Saturday, March 27, 2021

Two World War II pilots remember their time as flyboys

Roy Nolte

Lyle Bradley



FARGO (KFGO) – It was a step back in time last night at the Wings of Honor Dinner & Auction at the Fargo Air Museum. Two World War II veterans were featured and shared their stories of the Great War.

As you stepped into the building, you were met with the sweet sounds of Big Band standards.  Glenn Miller, Louis Armstrong, and Frank Sinatra transported you to a different time as you were surrounded by World War II era aircraft, artifacts, and auction items.

Two World War II pilots were featured last night.  Roy Nolte of Minnesota & Lyle Bradley of Iowa shared their stories.

Nolte was an Air Corp B-52 Bomber pilot.  He was one of 36 cousins in his family to serve in World War II.  He remembers his first experience in an airplane.

“There was a guy giving airplane rides at a county fair, I was only about 15 at the time.  I decided I wanted to take a ride, that was how I got into flying.”

When he started training flights, he recounts a certain night when he was landing his BT13 and missed the runway and crashed landed his plane into trees.

“It’s by the grace of god I survived.  That’s the only reason I’m still here.”

The other pilot featured was 96-year-old World War II & Korean War fighter pilot Lyle Bradley.  He flew the F4U Corsair his entire career with missions in WWII off the carrier USS Bennington and during the Korean War from Yonpo Airfield to the Chosin Reservoir; there he supported the famous First Marine Division with close air support.  Bradley says he always wanted to be a fighter pilot.

“There was no question, I wanted to be a fighter pilot.  I didn’t give dootaly darn about flying passengers.  I wanted to get in the fight.  I requested for it, and got it.”

He says the F4U Corsair is the most beautiful airplane ever made.

“The first time I saw it was in a local newspaper in Iowa. I fell deeply in love.”

Bradley says he saw a lot in his years in the cockpit, and especially remembers a friendship he had with a former Japanese Kamikaze pilot.

“After the war I met a former Kamikaze pilot, he told me he faked an injury to get out of that job and became a doctor.  He told me, ‘The very best thing you guys ever did was drop those atomic bombs on Japan’.”

Later, Bradley found out they had flown against each other in the Pacific and that Bradley had shot the Kamikaze pilots wingman, and best friend, down during a dogfight.

“We were on a mission to hit a big aircraft factory right outside of Akakura, Japan.  We had it all planned out that I would lead the assault.  I found a train and hit the train and after I came out of my dive I spotted a Japanese N1K shooting at my guys so I engaged him and shot him down.  It turned out the guy I shot down was best friends of the former Kamikaze pilot that I befriended.  We worked through that, I knew he liked wine so we sat down and killed several bottles of wine and talked.”

Bradley says you can’t go through war without remembering the dead.  He says he still has nightmares about what he saw but he said he never lost faith.

As time passes, the men and women who served in these wars are getting older and passing away.  It’s important to remember their stories and everything they sacrificed.



Incident occurred March 27, 2021 at Los Angeles International Airport (KLAX), California

HONOLULU (KHON) — An American Airlines flight bound for Chicago O’Hare International Airport from Honolulu landed at Los Angeles International Airport on Saturday, March 27, after a reported low tire pressure alert.

Officials said, the aircraft landed safely around 2:17 a.m. Hawaiian Standard Time.

Crews declared an emergency landing for American Airlines Flight 74 after reporting a dual low nose tire pressure alert, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

American Legend AL3, N712YP: Accident occurred March 27, 2021 at Petaluma Municipal Airport (O69), Sonoma County, California,

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

Napa Taildraggers Inc 


Location: Petaluma, CA 
Accident Number: WPR21LA167
Date & Time: March 27, 2021, 16:15 Local 
Registration: N712YP
Aircraft: AMERICAN LEGEND AIRCRAFT CO AL3
Injuries: 1 None 
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: AMERICAN LEGEND AIRCRAFT CO
Registration: N712YP
Model/Series: AL3
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KO69 
Observation Time: 16:15 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -5.6°C /-15°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / 13 knots, 320°
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.25 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 38.257793,-122.60532 (est)

PETALUMA, California (KRON) — Authorities responded to a plane crash at the Petaluma Municipal Airport Saturday afternoon.

Dispatch says California Highway Patrol received the first call around 4:12 p.m.

When officials got there, the plane was on the runway and had minor damage to the front of it.

The pilot, who was the only one inside, had exited the plane and was not injured. The pilot said they were flying from Napa to Petaluma and attempted to land at the Petaluma Airport.

During the landing, the plane was struck with a large gust of wind, which forced the plane to the ground.

The airplane was an American Legend Cub AL3.

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration were notified of the accident. 

Controlled Flight Into Terrain: Cessna 182D Skylane, N8889X; accident occurred April 02, 2017 near Blue Earth Municipal Airport (KSBU), Faribault County, Minnesota








Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Blue Earth, Minnesota 
Accident Number: GAA17CA215
Date & Time: April 1, 2017, 22:00 Local 
Registration: N8889X
Aircraft: Cessna 182
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT) 
Injuries: 2 Minor, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

The pilot reported that, while approaching the destination airport in night, marginal visual meteorological conditions, he turned on the pilot-controlled runway lights. He added that he began a descent to the runway without observing the runway lights or airport and encountered "ground fog" about 200 to 300 ft above ground level (agl). He further added that he continued the descent to the runway while referencing the navigational moving map and GPS altitude on his electronic flight bag (EFB) application ForeFlight. Subsequently, while in a left turn, the airplane impacted terrain about 1 nautical mile south of the runway.

The left wing, firewall, and fuselage sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. He added that, while en route, he reset his airplane installed barometric pressure altimeter to the GPS altitude indicated on his EFB, which resulted in a "300 ft. error."

An automated weather observing station, about 14 nautical miles west of the accident airport, recorded visibility at 2 1/2 statute miles, light rain, mist, and an overcast cloud ceiling at 300 ft agl.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's decision to continue the night, visual flight into instrument meteorological conditions, which resulted in controlled flight into terrain while on final approach. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's improper use of an electronic flight bag.

Findings

Personnel issues Decision making/judgment - Pilot
Aircraft Altitude - Not attained/maintained
Aircraft (general) - Incorrect use/operation
Environmental issues Fog - Decision related to condition
Environmental issues Below VFR minima - Decision related to condition

Factual Information

History of Flight

Approach-VFR pattern final VFR encounter with IMC
Approach-VFR pattern final Loss of visual reference
Approach-VFR pattern final Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT) (Defining event)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 67, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land 
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: December 22, 2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: September 9, 2016
Flight Time: (Estimated) 1069.8 hours (Total, all aircraft), 32.8 hours (Total, this make and model), 1069.8 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 12.1 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 7 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 7 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Student pilot Information

Certificate: Student 
Age: 56, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: September 29, 2016
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 35 hours (Total, all aircraft), 35 hours (Total, this make and model)

Passenger Information

Certificate: Age: Male
Airplane Rating(s): 
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): 
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): 
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification:
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N8889X
Model/Series: 182 D 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1961
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18253289
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2650 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3143.15 Hrs at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-470-L
Registered Owner:
Rated Power: 230 Horsepower
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument (IMC)
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFRM, 1162 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 14 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 03:06 Local
Direction from Accident Site: 270°
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Visibility 2.5 miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 300 ft AGL
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  / None
Wind Direction: 170° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.8 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 9°C / 8°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: Moderate - None - Mist
Departure Point: ST PAUL, MN (21D) 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: BLUE EARTH, MN (SBU) 
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 20:30 Local
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: BLUE EARTH MUNI SBU
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1107 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 34 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3400 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Straight-in

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Minor 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A Aircraft
Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor, 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 43.595275,-94.092781(est)

Preventing Similar Accidents

Reduced Visual References Require Vigilance

About two-thirds of general aviation accidents that occur in reduced visibility weather conditions are fatal. The accidents can involve pilot spatial disorientation or controlled flight into terrain. Even in visual weather conditions, flights at night over areas with limited ground lighting (which provides few visual ground references) can be challenging.

Preflight weather briefings are critical to safe flight. In-flight, weather information can also help pilots make decisions, as can in-cockpit weather equipment that can supplement official information. Incockpit equipment requires an understanding of the features and limitations.

We often see pilots who decide to turn back after they have already encountered weather; that is too late.

Pilot's shouldn't allow a situation to become dangerous before deciding to act. Additionally, air traffic controllers are there to help; be honest with them about your situation and ask for help.

Even when flying at night, visual weather conditions can also be challenging. Remote areas with limited ground lighting provide limited visual reference cues for pilots, which can be disorienting or render rising terrain visually imperceptible. Topographic references can help pilots become more familiar with the terrain. The use of instruments, if pilots are proficient, can also help pilots navigate these challenging areas.


The NTSB presents this information to prevent recurrence of similar accidents. Note that this should not be considered guidance from the regulator, nor does this supersede existing FAA Regulations (FARs).

Cessna 401, XB-HSW: Fatal accident occurred March 27, 2021 in Hermosillo, Mexico

 
C.P.A. José Eliseo Ramírez Heredia

Piloto aviador de transporte público ilimitado;
Más  de 40 años en el medio aeronáutico;
Conferencista de aviación;
Controlador de tránsito aéreo;
Observador del tiempo - meteorología;
International Council Of Air Shows. Member ( ICAS );
Professional flight instructor from National Association Of Flight Instructors;
Member (NAFI);
Director de eliceRAM.
 


La avioneta donde viajaba el subsecretario de Desarrollo Económico de Sonora, Leonardo Ciscomani, se desplomó este sábado en la ciudad de Hermosillo, en dicho estado, cuando se dirigía a Tucson, Arizona.

Así lo informó esta tarde el Gobierno del Estado a través de su cuenta de Twitter; detallando que el funcionario se encuentra en un hospital de la ciudad:

El Gobierno del Estado confirma que Leonardo Ciscomani, subsecretario de Desarrollo Económico en Sonora, es uno de los pasajeros de la aeronave que se desplomó hace unas horas en Hermosillo. En estos momentos está siendo atendido en un hospital de esta ciudad.

De acuerdo con la Secretaría de Seguridad Pública del Estado, cerca de las 12:35 horas un reporte al 911 alertó sobre una aeronave estrellada en el kilometro 14 de la carretera rumbo a Bahía de Kino, al poniente de la ciudad. La avioneta habría despegado a las 12:05 horas del aeropuerto de Hermosillo.

Los servicios de emergencia y autoridades policiales arribaron al lugar minutos después donde hallaron parte de la aeronave enredada con cables de alta tensión, por lo que se presume que la causa del incidente fue fallas internas al querer hacer un aterrizaje de emergencia.

Por su parte, la Secretaría de Salud estatal informó que elementos del Centro Regulador de Urgencias Médicas (CRUM) fueron quienes socorrieron a los involucrados en el siniestro. Reportaron al menos cuatro personas fallecidas y seis más con lesiones críticas, entre ellas Leonardo Ciscomani.

Todos fueron trasladados a clínicas del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) en Hermosillo para recibir atención médica. Entre estos están identificados Javier Laborín Azcárraga y el copiloto de la aeronave Benjamín Rodríguez.

Mientras que las personas identificadas que fallecieron son: Raquel Tapia Miranda, Verónica Tapia Miranda, Rosella Freaner Figueroa y el piloto José Elíseo Ramírez Heredia.





Hermosillo.- La Fiscalía General de Justicia del Estado de Sonora reportó el fallecimiento de Óscar Benjamín Rodríguez Barrón, quien era el piloto de la avioneta Cessna que se desplomó luego de despegar del aeropuerto, al Poniente de Hermosillo.

Rodríguez Barrón era uno de los tres sobrevivientes al percance aéreo que ocurrió a las 12:45 horas de este 27 de marzo, en el kilómetro 21 de la Carretera 100, a Bahía de Kino.

La aeronave bimotor Cessna, con número económico 401, matrícula XB-HSW tenía como destino Tucson, Arizona, y de acuerdo con la bitácora de vuelo se determinó que viajaban siete personas, de las cuales resultaron heridas el piloto Óscar Benjamín Rodríguez Barrón, Javier Laborín Azcárraga y Leonardo Ciscomani Freaner.

De las tres personas heridas, han fallecido Leonardo Ciscomani Freaner y de último momento se reporta la muerte de Óscar Benjamín Rodríguez Barrón.

También están registrados en la bitácora Rosella Freaner Figueroa, Raquel Tapia Miranda, Verónica Tapia Miranda y José Eliseo Ramírez Heredia.

En el lugar donde cayó la avioneta quedaron sin vida cuatro personas, personal de la Fiscalía de Sonora realizará comparativas de ADN para establecer su identidad, de manera científica, en el Laboratorio de Inteligencia Científica Forense (CIF).





Con especialistas del área de Servicios Periciales, personal de la Fiscalía General de Justicia del Estado de Sonora (FGJE) brindó apoyo a la Fiscalía General de la República (FGR) para procesar el área donde cayó una aeronave que dejó cuatro muertos y tres personas lesionadas de gravedad.

Personal de la FGJE Sonora acudió en apoyo a procesar el área del accidente, y en lo que se requiera, pero serán las autoridades federales, tanto de la FGR como de la aeronáutica, quienes realicen las investigaciones para determinar las causas del percance.

A las 12:45 horas de este sábado se reportó el accidente aéreo a través del Centro de Control, Comando, Comunicación, Cómputo, Coordinación e Inteligencia (C5i), suscitado en las inmediaciones del autódromo, en el kilómetro 21 de la Carretera 100, a Bahía de Kino.

Se trata de una aeronave bimotor Cessna, con número económico 401, matrícula XB-HSW, que tenía como destino Tucson, Arizona, la cual se desplomó luego de despegar del aeropuerto civil, a un kilómetro al Poniente.

La avioneta golpeó con cables de alta tensión de una torre de la Comisión Federal de Electricidad.

De acuerdo con la bitácora de vuelo se determinó que viajaban siete personas, de las cuales resultaron heridas el piloto Óscar Benjamín Rodríguez Barrón, Javier Laborín Azcárraga y Leonardo Ciscomani Freaner, quienes reciben atención médica.

También están registrados en la bitácora Rosella Freaner Figueroa, Raquel Tapia Miranda, Verónica Tapia Miranda y José Eliseo Ramírez Heredia.

Sobre los cuatro pasajeros que murieron tras el accidente, personal de la Fiscalía de Sonora realizará comparativas de ADN para establecer su identidad, en el Laboratorio de Inteligencia Científica Forense (CIF).

Loss of Control on Ground: Cub Crafters CC19-180, N711XC; accident occurred April 01, 2018 at Seldovia Airport (PASO), Alaska






Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Juneau, Alaska

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

AK AC LLC


Location: Seldovia, AK
Accident Number: GAA18CA196
Date & Time: 04/01/2018, 1200 AKD
Registration: N711XC
Aircraft: CUB CRAFTERS INC CC19
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

Analysis

The pilot receiving instruction in the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, during the landing roll, the airplane veered to the left. He applied right rudder and brake to correct, but the airplane continued to veer to the left. In an attempt to maintain directional control, he added power with left rudder and brake. Subsequently, the flight instructor pulled the engine power back and applied right rudder, but the airplane continued to the left and the right wing impacted the ground.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing and aileron.

The pilot reported that the airplane previously had a tendency to veer to the left during the landing roll. He further reported that, repairs were made during a recent annual inspection and noted that "thicker brake spaces" had been installed.

The instructor reported in a telephone conversation that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during landing. Contributing to the accident was the flight instructor's delayed remedial action.

Findings

Aircraft Directional control - Not attained/maintained
Personnel issues Aircraft control - Pilot
Personnel issues Delayed action - Instructor/check pilot

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing-landing roll Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Landing-landing roll Attempted remediation/recovery

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 69, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/16/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/06/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 856 hours (Total, all aircraft), 16 hours (Total, this make and model), 585 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age:, Female
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Rear
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Unknown
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/01/2017
Occupational Pilot:
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CUB CRAFTERS INC
Registration: N711XC
Model/Series: CC19 180
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2016
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: CC19-0009
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/07/2017, Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2300 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-360-C1G
Registered Owner: AK AC LLC
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: AK AC LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PASO, 29 ft msl
Observation Time: 1953 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 51°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 4°C / -8°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots, 360°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.36 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: ANCHORAGE, AK (MRI)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Unknown
Destination: Seldovia, AK (SOV)
Type of Clearance: Unknown
Departure Time: 1030 AKD
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: SELDOVIA (SOV)
Runway Surface Type: Gravel
Airport Elevation: 29 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 34
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 1845 ft / 80 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  59.442222, -151.703889 (est)

Marshall University, Mountwest Community break ground for new aviation maintenance program


Governor Jim Justice

Bill Bissett

Michael Sellards

Jerome Gilbert

Tim Thomas

William Smith

Ed Gaunch

Brent Brown

Mike Browning

Carol Miller

Shelley Moore Capito



HUNTINGTON, West Virginia — Aviation and academic enthusiasts alike came together to watch the new Aviation Maintenance Training program take flight during a groundbreaking ceremony Friday.

The AMT program has been in the making for a few years and will be available for students in spring 2022, Marshall University President Jerome Gilbert said. He said the program will teach West Virginians how to properly care for aircraft and will hopefully attract aerospace companies in the future.

“You are all witnesses to a turning point to the educational and economic future of this region,” Gilbert said. “Metaphorically, I will say that Mountwest and Marshall are flying in new airspace here. The joint program is the first of its kind, and we hope it will serve as a model to other institutions in the state.”

This is a joint program between Marshall University and Mountwest Community and Technical College, and will give students right out of high school an opportunity to get a certification in aviation maintenance or complete general education courses through Mountwest in order to receive an associate degree following the certification of the program from the Federal Aviation Administration.

In collaboration with the Huntington Tri-State Airport, the Robert C. Byrd Institute, Delta Airlines and more, Gilbert said he expects great successes to come from the AMT program.

Airport Director Brent Brown said he is excited to be able to have an AMT program in the Tri-State because it gives people a chance to learn and later work locally instead of having to go to other states to find jobs in aviation maintenance.

“We are going to go out there and do all that we can to promote this program and promote this airport and see what we can do to provide opportunities for the students graduating out of this program to have jobs right here at home,” Brown said. “We don’t want to see them leaving to Atlanta and Charlotte and these other places — we want them to stay right here in the Tri-State region.”

Brown said there are 95 acres of flat land at the airport and he hopes the maintenance program provides chances for expansion and further development of the land.

Renovations of an existing hangar and an armory will take place in preparation for the AMT program, with approximately $2.7 million being used to create classroom and laboratory spaces for future students.

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice attended the ceremony and discussed the 1970 Marshall University plane crash that devastated the area, and how in growing this program, it is as if the region is rising from the ashes and paying tribute to the 75 lives lost.

Justice also said the AMT program can lead to expansion in the aviation field in West Virginia.

“What we’re doing right here, right now, is we’re embarking on putting West Virginia on the map as a place where aviation-related industries can grow,” he said.

Gilbert said they have received two planes to use for the program and they plan to add seven more over the next five years. There was also a small plane donated by Marshall alumnus Daniel Ward, which Gilbert said will be taken apart and put back together by students for years.

Rep. Carol Miller, R-W.Va., was also in attendance at the groundbreaking and discussed how Boeing projects the need for nearly 770,000 workers in aviation maintenance for the next generation. She said the AMT program will be a combination of people who want business growth in the area and a skilled workforce.

“West Virginia’s next generation of aviation workers will have access to a unique, cross-institutional program. We are working together to prepare our next generation for the jobs,” Miller said. “With any growing business, we need a pro-business environment and a skilled workforce to make it work. This program will ensure that West Virginia not only has that pro-business environment, but the world-class workforce ready to serve a growing industry, too.”













Loss of Control in Flight: Piper PA-28-181 Archer III, N297PA; accident occurred April 01, 2018 at Phoenix Deer Valley Airport (KDVT), Maricopa County, Arizona






Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Phoenix, Arizona 
Accident Number: GAA18CA193
Date & Time: April 1, 2018, 13:53 Local 
Registration: N297PA
Aircraft: Piper PA28
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

Analysis

The flight instructor reported that he was conducting a lesson in takeoffs and landings and go-around procedures with the student pilot at the controls. During one particular go-around, the student retracted the flaps too far and the instructor stressed the importance of using the proper flap settings. On the subsequent downwind, the tower advised a crosswind from the south gusting to 18 knots. During the approach, the airplane drifted left of the runway centerline, so he called for the student to execute a go-around. The student pilot applied full power and reduced flaps from 40° to 10° (25º is prescribed in the go-around procedure). When the flight instructor noticed that the airplane was not climbing and the student was not correcting the course, the flight instructor took the flight controls. The flight instructor attempted to recover, but the airplane was in a nose-high attitude and struck the ground. The airplane then lifted off the ground and flew slowly toward a sign; the instructor "pulled up to avoid the sign," but the airplane struck the sign, aerodynamically stalled, and impacted the ground to the right of the runway.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing.

The flight instructor reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observation station located on the accident airport reported that, at the time of the accident, the wind was from 110° at 8 knots. The airplane was landing on runway 7L.

The Federal Aviation Administration's Airplane Flying Handbook, FAA-H-8083-3B, contains a section titled "Go-Arounds (Rejected Landings)" which states:

After establishing the proper climb attitude and power settings, be concerned first with flaps and secondly with the landing gear (if retractable). When the decision is made to perform a go-around, takeoff power is applied immediately and the pitch attitude changed so as to slow or stop the descent. After the descent has been stopped, the landing flaps are partially retracted or placed in the takeoff position as recommended by the manufacturer. Caution must be used in retracting the flaps. Depending on the airplane's altitude and airspeed, it is wise to retract the flaps intermittently in small increments to allow time for the airplane to accelerate progressively as they are being raised. A sudden and complete retraction of the flaps could cause a loss of lift resulting in the airplane settling into the ground.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The student pilot's improper selection of the flap setting during a go-around, and the flight instructor's delayed remedial action, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall.

Findings

Aircraft Configuration - Incorrect use/operation
Personnel issues Aircraft control - Student/instructed pilot
Personnel issues Delayed action - Instructor/check pilot
Aircraft Angle of attack - Not attained/maintained
Environmental issues Sign/marker - Contributed to outcome
Environmental issues Crosswind - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Approach-VFR go-around Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Approach-VFR go-around Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 32, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s):  Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/29/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/22/2018
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 336.4 hours (Total, all aircraft), 73 hours (Total, this make and model), 219.4 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft) 

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 24, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/05/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N297PA
Model/Series: PA28 181
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2002
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 2843506
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/20/2018, AAIP
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2558 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 18692 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-360 SERIES
Registered Owner: BIRD ACQUISITION LLC
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: AeroGuard Flight Training Center
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDVT, 1455 ft msl
Observation Time: 2053 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 183°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / -7°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots, 110°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.81 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: WICKENBURG, AZ (E25)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Phoenix, AZ (DVT)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1255 MST
Type of Airspace: Class D 

Airport Information

Airport: PHOENIX DEER VALLEY (DVT)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1478 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 07L
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4500 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Go Around 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  33.688889, -112.081944 (est)

Blue Angels jet lands in La Crosse, as Deke Slayton Airfest plan is announced

 

For the first time in seven years, the Deke Slayton Airfest is back in La Crosse.

Two pilots — Lieutenants Katlin Forster and Julius Bratton — flew in on Blue Angel No. 7 on Friday to check out the area, before the airshow June 12-13.

Along with the Navy’s Blue Angels F/A-18 E/F Super Hornets headlining, this year’s pair of shows will also include (click each for respective websites):

USAF F-16 Viper Demos

Susan Dacy flying the Super Stearman “Big Red”

Michael Vaknin flying the Extra 300

Vanguard Squadron multi-plane demonstration

Dave Scott flying the Pitts S1S

Grant Nielsen flying the CAP 232

Kyle Fowler’s Long EZ aerobatics

The Deke Slayton Airfest began in 1998 and went for 10 consecutive years, with the Blue Angels first coming in 2000 and the Thunderbirds only performance in 2007. After those 10 years, it’s been going on and off, with the last show held in 2014.

This year’s Airfest will be a bit different than the ones of the past.

A drive-in format takes the place of a traditional airshow. With 100 acres of airfield, the plan is to put as many as 35 cars on an acre, sort of “socially distanced.”

Tickets in advance will be $55 but not per person. Per car. And up to six people enter per car. That price jumps to $75 per car on June 10. Tickets are only good for one of the two days. They can be purchased at Airfest.com.

There won’t be any ‘static’ exhibits or planes on the ground to check out, thanks to COVID. It will be strictly an airshow.

Because of this format, organizers understand a lot of people are going to just sit outside their homes, look up and watch the show for free. They are encouraging the public to buy a ticket — even if it’s a group of 55 friends who all pitch in $1.

Everyone who works at the show is a volunteer. Tickets go to pay the performers and work on the next Airfest, which won’t be until 2024.

This year’s show will feature about eight performances. The show will last about four hours, getting started around noon. Guests should be able to arrive around 10 a.m.

Guests are encouraged to bring lawn chairs, umbrellas, drinks and snacks. There will be no grilling out, because they don’t really want to have to put out a fire at the airport. And pop-up canopy tents will also not be allowed.

Concessions at this point are up in the air but a “no” for right now. COVID protocols could change that, however, by June.


 

Loss of Control in Flight: Diamond DA42 NG Twin Star, N311ER; accident occurred April 01, 2020 at Flagler County Airport (KFIN), Palm Coast, Florida





Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

Embry–Riddle Aeronautical University Inc


Location: Palm Coast, FL
Accident Number:ERA20CA143 
Date & Time: 04/01/2020, 0900 EDT
Registration: N311ER
Aircraft: Diamond DA42
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

Analysis

The flight instructor reported that the pilot receiving instruction was practicing a simulated single-engine failure to a landing in the multiengine airplane. The left engine was set to about 12% power, simulating a feathered propeller engine failure. While on final approach to land, the airplane started to drift right of the runway, and the pilot receiving instruction reported that he was having difficulty controlling the airplane due to strong prevailing winds. The instructor reported that he told the pilot receiving instruction to use more left rudder, but the airplane continued to drift right. The pilot receiving instruction decided to abort the landing and initiated a go-around by advancing both engines to full power. During the go-around, the airplane drifted left and then the instructor took the flight controls and applied full right rudder. The airplane continued drifting left, descended, and impacted vegetation, and the landing gear collapsed. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the rudder and empennage. The instructor reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. A crosswind component of between 6 and 10 knots existed.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot receiving instruction's failure to maintain airplane control during a simulated engine failure landing and subsequent attempted go-around in gusting crosswind conditions and the flight instructor's delayed remedial action.

Findings

Personnel issues Aircraft control - Student/instructed pilot
Personnel issues Delayed action - Instructor/check pilot
Aircraft (general) - Not attained/maintained
Environmental issues Crosswind - Effect on operation
Environmental issues Gusts - Effect on operation
Environmental issues Tree(s) - Contributed to outcome

Factual Information

History of Flight

Approach Other weather encounter
Approach Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Approach-VFR go-around Attempted remediation/recovery
Approach-VFR go-around Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
After landing Landing gear collapse

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 26, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/24/2019 
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/20/2019
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 1439 hours (Total, all aircraft), 584 hours (Total, this make and model), 1311 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 199 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 69 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 20, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:No 
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/22/2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/04/2019
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 235 hours (Total, all aircraft), 16 hours (Total, this make and model), 162 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 16 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Diamond
Registration: N311ER
Model/Series: DA42 NG
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:2016 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 42.N212
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/05/2020, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 4407 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2271.1 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Austro Engine
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: e4-c-00-000-0
Registered Owner: Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Inc
Rated Power: 165 hp
Operator: Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: FIN, 33 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0850 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 42°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots / 15 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 330°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.85 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C / 9°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Daytona Beach, FL (DAB)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Palm Coast, FL (FIN)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 0830 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: Flagler Executive (FIN)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 33 ft
Runway Surface Condition:Dry 
Runway Used: 29
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5500 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 29.465278, -81.207778 (est)