Sunday, June 22, 2014

Mooney M20B, N74584: Fatal accident occurred June 20, 2014 in Page, Arizona

Charles M. Trotter:  http://registry.faa.gov/N74584

NTSB Identification: WPR14FA262
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 20, 2014 in Page, AZ
Aircraft: MOONEY M20B, registration: N74584
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 20, 2014, about 1430 mountain standard time, a Mooney M20B, N74584, sustained substantial damage when it impacted terrain about 35 miles southeast of the Page Municipal Airport (PGA) Page, Arizona. The pilot/owner was operating the airplane under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The commercial pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The personal cross-county flight departed PGA about 1409 for an unknown destination. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

Examination of the accident site by the National Transportation Safety Board, investigator in charge, revealed that all the major components of the airplane were contained within 85 feet of the main wreckage site.

The airplane was recovered to a secure facility for further examination.

 
Investigating Flight Standards District Office:   FAA Las Vegas FSDO-19 


The wife of a Liberty man killed in a plane crash in Arizona flew to Las Vegas with him and a family friend, but she returned home safely on a commercial flight, a law enforcement official said Wednesday.

Her husband and the 15-year-old friend later boarded a private plane for the trip back to South Carolina, but were killed when it crashed, Coconino County Sheriff's Office Commander Rex Gilliland told GreenvilleOnline.com.

The Sheriff's Office, using dental records, identified the crash victims as Charles Trotter, 47, of Liberty, and Dakota Jacks, 15, of Pickens. Trotter was believed to be piloting the plane. Jacks was a Trotter family friend, according to a Sheriff's Office statement.

A search and rescue officer talked to both families, Gilliland said.

Gilliland said Trotter's wife had flown on the private plane with her husband and Jacks, a Pickens County high school student, to Las Vegas.

The National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the cause of the crash, sheriff's officials said.

The officials said the plane crashed in a remote area of the Navajo Indian Reservation in the northeast part of Coconino County. Sheriff's search and rescue officers along with Arizona Department of Public Safety Ranger Helicopter responded to the scene Sunday and confirmed two people died, authorities said.

The Air Force Rescue Coordination Center had been investigating the report of an overdue aircraft with two males aboard destined for South Carolina, authorities said.

The AFRCC found the aircraft had departed Las Vegas sometime Friday, landed in Page, Ariz., and then departed Page at 1:30 p.m. Arizona time, authorities said. The pilot had not filed a flight plan.

Authorities said the AFRCC found the last cell phone contact with the pilot's phone was off a tower at Navajo Mountain shortly after the takeoff from Page. The Civil Air Patrol launched a multi-state search Sunday morning.

Four CAP wings were involved in the search across four states, including Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah, authorities said.

About 1:40 p.m. Arizona time, the Arizona Wing of the CAP located from the air the wreckage of a plane in a canyon. Wreckage matching the description of the missing aircraft was at the bottom of a remote desert area called Peach Canyon, authorities said.

Due to the remote nature of the canyon, the wreckage could only be accessed by helicopter, authorities said. The victims' bodies were removed and taken to the medical examiner's office in Flagstaff, authorities said.

A Pickens County schools spokesman said Jacks was a rising 10th-grader at Pickens High.

He was an honors student, Pickens High JROTC cadet, and part of the school's Bluegrass music group, said John Eby, spokesman for the Pickens County school district.

Trotter's family confirmed Monday that he was killed in the crash.

The family issued a statement saying: "Charles Michael Trotter, 47 years old, died doing what he loves — flying his plane. Devoted husband, loved his wife, loved flying, and loved Jesus. Now he is at home with his Lord and Savior. May he rest in peace."





Dakota Jacks
~


Charles Michael Trotter 
~



PICKENS COUNTY, S.C. - Two people from the Upstate were killed in a plane crash. 

Dakota Jacks, 15, and pilot and family friend Charles Michael Trotter, 47, of Liberty were on a sightseeing trip when the small plane crashed in Arizona.

The pair was on their way back when the crash happened.

Jacks was a rising 10th at Pickens High School.

Trotter died doing what he loved, flying, according to a statement from his family. “He was a devoted husband, he loved his wife, loved flying and loved Jesus,” it reads. “May he rest in peace.”

Monday evening, the Coconino Co Sheriff's Office released a report giving the current details into the investigation. The Air Force Rescue Coordination Center had received a report of an overdue aircraft to South Carolina.

They had found the aircraft had left from Las Vegas and landed in Page, AZ. It then took off from Page. The last contact with the pilot's phone was made shortly after take-off.

The AFRCC had then contacted Civil Air Patrol Wings from different states and a multi-state search was launched on the morning of the 21st. Four different Wings were involved in the search that stretch across the states of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah. A Wing of the Civil Air Patrol spotted wreckage that matched the description of the missing plane in a remote desert area called beach canyon.

The cause of the crash will be investigated by National Transportation Safety Board.

A spokesperson for the family says they appreciate the thoughts and prayers of the entire community.



A Pickens County high school student and a Liberty man were killed in a plane crash in Arizona, according to various sources.

 "We are stunned and saddened to learn of the death of Dakota Jacks, a rising 10th-grader at Pickens High School," said John Eby, spokesman for the Pickens County school district.

Officials searching for a missing plane on Sunday discovered two bodies found with aircraft wreckage in Peach Canyon, east of Page, on the Navajo Nation, according to The Arizona Republic newspaper.

"We extend our deepest sympathies to Dakota's family, friends and teachers," Eby said. "He was an Honors student, a Pickens High School JROTC cadet, and a part of the school's Bluegrass music group. Dakota was an outstanding member of the Blue Flame family, and he will be greatly missed."

The family of Charles Michael Trotter of Liberty confirmed Monday that he was killed in the crash.

The family issued a statement saying: "Charles Michael Trotter, 47 years old, died doing what he loves — flying his plane. Devoted husband, loved his wife, loved flying, and loved Jesus. Now he is at home with his Lord and Savior. May he rest in peace."

The Coconino County Sheriff's Office was notified of a missing aircraft around 7:30 a.m. Sunday after the aircraft took off from Page traveling to South Carolina carrying a man and juvenile believed to be unrelated, Sgt. Aaron Dick told The Republic.

Page is about 83 miles north of Flagstaff, Ariz.

After hearing of the missing 1961 Mooney M20B aircraft, the Civil Air Patrols of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah began searching for the aircraft, Dick told The Republic.

Around 1:30 p.m. Sunday, the Sheriff's Office was alerted of a possible aircraft wreckage sighting in Peach Canyon, according to The Republic.

An Arizona Department of Public Safety helicopter carrying a sheriff's office deputy located the crash site around 5 p.m. and recovered two bodies, Dick said.

"Based on the description of the aircraft, (the wreckage) is believed to be the one missing," Dick told The Republic.

The bodies were taken to Flagstaff Sunday evening for autopsy and identification, according to Dick.

The National Transportation Safety Board was scheduled to begin its investigation into the cause of the crash on Monday morning, according to The Republic.

Story and photo:  http://www.wltx.com


PAGE, AZ (CBS5) -    Two bodies have been pulled from the wreckage of a small aircraft in northeastern Arizona, the Coconino County Sheriff's Office said Monday afternoon.

The pilot is believed to be 47-year-old Charles Trotter of Liberty, SC and the passenger is believed to be 15-year-old Dakota Jacks from Pickens, SC, the sheriff's office said. Jacks is reported to be a friend of the pilot's family.

Sheriff's officials said positive identification of the victims will be made by the medical examiner's office.

The plane had departed Las Vegas sometime on Friday, June 20, landed in Page and then departed at 1:30 p.m., according to the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center.

The pilot had not filed a flight plan, center authorities said. The last cell phone contact with the pilot's phone was off a tower at Navajo Mountain shortly after the take-off from Page.

"What we did do is we utilized cell phone forensics and the possible sighting that we did see was very close to the location that the cell phone forensics picked up on," said Arizona Civil Air Patrol spokeswoman Lori Raska.

The center then contacted the Civil Air Patrol Wings from several states. A multi-state search began Sunday morning.

Four Civil Air Patrol Wings were involved in the search across four states, including Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah.

A ground search team was deployed to Tuba City from Arizona and a communications team from Colorado was deployed to Page.

The Arizona Wing of the CAP located from the air the wreckage of a plane in a canyon at around 1:40 p.m. Wreckage matching the description of the missing aircraft was at the bottom of a remote desert area called Peach Canyon.

Due to the remote nature of the canyon, access to the wreckage could only be made by helicopter. The bodies of the victims were removed and transported to the medical examiner's office in Flagstaff.

Story, photo gallery and videos:   http://www.cbs46.com

PAGE, AZ (CBS5) -    Investigators said they believe they've found the wreckage of an airplane that went missing after taking off from Page airport on Friday.

Officials say a father and his son were on board the aircraft.

The search began Saturday after family members told officials the plane never made it to South Carolina.

The pilot took off from Paige Airport about 1:30 p.m. Friday.

Civil Air Patrol found what they believe is an impact sight between Page and Monument Valley.

Investigators told CBS 5 the area is very mountainous and can only be accessed by helicopter.

The Coconino County Sheriff's Department is in charge of the rescue mission.

Officials say the pilot did not file a flight plan. However, search crews were able to use other technology to locate what they believe is the airplane.

"What we did do is we utilized cell phone forensics and the possible sighting that we did see was very close to the location that the cell phone forensics picked up on," said Arizona Civil Air Patrol Spokeswoman Lori Raska.

Investigators haven't said if the pilot made any distress calls. There's no word yet on what might have caused this plane to go down.


Source:  http://www.kpho.com

PAGE, AZ - The wreckage of a small plane has been found in northeastern Arizona.

Pilots with the Civil Air Patrol had been searching for an aircraft, identified as a 1961 Mooney M20B carrying a father and son, which left southern California and was headed to South Carolina.

The plane was in Page early Friday afternoon, but departed without a flight plan, according to CAP spokesman Paul Rehman.

According to the Colorado Wing of the Civil Air Patrol, the plane had remained low for sightseeing outside of Page.

Pilots from Utah, Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico were assisting in the search.

Coconino County Sheriff's Sgt. Aaron Dick said they were notified around 1:40 p.m. Sunday of a possible wreckage in Peach Canyon, 35 miles east of Page on the Navajo Nation.

A Department of Public Safety helicopter flew a sheriff's deputy into the area and located the wreckage with two bodies inside.

Dick said due to the damage it has not been possible to confirm that it is the missing plane.

The FAA and NTSB have been notified. Dick said the area is not accessible by ground.

FAA spokesman Allen Kenitzer said the family notified authorities on Saturday that the plane was missing.

Source:  http://www.abc15.com

Rush to fill air safety posts

New Delhi, June 22: Efforts are underway to fill up the vacant positions for flight inspectors in the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA), with global safety audit of the Indian skies just months away.

As many as 29 posts of flight operations inspectors need to be filled up by the DGCA before the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) starts its audit in August. The FAA had downgraded the country’s aviation safety rating to Category 2 in January after the DGCA failed to resolve the safety issues flagged off by the Americans.

The FAA had raised concerns over 33 issues, including the filling up of several senior positions such as full-time flight operations inspectors (FOIs).

According to DGCA officials, the FAA guidelines state that there should be one FOI for every 10 aircraft.

“As we have around 750 aircraft in the country, at present, we need 75 FOIs. The recruitment process is going on and will be completed in a few weeks time,” said a DGCA official.

According to sources, the civil aviation regulator has been able to fill as many as 46 positions and has floated advertisements to recruit 29 more.

“The recruitment process will be completed in a swift and efficient manner so that we are ready for the audit soon,” the official added.

In January, the aviation regulator appointed 18 chief flight operation inspectors and FOIs on contract.

Before the FAA downgraded India to Category 2 in January, the government had approved the creation of 75 crucial posts in the DGCA to carry out inspections of airlines and private charter companies.

Crucial positions such as chief, deputy and senior FOIs were also created in the flight standards directorate by the DGCA. The posts have been created based on the standards of the International Civil Aviation Organization.

The civil aviation ministry had earlier said the country would be ready for an FAA audit to regain its Category 1 status by June. However, the process is likely to be completed by August.

India now shares the Category 2 status with Bangladesh, Belize, Gambia and Haiti. 

Source:  http://www.telegraphindia.com

ASC Spirit, N127JK: Fatal accident occurred June 22, 2014 in Lehi, Utah

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Salt Lake City FSDO-07

http://registry.faa.gov/N127JK

NTSB Identification: WPR14LA263
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 22, 2014 in Lehi, UT
Aircraft: KNELL ASC SPIRIT, registration: N127JK
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 22, 2014, about 1430 mountain daylight time, an ASC Spirit Glider, N127JK, sustained substantial damage when it impacted terrain, about 1 mile southeast of the Cedar Valley Airport (UT10), 10 miles west of Lehi, Utah. The glider was owned and being operated by the pilot as a visual flight rules (VFR) personal local flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The solo pilot received fatal injuries. The glider departed Cedar Valley Airport (UT10), about 1350.

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on June 23, a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air safety inspector who visited the accident site, said witnesses reported to him that the glider was circling to land on runway 35. During the descent the pilot made several steep turns. When the airplane was about 40 to 50 feet above the ground the right wing dropped and the glider suddenly nosed into the ground short of the runway.

Prior to the accident, the pilot of the accident airplane was heard over the airport's universal communications radio frequency (UNICOM) reporting his position and intentions; no mechanical anomalies were reported.


 Jeffrey Kent Knell
1953 - 2014


Jeffrey Kent Knell passed away on June 22, 2014. He was 60 years old.

Jeff was a native of Salt Lake City, born to Jim and Shirlee Knell on July 28, 1953. He graduated from Skyline High School in 1971 and received Bachelor and Master of Science degrees from the University of Utah. Jeff had a colorful list of hobbies and interests, including music, aviation, enjoying his mountain home in the great outdoors, and fine wine and scotch. He was a beloved son, an incredible father, a loving brother, and a friend to everyone he met.

Jeff is survived by his two children, Steven and Georgia; his long-time companion, Sue; his mother and father, Jim and Shirlee; and his siblings, Brent, Carolyn, Kathy, David, and Scott.

A memorial for Jeff will be held at Larkin Sunset Lawn at 2350 E 1300 S in Salt Lake City on Monday, June 30 at 11:00AM. A celebration of his life will be held at the Hog Wallow at 3200 E Big Cottonwood Canyon Road on the same day beginning at 7:00 PM. In lieu of flowers, please send donations in his name to the Nature Conservancy, to help protect the outdoors that he knew so well and loved so much. http://www.nature.org/

- See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituary

 
EAGLE MOUNTAIN — One man died after a glider-style aircraft crashed at Cedar Valley Airport on Sunday afternoon.

According to Sgt. Cole Christensen of the Utah County Sheriff's Office, police received a report that an aircraft crashed at approximately 2:20 p.m. Christensen described the aircraft as "a glider-type airplane. It looks like an airplane without the motor on it."

The pilot of the aircraft, Jeff Knell, 60, of Salt Lake City, died before police arrived on scene, though it was unclear if the pilot died on impact. Christensen said the pilot was an experienced flyer who was known at the airport.

Eyewitnesses told police the aircraft appeared to have trouble while in flight, which they say could have caused the accident. Christensen said there were three witnesses on scene.

"I saw the glider going around doing a couple loops above us," Glen Black said. Black was driving on Pony Express Parkway when he saw the accident.

"It was really low on the horizon, and it had missed its last turn to make a good approach," Black said.

What happened next, Black can only guess. To him, he said, it looked like the wind caught the right wing of the glider.

"He dipped and went straight into the ground. I saw the tale go up and then dust everywhere," Black said. Black jumped into his car and cut through the field straight to the glider. He found the aircraft in pieces.

"I could see the pilot had been ejected from the plane. He wasn't in good shape. He wasn't moving," Black said.

Two other witnesses and Black took the pilot's pulse, but Black said the pilot had already died. Friends of the pilot told Black it was an experimental aircraft they had built. There allegedly was a problem with the glider about a year ago, but it had been fixed. Whether or not that played any part in causing the accident, investigators don't know.

"Investigations like this take some time because there's a lot of loose ends that need some follow up," Christensen said. Christensen could not provide a definitive timeline due to the nature of the investigation. Police will continue to gather flight and pre-flight information.

  http://www.ksl.com  


EAGLE MOUNTAIN — One man died after a glider-style aircraft crashed at Cedar Valley Airport on Sunday afternoon.

According to Sgt. Cole Christensen of the Utah County Sheriff’s Office, an aircraft crashed at approximately 2:20 p.m.

Christensen described the aircraft as “a glider-type airplane.

It looks like an airplane without the motor on it.”

The pilot of the aircraft died before police arrived on scene, though it was unclear if the pilot died on impact.

Officials said the pilot was an experienced flyer who was known at the airport.

Eyewitnesses told police the aircraft appeared to have trouble in the air, which they say could have caused the accident.

Christensen said investigations like this will take time and does not have timeline.

Police will continue to gather flight and pre-flight information.

Police have identified the pilot, but have not released his name pending notification of kin.

Ask The Times: Planes

Q. Is it allowed in Streator for a small airplane to continuously fly over residential areas? There is a small aircraft continuously flying over my house and disturbing the peace. Many people work the night shift and need to sleep during the day.

A. The plane in question is a crop duster. The city has no jurisdiction over airplanes. They are under the jurisdiction of the Federal Aviation Administration.


Source:   http://www.mywebtimes.com

Mysterious jet is operated through Million Air: Rogue Valley International - Medford Airport (KMFR), Oregon

On Monday, June 16, around noon, a huge, white jet, looking brand new and with no markings, flew into the Medford airport. Several of us noticed it and all commented that it was quite an awesome sight. Any information on it?

— Jerry S., via email


Well, Jerry, we here at Since You Asked take a particular interest in shiny things, so we're glad to help. We called Bern Case, manager of Medford/Rogue Valley International Airport, to find out about that plane.

Case told us it's a private jet operated through Million Air, one of the two fixed-base operation franchises at the airport.

If you're unfamiliar with FBOs, they're refueling facilities and hangars for private aircraft.

Unfortunately, Jerry, that's about where the info ends. We called Million Air Medford to see whether we could learn anything else about the jet, but they do not comment to newspapers as company policy.

A quick look at the company's website — www.millionair.com — shows a list of the aviation services and amenities at the Medford office, 2040 Milligan Way, and it all seems quite posh.

In addition to aircraft refueling, maintenance, detailing and storage, the site offers gourmet catering, a theater room, lounges, conference rooms and, brace yourself Jerry, Otis Spunkmeyer cookies.

SYA is looking into moving our operations there instead of our dark corner of the newsroom.


Source:  http://www.mailtribune.com

OUR OPINION: Federal Aviation Administration must make passenger safety its top priority

Miami Herald >  Opinion >  Editorials
 

The news has been scarier than usual: Iraq is on the boil, which has serious implications for U.S. security, random and mass-shooting tragedies seem to be coming at us weekly.

Add to these the fact that air-traffic controllers are too sleepy, and anyone who boards a plane should be very afraid. The controllers are suffering from chronic fatigue while on the job — the task of keeping the millions of people who fly from here to there safe in the air. It remains a major threat to the safety of the flying public that the Federal Aviation Administration must address immediately.

It’s not as if the FAA had no idea that too many of its 15,000 air-traffic controllers are at risk of nodding off or sluggish thinking. Three years ago, it was disclosed that there were controllers who were falling asleep in front of their screens, which forced the FAA to take a closer look at work scheduling, which has contributed to the problem.

This latest disclosure is a result of a report, mandated by Congress, from the National Research Council. At issue, short-term, is the policy that allows controllers to work five eight-hour shifts over four consecutive days — the last one being a midnight shift.

Controllers love it because they get 80 hours — the equivalent of two traditional work weeks — off before they have to return to work. However, the report says that this scheduling likely results in “severely reduced cognitive performance’’ during the midnight shift because of fatigue.

The schedule might be popular, but it’s a dangerous one. The FAA should sit down with the National Air Traffic Controllers Association and develop scheduling that reduces fatigue on the job and increases flight safety.

To its credit, the FAA imposed a fatigue risk management program after several controllers were caught sleeping on the job a few years ago. Cutbacks, however, have thwarted the program’s effectiveness. This is not encouraging news. Neither is what’s roaring down the pike, coming straight at helpless plane passengers and crew members at the mercy of air-traffic controllers who might — or might not — be at the top of their game. The FAA is confronting a deluge of retirements. Controllers are required to retire when they turn 56. The agency will have to replace about two-thirds of this workforce — 10,000 controllers — during the next 10 years.

In order to fill the ranks, the FAA has abandoned its hiring program, in place for almost 25 years, of recruiting controllers from among military veterans who have aviation experience and from FAA-accredited colleges and universities.

It’s a controversial move that rightly raises concerns about safety. It takes years to properly train air traffic controllers. It is imperative that the FAA — along with Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx — make a persuasive case that replacing recruits who have a leg up in their knowledge of aviation with neophytes starting from scratch will not further imperil people who fly.

The report makes several recommendations, including that the FAA analyze accident and incident reports and voluntary reports by controllers to identify specific links between staffing and safety; involve controllers in staffing decisions; and ensure sufficient staffing as its modernization initiative proceeds. Next Generation Transportation System will shift from ground-based radar to a satellite system. The agency must follow through.

Flying shouldn’t be a crap shoot because someone was asleep at the switch.

Source: http://www.miamiherald.com

Delegate Gary Howell wants a review of Autocross denial: Greater Cumberland Regional Airport (KCBE), Maryland

Cumberland — Delegate Gary Howell of District 56, W.Va. has asked Creade Brodie Jr., chair of the Potomac Highlands Airport Authority, to reconsider a recent vote that denied the members of the National Road Autosport LLC from holding their annual Autocross on the operational grounds of the Greater Cumberland Regional Airport. 

 Brodie made a motion at a special meeting of the PHAA on June 12 to deny the racing group access to the operational grounds and instead allow them to create an area outside the airport fence to hold the races.

“Let me keep this simple. It would be outside the fence,” said Brodie at the special meeting.

The motion also included an offer from Brodie of $5,000 for additional paving to the outlying property if it would help the Autocross meet its needs.

Although it passed unanimously, some authority members were uncomfortable with the motion.

Bill Herbaugh, secretary of the NRA, said the PHAA is not looking at the total benefit of the event.

“They are missing the boat. The Autocross has been a good economic development tool.”

For the past 11 years the Autocross has been held on the taxiway of the airport. The Autocross pits drivers from a wide variety of auto classifications against each other in races against the clock. Drivers compete individually in precision driving races through a series of highway cones.

 Del. Howell via email urged Brodie, who is also an Allegany County Commissioner, to revisit the vote.

“With autocrosses taking place at FAA controlled airports across the nation, I would request that you reconsider your decision to end the autocross at the airport in Wiley Ford, WV.,” wrote Howell.

Howell also want to review the process.

“I want to see the minutes from the meeting. I’m going to check with the state ethics committee and look into it. I want to be sure no ethics laws were violated,” said Howell.


Source:  http://www.times-news.com

Milwaukee Air and Water Show cancelled for second straight day: Air Show will not be rescheduled

MILWAUKEE -- Show organizers have called off the Milwaukee Air and Water Show for Sunday's performance.

Foggy conditions at Milwaukee's lakefront once again caused performers to stay on the ground. Organizers originally delayed the show to see if conditions would improve.

The Air Show was cancelled on Saturday as well because of the low visibility, which makes it unsafe for pilots to perform. Air show announcer Herb Hunter said it was unprecedented weekend.

"I can say that in 28 years of announcing, I've never seen two washouts back-to-back," said Hunter.

The Air Show will not be rescheduled. 


Source:  http://www.620wtmj.com

Midair scare as flight drops 5000ft in seconds

Patna, June 22: A Patna-Delhi Air India flight sharply tilted left and then right and lost thousands of feet in seconds, giving passengers a sensation of “free fall”, apparently because two planes had been allowed to come closer than stipulated.

It all happened as air traffic control (ATC) allowed Flight AI-410, carrying 119 passengers, to try and climb to 33,000ft from its assigned height of 32,000ft.

An aviation expert said the A319 probably got caught in the wake turbulence — the turbulence that forms behind a flying aircraft — of a bigger plane that had possibly flown above it a little earlier breaching the critical separation limit of 1,000ft between flights.

No Air India official at Patna airport would confirm the incident but an airline source said it was not a safety threat.

Among the passengers was Union agriculture minister Radha Mohan Singh, former director-general of police D.N. Gautam and an aviation expert, Atul Singh.

“The flight first tilted 40 degrees to the left and began losing altitude. Then it tilted 80 degrees the other way and continued to lose height,” said Singh, executive director of the Delhi-based company, Centre for Aviation Policy, Safety and Research.

“It lost around 5,000ft from its assigned height of 32,000ft within 10 to 12 seconds.”

He said the aircraft almost seemed out of control and was on the verge of entering into a stall — a situation where a plane can fall vertically because of lack of speed.

Gautam said from Delhi that the passengers “had to hold the meals kept on the tray as they were falling”.

Retired IAS officer Phool Singh said: “Suddenly, there was a thud and a feeling of free fall. The flight stabilised in a few seconds. A similar turbulence was felt a few moments later for 2-3 seconds. There wasn’t much panic among the passengers.”

Captain Amitesh Ahuja, the pilot, announced the situation was under control.

Singh, the aviation expert, said he spoke to Ahuja in the cockpit. “He said he had requested the Varanasi ATC to grant permission to ascend to 38,000ft but was directed to go up to 33,000ft only,” Singh said.

“Ahuja said probably a Boeing 747 or Boeing 777 had passed through the same altitude a little earlier. He said he had never experienced such wake turbulence in his career. As I am certain there was a human error, I shall file an official complaint with the (aviation regulator) DGCA.”

Another aviation expert, Mirza Faisan, who was not on the plane, said a “bank (flying with one wing above another) of 40 degrees is quite sharp for an A319, as the maximum permissible banking according to its design is 45 to 60 degrees”.

Story and photo:   http://www.telegraphindia.com

Fred Lutz receives prestigious pilot award

Fred Lutz had to get his mother's signature to fulfill his dream of flying.

The young Lutz had friends with student pilot licenses and he wanted to take lessons at the old Mankato Airport near what is now Minnesota State University — something he couldn't do without mom's signature for a form from the then Federal Aviation Agency.

Since then the 73-year-old North Mankato resident has logged 2,600 hours of private pilot hours — and done it without a single mishap or flight violation.

That record has landed Lutz in an elite group of pilots. As a result he received the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award, given to pilots who've flown for at least 50 years and have a clean flight record.

"It's rewarding. There are just over 2,000 in the country and only three of us from Mankato."

The other two are former banker George Sugden and the late John Roberts, who was a longtime flight instructor at MSU.

Recently, the FAA delivered Lutz's award during an event at the Mankato Regional Airport that drew 180 of Lutz's fellow pilots, local dignitaries and well wishers.

Lutz had forgotten about his mom's signature on the old document from 1960 but revisited it along with a detailed history of his flying life, thanks to impeccable record keeping by the FAA. When he qualified for the 50-year award, the FAA combed through all their records of his career, which included details of all his physical exams, inspections, licensing requirements, a Western Union telegram telling him he got his first license and his lifelong flight history — all of which he received copies of.

"People talk about the NSA. It's amazing the records a big agency like the FAA kept all these years," Lutz said.

While many of his young friends went on to become commercial pilots, he only flew for himself — for pleasure and for business when he ran the North Mankato soft drink bottling company that long produced 7Up.

The tail number of his Beechcraft Bonanza still carries the 77UP license number. "I tried to get 7UP, but someone in the parent company already had it," Lutz said.

Lutz said his only brush with a problem while flying was one incident where the engine killed in flight due to a failed fuel pump. "I just switched on the (fuel) boost pump and it was fine."

The Beechcraft that Lutz still flies was purchased with a partner in 1970 for $41,000. The plane's been completely reconditioned over the years, including new paint, new engine and updated controls. "That plane today costs $700,000 and it doesn't do any more than this one," Lutz said.

He said the biggest changes he's seen has been the advent of modern controls. "All the GPS and weather and traffic and maps, the communications systems all make it a lot safer."

And he's seen dramatic changes at the Mankato airport as it grew from a small local air strip to a regional airport.

"We have a great airport out there. The city has really done a lot and the (local) sales tax has done a lot for it. There is a lot of activity out there."

Lutz said his long flight career has been aided by good health. "I have to get a physical every two years. A lot of guys get grounded because of their health."

Lutz still flies fairly often, usually around Minnesota and neighboring states. "I go to Omaha, Chicago, down to St. Louis. I don't go a long ways too often anymore."

Story and photo:  http://www.mankatofreepress.com

Czech Sport Aircraft PS-28 Cruiser, HB-WXC: Lake Neuchâtel

Authorities on Sunday retrieved a small plane that crashed into Lake Neuchâtel, killing the two men aboard.

A 71-year-old and 59-year-old, both residents of the canton of Neuchâtel, died after the aircraft plunged into the water on Saturday morning around 30 minutes after taking off from Colombier, southwest of the city of Neuchâtel, Vaud cantonal police said.

A team, including a dozen police divers, managed to pull up the plane from a depth of 80 metres, using a crane on a barge, in a northeastern area of the lake three kilometres from the village Cudrefin, in the canton of Vaud, police said in a release.

Divers hooked a cable to the wreckage to allow it to be pulled to the surface, police said.

The two victims were extricated from the cabin of the aircraft.

It was the first time that Vaud police divers had achieved a mission at such depths, Olivia Cutruzzolà, a spokeswoman for the cantonal force told the ATS news agency.

Cutruzzolà noted the operation involved the cooperation of police and emergency rescue organizations from the cantons of Vaud, Fribourg, Neuchâtel and Geneva.

Sophisticated equipment including underwater robots from the Geneva and Vaud cantonal police forces were used to pinpoint the location of the plane by 7pm on Saturday, Vaud police said.

The bodies of the victims were transported to Lausanne for a forensic analysis.

The remains of the plane were taken to the Payerne aerodrome, in the canton of Vaud, where it will be examined by staff from the Swiss accident investigation service.

The cause of the accident has not yet been established.

Police issued a call for witnesses or people who may have information about what happened to phone 021 644 44 44.

Story:  http://www.thelocal.ch

Insassen des abgestürzten Flugzeugs sind tot

Die beiden Insassen des Flugzeugs, das in den See bei Cudrefin gestürzt ist, sind bei dem Unglück ums Leben gekommen. Ein Unterwasserroboter hatte das Wrack zuvor lokalisiert.

Story and photo gallery:   http://www.20min.ch

Christen A-1 Husky, N436C: Accident occurred June 22, 2014 in Tampa, Florida

NTSB Identification: ERA14LA305
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 22, 2014 in Tampa, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/12/2015
Aircraft: CHRISTEN INDUSTRIES INC A 1, registration: N436C
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Witnesses reported seeing the airplane take off from a grassy area adjacent to the runway. Witness statements and a video revealed that, immediately after takeoff, the airplane entered a steep left turn about 30 ft above ground level. The airplane then turned about 270 degrees, with continuous engine noise, before descending nose down into the ground. Examination of the wreckage did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation. The pilot did not have his five-point harness buckled during the flight. Although the pilot’s widow reported that the pilot probably crashed the airplane on purpose because they had been separated about 1 year and she had moved out of their residence 4 days before the accident, it could not be determined if the accident occurred as a result of an intentional act by the pilot. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain airplane control during initial climb after takeoff, which resulted in an uncontrolled descent into the ground. 

On June 22, 2014, about 1545 eastern daylight time, a Christen Industries Inc. A-1 (Husky), N436C, operated by a private individual, was substantially damaged during takeoff at Tampa Executive Airport (VDF), Tampa, Florida. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned local flight. 

Two witnesses, who worked at the airport, were standing outside and watched the accident takeoff. They stated that the airplane departed on the grass adjacent to runway 23. Immediately after takeoff, about 30 feet above ground level, the airplane entered a steep left bank turn. The airplane then turned about 270 degrees, before the nose dropped and it impacted the ramp area left wing and nose low. One of the witnesses added that the engine noise was loud during the turn. She also captured a video of the accident takeoff, which was forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory, Washington, D.C. Review of the video confirmed the witness statements regarding the steep left bank and sound of continuous engine noise. 

The airplane came to rest upright on the tarmac. Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the three wooden propeller blades had separated from the hub. The engine was partially separated from the airframe and canted right. Both wing outboard leading edges were impact damaged and the flaps were partially extended. The inspector was able to confirm flight control continuity from the elevator, rudder, and right aileron to the cockpit area. Left aileron continuity could not be confirmed due to impact damage. The inspector also noted that the pilot's five-point harness was intact and unbuckled. He confirmed with witnesses that the harness was not buckled when the pilot was recovered from the wreckage. The inspector added that when law enforcement notified the pilot's widow, she replied that the pilot had probably crashed on purpose as they had been separated for about 1 year and she moved out of their residence 4 days prior to the accident. 

Review of maintenance records revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on December 28, 2013, at a total airframe and engine time of 1,250 hours. The engine had operated 817 hours since major overhaul at the time of the inspection. The pilot's logbook was not recovered. He reported 3,600 total hours of flight experience on his most recent application for an FAA second-class medical certificate, which was issued on March 27, 2013.

An autopsy was performed on the pilot on June 23, 2014, by the State of Florida District 13 Medical Examiner's Office, Tampa, Florida. The cause of death was noted as due to blunt impact to the head and neck. Toxicological testing was performed on the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Science Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The test results were negative for drugs, ethanol, and carbon monoxide.


NTSB Identification: ERA14LA305
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 22, 2014 in Tampa, FL
Aircraft: CHRISTEN INDUSTRIES INC A 1, registration: N436C
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 22, 2014, about 1545 eastern standard time, a Christen Industries Inc. A-1 (Husky), N436C, operated by a private individual, was substantially damaged during takeoff at Tampa Executive Airport (VDF), Tampa, Florida. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned local flight.

Two witnesses, who worked at the airport, were standing outside and watched the accident takeoff. They stated that the airplane departed on the grass adjacent to runway 23. Immediately after takeoff, about 30 feet above ground level, the airplane entered a steep left bank turn. The airplane then turned about 360 degrees, before the nose dropped and it impacted the tarmac left wing and nose low. One of the witnesses added that the engine noise was loud during the turn. She also captured a video of the accident takeoff, which was forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory, Washington, D.C., for further review.

The airplane came to rest upright on the tarmac. Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the two wooden propeller blades had separated from the hub. The engine was partially separated from the airframe and canted right. Both wing outboard leading edges were impact damaged and the flaps were partially extended. The inspector also noted that the pilot's five-point harness had not been secured. He confirmed with witnesses that the harness was not secure when the pilot was recovered from the wreckage.


 Investigating Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19


http://registry.faa.gov/N436C

 
Ki Martin 
Ki L. Martin, 53, loved tinkering with planes and always had time to chat about engines, a colleague says. 
~


TAMPA — A pilot was killed when a small plane crashed at Tampa Executive Airport Sunday afternoon.   

Hillsborough sheriff's officials said the plane nose dived on the runway of the airport, 6530 Tampa Executive Road, just before 4 p.m. The crash occurred as the pilot, Ki L. Martin, 53, of Wimauma, was taking off, sheriff's officials said.

The plane went down just after getting airborne, officials said, and the cause was unknown.

Officials said no one else was aboard the plane, which Martin stored at the airport. The Federal Aviation Administration will investigate.

A colleague said Martin worked in the Tampa branch of Sarasota Avionics, a company that provides maintenance work on planes.

"I'm just totally sick," said Larry Viergever, an employee based in Sarasota who has known Martin for 15 years.

After hearing the news that a pilot had died in a crash at the airport, Viergever prayed it wasn't Martin.

He remembered Martin as a diligent worker who loved tinkering with planes and who always had a minute to chit-chat about engines and repair techniques. He was a respectful man who spoke to you like an equal, an attentive manager who stayed ahead of problems, and a wonderful pilot who was ecstatic in the cockpit, Viergever said.

Viergever asked a Tampa Bay Times reporter what kind of plane Martin was flying during the crash.

After being told it was a small, yellow airplane, he sighed. "Yeah, that was probably his Husky. It's a type of aerobatics plane. He was very proud of it. He always cleaned it."

"He is a great guy," Viergever said. "I can't hardly say was yet. He'll be missed more than most."


Source: http://pets.tampabay.com

"This 1988 Christen A-1 Husky fixed wing, two seat plane took flight Sunday afternoon in the Tampa Bay area over Ruskin, Florida. The reciprocating 200 hp engine is a Lycoming 0-360-C1F."

See photos:    http://www.photonews247.com


TAMPA — Ki Martin’s former neighbor remembered him as a friendly man who loved flying.

Richard Dover, of Hawthorne, said that Martin, who died after his single-engine airplane crashed Sunday afternoon at Tampa Executive Airport, was a careful pilot who was fond of flying over tiny Cue Lake, between Melrose and Hawthorne.

“He’d take off right over the water,” said Dover, who had not seen Martin, 53, in several years. “He did that all over the place. He did a lot of flying.”

Larry McKinnon, public information officer with the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office said that a motorist on Interstate 4, which runs by Tampa Executive Airport, called 911 after seeing Martin’s plane crash on the runway around 4 p.m.

“The plane was in the process of taking off,” McKinnon said. “I’m not sure if it got off the ground. We’re not sure if it was in route to a destination.”

The plane did not catch fire but 15 to 20 gallons of aviation fuel spilled onto the runway. Firefighters were able to contain the fuel and clean it up.

Dover said that Martin was as friendly as he was skilled in the cockpit.

“It would happen so quick,” Dover said of Martin’s flights over Cue Lake. “I could hear his plane, but by the time I’d get down there, he was gone. I remember him saying how the lake wasn’t that big, and he was always very careful about what he was doing. The length of the takeoff wasn’t that long, and there were pine trees 100 feet up that he would have to clear.”    The Federal Aviation Authority will investigate the cause of the crash, McKinnon said. 


Read more:

http://tbo.com

http://www.baynews9.com

http://www.tampabay.com 

http://www.wtsp.com

http://www.wfla.com

Flyjet yet to obtain license to fly out of Subang airport

SERI KEMBANGAN: After years of delay, Country Heights Holdings Bhd founder Tan Sri Lee Kim Yew's privately-owned Flyjet Sdn Bhd is still waiting for a license to operate a private jet service out of the airport in Subang.

Lee did not want to commit to a timeline for start of operations, saying that it depends on authorities' approval, but assured that operations would be based at Skypark Terminal, Subang.

"I think the problem (for the delay of obtaining a license) is our country is more stringent, the approval procedure is very stringent," he told SunBiz after Country Heights' AGM last Friday.

In July last year, SunBiz reported that Lee's planned venture was caught by an unofficial "freeze" on new air service permits (ASPs) for Sultan Abdul Aziz Shah Airport in Subang, Selangor due to congestion issues.

He however denied this, saying that the delay is mainly due to the need for stringent checks for its aircraft.

Lee said Flyjet is well-prepared to start its operation, having three planes at hand, but as the approval is still pending, thus it is yet to operate.

"We actually have three planes already, two Bombardier Challenger 601 and one Boeing 737-33A (models)…(we are) waiting for the license from the Ministry of Transport.

"(But) all my airplane are not new airplanes, they're used airplanes….they (the authorities) have to check and check," he added.

Lee believes the market response for its private jet service will be encouraging, judging from the current demand.

"Malaysia doesn't have proper air operator's certificate (AOC) for private charter, a lot of people are chartered illegally," he said.

Lee said the targeted customers for its private jet services are golfers, which include its golf clubs' members.

"The concept is very interesting…I always believe (in) private jet…I have this dream (of doing private jet chartering business) when I was 40 years old.

"Owning a private jet is very costly, so I have things called a fly option (where) you're buying golf membership from me, then at the same time, you will have free flying time," he said.

Lee said Flyjet plans to invest up to US$50 million (RM161 million) in the future to buy more planes, if the business is doing well.

"We encourage the businesses to make Malaysia as a hub...our customers not only in Malaysia," he added.

It's planes, with a capacity of maximum 40 people, are able to fly up to five to six hours, traveling to many countries in the region.

According to filings with Companies Comission of Malaysia, Flyjet, which was incorporated in September 2009, has three directors sitting on board – Lee himself, former Prime Minister Tun Dr. Mahathir Mohammad as the chairman, and Mohd Azha Jalil as the CEO.

Lee is the largest shareholder with 19.12 million shares, while his daughter Diani Lee Cheng Ni and Mahathir hold one share each.

The company is still listed as dormant.


Source:  http://www.thesundaily.my

3 Quebec helicopter escapees captured in Montreal

MONTREAL (AP) - A heavily-armed SWAT team raided an upscale Montreal condominium early Sunday to capture the three men police say made a bold escape by helicopter from a Quebec jail two weeks ago.

The men, who were facing murder and gangsterism charges before the jailbreak, were found in a posh 10th-floor condo with a stunning view of the city in a ritzy new development in Old Montreal, just steps from the historic waterfront.

Yves Denis, 35, Denis Lefebvre, 53, and Serge Pomerleau, 49, were arrested after police busted open the door to enter the residence around 1:30 a.m., Quebec provincial police said. They are due in court in Quebec City on Monday to face fresh charges, but police did not spell out what the new accusations would be.

Police did not divulge details about what led them to the condo.

By midday Sunday, police had left the scene after carrying out several containers and bags. Two maintenance workers were cleaning up the home where the men were arrested.

The splintered door was ajar in its bent frame, while inside the furniture was askew, with a couch on its side and cushions scattered about. Mattresses, blankets and pillows were on the floor.

Quebec police Sgt. Audrey-Anne Bilodeau said investigators had gathered evidence from the condo that could be used in court. She said the investigation into the June 7 escape is ongoing and further arrests are likely.

"It could be a person who helped them escape from prison or a person who helped them hide from us," Bilodeau said.

The three men were originally arrested as part of Operation Crayfish in 2010, which dismantled a network of drug traffickers.

On June 7, police said a helicopter plucked the three men from a courtyard of the Orsainville Detention Centre in suburban Quebec City, triggering an international manhunt. Interpol placed them on its list of the world's most wanted fugitives.

The Quebec government has ordered an internal investigation into the jailbreak.

Questions have been raised about a decision by Quebec Superior Court Justice Louis Dionne who had been asked to rule on a request by the three men to loosen the strict security conditions under which they were being held. The inmates had argued that the security conditions impeded preparations for their defense in court.

The judge's decision, which was dated March 24 and took effect shortly before the escape, was only recently made public. In his ruling, the judge gave the detainees access to a secured computer for their trial preparation. The ruling also stated they didn't have to wear handcuffs during proceedings and would be allowed to go into the prison yard on weekday evenings, prison staff permitting.

Quebec Public Security Minister Lise Theriault has said she doesn't know why the judge agreed to the request to loosen the security restrictions.

Theriault said Sunday that she was "relieved" the men had finally been caught.

"We've been saying for two weeks (that) the first priority is to catch the three men, so that's done," she said, adding that they will be under heavy security as they await Monday's court appearance.

The administrative probe will also examine a similar escape last year.

In March 2013, two inmates grabbed onto a rope dropped from a helicopter at the St-Jerome detention center and flew away, but they were quickly recaptured.

No-fly zones have now been imposed over select prisons in Quebec, following a request by the provincial government.

Story and photos:  http://www.wandtv.com

Outagamie County Regional Airport (KATW) could see major upgrades, expansion

GREENVILLE — Outagamie County intends to maintain its forward momentum by making improvements at its growing airport.

Outagamie County Regional Airport leaders recently finished a five-year plan that calls for aviation-based and business-related infrastructure improvements to be completed by the end of 2020. The projects — many dependent on the availability of state and federal dollars — would total $140 million.

The County Board will vote Tuesday on whether to support the plan.

“It’s pretty aggressive,” airport director Abe Weber said.

The plan for 2015 includes construction of a north general aviation ramp and a feasibility study on replacement of the air traffic control tower. In 2016, the airport would build a rental car facility separate from the terminal. In 2018, the airport would expand its air cargo facility and begin construction of aviation infrastructure for a new business park.

Heavy construction would get underway in 2019, including an extension of the shorter of its two runways from 6,500 to 8,000 feet. Depending on the results of the feasibility study, the airport would design and build a new air traffic control tower on its west side away from the main campus. The 2019 plan also calls for construction of a $19.2 million parking structure.
Key goals

Weber said the plan addresses several key goals — one of which is ensuring the airport is a vibrant business center as well as an active transportation hub.

The airport is self sustaining and must remain off the tax rolls. “That’s core to our strategy,” Weber said. “We need tenants renting space and growing here.”

County Executive Tom Nelson said the aggressive pace of the improvements is a matter of seizing opportunity. He called the airport “the main stage” when it comes to economic development in the Fox Valley.

“We’ve done so much, and there’s still so much more we can do,” he said.

Nelson cited a 2008 economic impact study that showed the airport contributed more than $400 million into the local economy and that the airport is directly and indirectly responsible for more than 2,600 jobs.
New business

Bringing in new business is high on the list of priorities.

A 150-acre business park would be built on the northwest side of the airport. The proposal comes as leaders continue to market a vacant — yet ready-for-construction — park on the airport’s north side.

Building on publicly owned land and leasing that space won’t appeal to every business, but it’s a strategy that makes sense, said Larry Burkhardt, executive vice president of the Fox Cities Regional Partnership.

A number of airports have moved ahead in similar fashion, he said, pointing to Outagamie County Regional Airport’s largest tenant — Gulfstream Aerospace — in highlighting the opportunities that airport-based business can bring to a community. Gulfstream’s operation here has nearly 900 employees with well-paying jobs, Burkhardt said.
Economic advantage

The airport’s plans come on the heels of several years of major efforts and significant investment. Last year, the airport opened a new $3.6 million general aviation terminal on the south side of the grounds. It’s complemented by a $650,000, 12,000-square-foot hangar. Kimberly-Clark Corp. built an adjacent hangar.

Nearby, Fox Valley Technical College is preparing to open its 91,600-square-foot public safety training center.

This year, crews moved a 150,000-square-foot hangar south to a new location away from the terminal to provide space should Gulfstream expand.

A major ongoing effort for the airport this year is securing a U.S. Customs office. To maximize marketing, the county board has approved a name change to Appleton Airport or Appleton International Airport. The name will depend on customs service being granted.

Nelson said the airport is a proven job creator and hasn’t reached its full potential.

“If there’s an opportunity to leverage our economic advantage, we’ll take it,” he said.


Source:   http://www.postcrescent.com

Beech A23-24, N3611Q, N3611Q LLC: Accident occurred June 21, 2014 in Sedona, Arizona

http://registry.faa.gov/N3611Q  

NTSB Identification: WPR14CA259
Accident occurred Saturday, June 21, 2014 in Sedona, AZ
Aircraft: BEECH A23 24, registration: N3611Q

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.


AIRCRAFT ON LANDING WENT OFF THE RUNWAY AND INTO A DITCH, SEDONA, AZ 

FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07:  http://www.asias.faa.gov/N3611Q   

Two people walked away from a single-engine plane crash at the Sedona Airport on Saturday morning, no injuries. 

http://www.azfj.org

https://twitter.com/myfoxphoenix

Pottsgrove Runners, Others ‘Wing It’ At Airport Race: Heritage Field (KPTW), Pottstown, Pennsylvania

LIMERICK PA – More than 190 runners of all ages arrived Friday evening (June 20, 2014) at the Pottstown-Limerick Airport on Airport Road in Limerick Township to participate in what most considered a unique event: the chance to race on an airport runway.

They did it without competing against planes, too!

The Chester County Running Store, the race sponsor that operates at the Suburbia Square Shopping Center in Pottstown, convinced airport officials to close the runway for what it called The Saucony Mile. That gave virtual wings to registered runners in four different classes: A kids race for ages 1-15, male and female groups for age 16 and older, and a combined elite race.
The weather was just what runners might have hoped for, sunny and accompanied by a cooling breeze.

Every runner seemed to prepare for the event in their own special way. Some got help from family members, who made sure their gear fit properly. Some twisted and turned like pretzels to stretch individual muscles. Most took a practice lap or two around the track, or a shorter but suitable substitute.

Of the four races, the largest field by far featured the kids. They proved to be just as fit, if not more so, than the adults. They started at the runway’s east end and thundered down its asphalt, rounded two corners on the airport’s west side, and then headed straight toward twin flags that marked the finish line.

Greater Pottstown communities were well represented on the tarmac. Carl and Sylvia Landis of Pottstown, long-time volunteers for the borough chapter of SCORE, were among top finishers in their age brackets for male and female runners, respectively. Pottsgrove Middle School coach Marilyn Eaton took third place in her age bracket. Also competing in the kids’ race were the children of Chad Camburn of Bursich Associates, the engineering firm for Lower Pottsgrove Township.

Liam Conway was the kids’ race winner, in 4 minutes 50 seconds. Owen Dawson was the overall elite group winner, and also winner of its men’s bracket, at 4 minutes 10 seconds; Callie Hogan was its women’s bracket winner, at 4 minutes 55 seconds. Johnny Carnes was the overall men’s group winner, in 4 minutes 39 seconds; and Abby Deon the overall women’s group winner, at 5 minutes 36 seconds.
Story, photo and video: http://sanatogapost.com

 

‘Top safety official in dark about air miss cases’

MUMBAI: In sixteen days during the second and third week of May, five "air miss incidents" took place over Mumbai skies as aircraft came in close proximity of each other, said a source.

However, the topmost Airports Authority of India (AAI) official (western region) tasked with monitoring aviation safety was kept in the dark about the cases.

The air traffic control services in the country are provided by the AAI. An increase in near miss incidents over the congested Mumbai skies is primarily the organization's concern. The authority investigates and finds solutions to remedy such situations, but the job function has not been taking place as mandated.

"AAI officials have been suppressing from me air miss incident reports since last year. They are being aided and abetted by the higher-ups in AAI headquarters," stated a letter sent on April 30 by S Mangala, AAI deputy general manager (aviation safety) of the western region to A K Sharma, regional AAI executive director.

Mangala being the western region's top aviation safety official is one of the administrators who should be mandatory informed about such incidents as soon as they take place. "It is high time that air safety is given more attention, especially in view of the downgrade by aviation regulator in the US last year," the letter mentioned. On May 1, AAI's vigilance officer made a noting on the letter calling for appropriate action. On May 5, Sharma sought an explanation on the matter. There has been no progress since then.

"Mangala has been vociferous in criticizing several controversial decisions taken by the AAI in the past. But by keeping her out of the loop, the AAI officials have hindered the job function of the top aviation safety official in Mumbai at a time when air miss incidents are on the rise," said an aviation source. AAI chairman was not available for comment.

Between 2013 and 2014, 13 air traffic control incidents were registered. On May 6, a serious incident took place when an IndiGo Mumbai-Jaipur flight, which was to take off from Mumbai airport's runway 14, delayed its departure because of which a Jet Airways aircraft that had been descending and cleared to land on the same runway was forced to do a go-around at the last moment.

In a few seconds, the air traffic controllers and the pilots of both aircraft faced tense moments because the IndiGo A320 lifted off only to find the Jet Airways Boeing 737, which had aborted its landing a few seconds ago also tracking a climb along the same direction, a few hundred feet over it.


Source:  http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com

Beechcraft B36TC Bonanza, N4245D: Accident occurred November 11, 2013 in Amarillo, Texas

http://registry.faa.govN4245D

NTSB Identification: CEN14FA047
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, November 11, 2013 in Amarillo, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/23/2014
Aircraft: BEECHCRAFT B36TC, registration: N4245D
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The noninstrument-rated private pilot filed an instrument flight plan to an airport that was reporting night instrument meteorological conditions (IMC), which included ¼-mile visibility, fog, sky obscuration, and 100-foot vertical visibility. Radar track data showed that, upon arrival at the airport, the pilot flew the instrument lighting system approach and then attempted to execute a missed approach. During the missed approach, radar contact was lost and the airplane impacted the terrain. The postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. 

The pilot’s toxicology report indicated that gabapentin and duloxetine were found in the pilot’s system, and both are disqualifying drugs for flight. The pilot did not report either of these disqualifying medications on his last medical certification examination. While both medications are sedating, a witness reported that the pilot was alert and energetic before the flight and showed no signs of sedation. Witness reports and findings from the wreckage examination are consistent with a loss of control event, and, based on the degraded visual reference conditions present about the time of the accident, it is likely that the pilot experienced spatial disorientation. Although it could not be determined what effect the use of the medications had on the pilot’s performance during the high-workload IMC flight, their use could increase the chance of experiencing and responding inappropriately to spatial disorientation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The noninstrument-rated pilot’s improper decision to fly a night instrument approach in instrument meteorological conditions, which resulted in the pilot’s spatial disorientation and loss of control of the airplane during an attempted missed approach.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On November 11, 2013, about 0056 central standard time (cst), a Beechcraft B36TC, N4245D, was destroyed when it impacted the terrain about 2 nautical miles northeast of the Rick Husband Amarillo International Airport (AMA), Amarillo, Texas, during a missed approach. The private pilot and two passengers received fatal injuries. The airplane was registered and operated by the pilot under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations as a Part 91 personal flight. Night instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed at the time of the accident, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed. The airplane departed from the Lubbock Preston Smith International Airport (LBB) about 2347 on November 10, 2013.

Air traffic control radar and communications data indicated that the pilot flew three previous flights on Sunday, November 10, 2013, before the accident flight. The first flight departed Tradewind Airport (TDW), Amarillo, Texas, about 1424 and landed at LBB about 1502. The second flight departed LBB about 1536 and landed at the Collin County Regional Airport (TKI), Dallas, Texas, about 1716. The third flight departed TKI about 2123 and landed at LBB about 2317. The accident flight departed LBB about 2347 with TDW as the intended destination. IFR flight plans were filed for all four flights.

Radar track data indicated that during the flight to TDW, the airplane entered a north/south holding pattern and flew two turns in holding as published at the ZERAR waypoint. About 0032, the Albuquerque Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) cleared the flight for the area navigation (RNAV) Runway 35 approach to TDW. The radar track data showed that the pilot flew the approach; and subsequently, the pilot executed the published missed approach at TDW. About 0039, the pilot contacted ARTCC and reported that he executed the missed approach at TDW due to fog. The flight proceeded back to the ZERAR way point in accordance with the missed approach procedure. 

At 0048, ARTCC cleared the flight for the instrument landing system (ILS) Runway 4 approach into AMA, which was about 6 nm from TDW, with an alternate landing airport at the Hale County Airport (PVW), Plainview, Texas, if the instrument approach was unsuccessful. The pilot acknowledged the clearance and no further radio transmissions were made by the pilot. The radar track data indicated the pilot flew the ILS Runway 4 approach to AMA; and then attempted to execute the missed approach. During the missed approach, the airplane departed radar contact and impacted the terrain. 

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The 48-year-old private pilot held a single-engine airplane land rating which he received on July 16, 1985. He held a third class medical certificate issued on October 24, 2013. During his medical examination, the pilot reported that his total flight time was 410 hours. There was no Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) record of an instrument rating being issued to the pilot. 

On October 24, 2014, the pilot took the FAA instrument knowledge test that is required to get an instrument rating. However, he received a score of 68 percent on the test, and a passing score is 70 percent. The pilot intended to fly the instrument check ride, but was unable to take the instrument check ride until he passed the instrument knowledge test. 

The pilot purchased the accident airplane on October 30, 2013, in Greensboro, North Carolina. The airplane broker who sold the pilot the airplane reported that the pilot intended to have his instrument rating completed prior to purchasing the airplane. The pilot received two days of initial Bonanza training after he purchased the airplane. The initial training consisted of 4 hours of ground instruction followed by 10.5 hours of flight instruction. The flight instructor reported that the pilot had about 400 to 600 hours of flight time in a Cessna 172RG. The pilot did not have any experience with the flight director, autopilot, or the Garmin Nav/Coms. The flight instructor reported they practiced basic air work which included takeoff and landings, stalls, steep turns, unusual attitudes, and emergency procedures. About 2.5 hours of flight time was flown in IMC conditions in which they practiced using the autopilot and flight director, programing the Garmin for instrument approaches, and hand flying in IMC conditions. As a result of the initial Bonanza training, the pilot received a high performance endorsement and a complex airplane endorsement. 

Although the accident pilot was checked out in the airplane, he hired another experienced Bonanza pilot to assist him in ferrying the airplane back to Texas. They flew about 15 hours in the next three days. The first day of flying was primarily practicing takeoff and landings. On the two flights en route to Texas, IFR flight plans were filed even though the weather was visual meteorological conditions. The accident pilot did all the flying and they did not fly any instrument approaches. The experienced Bonanza pilot reported that the accident pilot did not have any problems flying the airplane and he did not exhibit any unsafe tendencies. 

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was a Beechcraft B36TC, serial number EA-645, manufactured in 1999. The airplane had a maximum gross weight of 3,850 pounds was configured to seat six occupants. The engine was a Continental IO-520-B2 engine, which was converted to a 300-horsepower IO-550-B (AP) via Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) #SE02881AT on April 10, 2009. The last annual maintenance inspection was conducted on September 24, 2013. The airplane had accumulated a total time of 1,438.9 hours, and the engine had accumulated 319.3 hours since overhaul at the time of the inspection. 

The two passengers who flew in the airplane from Dallas to Lubbock on November 10, 2013, reported that the airplane flew fine, all the instruments were in the "green," and that it was a very normal flight. 

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 2353 on November 10, 2013, the surface weather observation at AMA was: wind 170 degrees at 13 knots; 1/4 mile visibility; fog; sky obscured; vertical visibility 100 feet; temperature 8 degrees Celsius (C); dew point 8 degrees C; altimeter 30.24 inches of mercury. 

At 0053 on November 11, 2013, the surface weather observation at AMA was: wind 170 degrees at 10 knots; 1/4 mile visibility; fog; sky obscured; vertical visibility 100 feet; temperature 9 degrees C; dew point 8 degrees C; altimeter 30.23 inches of mercury. 

At 1943 on November 10, 2013, the National Weather Service office in Amarillo, Texas, issued a dense fog advisory for much of the Texas Panhandle. This advisory warned of the low visibility conditions throughout the Panhandle because of dense fog, and that the dense fog conditions were expected to persist through 0900. 

During the approach to TDW, the air traffic controller provided the pilot with the current weather at AMA since there was no weather reporting at TDW. The current weather at AMA was wind 170 degrees at 13 knots; visibility 1/4 mile with fog obscuration and ceiling variable between 1,400 feet and 1,600 feet.

A witness, who was a Texas State Trooper, reported that at 2230 she was completing an investigation of a vehicle accident located about 3 miles from site of the airplane accident that occurred about 2.5 hours later. She reported that there was heavy ground fog in the area with horizontal visibility limited to about 50 feet. 

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane impacted a flat, clay dirt pasture on a magnetic heading of about 276 degrees. The debris path was about 1,000 feet long and 175 feet wide. The engine traveled the furthest from the initial impact point. The initial impact ground scar measured about 60 feet long. A green lens piece was found at the initial ground scar. About 60 feet from the initial impact point , a ground scar about 10 feet long was observed with the right elevator balance weight horn protruding into the ground at about an 85 degrees down angle. A burn area about 150 feet by 28 feet extended from the second ground scar. The right wing was fragmented, and pieces of the right wing were found in the debris path from the initial ground scar to where the main wreckage was located about 600 feet from the initial impact point. The propeller was separated from the engine and was found along a barb wire fence about 550 feet from the initial ground scar. 

The main wreckage consisted of the cabin aft of the engine firewall, the left wing, the aft baggage compartment, and the empennage, which was found inverted. A ground fire consumed a majority of the fuselage and cockpit instruments, and the left wing exhibited fire damage. The structure around the power quadrant was consumed by fire. The airspeed indicator was located in the debris field, and the pointer was found stuck at 156 knots. 

All primary flight control surfaces and flaps were located at the wreckage site. Flight control continuity of all primary flight control cables was confirmed from the cockpit to their respective flight control surfaces, with the cable separations exhibiting signatures consistent with overload. Continuity of the aileron, elevator, and rudder trim control cables was confirmed from the cockpit to the respective flight control trim surfaces, with the cable separations exhibiting signatures consistent with overload. The left flap remained attached to the left wing and was found in the up position. The right flap separated from the fragmented right wing, and the flap actuator extension corresponded to a 5 degree flap down position.

The engine came to rest inverted in a field approximately 1,000 feet from the initial point of impact. The intake and exhaust components were not attached to the engine and were found scattered among the debris field. All of the fuel system components were separated from the engine with the exception of the fuel manifold, injector lines, and nozzles. The magnetos, alternator, engine-driven vacuum pump, starter motor/starter adapter, turbocharger, pressure controller, overboost relief valve, wastegate actuator, intercooler, oil pump, oil cooler, oil filter, and oil sump were all separated from the engine, and all but the starter motor and adapter were identified throughout the debris field. 

Portions of the lower crankcase halves and the accessory end of both halves were separated from the engine and were located throughout the debris field. The crankshaft, camshaft, and idler gears, as well as the propeller drive and propeller bevel gears, were visible. There was no sign of operational distress, oil starvation, or discoloration on any of the visible internal components. The sparkplugs displayed normal wear and combustion deposits. The cylinders were examined using a lighted borescope, and no internal anomalies were noted with the cylinder barrels, pistons, valves, or valve seats.

The propeller was separated from the propeller flange. The examination of the 3-blade propeller revealed that all three blades remained attached to the propeller hub. All three blades displayed heavy polishing near the blade tips. The blade labeled A during the on-site examination was loose in the hub and was rotated approximately 140° within the hub. Blade A also exhibited leading edge gouges and deep, chord-wise scrapes. The blade labeled B was twisted toward low pitch toward the tip. Blade C sustained S-bending damage and twisting toward low pitch toward the tip, and the outboard eight inches of blade tip was separated from the blade. The mounting side of the propeller hub displayed numerous gouges, and the mounting bolt holes were elongated and distorted.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy of the pilot was performed at the Potter County Coroner's Office in Lubbock, Texas, on November 12, 2013. The "Cause of Death" was listed as multiple blunt force injuries of the head, neck, and torso due to an aircraft mishap. A Forensic Toxicology Fatal Accident Report was prepared by the FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute. The results were negative for ethanol. The test for cyanide was not performed. There was an insufficient specimen for carbon monoxide testing. The following substances were identified in the toxicology report: 22 (ug/ml, ug/g) acetaminophen detected in the urine, duloxetine detected in the urine, duloxetine detected in the liver, gabapentin detected in the urine, gabapentin detected in the blood (cavity), and ibuprofen detected in the urine. 

Acetaminophen is an analgesic marketed under the brand name Tylenol. It is available over the counter and by prescription in a number of combination medications. Ibuprofen is used for the management of mild to moderate pain, fever, and inflammation. Gabapentin may be used to treat nerve pain conditions. Duloxetine may be used to treat muscle pain and stiffness and chronic (long-lasting) pain that are related to muscles and bones. 

Gabapentin and duloxetine are both disqualifying drugs for flight. The pilot did not report either of these disqualifying medications on his last medical certification examination on October 24, 2013.

The pilot's daughter reported that he had broken his leg in December of 2011, and had severe nerve pain as a result which required him to take pain medications. She stated that the pilot was very alert and energetic during the flight from Dallas to Lubbock on November 10, 2013, and showed no signs of sedation.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The NTSB Materials laboratory examined the right wing aileron cable fracture using at optical stereomicroscope. No evidence of preexisting damage was observed. 

The J. P. Instruments (JPI) EDM 730/830 panel mounted engine monitor that can record up to 24 parameters related to engine operations was sent to the National Transportation Safety Board's (NTSB) Vehicle Recorder Division for examination. The JPI EDM-730's chip containing the non-volatile memory was removed from the internal circuit board and the data was downloaded. The EDM recording contained 121 recorded flight logs. The accident flight log was located from the data recorded on November 11, 2013, and it contained about 753 valid points of data over a span of about 75 minutes. The internal clock in the unit was set to coordinated universal time (UTC); however, the time recorded indicated that the internal clock was about 6 minutes "ahead" of UTC when compared to other sources. 

The EDM recorded data from the accident flight indicated that the engine start occurred at 23:46:30 cst (UTC time with the 6 hour offset. All times in cst) and it continued to record data until 01:01:42, when the unit was powered off. At 23:54:36, the fuel flow increased to about 35 gallons per hour (gph) with a correlated increase in rpm to about 2,700 rpm, which was consistent with takeoff power. About 12 minutes later, the fuel flow was reduced to about 17 gph and there was a correlated decrease in rpm to about 2,500 rpm. About 37 minutes later, the fuel flow increased to about 37 gph with a correlated increase in rpm to about 2,700 rpm, which lasted for about 4.5 minutes. Then the fuel flow and rpm were again reduced for about 11.5 minutes. At 00:59:48, the fuel flow rapidly increased to about 37 gph with a correlated increase in rpm to about 2,700 rpm for a third time during the flight. It maintained this value until the end of the recording at 01:01:42.


AMARILLO, TX -- An updated report this month from the National Transportation Safety Board revealed the pilot in a deadly November 11, 2013 crash had taken pain medication that would disqualify him from flying on the night of the crash.

The pilot, William Michael Capt, 48, and his passengers, William Michael Capt II, 19, and Robin Lea Capt, 48, were flying from Lubbock to Amarillo when the plane crashed in heavy fog. All three lost their lives.

An autopsy was performed on the pilot, William Capt, Sr., which showed that he had taken acetaminophen, duloxetine, gabapentin and ibuprofen. The report said Capt broke his leg in December 2011 and required pain killers for nerve pain.

The updated NTSB report said, “Gabapentin and duloxetine are both disqualifying drugs for flight.”

It also said, “The pilot did not report either of these disqualifying medications on his last medical certification examination on October 24, 2013.”

The NTSB investigated if Capt had been drowsy on a previous flight that same day from Dallas to Lubbock, and a witness said he did not appear sedated.

The NTSB previously revealed that Capt did not have a so-called IFR rating that would qualify him to fly in reduced visibility. During the night in question, the visibility was down to a quarter of a mile near the Rick Husband International Airport. Vertical visibility was listed as 100 feet.

The updated report indicated that Capt had failed the written test for his IFR test less than three weeks before the crash.

The report said, “On October 24, 2014, the pilot took the FAA instrument knowledge test that is required to get an instrument rating. However, he received a score of 68 percent on the test, and a passing score is 70 percent.”

Story and photo:   http://www.everythinglubbock.com