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing. The airplane was registered to Rapier Aviation LLC, Lewes, Delaware, and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

According to the pilot, prior to takeoff, the engine run-up, taxi to the runway, and takeoff were normal with no anomalies noted. After establishing a positive rate of climb, the pilot retracted the landing gear. Shortly after the gear retraction, the engine lost total power. The pilot quickly tried to restart the engine without success. The pilot performed a forced landing back to the remaining runway surface. The airplane impacted to the side of the runway and came to rest upright.

Postaccident examination of the airplane showed the left wing and forward fuselage were bent. The airplane was retained for further examination.

Cessna 421B, N920MC: Fatal accident occurred January 30, 2006 in Wheeling, Illinois

Appeals panel: Sybaris can't shake potential liability for 2006 plane crash that claimed founder's life

Sybaris Clubs, the company that owns and operates a chain of romantic getaway resorts and hotels in and around the Chicago area, can’t yet shake a lawsuit brought by the family of a man killed in a 2006 airplane crash that also claimed the life of the company’s founder, as a state appeals court said courts have not yet determined how much business the Sybaris founder was doing on the ill-fated trip aboard the aircraft he – and not Sybaris - co-owned.

On May 3, a three-justice panel of the Illinois First District Appellate Court ruled a Cook County judge had improperly granted Sybaris summary judgment in the action. The decision reversing the ruling of Cook County Circuit Judge Irwin J. Solganick was delivered as an unpublished order issued under Supreme Court Rule 23, which limits its use as precedent, except under limited circumstances.

Justice James G. Fitzgerald Smith authored the order, with justices Cynthia Y. Cobbs and Aurelia Pucinski concurring.

“Sybaris repeatedly urges us to decide that it cannot be vicariously liable for negligently entrusting something it did not own or control, but fails to cite case law to that effect,” the justices wrote.

However, they said, “vicarious liability is, in fact, quite broad, and extends to the ‘negligent, willful, malicious, or criminal acts of its employees when those acts are committed within the scope of employment.’

“Sybaris’ argument, then is unconvincing where … an employer’s liability for its employee’s negligent entrustment while that employee is acting within the scope of employment flows not from the employer owning the entrusted instrumentality, but from the employer-employee relationship itself.”

In 2006, Sybaris founder Kenneth Knudson was among a group of businessmen killed in the crash of a Cessna 421B aircraft at Palwaukee Municipal Airport in Wheeling. The Jan. 30 crash also claimed the lives of passengers Scott Garland and Michael Waugh, and Mark Turek, a novice pilot and businessman who was piloting the craft at the time of the crash.

The men had flown together to Kansas earlier that day on a business trip. Turek and Garland were traveling ostensibly on behalf of investment firm Morgan Stanley, while Knudson was purportedly meeting with a potential business partner to discuss opening a hotel near Kansas City, according to court documents. Waugh was general manager and chief operating partner of Joe’s Seafood, Prime Steak & Stone Crab in Chicago.

The aircraft was owned by a corporation established by Knudson and another business partner, for the purposes of operating the aircraft to help conduct Sybaris business. However, the aircraft was not owned by Sybaris, court documents said.

Court documents said Turek was piloting the aircraft to give Knudson a chance to evaluate his flying abilities, and determine if he could be added as a co-owner of the corporate entity that owned the ill-fated aircraft.

According to court documents, before departing the Kansas airport that day, Knudson had expressed misgivings about Turek’s pilot skills, yet had not intervened to prevent Turek from flying the group home to the Chicago area.

The aircraft later crashed while on approach for landing at Palwaukee.

Litigation has wound through the courts in the years since.  Morgan Stanley, for instance, agreed in 2009 to settle with Waugh’s family for $15 million, according to published reports.

However, wrongful death and negligence actions against Sybaris Clubs has continued, despite Sybaris’ repeated attempts to persuade courts to dismiss the action against it, arguing it did not own the aircraft and could not control where it went or who was piloting it.

In 2016, Judge Solganick appeared to grant Sybaris the relief it sought, granting summary judgment to the company over the claims brought by Garland’s family.

On appeal, however, the appellate justices said Solganick’s summary judgment order was issued improperly, as it came despite the appeals court’s 2014 ruling in the case, in which justices said at that time too many questions remain unanswered as to what Knudson was doing on the trip, and whether his business dealings on the trip can render Sybaris at least partially liable for the crash, even though Sybaris did not directly own the aircraft.

With too many questions left outstanding, the justices said Sybaris may yet be sued for Knudson’s alleged decision to allegedly entrust operation of the aircraft to Turek, leading to the crash.

They said they reached that conclusion now, as they did in 2014, while being “fully aware that Sybaris had no ownership interest in the airplane” and while they “recognized that Sybaris was neither an owner nor a de facto owner of the airplane.”

Garland’s widow, Jennifer Garland, is represented in the case by the Clifford Law Offices, of Chicago.

Sybaris was defended by the Hoff Law Group, of Chicago, according to Cook County court records.

Organizations in this Story:

Clifford Law Offices
120 N LaSalle Dr
Chicago, IL 60602

Hoff Law Group
135 S LaSalle St Suite 3300
Chicago, IL 60604

Illinois First District Appellate Court
160 N Lasalle St
Chicago, IL 60601

Cook County Circuit Court
50 W Washington St
Chicago, IL 60602 

Original article can be found here:   http://cookcountyrecord.com




Aviation Accident Final Report -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

National Transportation Safety Board -  Aviation Accident Data Summary: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Additional Participating Entities:
FAA, Dupage FSDO; West Chicago, Illinois 
Cessna Aircraft Company; Wichita, Kansas

Teledyne Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama 

NTSB Identification: CHI06FA076
The docket is stored in the Docket Management System (DMS). Please contact Records Management Division
Accident occurred Monday, January 30, 2006 in Wheeling, IL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/25/2007
Aircraft: Cessna 421B, registration: N920MC
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airplane was destroyed and the occupants fatally injured when it impacted the ground during approach to landing. Examination of the airplane, its engines and propellers, revealed no anomalies that were determined to have existed prior to impact. The propellers were found to have been in their normal operating range and neither propeller was in a feathered position. The quill shafts of both engines showed evidence of damage due to the production of torque. A sound spectrum examination of audio transmissions showed signatures that both engines were operating during the last two radio transmissions from the airplane. Based on radar data, communications and meteorological information obtained during the investigation, the airplane was operating in visual meteorological conditions below an overcast layer of clouds. The radar data showed the airplane as it approached the airport and as it entered a left hand traffic pattern for runway 34. Radio communications confirmed that the airplane had been cleared for a left hand traffic pattern to runway 34. The radar data showed the airplane as it made a turn to the left while its speed decreased to about 82 knots calibrated airspeed as of the last received radar return. This radar return was about 0.1 nautical miles from the accident site and 0.8 nautical miles and 216 degrees from the approach end of runway 34. The airplane owner's manual listed stall speeds ranging from 81 to 94 knots calibrated airspeed for airplane configurations including gear and flaps up to gear down and flaps 15 degrees, and bank angles from 0 to 40 degrees. Flap position could not be determined because the flap chain had separated from the flap drive motor. The owner's manual also listed an approach speed of 103 knots.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain airspeed during the landing approach which led to an inadvertent stall and subsequent uncontrolled descent and impact with the ground.

This narrative was modified on July17, 2007.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On January 30, 2006, at 1829 central standard time (CST), a Cessna model 421B, N920MC, piloted by a private pilot, was destroyed when it impacted the ground in Wheeling, Illinois. The airplane was in the landing traffic pattern for runway 34 at the Palwaukee Municipal Airport (PWK) when the accident occurred. The 14 CFR Part 91 business flight was operating in visual meteorological conditions and was on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan. All four occupants were fatally injured. The airplane had departed from the Johnson County Executive Airport (OJC), Olathe, Kansas, about 1710.

According to communication records, the airplane received an IFR clearance and departed OJC at 1710. The airplane continued its flight to the Chicago area where an ILS runway 16 approach to PWK was executed. The IFR flight plan was cancelled and the airplane was cleared to land on runway 34 at PWK. The airplane subsequently impacted the ground approximately 0.9 miles and 210 degrees from the approach end of runway 34 at PWK.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The individual listed as the pilot in command (PIC) on the aircraft flight plan held a private pilot certificate with single engine land, multiengine land, and instrument airplane ratings. He also held a second class medical certificate that was issued on January 24, 2005. The medical certificate included a restriction that the pilot wear corrective lenses.

A review of the PIC's flight logbooks was conducted. Due to several mathematical errors that were discovered, re-totaling of the individual logbook entries was conducted. These totals revealed that the pilot had accumulated a total of 1,284.05 hours total flight experience including; 161.2 hours in single-engine airplanes, 1,052.65 hours in multiengine airplanes, and 70.2 hours in flight simulator devices. The records showed that 32.75 hours were logged in Cessna 421 airplanes. Of those 32.75 hours, 18.2 hours were obtained prior to the pilot having received the instruction required by 14 CFR 61.31 (g) to act as pilot in command of a pressurized airplane. In addition, of the 32.75 hours logged in Cessna 421 airplanes, 27.5 hours were obtained prior to the pilot having received dual instruction in a Cessna 421 airplane. A total of 5.25 hours of logged dual instruction in Cessna 421 airplanes was recorded in the pilot's logbook.

Another occupant held a commercial pilot certificate with single engine land, multiengine land, and instrument airplane ratings. The single engine rating was limited to private pilot privileges. This pilot also held a third class medical certificate issued on November 10, 2005. The medical certificate included a restriction that the pilot wear corrective lenses for near vision. On his most recent application for his airman medical certificate, he reported having in excess of 2,000 hours of flight experience including 40 hours in the preceding 6 months. The pilot's flight logbooks were not reviewed.

No determination could be made as to which front seat occupant was manipulating the controls prior to or at the time of the accident.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was a Cessna model 421B, serial number 421B0884. It was a twin-engine, low-wing, retractable gear airplane. The airplane was equipped with wing and tail de-icing boots and propeller anti-ice and was approved for flight into known icing conditions. A review of the airframe logbooks revealed that the airplane had accumulated 5,436.8 hours total time in service as of the most recent annual inspection dated December 28, 2005.

The airplane was powered by 2 Teledyne Continental Motors model GTSIO-520-H engines. Each geared engine was rated to produce 375 horsepower at 2,275 propeller rpm. Each engine maintenance logbook was reviewed. During the review, a mathematical error relating to the accumulated time on the left engine was found. After taking this mathematical error into account it was found that the left engine, serial number 267029-R, had accumulated 1,782.8 hours total time and 455.5 hours since overhaul as of the December 28, 2005, annual inspection. The right engine, serial number 267035-R, had also accumulated 1,782.8 hours total time and 455.5 hours since overhaul as of the December 28, 2005, annual inspection.

According to Cessna Aircraft company records, the airplane was originally purchased from Cessna on March 21, 1975. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) registration records showed that the airplane was purchased on August 27, 2004, by the hotel company owned by the pilot rated passenger. On May 12, 2005, the airplane registration was transferred to HK Golden Eagle, Inc. The pilot rated passenger was listed on the FAA registration documents as the president/secretary of HK Golden Eagle, Inc. 

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Depiction Chart for 1900 CST January 30, 2006, depicted a region of IFR conditions over northern Indiana and southwestern Michigan. Surrounding this area was an area of marginal visual flight rules (MVFR) conditions that covered portions of Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan that included the accident site.

The NWS Current Icing Potential for 1800 CST depicted a probability of icing conditions over the Chicago area which ranged from about 10 percent at 3,000 feet, to about 70 percent at 5,000 feet. Several pilot reports of icing were recorded in the hours surrounding the accident time. One aircraft reported moderate rime icing between 2,500 and 7,000 feet about 15 minutes prior to the accident time.

PWK is equipped with an Automated Surface Observation System (ASOS) and is augmented by NWS certified weather observers. The surface observations at PWK reported a mixture of freezing precipitation and snow that started at 0649 CST and turned to light snow and mist which continued on and off through 1648 CST. No major accumulation of ice or snow was reported during the period. The observations surrounding the accident time were as follows:

At 1753 CST, wind from 310 degrees at 13 knots, visibility unrestricted at 10 statute miles, ceiling broken at 2,000 feet above ground level (AGL), overcast at 2,800 feet AGL, temperature -1 degrees Celsius (C), dew point temperature -4 degrees C, altimeter setting 29.81 inches of Mercury (Hg). Remarks: automated observation system, sea level pressure 1010.0 hectopascals (hPa), 6-hour precipitation less than 0.01 inches, temperature -0.6 degrees C, dew point -3.9 degrees C, 12-hour maximum temperature 2.8 degrees C, 12-hour minimum temperature -0.6 degrees C, 3-hour pressure tendency risen 1.9-hPa.

At 1836 CST, wind from 310 degrees at 9 knots, visibility unrestricted at 10 statute miles, ceiling overcast at 2,100 feet AGL, temperature -1 degrees C, dew point temperature -4 degrees C, altimeter setting 29.83 inches of Hg. Remarks: automated observation system, aircraft mishap.

COMMUNICATIONS

Records indicate that an individual called the Columbia Automated Flight Service Station (AFSS) at 1543, filed an IFR flight plan, and obtained weather information for a flight from OJC to PWK. The caller identified N920MC as the registration number of the airplane when filing the flight plan. The caller also indicated that he was the pilot in command and provided his name and telephone number to the AFSS briefer when he filed the flight plan. The complete transcript of this communication is included in the docket material associated with this report.

At 1710, the accident airplane departed OJC and radio contact with air traffic control was established. Between 1710 and 1826, the airplane continued its flight to PWK while maintaining communications with the appropriate ATC facilities. At 1826, communication between the aircraft and the PWK air traffic control tower (ATCT) was established. The following is a transcript of radio communications between N920MC and the PWK ATCT local control (LC) position:

1826:10 N920MC palwaukee tower this is um zero mike charlie over cutey ah inbound for landing

1826:19 PWK-LC golden eagle nine two zero mike charlie report canceling left traffic for three four

1826:23 N920MC left traffic for three four nine two zero mike charlie

1828:11 PWK-LC zero mike charlie you canceling

1828:13 N920MC i'm canceling i f r zero mike charlie

1828:17 PWK-LC zero mike charlie three four clear to land

1828:19 N920MC clear to land nine two zero mike charlie

1828:57 unknown ah

1829:00 unknown (unintelligible)

No further transmissions were received from the accident airplane.

The transcripts and summaries of transmissions between the various ATC facilities and the accident airplane are included in the docket material associated with this report.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

PWK is a tower controlled airport and has three intersecting paved runways. Runway 16/34 was the longest of the airport's runways at 5,000 feet long by 150 feet wide. Runway 34 was the runway in use at the time of the accident. Runways 6/24 and 12/30 were 3,660 feet by 50 feet, and 4,386 feet by 75 feet, respectively. 

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane impacted into an industrial storage yard for a local construction company. The coordinates of the accident site were 42 degrees, 5.960 minutes north latitude, 87 degrees, 54.558 minutes west longitude. The storage yard was paved with concrete and was used to house various construction items including trucks, trailers, and concrete forms.

The aircraft was fragmented and burned during the impact, post-impact explosion and fire. Portions of both wings, the fuselage, and the tail surfaces were found at the accident site. The majority of the fuselage was consumed by the post-impact fire and explosion. The outboard half of the right wing had separated from the airplane. The empennage consisted of burned portions of the horizontal stabilizer, vertical stabilizer, elevator and rudder. The rudder remained attached to the vertical stabilizer, and the melted and burned portions of the elevator remained attached to the horizontal stabilizer.

Examination of the control system confirmed flight control cable continuity from the instrument panel to the tail surfaces. The aileron control cables were traced from the instrument panel to the aileron sector. The four left and right aileron wing cables were traced from the aileron sector to the ailerons. All cable breaks exhibited signatures consistent with tensile overload. Flap position could not be determined because the flap chain had separated from the flap drive motor.

Both engines and propellers were examined at the manufacturer's facilities after removal from the accident scene.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION
Autopsies were performed on both pilots by the Cook County Medical Examiner's Office.

A Forensic Toxicology Fatal Accident Report listed negative results for all tests performed with regard to the pilot in command.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Both engines were examined at the Teledyne Continental Motors facility under the direct supervision of the NTSB investigator in charge.

Examination of the left engine revealed no internal failures that could be determined to have existed prior to the impact. Examination of the quill shaft that connects the engine crankshaft to the gear reduction section of the engine revealed spiral cracking of the case hardened layer of the shaft. The hardness of the shaft was tested and was found to be within the manufacturer's specifications. The spiral cracks were consistent with the application of an excessive torsion load to the shaft.

Examination of the right engine revealed no internal failures that could be determined to have existed prior to the impact. Examination of the quill shaft that connects the engine crankshaft to the gear reduction section of the engine revealed cracking of the case hardened layer of the shaft at the radius adjacent to one of the splined ends. The hardness of the shaft was tested and was found to be within the manufacturer's specifications. 

Examination of the propellers was conducted at the manufacturer's facility under the direct supervision of the NTSB investigator in charge. Both propellers exhibited damage consistent with impact and no indications of a pre-impact failure were found. The left propeller hub was fractured and the propeller blades had separated. The right propeller blades remained attached to the hub. Impact signature marks found on the hub sockets and blade butts indicated that the propeller blades were at pitch angles within the normal operating range of the propeller at the time of the impact. Neither propeller was in a feathered position. The right propeller blades had chordwise scratching consistent with propeller rotation at the time of impact. One of the blades from the left propeller had its outer tip separated and another blade exhibited gouges on its leading edge.

A certified cassette re-recording of communications between the airplane and the PWK ATCT LC position was sent to the National Transportation Safety Board audio laboratory for examination. Six transmissions were examined using an audio spectrum analyzer to identify any background sound signatures that could be associated with either of the airplane's engines or propellers. Several of the transmissions contained background sounds that were identified as having come from the engines/propellers. The first transmission contained a sound signature that equated to a rotational speed of about 2,610 rpm. Only one sound signature was identifiable during this transmission. The last two radio transmissions from the accident airplane also contained identifiable sound signatures which equated to propeller speeds of 2,247/2,296 rpm and 2,082/2,170 rpm respectively. No conclusion could be made as to which engine produced which sound signature.

The Cessna 421 Owner's Manual lists a maximum engine operating speed of 2,275 propeller rpm.

Radar data was obtained from the FAA's Chicago O'Hare Terminal Radar Approach Control facility. The airplane's flight track was plotted on a portion of a Chicago VFR Terminal Area Chart and on a satellite image of the area surrounding the accident site. Both plots are included in the docket material associated with this accident report. 

A review of the radar data was conducted. At 1820, the airplane was at a pressure altitude of 3,900 feet (about 3,800 feet msl), and about 165 knots calibrated airspeed. The airplane was heading in an east-northeast direction as it approached the Northbrook VHF omnidirectional range (VOR) station located 343 degrees and 6.8 nautical miles from PWK. The data showed that the airplane descended as it approached the VOR and leveled its descent at 2,500 feet pressure altitude. During this period of time the calibrated airspeed remained between 150 and 170 knots. The track plot showed that about 1825:30 the airplane made a right turn to a south-southeast heading toward PWK. At 1826:17, the data showed that the airplane's ground track was 175 degrees at a calibrated airspeed of 165 knots and a pressure altitude of 2,000 feet. Over the next 115 seconds, the airplane remained on a southerly heading and the airspeed decreased to 110 knots. At 1828:22, the airplane was about 0.79 nautical miles and 250 degrees from the north end of runway 34 at PWK. At this time the airplane was heading 170 degrees at 110 knots calibrated airspeed at a pressure altitude of 1,400 feet. Between 1828:33 and 1829:03.85, the airplane's heading went from 165 degrees to 124 degrees and during the same interval the calibrated airspeed decreased from 110 knots to 82 knots and the pressure altitude went from 1,400 feet to 1,200 feet. The last radar return was recorded at 1829:03.85. The accident site was located 0.1 nautical miles and 124 degrees from the last recorded radar position. The last recorded radar position was 0.8 nautical miles and 216 degrees from the approach end of runway 34 at PWK. 

The business located where the airplane impacted the ground had external security video cameras located at various locations on the property. One of the security cameras captured the accident airplane while in flight and also three frames of video immediately prior to the explosion on impact. Based on the location of the security camera, several frames of the security video show an aircraft with its landing lights on approaching from the north of the camera location on a southerly heading. The aircraft then travels out of the frame of the video. Approximately 15 seconds later, the airplane re-enters the security video frame and three frames of video were captured prior to the explosion. These three frames of the video show the airplane in a left wing low, near vertical descent. The entire underside of the airplane is visible including the fuselage, wings, horizontal tail, and extended landing gear. Due to the low resolution of the video images, no determination could be made as to flap position. Still images of the three frames prior to the explosion and the first frame showing the explosion are included in the docket material associated with this accident.

The Cessna model 421 Owner's Manual lists the following stall speeds and aircraft configurations for an airplane loaded to 7,450 pound gross weight: 

Stall speed 83 knots calibrated airspeed with landing gear and flaps up and 0 degree bank angle.
Stall speed 85 knots calibrated airspeed with landing gear and flaps up and 20 degree bank angle.
Stall speed 94 knots calibrated airspeed with landing gear and flaps up and 40 degree bank angle.
Stall speed 81 knots calibrated airspeed with landing gear down, flaps 15 degrees down, and 0 degree bank angle.
Stall speed 83 knots calibrated airspeed with landing gear down, flaps 15 degrees down, and 20 degree bank angle.
Stall speed 94 knots calibrated airspeed with landing gear down, flaps 15 degrees down, and 40 degree bank angle.

The Cessna Owner's Manual lists an approach speed of 103 knots indicated airspeed and a minimum single engine control speed of 87 knots indicated airspeed. A review of the airspeed correction table shows a maximum of 2 knots differential between calibrated airspeed and indicated airspeed for speeds between 70 and 110 knots for all flap settings.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The FAA, Cessna Aircraft Company, and Teledyne Continental Motors were parties to the investigation.