Saturday, December 12, 2020

Alejandro Carlson: December 12, 2020 and July 26, 2012

Alejandro Carlson
December 2020


LAS VEGAS (KSNV) — The man accused of climbing onto the wing of a commercial airplane at Las Vegas's airport told police he was mentally ill, according to an arrest report.

Las Vegas Metropolitan Police arrested Alejandro Carlson, 41, on Saturday after he allegedly got onto the wing of an Alaskan Airlines flight at McCarran International Airport.

In their arrest report, police write that airport dispatch was alerted to a man running across two active runways around 1:35 p.m.

A captain in the Alaskan Airlines flight alerted the flight control tower moments later that the man was running toward his plane, waving his arms.

The man then ran to the back of the plane and climbed onto the left wing, police say. Officers assigned to the airport arrived and tried to talk the man down from the wing.

Eventually, the man got up and "shimmied his way off the tip of the wing," falling to the ground, according to the report. Carlson was placed in custody and taken to UMC with a broken nose and some small cuts.

After receiving a medical exam, Carlson spoke with a counter-terrorism sergeant with LVMPD.

"Carlson admitted to being mentally ill," police wrote. "In brief, he said he had a 'story' to tell the world and believed that if he jumped on the wing of an aircraft, he would be likely to have a bigger audience."

Police say 72 passengers were on board the flight, including three federal air marshals. Air traffic control stopped all landings during the incident, but no planes were diverted, according to airport officials.

Carlson faces charges of trespassing and disregard for the safety of persons or property.


Alejandro Carlson
December 2020


 

Alaska Airlines released this statement:

Around 2 p.m. PST, Alaska Airlines flight 1367 from Las Vegas to Portland was preparing for take-off when the pilot noticed an individual advancing towards the aircraft. The pilots notified the tower. Law enforcement was dispatched and able to apprehend the individual. Our guests and employees are safe and we are working with law enforcement. The plane has returned to the gate for a full inspection.


Alejandro Carlson
December 2020

Alejandro Carlson
December 2020



Alejandro Carlson
August 2012
Jacksonville Sheriff's Office booking photo of Alejandro Carlson


Published: August 2, 2012

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – A 32-year-old man broke into an Arlington home, was shot by the homeowner, then ran to another home saying, "They're after me," according to Jacksonville police.

Police said Alejandro Carlson broke into the first home on North Arlington Road about 4:30 a.m. July 26, 2012, and the homeowner was awakened by his dog barking.

The man immediately armed himself with a shotgun loaded with birdshot and went to the kitchen, where he found his dog barking at something in the Florida Room, police said. Officers said Carlson had pried the door to the room open with a knife, which was later recovered by police.

The homeowner told police he saw Carlson running toward the door where the dog was barking, and he fired a single shot at Carlson, who then left the home, police said.

Investigators said Carlson ran to an adjacent home, where he forced his way through a set of French doors and into the master bedroom where an older couple was sleeping.

Joanne Farley, 68, woke up to Carlson running through the bedroom yelling, "They're after me," and she got out of bed and followed him, police said.

"This door comes busting in, and a guy's running, and Joanne jumps up and she's after him," her husband, Joe Farley, said. "I'm like, 'Joanne, get back here. Don't do that.' She ain't listening to me and he's not listening to her."

Police said Joanne found Carlson in the bathroom, and he pushed the door back at her, then grabbed her arms after she grabbed onto his bloodied shirt.

"He went in here and he closed the door and actually hid in the shower, and when he came in he was yelling, 'Call the police, call the police. They're after me. They're going to kill me," said Joe, who's also 68.

Joe went into the bathroom and tried to detain Carlson, but Carlson pushed him out of the way, police said.

"We got right about there and he said, 'I need to hide. I need to hide. They're coming because that clock went off.' And I said, 'OK, I'll hide you. Sit right there. Sit right there. Don't move.' Well he did," Joanne said. "He was so high that I think when he got shot, he just really thought someone was after him and going to kill him."

Carlson ran through several rooms, and Joanne cornered him in the laundry room and called 911, police said. Officers said Carlson also pulled out a cellphone and called 911, then handed the phone to Joanne for her to speak with the dispatcher.

Police said Joe went to the bedroom and got a handgun, then went to the laundry room, where he held Carlson at gunpoint until police arrived.

"He was soaking, sopping wet from his head to his waist, and I felt sorry for him, I guess, and I asked him if he wanted a glass of water, and he said, 'Yes, ma'am, please,'" Joanne said.

Carlson was arrested and charged with armed burglary to a dwelling. He was taken to a hospital and treated for minor injuries from the birdshot.

Still bruised from Carlson's fight back, the Farleys are thankful they're here to share the story with some laughter.

"When I think about what I did, I can't believe I did that," Joanne said. "I mean, it was just, you react, you don't think about what you're doing. You know the old story, kill me but you can't eat me."

Carlson was being held in the Duval County jail with bail set at $50,000.

Canandaigua Airport (KIUA) serves in a heartbeat for organ donations

Two jets involved in transporting a heart and other vital organs from a local donor to the New York City area are seen on the morning of November 20th, at the Canandaigua Airport.  The jets are waiting for surgical teams to return to the airport. 
 

CANANDAIGUA, New York -- In the wee hours of November 20th, two jets touched down at the Canandaigua Airport. Landing in the predawn darkness of a chilly morning the Friday before Thanksgiving were surgical teams and support crew on a mission. The death of a young man from an overdose would save lives hundreds of miles away. But first, a team involving six pilots, four aircraft, four ambulance crews and six surgical personnel would have to accomplish what might be routine for them, yet extraordinary for those on the ground at the general aviation airport in Ontario County.

“I was on call that night,” said Dan Brady, line service technician for Mercy Flight Central Aviation Services at the airport. Like others that morning working to ensure a smooth and successful transport of live-saving organs, Brady knew little of the details as he focused on his role. The planes, a Learjet and a Cessna, had to be fueled and ready to go in a heartbeat.

They were.  

The Learjet took the heart. The Cessna took lungs and liver.

“We weren’t sure what was going on until it was nearly over,” said Bob Mincer, Canandaigua Airport manager. The airport got word there the day before and knew what had to be done. This was not the first time the Canandaigua Airport had served aircraft for organ transplants. Mincer estimated such flights take place about six times a year. 

But not to the extent of what took place this day.

Airport records show both jets arrived from Teterboro Airport in New Jersey, a general aviation relief airport about 14 miles from Manhattan. The first flight arrived at 3:30 a.m. and the planes remained at the airport until takeoff about six hours later, at 9:31 a.m., on return to Teterboro. 

Ambulances took the surgical team from the airport to Newark, where the organs were removed from the donor in an operating room. Every minute counts, as organs remain healthy only for a short period of time after being removed.

While waiting for the surgical team’s arrival back at the airport, Mincer said he had a chance to talk briefly with a pilot. He also put his old Polaroid camera to work doing what he does when the airport hosts special visitors — snap a shot of the guests with Canandaigua Airport Wildlife Specialist Fergus.

Mincer said the success of this “multi-layered event” left a positive impression with the Organ Procurement Organization. The OPO is charged by the federal government to be responsible for recovering organs from deceased donors for transplantation. The organization “will depend on the airport and our medical community for success in future missions,” Mincer said.

The Canandaigua Airport in the town of Canandaigua dates back to a grass strip in the 1940s. Developments in recent decades included a major airport expansion in 2013. The project produced a longer, wider runway making it possible to accommodate additional jet traffic and larger aircrafts used during lifesaving missions.

Owned by the Ontario County Industrial Development Agency, the airport is home base for a variety of general aviation aircraft and houses related organizations and businesses including Mercy Flight Central, Penn Yan Flying Club, and Canandaigua Air Center LLC. The airport caters to corporate and recreational flying, is used for military operations, and has a full-service maintenance shop.

For the airport’s role in this recent life-saving mission, Mincer commended Mercy Flight Aviation Services, which provided a seamless transition between each ground transportation and flight. 

Mercy Flight’s Brady was glad to be there. “It’s a cool job to have for moments like this,” Brady said.

Seen on the morning of November 20th, at the Canandaigua Airport are crews involved with the transport of a heart and other vital organs.  In the background a pilot is seen standing by one of the transport jets as members of Finger Lakes Ambulance and a surgical team  take a moment before departure to visit with Fergus, the airport's wildlike specialist. 


Desperate need for organs

Organ transplant procedures in the United States were cut in half by the coronavirus pandemic, exacerbating the worldwide shortage of organs and the need for transplants, according to a USA Today report. By early April, the U.S. saw a 50% decline in deceased donor transplants from the month before, according to an analysis by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Paris Transplant Group.  

“Our findings point to the far-reaching and severe ripple effects of the COVID-19 outbreak on health care, including lifesaving organ transplants,” said study co-author Dr. Peter Reese, an associate professor of medicine and epidemiology at Penn. The analysis, published in The Lancet, attributed the overall decline to a steep reduction in kidney transplants, but it also reported a substantial drop in heart, lung and liver transplants.

Making matters worse, organs are usually transported via commercial aircraft but the coronavirus pandemic drastically reduced the number of flights available.

As of September 2020, 109,000 people were on the national transplant waiting list. Each day, 17 people die waiting for an organ transplant.

Canandaigua Airport Manager Bob Mincer is seen at the airport in early 2020 with airport Wildlife Specialist Fergus.

How can you be a donor?

The New York State Donate Life Registry is a database of people who have signed up to donate their organs, eyes and/or tissues after their death. This database is kept confidential.

There are many ways to sign up. Those include with the New York State Department of Motor Vehicles when applying for or renewing a learner permit, driver's license or non-driver ID. When you enroll at the DMV, a heart and the words "Organ Donor" appear on these documents.

Learn more at https://donatelife.ny.gov/

Piper PA-24-180 Comanche, N7639P: Accident occurred December 12, 2020 near John C. Tune Airport (KJWN), Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville, Tennessee


Location: Nashville, TN 
Accident Number: ERA21LA070
Date & Time: December 12, 2020, 12:50 Local 
Registration: N7639P
Aircraft: Piper PA24 
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On December 12, 2020, about 1250 central standard time, a Piper PA-24-180 airplane, N7639P, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Nashville, Tennessee. The commercial pilot incurred minor injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot reported that he departed with 54 gallons of fuel for the cross-country flight and switched tanks every 30 minutes while enroute. After an un-eventful enroute segment of flight, during the approach, about 7 nautical miles from the destination, the pilot reported that he observed a “significant drop in manifold pressure and change in engine noise, best described as a steady roll-back.” He reported that at the time of the loss of engine power, the airplane was still in a “cruise configuration” with the mixture leaned and the landing gear up.

The pilot subsequently pitched for best glide speed, began looking for an open area to land, and started troubleshooting the loss of power. He reported that he switched the fuel selector from the left tank to the right tank, moved the mixture and propeller levers full forward, turned on the boost pump, and engaged the engine starter, however, none of the actions restored power. The pilot continued his approach to a field that had trees and a house in the flight path. Just prior to impact the pilot reported that he could feel the onset of an aerodynamic stall and the airplane touchdown hard and skidded to a stop in the field.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Inspector found that the fuselage and both wings sustained substantial damage. Flight and engine control continuity was established. A total of about 7 gallons of fuel was drained from the left fuel tank, and 1/8 to 1/4 cup was drained from the right fuel tank. There was no debris or discoloration noted with the fuel, and no damage to the fuel tanks or evidence of fuel leakage was discovered at the accident site. There was no evidence of fuel at the inlet side of the electrical fuel pump nor was there any remnants of fuel discovered at the outlet side of the engine driven fuel pump.

During postaccident interviews and correspondence, the pilot reported that he had not turned on the carburetor heat in the preceding 30 minutes before the engine failure and did not engage the lever after the failure. He also reported that both fuel gauges indicated levels just below half tanks about 45 minutes before his expected arrival time and estimated that each tank should have been about 1/3 to 1/2 full about the time of the loss of power.

Review of the FAA Carburetor Icing Chart found that the airplane was at risk of serious icing at glide power given the atmospheric conditions reported near the accident site.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N7639P
Model/Series: PA24 180
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: JWN,501 ft msl
Observation Time: 12:55 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C /11°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 3200 ft AGL
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / , 230°
Lowest Ceiling: 
None Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.84 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Enterprise, AL (EDN)
Destination: Nashville, TN (JWN)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 36.047696,-86.947017 (est)



NASHVILLE, Tennessee (WTVF) — A small plane crashed Saturday afternoon in Bellevue near Highway 100.

Crews responded around 1 p.m. along the 7000 block of Highway 100.

Officers on scene said the pilot had minor injuries, with lacerations to head and face. He was taken to Vanderbilt.

No other injuries have been reported.

Initial assessment indicates the plane's engine failed, according to MNPD.

Online tracking of the plane's flight schedule shows it departed from Ozark, Alabama around 10:30 a.m. and was scheduled to land at the John C. Tune airport around 12:30 p.m.



BELLEVUE, Tennessee  — A small aircraft crashed into a field near Highway 100 in Bellevue, according to officials with the Federal Aviation Administration. 

The Piper PA-24-180 Comanche crashed in a field near John C. Tune Airport. 

The pilot was the sole person aboard, Federal Aviation Administration officials said.

Nashville Fire Department personnel are on the scene of the incident. 

"As of now, we have not transported anyone," Nashville Fire Department spokesperson Joseph Pleasant said. "There is one patient that has a laceration to the head and no other injuries have been reported at this time." 

Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen said the flight departed from Cairns Army Airfield in Fort Rucker, Alabama, with John C. Tune Airport as the intended destination.

Beech V35B Bonanza, N5470U: Fatal accident occurred December 12, 2020 in Attalla, Etowah County, Alabama

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham, Alabama 
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
FAA/FSDO; Birmingham, Alabama 

Leadlay Aircraft LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N5470U

Location: Attalla, AL 
Accident Number: ERA21LA068
Date & Time: December 12, 2020, 12:49 Local 
Registration: N5470U
Aircraft: Beech V35A 
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On December 12, 2020, about 1249 central standard time, a Beech V35A, N5470U, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Attalla, Alabama. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot was flying from Kyle-Oakley Field Airport (CEY), Murray, Kentucky, to Merritt Island Airport (COI), Merritt Island, Florida. According to Federal Aviation Administration audio recordings and ADS-B data, the flight departed CEY under visual flight rules about 1131, and shortly after takeoff the pilot contacted Memphis Air Route Traffic Control Center to obtain an instrument flight rules (IFR) clearance. The flight was radar identified 2 miles south of CEY and was cleared to climb to 9,000 ft mean sea level (msl). The flight remained on a southerly heading until about 1133, then turned left to a southeasterly direction.

At 1236:35, the pilot established contact with Birmingham Air Traffic Control Tower and the controller issued the current altimeter. The airplane remained on a southeasterly heading at an altitude of 9,000 ft msl until about 1248:09, when it began a right descending turn that was not directed by the controller or announced by the pilot. At 1248:41, the airplane was at an altitude about 7,000 ft msl, the controller attempted to contact the airplane and the pilot replied, “yeah im with you im…;” however, the rest of the communication was unintelligible. The airplane completed a 360° right turn and at 1248:47, while flying about 5,500 ft msl, it continued the right descending turn; however, the radius of the turn decreased. The controller broadcast that radar contact with the airplane was lost, but there were no further communications from the pilot. The last ADS-B target at 1248:54 recorded the airplane over a wooded area at an altitude about 3,600 ft msl.

The airplane impacted an open field about 1,260 ft northeast from the last ADS-B target. The airplane was heavily fragmented. Both stabilizers and ruddervator trim tabs, and pieces of both ruddervators were found near the main wreckage; the tip of one ruddervator was not located.

The wreckage was recovered and retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech 
Registration: N5470U
Model/Series: V35A NO SERIES 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGAD,569 ft msl
Observation Time: 12:56 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 7 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C /15°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 210°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 1100 ft AGL
Visibility: 5 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.94 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Kyle-Oakley Field Airport Murray, KY (CEY)
Destination: Merritt Island Airport Merritt Island, FL (COI)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Latitude, Longitude: 34.093008,-86.086574 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

Elliot George Charles Leadlay of Merritt Island


BIRMINGHAM, Alabama (WBRC) - Etowah Co. officials report the death of a Florida man after his plane crashed in an open field in the Sand Valley area of western Etowah County Saturday afternoon.

The Etowah Co. Sheriff’s office received a 911 call around 12:53 p.m. reporting that it sounded like a plane had crashed somewhere near Buster Willet Rd.

Deputies began searching the area when a second 911 call came in saying the crash site had been located in a open field behind a home in the 200 block of Kelley Lane off Sand Valley Rd.

First responders arrived to find pieces of a small plane scattered across an open field along with the remains of the pilot, identified as Elliot George Charles Leadlay of Merritt Island Fl.

According to Mr. Leadlay’s family he was an experienced pilot with decades of flying experience. Aviation officials and family confirm he was flying home to Florida after visiting a friend in Kentucky when the crash occurred.


SAND VALLEY, Alabama (WIAT) — One person was killed after a small plane crash in Sand Valley Saturday afternoon.

Around 12:50 p.m., the Etowah County Sheriff’s Office received a 911 call stating that it sounded like a plane had crashed somewhere in the area of Sand Valley near Buster Willet Road. Deputies were dispatched and began canvassing the area when a second call came in at around 1:05 p.m. A citizen reporting that he had found the crash site located in an open field behind a residence located in the 200 Block of Kelley Lane off of Sand Valley Road in a rural area of the west side of Etowah County. 

When deputies arrived on the scene, along with members of local volunteer fire departments and others, they found a large open field with debris from a small plane scattered across acres. Deputies were able to identify the plane by locating the numbers on the tailpiece and identifying the operator with aviation authorities. He was flying a Beechcraft V35B Bonanza.

Authorities were able to identify the pilot who is the victim of the plane crash as Elliott George Charles Leadlay of Merritt Island, Florida.

Family members of Leadlay stated he was an experienced pilot with decades of flying.  Aviation officials, along with family members, confirmed he was flying a route from Kentucky, where he had been visiting a friend, and returning home to Florida at the time of the crash.  Identification was quickly obtained in various ways including a prosthetic limb that was known to have belonged to him.

The Federal Aviation Administration has been notified and will assist in the investigation to probe the cause of the crash.

Loss of Control on Ground: Van's RV-3, N24DE; Accident occurred April 23, 2020 at Independence Municipal Airport (KIIB), Buchanan County, Iowa



Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines, Iowa

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Independence, Iowa 
Accident Number: CEN20CA155
Date & Time: April 23, 2020, 09:25 Local 
Registration: N24DE
Aircraft: Vans RV 3 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

The pilot practiced taxiing the airplane for about 1/2 hour before he attempted a takeoff and landing. After landing, he decided to practice a runway "speed up and down" to become more comfortable with engine settings. During the first "runup," he applied "very light throttle input," but the engine power increased "very fast." The airplane suddenly turned left, and the left wing dropped close to the ground with the airplane between about 35 and 40 mph. The pilot applied right rudder and changed the engine power but was unable to gain control of the airplane. The airplane veered left off the runway, went up an incline, struck the airport perimeter fence, and impacted terrain. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings. A quartering tailwind prevailed at the time of the accident.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during a high-speed taxi with a quartering tailwind, which resulted in a runway excursion and impact with a fence and terrain. 

Findings

Aircraft Directional control - Not attained/maintained
Personnel issues Aircraft control - Pilot
Environmental issues Tailwind - Effect on operation
Environmental issues Fence/fence post - Effect on operation
Personnel issues Total experience w/ equipment - Pilot

Factual Information

History of Flight

Takeoff Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Takeoff Attempted remediation/recovery
Takeoff Runway excursion
Takeoff Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 54,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: April 20, 2020
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: May 16, 2019
Flight Time: 1057 hours (Total, all aircraft), 3 hours (Total, this make and model), 1032 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 12 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Vans 
Registration: N24DE
Model/Series: RV 3 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1979
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental (Special) 
Serial Number: 1
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: March 19, 2019 Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1180 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 386 Hrs as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-290-D-2
Registered Owner:
Rated Power: 135 Horsepower
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 09:15 Local 
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 800 ft AGL
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 100°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.68 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 12°C / 10°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Independence, IA (IIB) 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Independence, IA (IIB)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 09:25 Local 
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Independence Municipal Airport IIB 
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 979 ft msl
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 36 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5500 ft / 100 ft 
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 42.456943,-91.947776(est)

System/Component Malfunction/Failure (Non-Power): Van's RV-10, N665HM; Accident occurred May 21, 2020 at Henry County Airport (KHMP), Hampton, Georgia






Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Hampton, Georgia 
Accident Number: ERA20CA200
Date & Time: May 21, 2020, 19:15 Local
Registration: N665HM
Aircraft: Vans RV8 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Sys/Comp malf/fail (non-power)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline transport; Commercial; Flight instructor
Age: 61, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Single-engine sea; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: March 17, 2020
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: March 24, 2020
Flight Time: 28784 hours (Total, all aircraft), 31 hours (Total, this make and model), 11000 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 74 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 11 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Vans
Registration: N665HM
Model/Series: RV8 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2011
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental (Special)
Serial Number: 82384
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: June 1, 2019 Condition 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1800 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 34 Hrs
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 443.9 Hrs at time of accident 
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-360-A1A
Registered Owner:
Rated Power: 180 Horsepower
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC) 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: HMP, 882 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 19:15 Local
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 7500 ft AGL
Visibility 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 110° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 16°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Peachtree City, GA (HMP)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Hampton, GA (HMP)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 18:50 Local
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport: Henry County Airport HMP 
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 0 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 06
IFR Approach: None 
Runway Length/Width:5500 ft / 75 ft 
VFR Approach/Landing: Full stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 33.389999,-84.331108

Aircraft Structural Failure: Van's RV-8, N44LA; Accident occurred June 08, 2020 at Southland Field Airport (KUXL), Sulphur, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana







Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Sulphur, Louisiana
Accident Number: CEN20CA220
Date & Time: June 8, 2020, 11:00 Local
Registration: N44LA
Aircraft: Vans RV8
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Aircraft structural failure 
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline transport 
Age: 76,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Unmanned (sUAS) 
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane multi-engine; Airplane single-engine; Instrument airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: September 1, 2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 7650 hours (Total, all aircraft), 9898 hours (Total, this make and model), 7178 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 48 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 18 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Vans 
Registration: N44LA
Model/Series: RV8
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2007
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental (Special)
Serial Number: 82421
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel 
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: June 30, 2019
Condition Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1800 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 83 Hrs 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 634 Hrs at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Aero Sport Power
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: O360-A1A
Registered Owner:
Rated Power: 180 Horsepower
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 250° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: Temperature/Dew Point:
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Leesville, LA (L39)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Unknown
Destination: Sulphur, LA (UXL)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:
Type of Airspace: Unknown

Airport Information

Airport: Southland Field UXL 
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 10 ft msl
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 15
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:5001 ft / 75 ft 
VFR Approach/Landing: Full stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A Aircraft
Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 30.133888,-93.377777(est)

Van's RV-4, N173CW: Fatal accident occurred June 09, 2020 near Safford Regional Airport (KSAD), Graham County, Arizona

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona 
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania 


Location: Safford, AZ
Accident Number: WPR20LA176
Date & Time: June 9, 2020, 08:45 Local
Registration: N173CW
Aircraft: Vans WILSON RV4
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On June 9, 2020, about 0845 mountain standard time, an experimental amateur-built Wilson (Vans Aircraft) RV4, N173CW, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Safford Regional Airport (SAD), Safford, Arizona. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

Preliminary ADS-B data revealed the airplane departing from runway 11R at Tucson International Airport (TUS) about 0810, and initiating a climbing left turn to the northeast. The airplane continued on the same track, reaching an altitude of about 9,800 ft mean sea level (msl), about 7 minutes later. For the next 25 minutes, the airplane maintained the same general altitude and heading while traversing the mountain passes northeast of Tucson, and maintaining terrain clearance of between 4,000 and 7,000 ft above ground level.

About 0836, 28 miles southwest of SAD, the airplane began to descend at a rate of about 500 ft per minute (fpm). Seven minutes later, the airplane changed track to the north, toward SAD, with an accompanying reduction in groundspeed from 165 to 115 knots and an increase in descent rate to about 800 fpm. After arriving about 1 mile south of the approach end of runway 30, at an altitude of 4,200 ft, the airplane turned 10° to the left, and began a 4,000-fpm descent that lasted about 12 seconds.

The first identified point of impact consisted of a 25-ft long ground disruption located at an elevation of 3,090 ft, about 500 ft north of the last ADS-B target, and 1/2 mile southwest of the runway 30 threshold. The disruption was on a south-facing bluff, and projected uphill on a north heading toward the main wreckage. The ensuing 300-ft long debris field contained fragments of wing tip, main landing gear, the propeller and exhaust pipe assembly, and the left aileron.

The main wreckage came to rest 40 ft above the first point of impact, and 40 ft below the runway elevation.

Image 1 – Debris Field and Main Wreckage (Photo Courtesy of the Thatcher Police Department)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Vans 
Registration: N173CW
Model/Series: WILSON RV4 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VM
C Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSAD,3176 ft msl
Observation Time: 14:51 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C /-13°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 180°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.14 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Departure Point: Tucson, AZ (TUS)
Destination: Safford, AZ (SAD)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Latitude, Longitude: 32.840831,-109.623054

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Capt. Delos E. Echlin USN (RET)
1941 - 2020

Capt. Delos E. Echlin USN (RET) passed away on June 9th, 2020 at the age of 79 doing what he loved best. Captain Echlin was a decorated Vietnam veteran who served 26 years on active duty.

Captain Echlin was born May 30, 1941 in Lexington, Kentucky to his parents, Charles and Lydia Echlin. On May 11, 1964, when he was 23 years old he enlisted in the Navy and went on to fly over 131 missions in the Vietnam War. Captain Echlin retired from the Military on July 1, 1990. Captain Echlin married in 1964 to Bonnie Chaples, they had two children. They remained married for 44 years until Bonnie passed in 2008.

Surviving are his brother, Dennis (Sheryl) and Beth (Pete); his sweetheart, Dorothy Sayer; daughter, Kimberly Taylor (Scott); son, John Echlin (Charla) and five grandchildren, Roxanne, Cody, Alexandra, Jack and Elizabeth.

A Tucson man was killed on June 9th when his experimental plane crashed just shy of the Safford airport.

The victim was identified as 79-year-old Delos "Dee" Echlin. Graham County Undersheriff Jeff McCormies said Echlin's family was notified of his death and an autopsy would be held Wednesday.

According to a Sheriff's Office report, Echlin left Tucson International Airport shortly after 8 a.m., bound for the  Safford Regional Airport. His plane went off radar around 8:50. McCormies said no mayday calls were made.

The plane hit a hillside near Sanchez Road and Airport Road, just short of the airport. A local resident called the Sheriff's Office around noon to report that the plane was on the hill.

The Safford Fire Department, which brought their "jaws of life," and Graham County Search and Rescue also responded to the crash scene, along with NTSB investigators.

Van's RV-8, N553KM: Accident occurred June 12, 2020 at Henry County Airport (KHMP), Hampton, Georgia

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia 


Location: Hampton, GA 
Accident Number: ERA20LA213
Date & Time: June 12, 2020, 19:50 Local
Registration: N553KM
Aircraft: Vans RV8 
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On June 12, 2020, at 1950 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Vans RV8, N553KM, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident at Henry County Airport (HMP), Hampton, Georgia. The airline transport pilot was seriously injured. The flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the owner/operator of the airplane and several witnesses, the purpose of the flight was for the pilot to join the operator in the air for an airshow practice flight. The operator was already at altitude when the accident airplane departed.

During the initial climb after takeoff from runway 06, witnesses described the engine sound as "missing... popping… not making significant power... and couldn't get to max power." The witnesses also described black smoke trailing in the engine's exhaust. The operator stated that the pilot announced unspecified "engine problems" over the radio.

Witnesses further described the airplane performing a 180°-turn for landing in the opposite direction on runway 24. They surmised that inadequate runway remained for a successful landing on runway 24 and watched as the airplane entered a subsequent 180°-turn for landing on the departure runway. At low altitude, and low airspeed, while aligned with the left base leg of the traffic pattern for runway 06, the airplane "stalled" and impacted terrain in a flat attitude at the approach end of the runway. The landing gear and cockpit canopy separated, and the wings and the fuselage were substantially damaged.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the airplane was manufactured in 2004. The airplane was powered by a JBA IO-360-BLXC3, 185 -horsepower, 4-cylinder engine and its most recent condition inspection was completed on February 10, 2020 at 1,894.7 total aircraft hours.

The airplane was examined by an FAA aviation safety inspector. Flight control continuity was confirmed. The engine was rotated by hand and continuity was confirmed though the powertrain and valvetrain to the accessory section. Compression was tested on each cylinder and found within the normal operating range. Timing on each magneto was confirmed, and both magnetos produced spark on all terminal leads when bench tested.

The fuel injection servo was separated from the engine and damaged by impact. All fuel lines and the flow divider were absent of obstruction and debris when checked visually and with compressed air except for the No. 2 fuel nozzle which was blocked. The obstruction was cleared with a length of safety wire. Examination of the spark plugs (top and bottom) revealed signatures consistent with "rich" mixtures in the Nos. 1 and 4 cylinders, and "lean" mixtures in the Nos. 2 and 3 cylinders.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Vans
Registration: N553KM
Model/Series: RV8 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held:None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: K6A2,959 ft msl
Observation Time: 19:55 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C /16°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots / , 70°
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.07 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Hampton, GA (HMP)
Destination: Hampton, GA (HMP)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 33.389999,-84.331108 (est)