Friday, June 15, 2012

Halifax-Northampton Regional (KIXA), Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina: New plant at airport all about jobs

 
Roger Bell | The Daily Herald
LSA America, makers of the Allegro aircraft, took the first step toward building a permanent facility at the airport by breaking ground today.


A plant breaking ground at the Halifax-Northampton Regional airport is all about jobs and economic development. 

 LSA America, makers of the Allegro aircraft, have been manufacturing the small planes at a temporary plant in Littleton for the last few months, but they took the first step toward building their permanent facility at the airport by breaking ground today.

The plant, when completed, will be 16,000 square feet, and, within the next two years, employ 34 people.

“These are good jobs, well-paying jobs,” Halifax County Economic Development Director Cathy Scott said.

The company’s leadership said the project is all about jobs, and they are impressed with how the county banded together to bring the project, which nearly located in Wisconsin, to Halifax County.

“We’ve never seen any place that was so united to bring jobs to their community,” LSA America President Doug Hempstead said. “We really can’t say enough about it.”

LSA officials say they hope to move into the new facility by May 2013.

Read more and photos:   http://www.rrdailyherald.com

Philadelphia International Airport (KPHL), Pennsylvania: Seven TSA Workers Being Canned In Wake of Testing Scandal

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) – The Transportation Security Administration announced Friday that they intend to fire seven of their employees following the discovery of a bribery scandal at the Philadelphia International Airport.

After an eight month investigation, authorities say a TSA training instructor who was responsible for administering annual proficiency exams was found to have accepted payment from TSA security officers to ensure passing grades.

A total of ten employees were removed from security duties when the investigation began in November of last year. Since then, three employees have resigned and the seven others were notified by the TSA that they will lose their jobs.

The training instructor pleaded guilty in February to a charge of bribery.

The TSA released a statement on Friday:

“TSA holds all of its employees to the highest professional and ethical standards and has zero tolerance for misconduct in the workplace. The agency takes prompt and appropriate action with any employee who does not follow TSAs procedures and engages in misconduct. The decision to propose the removal of the seven TSA employees affirms our strong commitment to the safety of the traveling public and to hold all our employees to the highest standards of conduct and accountability.”


Source:   http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com

Woof! Meow! Oink! Pilot rescues 1,000th animal: Jeff Bennett has flown dogs, cats, rabbits, pythons and more to safety in his small plane

If accentuating the positive and eliminating the negative were Olympic events, Jeff Bennett would be bound for London next month.

 Bennett, 53, a business owner and pilot who lives in the Florida Keys, studiously avoids dark headlines and depressing news stories. He gravitates toward happy people who build up rather than tear down, and he’s always on the prowl for ways to help out and give back.

But of course, not all disturbing news can be avoided. Bennett really gets riled over stories of animal cruelty, neglect and abandonment — and, about three and a half years ago, he decided to do something about it. He started using his small plane to fly dogs, cats and a host of other critters in dire circumstances to safe places where they’d receive treatment and care. On Friday, Bennett is hitting a milestone by flying his 1,000th rescue animal to safety.

“I never thought I’d be moving this many animals,” Bennett told TODAY.com. “I just really enjoy it, and I get to meet some of the best people out there.”

Heaven's Landing Airport (GE99), Clayton, Georgia: 1/2 Mile Shootout - September 22nd, 2012




"wannaGOFAST was founded in order to fill a niche in the motorsports market place. Our goal was to create a safe and controlled environment for fellow car enthusiasts to pursue their "Need for Speed" without the restrictions of the standard 1/8 or ¼ mile drag strip. We've taken a "retro" approach to what Americana used to be and fast forwarded it into Modern Day times with an efficient and unique event platform."

"Our next event is coming up on September 22nd at the Prestigious Heaven's Landing Airport (www.heavenslanding.com) in Clayton, Ga. Nestled in the Blue Ridge Mountains this airport is more of a work of art then a place to land your plane..........or in our case race your cars!! Come join us for a day of, side-by-side, ½ MILE racing at this rare and exclusive location. All of our participants will be given a chance to take their vehicle's Top Speed down Heavens Landing's private MILE long runway and race door-to-door against the competitor of their choice!! See what it's finally like to race without the
restrictions of speed limits, on what is basically your own private interstate in the mountains!! Visit our website at www.wannagofast.com to register for this once in a lifetime experience!! This event is limited to only 100 cars and is sure to sell out quick!! See you on the runway!!"

Registration begins on our website at www.wannagofast.com on June 6th.

Beech Baron: Brakes Test - Aircraft Off Runway At Igor I Sikorsky Memorial Airport (KBDR), Bridgeport, Connecticut

 

A plane slid off the runway at Sikorsky Memorial Airport around 11:30 a.m. Friday, June 15. 
(Photo Credit:  John Kovach)

No one was injured when a plane skidded off the runway at Sikorsky Memorial Airport Friday, June 15. 

No one was injured when a plane skidded off the runway at Sikorsky Memorial Airport Friday, June 15.

The twin-engine plane came to rest a few feet off the end of the runway, in a grassy area.

According to a Tweet from Stratford Fire Department Local 998, Engine 3, Engine 1, TAC 5, Ladder 1 and Car 3 were sent to the airport at 11:35 a.m. for a report of a plane in trouble.

WTNH reported that the plane was undergoing maintenance and never left the ground.

Dispatch updated firefighters that they had received one call reporting an airplane off the runway.

The on-duty assistant chief arrived and informed units that it appeared everyone was safely out of the aircraft.

The Stratford Star was the the first media on the scene. The Sikorsky Airport Fire Department crash truck was parked near the aircraft, and Stratford fire and police units rolling in.

Stratford EMS and American Medical Response also arrived on the scene.

Stratford Fire and EMS units, along with AMR, left the scene a short time after they arrived.

Because the airport is Bridgeport property, fire and police from the Park City also arrived.

Airport personnel were near the aircraft and preparing to tow it back onto the runway around noon.

Traffic slowed and passers-by parked along Stratford Road to view the scene and take photographs.

Source:   http://www.stratfordstar.com

STRATFORD -- A plane testing its brakes at Sikorsky Memorial Airport lost control Friday morning when the brakes malfunctioned and skidded about 20 feet off the runway and into the grass. 

 A Stratford Fire Department dispatcher said the incident happened at about 11:25 a.m. The twin-engine Baron aircraft, based at the airport, was undergoing maintenance when the malfunction occurred, according to John Ricci, airport manager.

"The plane was never airborne," Ricci said. "They were using the alternate runway to test the brakes. The brakes failed or locked up and the plane overshot the pavement and went into the grassy area about 20 feet."

According to emergency dispatches, the plane was smoking as it skidded from Runway 11/29 and into the grass about 20 feet away, but the smoke was quickly extinguished. Ricci said the smoke was the result of the brake failure.

Two people were on board at the time of the incident, but both people got out safely.

Sikorsky Memorial Airport is owned by the City of Bridgeport. Prior to 1937 when Bridgeport purchased the airport, it was known as Mollison Field. This name came from Captain James Mollison's crash landing in July 1933 during his attempt to fly across the Atlantic from Wales, England to New York. During the 1930s many now-famous aviators visited the field. Names such as Amelia Earhart, Charles Lindbergh, Howard Hughes, and Juan Trippe can be found in the airport logbooks documenting their arrivals.

The airport has two runways, 6/24 and 11/29. Both are approximately 4,600 feet in length.

Source:  http://www.ctpost.com

Remos GX, N206GX: Accident occurred June 15, 2012 in Westminster, Maryland

NTSB Identification: ERA12FA395  
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 15, 2012 in Westminster, MD
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/05/2013
Aircraft: REMOS ACFT GMBH FLUGZEUGBAU REMOS GX, registration: N206GX
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The special-light sport airplane was designed with the ability to fold both wings back to facilitate storage and transportation. In addition, both wings and the horizontal stabilizer were removable. The pilot, who was also a mechanic, disassembled the airplane for storage during the winter. He subsequently reassembled it and completed a condition inspection. He then flew the airplane to an airport where a ballistic parachute system was installed. The pilot then flew the airplane to another airport and, the next day, departed on the accident flight with the intention of delivering the airplane to its owner.

About 20 minutes after takeoff, the airplane experienced a disconnected elevator, and the pilot attempted to fly to a nearby airport. The airplane was about 50 feet above the ground when it entered a sudden steep pitch downward and impacted the ground about 60 feet before the runway.

The airplane's flight controls were actuated by a series of push-pull rods. The respective push-pull rods for the left and right ailerons and elevator controls featured a "quick-fastener" to disconnect and reconnect the respective flight control. Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the elevator quick-fastener was disconnected. Additional examination of the quick-fastener revealed that it contained some corrosion; however, it did not experience any failures and was capable of functioning as designed. In addition, the ballistic parachute system parachute was not activated, and the activation handle, which was mounted on the center console, was found secured with a padlock. The key for the padlock was found on a key ring with the ignition key, which remained inserted in the ignition switch.

The preflight checklist located in the pilot operating handbook required a check of the quick-fasteners and the ballistic parachute activation handle before every flight. Associated placards were also present in the cockpit. The pilot had at least three opportunities to identify an improperly secured elevator quick-fastener since he assembled the airplane; at least two of those opportunities occurred after the installation of the ballistic recovery parachute system. While it could not be determined if the pilot would have used the airplane's ballistic recovery parachute system, his failure to remove the padlock from the activation handle precluded the option of deploying the system during the accident flight.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The pilot's inadequate preflight inspection, which failed to ensure that the elevator quick-fastener was properly secured, resulting in an inflight elevator control disconnect and subsequent loss of control during the ensuing emergency landing. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's failure to remove the padlock from the airplane's ballistic recovery system parachute activation handle.


HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 15, 2012, about 1010 eastern daylight time, a Remos Aircraft GmbH Flugzeugbau Remos GX, special-light sport aircraft (S-LSA), N206GX, operated by a private individual, was substantially damaged when it impacted the ground during an emergency landing at the Carroll County Regional Airport (DMW), Westminster, Maryland. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the flight that departed the Frederick Municipal Airport (FDK), Frederick, Maryland, and was destined for the Piseco Airport (K09), Piseco, New York. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to witnesses, the pilot flew the airplane from K09 to Haysfield Airport (MD24), Clarksville, Maryland, during November 2011, where it was disassembled and stored for the winter. It was subsequently reassembled during April 2012. The pilot, who was also a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certificated airframe and powerplant mechanic, completed a condition inspection on June 1, 2012. The pilot then flew the airplane to Bay Bridge Airport (W29), Stevensville, Maryland, where a pitot-static system check was performed on June 8, and a Magnum 601 ballistic parachute system was installed on June 12, 2012. The pilot flew to FDK on June 14, 2012, and was planning to fly to K09, with an en route fuel stop, to deliver the airplane to its owner on the day of the accident.

A witness at DMW heard the pilot transmit over the airport common traffic advisory frequency "my elevator has come detached, I need to make a landing on runway 16." Another witness observed the airplane "climb and dive" as it approached the 5,100-foot-long, asphalt runway. A third witness stated the airplane appeared "very, very fast" and approached the runway in a flat or slight nose down pitch attitude. When the airplane was on short final, over the grass area just prior to the runway threshold, it pitched "sharply nose down", and impacted the ground.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 64, held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land, glider, and instrument airplane. In addition, he held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine, airplane multiengine, glider, and instrument airplane. He also held a mechanic certificate with airframe and powerplant ratings. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on March 16, 2010.

Review of the pilot's logbook revealed that at the time of the accident, he had accumulated about 3,250 hours of total flight experience, which included about 100 hours during the 1 year preceding the accident. The pilot's first flight in the accident airplane was on April 24, 2011, and at the time of the accident he had accumulated approximately 16 hours of total flight experience in the same make and model as the accident airplane.

The pilot's most recent biennial flight review was conducted on December 1, 2011.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION


According to records obtained from the FAA, the two-seat, high-wing, fixed tricycle landing gear, S-LSA, serial number 335, was issued a special airworthiness certificate on September 30, 2009, and purchased by its current owner during May 2011. The airplane was powered by a Rotax 912ULS, 100-horsepower engine equipped with a Neuform three-bladed propeller.

The airplane was of composite carbon fiber monocoque construction, and was designed with the ability to fold both wings back to facilitate storage and transportation. In addition, both wings and the horizontal stabilizer were removable. The flight controls were actuated by a series of push-pull rods. The respective control push-pull rods for the left and right ailerons, and elevator featured a "quick-fastener" to disconnect and reconnect the respective flight control push-pull rod.

Each quick-fastener consisted of two-hooks, a locking sleeve, an anti-twist pin, a locking pin, and a locking spring. To connect the respective push-pull rod, the two hooks would be interconnected, and then the locking sleeve would slide over the connection. Once the locking sleeve was in position, the spring would push the locking pin into position and secure the assembly. The anti-twist pin prevented a misalignment of the sleeve, which would prevent the locking pin from sliding into position.

The individual who assisted the pilot with the reassembly of the airplane stated that the pilot was familiar with the operation of the quick-fasteners. He stated that the wings were folded and the horizontal tail was removed for storage. He also reported that there were no issues during the reassembly of the airplane. He further stated that he did not specifically observe the quick-fastener connection associated with the elevator control system.

On March 25, 2009, after a fatal accident involving the improper connection of an aileron quick-faster, Remos Aircraft introduced the anti-twist pin feature, and issued a Safety Directive (SD) which called for an inspection of the aileron and elevator quick-fasteners, an update of the Pilot Operating Handbook (POH) and the addition of warning placards associated the quick-fasteners. Quick Fastener Safety Directive SD-05 was current at the time of the accident. Review of SD-05 noted that the photograph depicting the elevator quick-fastener was depicted with the tail cone, which was secured by two screws removed. According to the manufacturer, it was normal procedure not to remove the tail cone during preflight inspection. A subsequent inspection of an exemplar Remos GX by the NTSB revealed that it was possible to view elevator quick-fastener locking pin with the tail cone installed.

At the time of the accident, the airplane had been operated for about 210 total hours, and about 2 hours since the condition inspection. Review of the inspection checklist utilized by the accident pilot/mechanic during the condition inspection included an inspection of all components and systems that made up the empennage assembly for insecure attachment, and improper component installation.

The mechanic who performed the parachute installation stated that he did not disconnect any of the quick-fasteners. In addition, review of the Parachute Installation Manual for the Magnum 601 ballistic parachute system revealed that it was not necessary to disconnect any of the quick-fasteners to facilitate the installation.

A placard located on the instrument panel stated: "CHECK: Flight System Control and Three Quick Fasteners." There were also placards stating to check the quick fasteners for a secure connection, with associated illustrations, consistent with compliance with the Remos Quick Fastener Safety Directive, located near the respective aileron and elevator push-pull rod quick-fasteners.

Placards located on the center console included: "Remove Lock from BRS Before Flight" and a "Start-Up Checklist" that included "Recovery System Armed."

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION


The reported weather at DMW, at 1007, was: winds calm; visibility 10 miles; temperature 21 degrees Celsius (C); dew point 13 degrees C; altimeter 30.31 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE INFORMATION


The wreckage was examined at the accident site on June 16, 2012. The airplane impacted the ground about 60 feet prior to runway 16, and about 12 feet to the left of the right runway edge. Debris was scattered south-southeast approximately 350 feet, with the majority of the wreckage found on the grass area that was located immediately off the right side of and parallel to the runway.

All major portions of the airplane were accounted for at the accident site. Both wings and the top portion of the cabin were inverted and found about 220 feet from the initial impact point. The main wreckage was found about 265 feet from the initial impact point. It consisted of the cockpit, which was destroyed, the engine, and the tail assembly aft of the cabin, which remained intact. The ballistic parachute system parachute was not activated and found strewn along the debris path. The activation handle, which was mounted on the center console, was found with the main wreckage and was secured with a padlock. The key for the padlock was found on a key ring, with the ignition key, which remained inserted in the ignition switch.

Examination of the airplane's flight controls revealed that the elevator quick-fastener was disconnected. The left and right aileron quick-fasteners remained connected, and the flight control cables to the rudder remained attached. Damage was noted on the flight control push-pull rods that was consistent with impact damage. The elevator trim tab was about 1/4-inch from the full nose down trim position. Examination of the airplane's engine did not reveal any failures that would have precluded normal operation.

The elevator and aileron quick-fasteners were removed and forwarded to the NTSB Materials Laboratory, Washington, DC, for further examination. In addition, the airplane was equipped with a Dynon Avionics "FlightDEK-D180 combined EFIS and EMS" unit, and a Garmin 496 global positioning system (GPS) receiver, which were forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Division for data download.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION


An autopsy was performed on the pilot by the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Baltimore, Maryland. The autopsy report revealed the cause of death as "multiple injuries."

Toxicological testing performed on the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Science Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma with negative for alcohol and positive for Doxepin, a prescription antidepressant, Nordoxepin, a metabolite of Doxepin, and Pioglitazone, a prescription anti-diabetic agent.

During the pilot's most recent FAA medical examination, he listed "occasional aspirin" as medications he was currently taking.

TESTS AND RESEARCH


Examination of the flight history page from the Garmin 496 GPS receiver revealed that the airplane was flown from K09 to MD24 on November 19, 2011. In addition, a 30 minute flight from MD24 to W29 was recorded on June 8, 2011, and a 47 minute flight from W29 to FDK was recorded on June 14, 2011. In addition, the accident flight was recorded as a 31 minute flight from FDK to DMW.

Data downloaded for accident flight from the Dynon Avionics FlightDEK-D180 revealed that the accident flight departed from FDK about 0935, climbed to a GPS altitude of about 2,500 feet and preceded on a northeasterly heading without incident. The airplane overflew DMW about 0950, and continued on a northeasterly heading for about another 5 minutes before turning right 270 degrees, and then left on a southwest heading back toward DMW, about 0958. At 1003, the airplane was about 3 miles from DMW, at a GPS altitude of about 1,700 feet, and an airspeed of about 100 knots, when it turned onto the final approach course for runway 16. About 1 minute later, the airplane was 1.5 miles from the approach end of the runway, at a GPS altitude of about 1,400 feet (about 610 feet above ground level) and an airspeed of 87 knots. At 1004:33, the airplane was about .5 miles from the runway, at a GPS altitude of about 950 feet (160 above ground level), and an airspeed of about 125 knots.

As the airplane continued to descend toward the runway, the recorded pitch angle decreased from -0.38 to -12.38 just prior to impact with the ground. The final recorded GPS altitude was 834 feet (about 45 feet above ground level). [Additional information can be found in the Cockpit Display(s) – Recorded Flight Data Factual Report located in the public docket.]

Examination of the quick-fasteners retained from the wreckage was performed at the NTSB Material's Laboratory, Washington, DC.

Examination of the elevator quick-fastener revealed that it did not experience any pre-impact failures and all functions performed as designed. During disassembly, white salts consistent with aluminum corrosion were found in the cross-drilled hole that housed the spring and lock button, and areas of fretting wear scars and fretting corrosion were identified on the fastener clevis connector and on the inside surface of the lock sleeve. [Additional information can be found in the Materials Laboratory Factual Report located in the public docket.]

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Pilot Operating Handbook


The pilot operating handbook (POH) located in the cockpit was identified as "Rev. 03/May 2010" on the title page; however, the various sections of the POH contained individual revision references.

The preflight check, "Checks inside the aircraft" included: "Remove rescue system securing pin from emergency handle."

The before each flight preflight checklist included:

"12. Check all control surfaces and connection for proper operation
13. Check for free and full travel of all control surfaces
14. Check elevator quick-fastener for secure locking"

In addition, the following warning was included:

"Insecurely connection, improper operation of control surfaces or insecure locked fasteners will lead to loss of control of the aircraft."

The information pertaining to ground handling and servicing, was identified as "Rev.02-July 16, 2009." Section 8.8 regarding the connection of the folded wings to the fuselage contained a warning that stated:

"Insecurely connection, improper operation of control surfaces or insecure locked fasteners will lead to loss of control of the aircraft! When in doubt contact your local Remos dealer or service center"

The warning was not present in section 8.9, titled "Installing Horizontal Stabilizer."
According to Remos, a free up-to-date version of the POH was provided on its website. Review of the Aircraft Ground Handling and Servicing section that was current at the time of the accident (Rev.04) included a numbered description of the horizontal stabilizer installation and the same warnings that were present for the installation of the wings.

On October 15, 2012 , Remos released Notification NOT-008-Documentation Update, which provided the current revision number for the respective sections of the POHs of their various model airplanes, including the GX.


 NTSB Identification: ERA12FA395 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 15, 2012 in Westminster, MD
Aircraft: REMOS ACFT GMBH FLUGZEUGBAU REMOS GX, registration: N206GX
Injuries: 1 Fatal.
  

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 15, 2012, about 1010 eastern daylight time, a Remos Aircraft GmbH Flugzeugbau Remos GX, special-light sport aircraft (S-LSA), N206GX, operated by a private individual, was substantially damaged when it impacted the ground during an emergency landing at the Carroll County Regional Airport (DMW), Westminster, Maryland. The certificated commercial pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the flight that departed the Frederick Municipal Airport (FDK), Frederick, Maryland, and was ultimately destined for the Piseco Airport (K09), Piseco, New York. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to records obtained from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the two-seat, high-wing, fixed tricycle landing gear, S-LSA, was issued a special airworthiness certificate on September 30, 2009, and purchased by its current owner during May 2011.

The airplane was of composite carbon fiber monocoque construction, and was designed with the ability to fold both wings back to facilitate storage and transportation. In addition, both wings and the horizontal stabilizer were removable. The respective control push-pull rods for the left and right ailerons, and elevator featured a "quick-fastener" to disconnect and reconnect the respective flight control.

According to witnesses, the pilot flew the airplane from K09 to Haysfield Airport (MD24), Clarksville, Maryland, during November 2011, where it was disassembled and stored for the winter. It was subsequently reassembled during April 2012. The pilot, who was also an FAA certificated airframe and powerplant mechanic, completed a condition inspection on June 1, 2012. The pilot then flew the airplane to Bay Bridge Airport (W29), Stevensville, Maryland, where a pitot-static system check was performed on June 8, and a Magnum 601 ballistic parachute system was installed on June 12, 2012. The pilot flew to FDK on June 14, 2012, and was planning to fly to K09, with an en route fuel stop, to deliver the airplane to its owner on the day of the accident.

A witness at DMW heard the pilot transmit over the airport common traffic advisory frequency "my elevator has come detached, I need to make a landing on runway 16." Another witness observed the airplane "climb and dive" as it approached the 5,100-foot-long, asphalt runway. A third witness stated the airplane was about 50 feet from the beginning of the runway, when it made a dramatic pitch downward.

The airplane impacted the ground about 60 feet prior to the runway, and about 12 feet to the left of the right runway edge. Debris was scattered south-southeast approximately 350 feet, with the majority of the wreckage found on the grass area that was located immediately off the right side of and parallel to the runway.

All major portions of the airplane were accounted for at the accident site. Both wings and the top portion of the cabin were inverted and found about 220 feet from the initial impact point. The main wreckage was found about 265 feet from the initial impact point. It consisted of the cockpit, which was destroyed, the engine, and the tail assembly aft of the cabin, which remained intact. The ballistic parachute system parachute was not activated and found strewn along the debris path. The activation handle was found in the main wreckage secured with a padlock. The key for the padlock was found on a key ring, with the ignition key, which remained inserted in the ignition switch.

Initial examination of the airplane's flight controls revealed that the elevator quick-fastener was disconnected. The left and right aileron quick-fasteners remained connected, and the flight control cables to the rudder remained attached. Examination of the airplane's engine did not reveal any failures that would have precluded normal operation.

The elevator and aileron quick-fasteners were removed and forwarded to the NTSB Materials Laboratory, Washington, DC, for further examination. In addition, the airplane was equipped with a Dynon Avionics "FlightDEK-D180 combined EFIS and EMS" unit, and a Garmin 496 global positioning system receiver, which were forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Division for data download.


FAA IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 206GX        Make/Model: LSA       Description: REMOS GX LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT
  Date: 06/15/2012     Time: 1400

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: WESTMINSTER   State: MD   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED ON THE APPROACH END OF THE RUNWAY, THE 1 PERSON ON BOARD 
  WAS FATALLY INJURED, WESTMINSTER, MD

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Approach      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: BALTIMORE, MD  (EA07)                 Entry date: 06/18/2012 
 

HENRY THOMAS JUDKINS 
 "Tom" 
(Age 64) 

Born May 24, 1948 in Indianapolis IN, died June 15, 2012 in an airplane crash at Carroll County Regional Airport in Maryland. A resident of Rockville MD, Tom started general aviation flying in 1979, ending in 2012 as a Commercial Pilot and Flight Instructor for Single engine / Multiengine/ Instrument Airplane and Glider, and Airframe and Powerplant Mechanic. Tom was very active as instructor and tow pilot in the Mid-Atlantic Soaring Association from 1993 through 2001. He is survived by his wife of 25 years Elizabeth, brother Norman Judkins, and sisters Betty Miller, Margaret Judkins, Patricia (husband, Braxton) Foist, and Mary (husband, Perry) Floyd. There will be a memorial service at 10 a.m. on Saturday June 25, 2012 at Grace United Methodist Church, 119 N. Frederick Ave., Gaithersburg MD 20877. Family visitation will be at 9 a.m. Memorial contributions in Tom's name may be made to The AOPA Foundation Inc., 421 Aviation Way, Frederick MD 21701, or to Grace United Methodist Church.

- See more at: http://www.legacy.com


The lone occupant of an airplane that crashed Friday morning at the Carroll County Regional Airport in Westminster has died.

State Police spokeswoman Elena Russo confirmed Friday afternoon that the man, 64, died at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center as a result of injuries sustained in the crash.

Police identified him as Henry Judkins, of Derwood, in Montgomery County. Police said he was the pilot and the only individual aboard the Remos GX, a "light sport" aircraft, at the time of the crash.

Police said they and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash.

The preliminary investigation indicates Judkins was one mile away from the airport when he reported mechanical issues. Police said witnesses observed the aircraft flying at varying altitudes before descending into a grassy area approximately 40 feet prior to the runway.

The crash occurred between 10:15 and 10:30 a.m., according to reports. Responders from the Westminster Fire Engine and Hose Co. 1 were the first to arrive, according to Gil Roper, public information officer for the Westminster company.

He said the pilot had apparently been ejected from the single-engine, fixed-wing plane.

"We found him about 50 feet from the airplane," said Roper, who was among those responding to the scene. "He was still strapped in his seat."

"There wasn't much left of the plane," Roper said.

Read more and photos:  http://www.baltimoresun.com



Wreckage from Friday's single-engine plane crash at Carroll County Regional Airport in Westminster. 
(Photo by Gil Roper, Westminster Fire Department / June 15, 2012)


Photo Credit:  KEN KOONS





























A man was flown to University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center by helicopter Friday after reportedly being thrown from his plane during a crash at Carroll County Regional Airport in Westminster.

"We found him about 50 feet from the airplane," said Gil Roper, public information officer for the Westminster Fire Engine and Hose Co. 1, which was among those responding to the scene. "He was still strapped in his seat."

Roper said Westminster fire and paramedic crews were first on the scene, and administered aid to the pilot until a helicopter arrived to transport the man to the University of Maryland Shock Trauma.

They had expected him to be transported via helicopter — and in fact the man was loaded into the state police helicopter, but then, Roper said, the state crew motioned for Westminster to take him instead.

 "They actually had put him on," Roper said. "They were revving up to go, and the doors came open and they motioned for us to come get him."

Elena Russo, spokeswoman for the Maryland State Police, confirmed that the helicopter had a mechanical issue and was grounded at the scene.

Instead, the inpured man was put in an ambulance, which was en route to Carroll Hospital Center when it was told to meet another state helicopter at Mitchell's Golf Center in Reisterstown.

There, Roper said the pilot was transferred to a different helicopter and flown to Shock Trauma as a "Priority 1" patient — meaning the injury requires immediate care.

Rpoer said he did not know of the pilot's specific injuries, but said the Priority 1 status indicates, "very critical" status.

The identify of the pilot has not be released, and his condition is unknown.

The single-engine, fixed wing airplane crashed during landing around 10:30 a.m. Friday, according to Carroll County officials.

Roper said "there wasn't much left of the plane."

Joe McKelvey, manager of the airport, was not available for comment, but Carroll County spokeswoman Roberta Windham said the crash did not involve spilled fuel or hazardous materials, and there was no damage to the airport.

According to a release from the Carroll Board of County Commissioners, the cause of the crash is under investigation.

In addition to crews from Westminster, the Pleasant Valley Community Fire Department also responded to the scene.

At the airport Friday afternoon, local television crews were standing by in the parking lot outside the airport gate, but staff inside referred all questions to Windham.

Windham said the airport is currently closed, but they hope to reopen it by the end of the day. Flights scheduled to land at the Westminster airport will be diverted elsewhere.

WESTMINSTER, Md. - Maryland State Police said a small plane has crashed in Carroll County,   injuring at least one person.  

The crash was reported around 10:15 a.m. at the north end of the runway at the Carroll County Airport in Westminster.

Sky Team 11 Capt. Roy Taylor reported that the pilot of the plane made a radio call saying the plane was having issues with the elevator system and was in the process of making an emergency landing when it crashed.

Taylor said the wings of the plane were sheared off, and the fuselage settled about 20-40 yards past the wings.

Taylor reported that the victim was taken to Shock Trauma in critical condition.  He said the original state police helicopter that was supposed to fly the victim to the hospital broke down, so the person was instead taken by ground to another area so he could be picked up by another chopper.

It's not known if anyone else was on the plane.

The airport was still closed at noon.

Taylor said the plane's ballistics parachute system hadn't yet deployed and it needed to be disarmed before crews could remove the debris.

 
A plane crashed at around 10:15 a.m. today on north end of the runway at the Carroll County Regional Airport in Westminster, according to Maryland State Police.  

 The pilot of the single-engine plane suffered serious injuries. He was initially going to be flown to Shock Trauma but was taken by ground transport to Carroll Hospital Center because of the severity of his injuries, according to county spokeswoman Roberta Windham. The pilot has not been identified but is believed to be a 60-year-old male.

The crash occurred during the plane landing, and the cause is under investigation, according to a news release from the county.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board have been notified and officials from those organizations are en route to the airport, according to the duty officer at the Westminster barracks of state police.

The airport is shut down while police continue to investigate, but officials expect to reopen it later tonight, Windham said.

Planes are currently being diverted to surrounding airports, she said.

No damage occurred to the runway or airport as a result of the crash, Windham said.   No fuel is believed to have been spilled from the plane.

Lake in the Hills (3CK), Illinois: Village Board to Vote on T-Hangar Rental Rates - Ponders what to do when 11 of the airport's 20 T-hangars are vacant

By Amie Schaenzer
June 14, 2012 

The Village Board is poised to vote tonight on lowering T-hangar rental rates with hopes of filling vacancies at Lake in the Hills Airport. 

 The Lake in the Hills Board of Trustees meeting is at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Village Hall, 600 Harvest Gate, Lake in the Hills.

The village is proposing lowering T-hangar rental rates from $378.59 to $290 effective June 14. Of the 20 T-hangars for lease at the airport, 11 are vacant, according to village documents.

The village recently adopted an incentive plan with hopes of drawing in tenants. Under the incentive plan, the village drew in one new tenant but recently lost an existing tenant, according to village documents.

Filling three vacancies at the reduced rate could bring the village "to the break-even point," according to Village Board documents that indicate renting out more than three spaces would increase revenue.

The rate would include new tenants and would apply to existing tenants when they renew their lease.

Flypast delights ‘evacuees’ at air museum’s wartime day

 

Children in evacuee gear waved as a World War Two Dakota plane roared overhead in a thrilling spectacle at the Yorkshire Air Museum. 

 Pupils from St Mary and St Joseph’s primary school in Pocklington, pictured, were among those delighted by the aircraft as it swooped low over the historic site at Elvington.

The plane was flown by the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight, which led the recent Diamond Jubilee Flypast in London, as part of the museum’s seventh annual FlightPATH event.

Ian Richardson, of the museum, said: “It is absolutely fantastic that the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight have supported this event once again this year, with the flypast by the Dakota, which is closely associated with the D-Day Landings 68 years ago in June 1944.”

Around 200 key stage two pupils and staff – many dressed up, 1940s style – took part in the action-packed day of World War Two workshops, which ended with singalong wartime songs in the T2 Hangar.

Other primary schools taking partv were Sheriff Hutton, Goathland, Slingsby, Osbaldwick and North Duffield.

Source:   http://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk

Aircraft engineered with failure in mind may last longer ✈ New design approach tailors planes to fly in the face of likely failures -Massachusetts Institute of Technology

By Jennifer Chu, MIT News Office 

Complex systems inhabit a “gray world” of partial failures, MIT’s Olivier de Weck says: While a system may continue to operate as a whole, bits and pieces inevitably degrade. Over time, these small failures can add up to a single catastrophic failure, incapacitating the system. 

 “Think about your car,” says de Weck, an associate professor of aeronautics and astronautics and engineering systems. “Most of the things are working, but maybe your right rearview mirror is cracked, and maybe one of the cylinders in your engine isn’t working well, and your left taillight is out. The reality is that many, many real-world systems have partial failures.”

This is no less the case for aircraft. De Weck says it’s not uncommon that, from time to time, a plane’s sensors may short-circuit, or its rudders may fail to respond: “And then the question is, in that partially failed state, how will the system perform?”

The answer to that question is often unclear — partly because of how systems are initially designed. When deciding on the configuration of aircraft, engineers typically design for the optimal condition: a scenario in which all components are working perfectly. However, de Weck notes that much of a plane’s lifetime is spent in a partially failed state. What if, he reasoned, aircraft and other complex systems could be designed from the outset to operate not in the optimal scenario, but for suboptimal conditions?

De Weck and his colleagues at MIT and the Draper Laboratory have created a design approach that tailors planes to fly in the face of likely failures. The method, which the authors call a “multistate design approach,” determines the likelihood of various failures over an airplane’s lifetime. Through simulations, the researchers changed a plane’s geometry — for example, making its tail higher, or its rudder smaller — and then observed its performance under various failure scenarios.

Read more:   http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/designing-for-failure-0615.html

Strother Field Airport (KWLD), Winfield/Arkansas City, Kansas: Fly-In and car show Saturday

Pilots from throughout the United States are expected to participate in the fifth annual Strother Field Fly-In and Classic Car Show on Saturday. 

Event organizers now are calling the event “Wings and Wheels.” They are hoping to attract a large number of participants.

More than $1,000 will be awarded in drawings and gift certificates, said Strother Field Manager Shawn McGrew.

The prizes will be divided, $500 apiece, between contests for the car show and the fly-in, McGrew said.

This year, 27 pilots have confirmed they will participate in the Cessna 172 Flying Club National Fly In, a popular part of the show, McGrew said.

The pilots will fly in from all across the U.S., including at least one from California, he said.

Another popular event will be plane rides for sale by the Commemorative Air Force, he said. PT 26 open-cockpit rides are $100 per person. UC-78 rides are $225 per flight, three riders at a time.

The event schedule is as follows:

•7:30 to 9:30 a.m. — Pancakes with drink, $6 — provided by Chris Cakes, of Rose Hill. Breakfast participants are eligible for a $50 gift certificate.

•7:30 to 9:30 a.m. — Precision Landing Contest for all arrivals. They will aim for a 1,000-foot marker on the runway.

•9 to 11 a.m. — Classic Car Show. Drawing fro 10 $50 gift cards for car show participants.

•10 a.m. — Flour bombing contest. $50 gift certificate awarded to winner.

•11:30 a.m. — Gift drawing for show fly-in participants.

Other events include $50 introductory flights from B-Four Flying, a static aircraft display and a plane or car wash by the Arkansas City High School Purple Paws dance team ($10 per car or $20 per plane).

The place where dead airplanes come back to life - By Ayesha Durgahee, CNN

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Tarmac Aerosave recycles disused aircraft at its plant in southern France
  • Airbus says around 9,000 planes will be retired or withdrawn from service over the next 20 years
  • Tarmac believes recycling old aircraft could save airlines considerable amounts of money
Tarbes, France (CNN) -- Noses sliced off, fuselages without wings and cockpits stripped down to the bare bone; the giant hangar at the home of Tarmac Aerosave is where aged airplanes meet their end.

But amidst this scene of industrial destruction rises a triumph of recycling reincarnation, says Sebastien Medan, head of dismantling at the French aerospace company.

"We receive an old aircraft ... and completion of this work (is) when all the material can be reused," says Medan.

Tarmac Aerosave has been dismantling disused aircraft at its base in "Aerospace Valley" -- a cluster of French flight engineering firms near the town of Tarbes in southern France -- since it was formed in 2009. Although the company's primary business remains aircraft storage, it has stripped 12 planes completely since its inception.

 The parts salvaged during this process are repackaged and repurposed. Landing gear and wing flaps are shipped out to be reinstalled in new planes while cockpits are reborn as flight simulators. All parts that are saved can be sold on by the aircraft owners. The remaining waste and scrap metal, meanwhile, is broken down for resale by Tarmac.

"The percentage of the aircraft to be recycled is around 87% (and) actually we expect to rise that to 90%" says Medan.

 With Tarmac's parent company, Airbus, predicting that more than 9,000 aircraft will be retired or withdrawn from service over the next 20 years, there's a clear need for aging planes to be disposed of in an environmentally friendly.

By relieving retired models of their most valuable assets, Tarmac also believes it can transform airplane recycling into a lucrative business and one that makes sense for airlines looking to dispose of old models.

The cost of storing a disused aircraft can cost as much as €20,000 ($25,000) per month. This compares to a one-off cost of between €100,000 and €150,000 (between $125,000 and $185,000) to tear down a plane, stripping it of items that can be reused or sold on at a profit.

"All the materials we take out from each aircraft could be used in other industry, especially aeronautical industry," says Medan.

While the efficiency savings this process brings are obvious, Tarmac also believe that dismantling old planes will allow engineers to better design more efficient aircraft in the future. By understanding how parts erode, decay or develop over time it will allow them to transfer that knowledge into new designs.

"We are collecting in service aircraft components to asses the remaining characteristics and capability in terms of stress and fatigue," says Olivier Malavallon, project director of business development and change at Airbus.

"It's crucial in terms of experienced feedback in better designing the aircraft and providing to the designer some guidance -- how best we can assemble things together where things are fitting better."
As it stands, Tarmac's site in southern France can cater for 20 aircraft at a time, the company says. Across the border in northern Spain however, a new site is being prepared by one of the company's subsidiaries. It will be able to store 200 planes at a time, and strip down between 30 and 40 models a year.

According to Malavallon this expansion will enable Tarmac to prepare for the coming influx of retiring planes. It will also ensure aircraft are disposed of in a way that is efficient and makes the most of valuable materials.

Instead of "going from cradle to grave," he says, airplanes will go from "cradle to cradle."

Philadelphia Speaks: Airplane Banner Towing

"This has been driving me insane this summer. The moment you settle in to enjoy a nice quiet afternoon in the city, you get blasted with the noise of a propeller plane dragging a Geico ad in a circle around center city. Whose dim-witted idea was this? Bring in a tiny trickle of revenue for the city in exchange for noise polluting the entire downtown region? I'm almost to the point of being annoyed enough to call someone about it. Maybe if I see it today..... Is it appropriate to call 311 about this or is there a better target?" 

Unregistered Ultralight : Accident occurred in Smethport, Pennsylvania

UNREGISTERED ULTRALIGHT CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES, THE 1 PERSON ON BOARD WAS FATALLY INJURED, NEAR SMETHPORT, PA

FAA FSDO: ALLEGHENY CO., PA  (EA03)           

Regis#: UNREG        
Make/Model: ULTR      
Description: UNREGISTERED ULTRALIGHT
Date: 06/14/2012    
Time: 2130
Event Type: Accident   
Highest Injury: Fatal     
City: SMETHPORT   
State: PA   

State Police in Kane say 48-year-old Michael R. Duffy, of Smethport, PA, was killed when his ultralight aircraft crashed at a private airstrip in Keating Township on Thursday, June 14. 

Duffy was killed instantly in the crash, according to police.

He was the owner of Duffy Inc., an excavation company in East Smethport.

At 5:43 pm on Thursday, Smethport Fire Dept and Priority Care Ambulance have been dispatched to a Ultralight airplane crash in an airstrip in a field behind the old Highlander Inn. Responders to meet individual on a 4 wheeler behind the old Highlander Inn to be taken to the victim who is reported unresponsive.

LZ BEING SET UP FOR MERCY FLIGHT TO THE AIRSTRIP

HELICOPTER HAS BEEN CANCELLED

Mt. Jewett Echo is reporting that the pilot of this plane was found to be deceased.

State Police have identified the pilot who died in the crash as Michael R. Duffy, 48, of Smethport, Pennsylvania

Young Eagles Flight Rally planned

CRESTVIEW — Area young people ages 8-17 will have a chance to take to the skies on June 23 as Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 108 hosts a Young Eagles Flight Rally at Bob Sikes Airport, Crestview. 

 The rally is part of the chapter's Young Eagles Program, created to interest young people in aviation. Since the program was launched in 1992, the group's volunteer pilots have flown more than 1.7 million young people who reside in more than 90 countries.

Other activities scheduled for the flight rally include a plane and car wash organized by the Niceville Seniors Little League, which will operate concurrently with the flying activities that Saturday.

Along with flight rallies, EAA members also fly Young Eagles on an individual basis. Each pilot volunteers their time and aircraft so the flights can be provided free of charge for interested young people.

Those attending the flight rally on Saturday, June 23 are asked come to Emerald Coast Aviation starting at 8 a.m. to register for their flight. A parent or guardian must sign the release for each student prior to flight. Student, parent, and pilot briefings will begin at 9 a.m., and flights will begin at 9:30 a.m., with registration closing at 10 a.m.

Read more:  http://www.crestviewbulletin.com/news/rally-17816-young-crestview.html

Wisconsin Rapids explores options for Alexander Field airport solvency

With the South Wood County Airport Commission relying on leftover money from its 2011 budget to operate Alexander Field, Wisconsin Rapids city leaders are looking for ways to prepare for the future.

Unless regional leaders can develop a plan for how to either cut spending or bring in more revenue, increasing costs eventually will lead to a budget deficit that cannot be fixed, Mayor Zach Vruwink said Tuesday during a Committee of the Whole meeting of the City Council.

"There are some improvements that are going to have to happen -- one of the runways is going to need to be (repaired) -- and we don't have a strategic plan," said Vruwink, who also serves as Airport Commission chairman.

Last year, the commission faced a nearly $17,300 shortfall after Grand Rapids -- one of four municipalities that support the airport and have a representative on the commission -- decided not to contribute any more than it did in 2010. Officials for the other three communities -- Wisconsin Rapids, Port Edwards and Nekoosa -- said they were willing to contribute at expected 2012 levels but only if all members did the same.

After several months of discussion, the commission found about $50,000 in unallocated money from the 2011 budget to fill the gap, said Tim Desorcy, finance director for the city.