Friday, October 5, 2012

No plane crash found after unproven report - Jefferson County, West Virginia

CHARLES TOWN - A report of a possible plane crash Thursday in Jefferson County turned out to be unfounded. 

A thorough search for the reported downed aircraft was conducted Thursday afternoon, but didn't result in any crashed aircraft being located.

Jefferson County Sheriff Robert "Bobby" Shirley said a caller reported seeing an airplane turning in the air before spiraling toward the ground between Summit Point Road and W.Va. 51.

A Maryland State Police helicopter that was assisting in an unrelated search effort for a missing teen in Ranson Thursday flew to the area, but didn't locate any airplane or wreckage.


http://www.journal-news.net

Aeronca 7AC Champion, N1986E: After landing the aircraft went off the side of the runway - Ocean City, New Jersey

IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 1986E        Make/Model: AR7       Description: 7KCAB
  Date: 10/05/2012     Time: 1555

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: OCEAN CITY   State: NJ   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AFTER LANDING THE AIRCRAFT WENT OFF THE SIDE OF THE RUNWAY. OCEAN CITY, NJ

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: PHILADELPHIA, PA  (EA17)              Entry date: 10/09/2012 

http://registry.faa.gov/N1986E

http://www.flickr.com/photos



OCEAN CITY -- Authorities are investigating why a plane went off the runway after landing Friday.
 

An Aeronca 7AC plane was landing at the Ocean City Municipal Airport just before noon when it went off the side of the runway. 

Local authorities responded to the scene. 

Neither of the two passengers in the plane were injured.

No impact was reported to air operations, meaning that flights in the area weren't affected by the accident.


The plane is registered to an owner in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania.

The FAA is currently investigating the incident.


http://abclocal.go.com

First Solo Flight: Diamond DA40 F Diamond Star, N424FP, Utah State University ... Logan-Cache Airport (KLGU), Logan, Utah

 

Published on September 27, 2012 by divadthegreat220 

"First Solo Flight in the pattern as part of my private pilot training at Utah State University."

Airport is Logan-Cache (KLGU)
 
Airplane is a 2006 Diamond Star DA40FP (fixed pitch) - N424FP (Aggie 4)

Cirrus SR22 GTS G3 Turbo, Gandy Air LLC, N308PJ: Fatal accident occurred October 03, 2012 in Gary, Indiana

NTSB Identification: CEN13FA002
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 03, 2012 in Gary, IN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/16/2014
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N308PJ
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was flying an RNAV/GPS approach when the accident occurred. The air traffic controller did not provide approach clearance to the accident airplane until it was inside the final approach fix (FAF) and 1,000 feet above the FAF crossing altitude. The controller also issued a late turn to intercept the approach coarse, and he did not issue a descent clearance because his attention was directed to resolving a separation conflict involving two other aircraft. According to data recorded by the airplane’s primary flight display, the pilot disconnected the autopilot after receiving the approach clearance, and the airplane then began a rapid descent. About 40 seconds later, the airplane rolled left and tracked left of the approach course. The airplane’s ground proximity warning alert activated, and the airplane subsequently rapidly reversed roll and pitch directions consistent with an attempt by the pilot to correct the airplane’s hazardous flight path. The airplane continued to roll right and pitch to a nose-high attitude before rapidly transitioning to a nose-down attitude of more than 85 degrees. As the airplane descended below a 900-foot cloud layer, the pilot rolled the airplane to wings level and made a high g-force pullup until ground impact. Given the pilot’s high workload due to deficient approach control services and possible distraction while operating in instrument meteorological conditions and the subsequent loss of airplane control, it is likely that the pilot experienced spatial disorientation.
Examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any preimpact failures or malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation. Toxicology testing indicated the pilot used cocaine, hydrocodone, and marijuana at some point in the recent past. However, the use of the cocaine and hydrocodone likely did not affect the pilot’s performance at the time of the accident, and the effect of the marijuana use could not be determined from the available evidence.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s loss of control during an instrument approach due to spatial disorientation. Contributing to the accident were deficient approach control services and the pilot's loss of positional awareness.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On October 3, 2012, at 1116 central daylight time, a Cirrus SR22, N308PJ, operated by a commercial pilot, collided with terrain while flying an instrument approach at the Gary/Chicago International Airport (GYY), Gary, Indiana. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed from ground impact and postimpact fire. The flight was being operating under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed during the instrument approach portion of the flight and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the Smyrna Airport (MQY), Smyrna, Tennessee, at 0925.

According to voice recordings provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the pilot first contacted approach control about 35 miles southeast of GYY while in a descent to 4,000 feet mean sea level (msl). After receiving vectors and a further descent to 3,000 feet msl, N308PJ was cleared for the RNAV/GPS Y approach to runway 30 at GYY.

At the point of the first approach clearance by air traffic control (ATC), N380PJ was inside the final approach fix (FAF) and 1000 feet above the recommended FAF altitude. After no response was received from the pilot, ATC repeated the approach clearance to N308PJ. The pilot acknowledged this approach clearance, as well as a frequency change to the tower. No further radio transmissions were recorded on either approach or tower control frequencies.

After the pilot confirmed the approach clearance, radar returns indicated N308PJ in a descent and close to on course laterally. About 40 seconds after starting the descent, radar returns indicated N308PJ initiated a left, descending turn away from course centerline. The last recorded radar return indicated an altitude of 1,700 feet msl, about one mile southeast of runway 30 at GYY, almost overhead of the accident site.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 48, held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land, single-engine sea, and instrument ratings. On May 18, 2012, the pilot was issued a FAA Class 2 medical certificate, which required corrective lenses be worn. At the time of the medical examination, the pilot reported having 1,100 hours of total flight experience, with 50 hours in the last six months. The pilot reported 650 hours of flight experience in the make and model of the accident airplane on his application for aircraft insurance, dated December 5, 2011.

A certified flight instructor (CFI), who flew training flights with the accident pilot, stated that the pilot often struggled to maintain instrument flying proficiency due to an active lifestyle. He stated that the accident pilot was challenged with accomplishing routine instrument flying tasks, such as changing a radio control frequency while conducting an instrument approach.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane, a 2007 Cirrus SR-22, was registered to Gandy Air LLC. A standard airworthiness certificate was issued for the airplane on August 8, 2007. The airplane was equipped with a Continental IO-550-N46B engine. The last annual inspection was performed on the airplane on September 17, 2012, with a total aircraft time of 566.4 hours.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The weather observation station at GYY reported the following conditions at 1140: wind variable at 6 knots, visibility 5 miles, ceiling 900 feet overcast, temperature 17 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 13 degrees C, and altimeter 29.97 inches of mercury.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

A circuit card from the airplane's primary flight display (PFD) and an autopilot unit were recovered from the accident airplane and forwarded to the National Transportation Safety Board's Vehicle Recorder Laboratory for evaluation. The autopilot unit was destroyed by fire and flight data was not recovered. Two flash memory devices were removed from the damaged PFD and read using a memory chip reading device.

The following summary utilized data from the PFD: The airplane departed MQY and climbed to a final cruise altitude of 10,000 feet msl. The GPS steering autopilot mode was used for lateral navigation during the cruise portion of the flight. At 1053 the airplane began a descent, leveling briefly at 8,000 feet msl, 4,000 feet msl, and 3000 feet msl. At 4,000 feet msl, the GPS steering mode deactivated and heading hold mode activated. At 1109, the next waypoint parameter switched from "KGYY" to "WASTU", which was the FAF. Autopilot vertical speed mode was used to descend from 4,000 feet msl to 3,000 feet msl.

The autopilot altitude hold mode was used to maintain 3,000 feet msl. At 1114:07, the autopilot switched from heading hold to approach mode. At 1114:32, the next waypoint parameter switched from "WASTU" to "RONOY", an intermediate stepdown fix on final (ATC transmitted the second approach clearance to N308PJ at 1115:09).

At 1115:25, inside the FAF and still at 3,000 feet msl, the autopilot disconnected. During two periods immediately prior to the disengagement of the autopilot a "TRIMMING" indication was sent by the autopilot. This indication is present when the autopilot has run the pitch trim for a period in excess of four seconds, which is consistent with pushing or pulling on the yoke while the autopilot is still connected.

After the autopilot disconnected, the airplane began a descent that reached 5,000 feet per minute. During this descent, the airplane rolled 37 degrees left and pitched down to 14 degrees nose low. At 1115:50, the airplane reversed both roll and pitch directions, commencing a roll to the right and a pitch up.

The altitude and vertical speed profile at which the roll and pitch reversed corresponded to the activation criteria for the enhanced ground proximity warning system (GPWS), which triggers aural voice and visual annunciator warnings. Initially, the voice alert "Sink Rate" is triggered and a yellow caution alert annunciator lamp illuminates. The pilot guide for the enhanced GPWS installed in the accident airplane is located in the NTSB public docket.

After reversing pitch and roll direction, the airplane continued rolling right and pitched up to a 15-degree nose up attitude. The airplane continued rolling right and transitioned to a nose down pitch of more than 85 degrees nose low and 170 degrees of right roll. As the airplane descended below 900 feet above ground level, a rapid roll to wings level and pitch up occurred. Centrifugal forces during the pitch up were recorded in excess of 4.5 Gs. The last data record was 48 degrees nose down, with a descent rate of about 7,000 feet per minute.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site was located in a wooded area about one mile from the approach end centerline of runway 30 at GYY. The wreckage debris was scattered from the initial impact crater outward on a 164-degree heading. The debris field extended about 100 feet from the impact crater and was about 65 feet wide at its widest point. To the north of the impact crater, trees displayed freshly broken and cut tree limbs. The angle at which the broken and cut tree limbs made with respect to each other and the impact crater was measured as a 52-degree descent.

The airplane was fragmented and mostly consumed by fire. The aileron control cable was fractured on both sides of the console aileron actuation pulley and the right hand aileron actuation pulley. All three turnbuckles were present with safety clips installed. Elevator and rudder control cable continuity was confirmed.

The Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS) parachute was located about 60 feet from the impact crater. The parachute remained partially packed in the deployment bag (D-bag) and exhibited thermal damage. The rocket motor was hanging in some small trees, still attached to the pickup collar, lanyards, and incremental bridle. The motor was determined to be expended. The incremental bridle remained in the sheath and had not "unzipped."

The D-bag straps were attached to the incremental bridle. The ends of the D-bag straps exhibited thermal damage where they separated from the bag. A portion of the suspension lines were hanging in the tree branches and exhibited thermal damage at both ends. The lines were hanging in a straight line between the parachute and the impact crater. Portions of thermally damaged risers were also present in the trees between the impact crater and the parachute.

The flight station bulkhead was located about 28 feet forward of the impact crater. The launch tube, base, and igniter assembly were present. Approximately two feet of the activation cable extended from the igniter assembly. The activation handle was out of the handle holder and approximately 93 inches of activation cable remained attached to the activation handle. The plastic sheath for the activation cable was not present, consistent with the thermal damage to the surrounding components. The safety pin for the activation handle was not observed.

The aluminum cross beam that bolts across the opening to the CAPS enclosure was bowed forward. The reefing line cutters were not observed. The CAPS enclosure cover was located 55 feet from the impact crater and exhibited impact and fire damage. Evidence at the accident site was consistent CAPS deployment due to ground impact forces.

The engine was examined off the accident site. A borescope inspection was conducted on all six engine cylinders. None of the cylinders, cylinder barrels, pistons, or valves displayed any sign of operational distress. The induction system, exhaust system, magnetos, oil sump, and fuel pump were examined, with no pre-impact anomalies noted. The ignition system was destroyed during the accident sequence and ensuring fire.

Examination of the airframe, engine and propeller did not reveal any anomalies associated with a pre-impact failure or malfunction.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

On October 5, 2012, an autopsy was performed on the pilot by the Lake County Coroner. The cause of death was blunt force injuries. Toxicology testing of vitreous as part of the autopsy indicated past use of cocaine and hydrocodone. The FAA's Civil Aeromedical Institute in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology tests on the pilot, which was limited by the lack of available blood or urine. No ethanol was detected in the muscle or liver. Trace amounts of tetrahydrocannabinol (marijuana) was found in lung and its metabolite tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid was detected in the lung and liver.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The air traffic controller stated that while vectoring N308PJ toward the final approach at GYY, he observed two aircraft east of GYY that were "becoming a conflict". A conflict alert (CA) alarm sounded and was displayed on his radar screen, which drew his attention away from N308PJ. After resolving the conflict, the controller stated that he was still a little flustered as he returned to provide approach service to N308PJ. He stated that if not for the loss of separation conflict, he felt he would have given better approach services to N308PJ.



 http://registry.faa.gov/N308PJ
NTSB Identification: CEN13FA002
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 03, 2012 in Gary, IN
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N308PJ
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 3, 2012, at 1120 central daylight time, a Cirrus SR22, N308PJ, operated by a commercial pilot collided with terrain while flying an instrument approach at the Gary/Chicago International Airport (KGYY), Gary, Indiana. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage from impact and postimpact fire. The flight was being operating under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the Smyrna Airport (KMQY), Smyrna, Tennessee, at 0925.

The pilot requested and was cleared for the RNAV(GPS)Y RWY 30 instrument approach into KGYY. The pilot was issued vectors for the approach and was subsequently cleared for the approach by the Chicago TRACON. The pilot was subsequently issued a frequency change and instructed to contact the KGYY air traffic control tower. The pilot did not check in on the tower frequency. The airplane impacted trees and the terrain approximately 1 mile southeast of KGYY.

Weather conditions recorded at KGYY at 1140 were: wind variable at 6 knots, visibility 5 miles, ceiling 900 feet overcast, temperature 17 degrees Celsius, dew point 13 degrees Celsius, and altimeter 29.97 inches of mercury.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 308PJ        Make/Model: SR22      Description: SR-22
  Date: 10/03/2012     Time: 1619

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: GARY   State: IN   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES, THE 2 PERSONS ON BOARD WERE 
  FATALLY INJURED, NEAR GARY, IN

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   2
                 # Crew:   2     Fat:   2     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: SOUTH BEND, IN  (GL17)                Entry date: 10/04/2012 # 




Patsy John Crisafi 
Obituary


Patsy John Crisafi, 48, of St. Augustine, Fla., formerly of Connellsville, died Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 in Lake County, Ind. He was born Jan. 11, 1964 in Allegheny County, Pa., a son of the late Patsy and Catherine "Kitty" Valvassori Crisafi. Patsy was a loving son, brother, uncle and friend.

Patsy was successful businessman and entrepreneur. Following a successful 18-year career with CSX Transportation, which included positions in Connellsville, Pa., Atlanta, Ga. and Jacksonville, Fla., he left to pursue other business interests in the railroad industry. Patsy served as executive vice president of Utilco Co., in Tifton, Ga. He was the co-founder, principal and executive vice president of Roadway Worker Training, Inc. (RWT), a successful railroad industry consulting, training and support company.

Among his other business interests were; Railroad Protective Services, Inc. (RPS), founder and president, C&C RWT, LLC, co-founder and partner, Crisafi-Maloy Development, Inc., Crisafi Services, Inc., National Pike Properties, LLC, VHMC, LLC and Gandy Air, LLC. Patsy was a commercially rated pilot. His special railroad expertise was railroad operating rules, safety and technical training and the development and implementation of railroad safety policies.

Patsy was a long-time member of St. Rita"s Roman Catholic Church, Elks Lodge, the NRC and AREMA. Patsy was a long-term sponsor and active supporter of Big Brothers and Sisters of St. Augustine, Fla. He was a member of the hunting group, Sugar Bottom in Montgomery, Ala., and a willing and generous contributor to many veterans and children"s causes. Patsy loved and lived for his family and legions of friends. Among his many joys were his dogs, airplanes, motorcycles, hunting, cars, flying and off shore fishing, diving, boating, cooking, entertaining and his passion for his work. Patsy graduated from Connellsville High School in 1981.

He is survived, loved and sadly missed by his sister, Lisa Crisafi Nudo and her husband Ken, and nephew, Devin Nudo, all of Connellsville, Pa.; his fiancŽe, Jackie Carter of St. Augustine, Fla.; and her son, Adam of Millwood, Ga.

Friends will be received from 7-9 p.m. Wednesday and 2-4;7-9 p.m. Thursday in the Brooks Funeral Home, Inc., 111 E. Green St., Connellsville, Pa., where a Blessing Service will be held Friday at 9:30 a.m. followed by a Funeral Mass at 10 a.m. in St. Rita"s R.C. Church, Connellsville. with the Rev. Robert Lubic as celebrant. Interment will follow in St. Rita"s Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers the family suggests memorial contributions be made to St. Rita"s Cemetery Care Fund, the ASPCA, Humane Society or the Big Brothers of America in memory of Patsy John Crisafi.

To sign the guest registry, please visit www.brooksfuneralhomes.com

http://www.legacy.com

http://www.legacy.com/guestbook



VINCENT "VINNIE" VACCARELLO 
Obituary 

 VACCARELLO
VINCENT "VINNIE"


45, of St. Johns, FL, was delivered to God in Heaven along with his dear friend, Patsy Crisafi, on October 3, 2012. Vinnie was a native of Pittsburgh, PA, and a die-hard Steeler fan! He was a graduate of Chartiers Valley High School and Duquesne University. He obtained a Masters degree in business at Jacksonville University. He was an appointed member of the NRC Board of Directors. Vinnie was a very successful entrepreneur and co-owner of All Rail Road Service of Jacksonville, FL. He was the all-time leading tackler (440) and a Hall of Fame member of the Duquesne Dukes football program. Larger than any personal accomplishments was Vinnie's HEART and the LOVE and GENEROSITY he gave to ALL. Our beloved Vinnie is survived by his wife, April; and two sons, Victor and Anthony; mother and father, Mary and John Vaccarello; brothers, John and Eric and their families; mother and father-in-law, Carol and Gene Piscopo; brother and sister-in-law and their families; dear friend and business partner, Mike Heridia; many loving aunts, uncles, cousins and friends. 


Mass will be held on October 20, 2012 at Saint Simon & Jude Church, 1551 Greentree Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15220 at 11:00 a.m. Following church services, all friends and family are invited to the "Celebration of Vinnie's Life" to be held at Hilton Garden Inn - Southpointe, 1000 Corporate Drive, Canonsburg, PA 15317 from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

 In lieu of flowers, donations are being accepted at San Juan Del Rio's "Building Fund", 1718 State Route 13, Saint Johns, FL 32259.

http://www.legacy.com



 
Photo Courtesy of Roadway Worker Training Inc. 
Plane piloted by Crisafi (right) crashed Oct. 3, killing him and construction business associate Vaccarello in Gary, Ind.

Two rail construction Execs die in private plane crash 

 (Indiana) -- Two veteran rail construction executives based in Florida died Oct. 3 when the private plane they jointly owned and was being piloted by one of them crashed near the Gary, Ind., airport. Killed were Patsy J. "PJ" Crisafi, 45, co-founder and executive vice president of Roadway Worker Training Inc., St. Augustine, Fla., and Vincent “Vinnie” Vaccarello, 48, co-founder and co-president of All Railroad Services Corp., also based there. Crisafi was believed to have been the pilot. . According to Baker, Crisafi’s funeral is set for Oct. 12 in Connellsville, Pa. Services for Vaccarello are set for Oct. 13 in St. Johns, Fla. and a reception will be in Jacksonville. 

 The cause of the crash was under investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board, but witnesses reported either a small explosion or or some sort of engine failure on the plane while it was still in the air,” says Chuck Baker, president of the Washington, D.C.-based National Rail Construction and Maintenance Association, of which both were current board members.

The group’s members include rail and transit construction contractors, engineers and suppliers, says its website.

Crisafi’s firm specializes in railroad consulting, employee training and track safety and support; Vaccarello’s serves short line, transit, and Class 1 railroads, providing pole line removal, tree trimming, maintenance of vegetation at railroad crossings and numerous other services, according to the firms’ websites.

Crisafi was an 18-year management veteran of CSX Transportation, while Vaccarello is a former vice president of operations for Balfour Beatty Rail. Vaccarello's current firm has about 135 employees in the U.S., Canada and Mexico, according to the firm.

“Vinnie and Patsy were both well-known and respected in the industry,” says John August, executive vice president of RailWorks Corp., New York City. He says the executives, who often worked together and co-owned the Cirrus SR-22 aircraft, were en route to the Chicago area for a meeting with Canadian National Railroad engineering officials.

Both of the firms had been subcontractors to RailWorks on past projects, says August.


 According to Baker, Crisafi’s funeral is set for Oct. 12 in Connellsville, Pa. Services for Vaccarello are set for Oct. 13 in St. Johns, Fla. and a reception will be in Jacksonville.
http://www.aggregateresearch.com

 The Lake County Coroner has identified the plane crash victims as Vincent Vaccarello and Patsy Crisafi, both of St. Augustine, according to a news release.   

The Associated Press -
The two men killed when a small airplane crashed into a wooded area about a mile short of Gary-Chicago International Airport in northwestern Indiana have been identified as being from St. Augustine, Fla.

Lake County coroner Merrilee Frey (fry) said in a news release she used dental records to identify the remains of Vincent Vaccarello and Patsy Crisafi. She didn't release any further information about the men.   A telephone message seeking further information was left Friday night by The Associated Press.

Aviation officials haven't yet released any information about what caused the crash. The single-engine plane was registered to Gandy AIR LLC in St. Augustine, Fla., according to the FAA. The plane last taken off from Smyrna, Tenn.


Previous version:
A St. Johns County businessman could be one of two men killed after a private plane his company owned crashed in Gary, Ind., on Wednesday.

The plane was registered to Gandy Air LLC of St. Augustine, but as of Thursday officials had not released the names of the two victims, pending notification of families.

Managing member of Gandy Air is Patsy J. Crisafi, according to business records. The company has an address on Ryan Road.

The Cirrus SR22 single-engine plane crashed into the woods behind West Gary Lighthouse Charter School around 11:18 a.m. on Wednesday and burst into flames.

The victims had not been identified as of Thursday, said Jessica Metros, administrative officer for the Lake County Coroner’s Office.

Ed Wuellner, executive director at the Northeast Florida Regional Airport in St. Johns County, confirmed that Crisafi has had a hangar at the airport since 2008, but he said he did not know Crisafi personally.

Crisafi is listed as the executive vice president for Roadway Worker Training of Jacksonville, president of Crisafi Services and director of Railroad Protective Services, according to business records.

Stephen Ramsey, who is listed as a business associate, declined to comment and would not confirm whether Crisafi was on the plane. Another person listed on the business records declined to comment.

The Cirrus SR22 left the Northeast Florida Regional Airport around 3 p.m. on Tuesday and was scheduled to arrive in Smyrna, Tenn., around 5:30 p.m., according to flight records.

Smyrna/Rutherford County Airport Director John Black said he didn’t know who owned the plane or who might have been onboard, according to the Associated Press. He said the plane arrived at the airport Tuesday night and departed Wednesday morning.

The plane was enroute from Smyrna to the Gary/Chicago International Airport when it crashed, according to the Gary Police Department.

Investigators have said the plane did not send a distress signal before crashing, according to First Coast News.

Lake County Coroner’s Office officials removed the bodies of two men from the wreckage around 5:35 p.m. Wednesday.

Delores Hinton, who lives nearby and saw the crash, said the plane “exploded in the air” over her house, according to the Associated Press. “I said, ‘What was that?’ The next thing I know, it was down,” she said.

Gary Police Department spokeswoman Cpl. Gabrielle King said there was not an update to the investigation as of Thursday evening.

Cause of the crash is under investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration.


http://staugustine.com

Bell 407, Bristow US LLC, N406AL: Accident occurred October 05, 2012 in Intracoastal City, Louisiana

NTSB Identification: CEN13FA003
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 05, 2012 in Intracoastal City, LA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/10/2015
Aircraft: BELL 407, registration: N406AL
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the operator, the pilot was performing a local postmaintenance flight following a routine phase check that had been completed the previous evening. Several witnesses reported seeing the helicopter start up and enter a low altitude hover before it hover-taxied toward the runway. One witness reported that she saw the helicopter depart on the runway heading and disappear into fog or a low cloud ceiling. Another witness, who also was a pilot employed by the operator, reported that there was mist, fog, and a low cloud ceiling when the helicopter departed. Recovered flight data indicated that, about 20 seconds after takeoff, the helicopter reached a maximum altitude of 255 feet and ground speed of 51 knots while still on the runway heading. The helicopter then entered a left descending turn, during which, it reached a maximum bank angle of 38 degrees to the left and a 20-degree nose-down pitch angle. The helicopter also achieved a 1,600 ft per minute descent during the turn. After turning about 200 degrees from the original departure heading, the helicopter descended into trees and terrain in a nose-low, left-skid-low attitude. The postaccident examination of the helicopter revealed no evidence of a preimpact failure or malfunction that would have precluded normal operation. Additionally, the engine exhibited damage consistent with it operating at the time of impact. The witness accounts of the helicopter climbing into a low cloud ceiling during initial climb and the subsequent descending left turn shown by the recovered flight data were consistent with the pilot inadvertently encountering instrument meteorological conditions and then attempting a course reversal. Additionally, the helicopter’s descent rate and pitch and bank angles during the course reversal were consistent with the pilot lacking a discernible horizon or ground reference to maintain control of the helicopter. Although the helicopter was equipped with basic attitude instrumentation and avionics, it was not certified for flight under instrument flight rules (IFR). Additionally, although he held an instrument rating for helicopters, the pilot was not current for IFR operations nor was it required for his employment as a pilot of helicopters limited to visual flight rules operations.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s decision to attempt a local flight in marginal visual meteorological conditions and his subsequent loss of control following an inadvertent encounter with instrument metrological conditions shortly after takeoff.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On October 5, 2012, about 0758 central daylight time, a Bell 407 helicopter, N406AL, was substantially damaged when it collided with terrain shortly after takeoff from Central Industries Airport (2LA0), near Intracoastal City, Louisiana. The commercial pilot, who was the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The helicopter was registered to and operated by Bristow US LLC, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 while on a company flight plan. Day instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed for the postmaintenance flight that was originating at the time of the accident.

According to the operator, the pilot was performing the postmaintenance flight to identify if there was any residual oil left behind during a routine phase check that had been completed the previous evening. At 0756, the pilot sent an electronic message to the company's flight-following center located in New Iberia, Louisiana, to activate his local flight plan and to report having 1 hour of fuel on-board.

Several witnesses reported seeing the helicopter startup and enter a low altitude hover over the landing pad before it hover-taxied toward runway 24. One witness reported that she saw the helicopter depart on the runway heading and disappear into fog or a low cloud ceiling. Several witnesses reported hearing a sound consistent with a ground impact shortly after the helicopter had departed toward the southwest.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot, age 62, held a commercial pilot certificate with helicopter and instrument helicopter ratings. His last aviation medical examination was completed on April 18, 2012, when he was issued a second-class medical certificate with a limitation for corrective lenses.

According to flight time records provided by the operator, the pilot had accumulated 11,386 hours of flight experience, of which 11,262 hours were logged as pilot-in-command. All of the pilot's accumulated flight experience had been completed in helicopters. He had accumulated 619 hours in a Bell model 407 helicopter. He had logged 455 hours at night, 279 hours in instrument meteorological conditions, and 155 hours in simulated instrument conditions. The operator reported that since being hired, in November 2000, the pilot had accumulated 5.0 hours of simulated instrument time. Additionally, the operator reported that the pilot had accumulated 0.5 hours of simulated instrument time in the 12 months preceding the accident. According to the operator, the pilot was qualified and approved to fly Bell models 206 and 407 helicopters; however, neither helicopter model was certified for instrument flight rules (IFR) operations. The pilot's most recent FAA Part 135 Proficiency/Qualification Check for the Bell model 407 helicopter was satisfactorily completed on February 8, 2012. Additionally, on August 15, 2012, the pilot received a separate FAA Part 135 Proficiency/Qualification Check in a Bell model 206 helicopter.

The pilot had logged 446 hours during the past year, 222 hours during the prior 6 months, 118 hours during previous 90 days, and 43 hours in the last 30 days. The operator reported that the pilot had flown 7 hours within the 24 hour period before the accident flight.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident aircraft was a Bell Helicopter model 407, serial number 53481. The helicopter was configured to transport personnel to/from off-shore platforms. The FAA type certificate required one flight crew member (pilot) and permitted operations under day or night visual flight rules (VFR). Although the cockpit was equipped with flight attitude instrumentation and avionics, the accident helicopter was not certified for flight under IFR. The helicopter was powered by a Rolls-Royce model 250-C47B turboshaft engine, serial number CAE-847752, with maximum takeoff and maximum continuous power ratings of 650 and 600 shaft horsepower, respectively.

The helicopter was issued a normal category standard airworthiness certificate in June 2001. The helicopter was maintained under an approved aircraft inspection program. The most recent inspection, a routine phase inspection, was completed on October 4, 2012, at 11,465.5 hours total airframe time. The engine had accumulated 7,530.7 hours total time. A review of the available maintenance records did not reveal a history of outstanding maintenance discrepancies.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The closest weather observing station to the accident site was located at the Abbeville Chris Crusta Memorial Airport (IYA), about 13.6 miles north-northeast of the departure airstrip. At 0755, the IYA automated surface observing system reported: calm wind, visibility 1/4 mile with fog, an overcast ceiling 200 feet above ground level, temperature 20 degrees Celsius, dew point 20 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 30.14 inches of mercury.

A witness to the accident flight, who also was a pilot employed by the operator, reported that on the morning of the accident, before sunrise, instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at 2LA0 with a low cloud ceiling and ground fog. He reported that after sunrise, the weather conditions improved for a brief time, which allowed two helicopters to depart the airport under VFR conditions; however, shortly following the two departures, instrument meteorological conditions resumed at the airport. The witness reported that when the accident helicopter departed there was a low cloud ceiling, with mist and fog.

According to documentation provided by the operator, at 0634, the base manager issued a weather alert for ground fog and a zero surface visibility at 2LA0, and as such, all VFR helicopter operations were placed on a ground-hold. At 0713, the base manager upgraded the weather conditions to scattered ground fog. The improved weather conditions allowed VFR helicopter operations to proceed under "caution" without a requirement to consult the base manager. At 0722, a Bell model 407 (N687AL), departed 2LA0 under VFR conditions and the pilot issued a pilot report (PIREP) for scattered ground fog, but clear weather conditions above the fog layer. Following the accident, at 0802, the base manager issued a weather alert for ground fog and reinstated the requirement that pilots consult with him before a planned VFR departure. At 0827, the base manager issued a weather alert for ground fog and a zero surface visibility. All helicopter operations were ceased following the 0827 weather alert.

Another operator based at 2LA0 reported that one of their helicopters had departed about 16 minutes before the time of the accident. The pilot of that helicopter reported that during departure he was able to see down the entire length of the airstrip (3,100 feet by 75 feet). However, after climbing above the surrounding tree line he observed ground fog, approximately 75-100 feet thick, immediately adjacent to the east side of the airbase near the Bristow facility. He reported that as he continued toward his planned destination, toward the west, there were no visibility restrictions.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The Central Industries Airport (2LA0) was located about 1 mile north of Intracoastal City, Louisiana, and was used primarily for off-shore helicopter operations. The private-use airport was served by a single runway: 6/24 (3,100 feet by 75 feet, grass/turf). The airport elevation was 2 feet msl.

FLIGHT RECORDERS

The helicopter was equipped with an Appareo Flight Data Monitoring (FDM) system, which included a crash-hardened self-contained flight parameter data recorder. The FDM system consisted of a detached SD memory card storage unit, an internal GPS receiver, and an internal attitude reference unit. The system generated a new data file for each power-up cycle and could store approximately 200 hours of accumulated flight data. The recorded data was used by the operator for their Flight Operations Quality Assurance (FOQA) program. The system recorded 3-axis accelerometer data in addition to GPS positional data. The system, as configured on the accident helicopter, did not record indicated airspeed or any engine parameters. The system was designed to record data on two devices; a data collection device with non-removable memory and a separate removable SD memory card device that was used for normal data retrieval.

The recovered SD memory card contained records from the accident flight and the previous 98 power cycles. The accident flight data file was approximately 6 minutes in duration; however, there was only about 2 minutes of data associated with significant movement of the helicopter over the ground. The data for the accident flight began at 0752:43 (HHMM:SS). The helicopter maneuvered in a low-altitude hover, at a nearly static location over the ground, until about 0756:50, when it began a hover taxi to the northeast. The helicopter turned northwest before it turned to a west-southwest course and began increasing altitude at 0757:55. The plotted position data established that the helicopter performed a takeoff using runway 24. About 20 seconds later, the helicopter reached a maximum altitude of 255 feet and ground speed of 51 knots while still on the departure runway heading. At this time the helicopter entered a left descending turn. During the descending turn, the helicopter reached a maximum bank angle of 38 degrees to the left and a 20 degree nose down pitch angle. The helicopter also achieved a 1,600 feet per minute descent during the turn. The final data point was recorded at 0758:30 with the helicopter at 37 feet altitude, rolled about 20 degrees to the left, and pitched 17 degrees nose down. The last recorded data point was located approximately 113 feet from the initial ground impact point and 255 feet from the final location of the main wreckage. As of the final recorded data point, the helicopter had turned about 200 degrees from the original runway heading. Download of the separate data collection device did not yield additional flight data beyond 0758:30.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

A postaccident investigation confirmed that all airframe structural components were located at the accident site. The initial point-of-impact was within a small grouping of trees located about 132 feet south-southwest of the main wreckage. At the initial point-of-impact, there were two small trees that exhibited limb and trunk damage about 20 feet above the ground. A third tree, located about 32 feet into the debris path, exhibited limb and trunk damage about 15 feet above the ground. The magnetic heading between the initial point-of-impact and the main wreckage was about 035 degrees. A depression that was attributed to the left toe skid appeared to be the first ground impact. The left float blow-down bottles were found within the initial ground impact depression. The remaining landing gear components were located between the initial ground impact depression and the main wreckage. The main wreckage consisted of the entire fuselage and tailboom. The fuselage was found resting on its right side against trees and overgrowth. Flight control continuity could not be established due to multiple separations; however, all observed separations were consistent with overstress fractures. All four hydraulic control servos moved freely when manipulated by hand. The transmission, mast, and main rotor hub assembly had separated from the fuselage transmission mounts as a single unit. The main rotor and tail rotor drive systems exhibited impact damage and overstress separations. The main rotor blades remained attached to the hub; however, each blade exhibited bending and delamination consistent with ground impact. The tailboom had separated at the fuselage attach point and exhibited a second fracture immediately forward of the tail rotor gearbox. The tailrotor gear box output shaft rotated freely when moved by hand. One tail rotor blade was found fractured about midspan and the other blade appeared relatively undamaged. The airframe examination did not reveal any evidence of a preimpact failure or malfunction of the helicopter structure, drive train, flight controls, hydraulic system, and main and tail rotor systems that would have precluded normal operation. All observed airframe fractures were consistent with overload forces that were encountered during the impact sequence.

The engine remained attached to the fuselage by oil supply lines. The engine was found in a vertical position with the compressor section partially buried in dirt and mud. The N1 drive train did not rotate freely because of impacted dirt and vegetation found within the compressor inlet. After the debris was removed, the N1 drive train rotated freely between the starter generator and the compressor. Inspection of the compressor impeller revealed several blade tips that were bent in the opposite direction of rotation. The N2 drive train rotated freely between the No. 4 power turbine wheel and the power takeoff gear. About 1-tablespoon of fuel was collected from the supply line connected to the fuel nozzle. The fuel nozzle appeared undamaged. Other than the presence of dirt and debris, the combustion liner appeared undamaged and normal burn signatures were observed. Examination of the upper and lower magnetic chip detectors established that they were oil-covered and free of foreign material. The engine and its electronic control unit (ECU) were retained for additional examinations.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

On October 8, 2012, an autopsy was performed on the pilot at the Louisiana Forensic Center, located in Youngsville, Louisiana. The cause of death for the pilot was attributed to multiple blunt-force injuries sustained during the accident.

The FAA's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology tests on samples obtained during the pilot's autopsy. Carbon monoxide, cyanide, and ethanol were not detected. Pioglitazone and Rosuvastatin were detected in blood and liver samples. Pioglitazone, brand name Actos, is a prescription oral antidiabetic agent used in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Rosuvastatin, brand name Crestor, is a prescription medication used to treat elevated cholesterol.

According to FAA medical documentation, dating back to May 1980, the pilot never disclosed having been diagnosed with diabetes or elevated blood cholesterol levels. Additionally, the pilot did not report the use of any prescription or non-prescription medication on his most recent medical certificate application.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

On November 14, 2012, the engine electronic control unit (ECU) was examined at the Triumph Engine Control Systems factory located in West Hartford, Connecticut. An analysis of the nonvolatile data recovered from the ECU revealed that there were no malfunctions in the full authority digital engine control (FADEC) at the time of the accident. There were no unexpected records recorded in the engine history data. Additionally, no incident recorder information was stored on the device, indicating that no event triggers had been detected during the accident flight. The manufacturer attributed the lack of recorded faults during the accident flight to a sudden loss of FADEC system power at the time of impact.

On February 19, 2013, an engine teardown inspection was completed at the Rolls-Royce factory located in Indianapolis, Indiana. The teardown inspection revealed damage to the compressor impeller blades, scoring of the aft impeller face, scoring of impeller inducer shroud, and scoring within the blade tracks of the gas producer and power turbine wheels. The observed damage was consistent with engine operation at the time of impact. Additionally, there was ingested dirt found throughout the engine air flow path. The engine teardown inspection did not reveal any mechanical anomalies that could be associated with a preexisting condition or failure that would have precluded normal engine operation.

 http://registry.faa.gov/N406AL 

NTSB Identification: CEN13FA003 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 05, 2012 in Intracoastal City, LA
Aircraft: Bell 407, registration: N406AL
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 5, 2012, about 0758 central daylight time, a Bell 407 helicopter, N406AL, was substantially damaged when it collided with terrain shortly after takeoff from Central Industries Airport (2LA0), near Intracoastal City, Louisiana. The commercial pilot, who was the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The helicopter was registered to and operated by Bristow US LLC, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 while on a company flight plan. Day instrument meteorological conditions prevailed for the post-maintenance flight that was originating at the time of the accident.

According to the operator, the pilot was performing the post-maintenance flight to identify if there was any residual oil left behind during a routine phase check that had been completed the previous evening. At 0756, the pilot sent an electronic message to the company’s flight-following center located in New Iberia, Louisiana, to activate his local flight plan. He reported having 1 hour of fuel on-board. Several witnesses reported seeing the helicopter startup and enter a low altitude hover over the landing pad before it hover-taxied toward runway 24. One witness reported that she saw the helicopter depart on the runway heading and disappear into fog or a low cloud ceiling. Several witnesses reported hearing a sound consistent with a ground impact shortly after the helicopter had departed toward the southwest.

Another operator based at 2LA0 reported that one of their helicopters had departed about 16 minutes before the time of the accident. The pilot of that helicopter reported that during departure he was able to see down the entire length of the airstrip (3,100 feet by 75 feet). However, after climbing above the surrounding tree line he observed ground fog, approximately 75-100 feet thick, immediately adjacent to the east side of the airbase near the Bristow facility. He reported that as he continued toward his planned destination, toward the west, there were no visibility restrictions.

The closest weather observing station was located at the Abbeville Chris Crusta Memorial Airport (KIYA), about 13.6 miles north-northeast of the departure airstrip. At 0755, the KIYA automated surface observing system reported the following weather conditions: calm wind, visibility 1/4 mile with fog, overcast ceiling 200 feet above ground level, temperature 20 degrees Celsius, dew point 20 degrees Celsius, altimeter setting 30.14 inches of mercury.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 406AL        Make/Model: B407      Description: Bell 407
  Date: 10/05/2012     Time: 1330

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: ABBEVILLE   State: LA   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES. ABBEVILLE, LA

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                 # Crew:   0     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: BATON ROUGE, LA  (SW03)               Entry date: 10/09/2012 



 
With a thick fog, the helicopter crashed just behind these trees. 


INTRACOASTAL CITY - The pilot of a Bristow Bell 407 helicopter was pronounced dead Friday morning after the helicopter he was flying crashed not far from the Bristow Heliport (the old Air Logistics Heliport) in Intracoastal City Friday at 8:30 a.m. 
 
Bristow released a statement: “We are deeply saddened to report that the pilot was fatally injured and are in the process of notifying next of kin.”

The name of the pilot, who is from Texas, was not released by the Bristow Group out of Houston until his family has been contacted.

Witnesses near the heliport thought fog may have played a big part in the helicopter crashing; however, nothing official has been released by the Vermilion Parish Sheriff’s Office.

The crash occurred in a field less than 200 yards from the heliport. It was not determined if the helicopter was leaving the heliport or on his way back to the heliport. Officials from Bristow did not want to release any information until an investigation is completed.

The crash occurred across the street from Maxi Pierce Grocery Store.



A test flight in Intracoastal City claims the life of a Texas helicopter pilot.

That's when the Vermilion Parish Sheriffs Office was notified the helicopter had crashed.

Bristow Group Incorporated is a Houston based company that specializes in helicopter services for offshore businesses.

One of Bristow's Bell 407 helicopters took off from the Chevron heliport near Intracoastal City...but the chopper made it only a quarter mile away from the heliport before crashing.

The pilot, Carl Amos of Corpus Christi, was said to have been on a test flight.
 

Bristow is currently cooperating with authorities in the investigation.

Piper PA-28RT-201 Arrow III, N4184M and Piper PA-28-161 Warrior II, N8115Q: Accident occurred October 05, 2012 in Chandler, Arizona

http://registry.faa.gov/N8115Q

NTSB Identification: WPR13LA004A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 05, 2012 in Chandler, AZ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/30/2013
Aircraft: PIPER PA-28-161, registration: N8115Q
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

NTSB Identification: WPR13LA004B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 05, 2012 in Chandler, AZ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/30/2013
Aircraft: PIPER PA-28R-201, registration: N4184M
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


During instructional flights with a flight instructor and a student pilot on board each airplane, a Piper Warrior and a Piper Arrow collided in midair during day visual meteorological conditions. The instructors reported that their students were simulating instrument conditions and were wearing view-limiting devices as they practiced instrument maneuvers. Both flight instructors reported that they saw the other airplane only moments before the collision and were not aware of other aircraft in the area.


Neither airplane was using flight following services nor did they have any radar guidance during the flight. A review of recorded radar data for the area depicted two targets on a southwesterly heading, one ahead of the other. The targets were spaced about 2 miles apart and both were at 4,000 feet mean sea level. The rear target, the Arrow, changed its southwesterly heading to a westerly heading, and shortly after, the target identified as the Warrior started a wide right turn. Both airplanes were flying toward each other when the Warrior’s right wing and the Arrow’s left wing collided.


After the collision, both airplanes subsequently made uneventful landings.


The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The failure of both flight instructors to see and avoid the other airplane while providing instrument flight training, which resulted in a midair collision.

On October 5, 2012, about 1407 mountain standard time, a Piper PA-28-161, Warrior, N8115Q, and a Piper PA-28R-201, Arrow, N4184M, collided midair approximately 12 miles south of Chandler, Arizona. Both airplanes were being operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as local instructional flights. The Warrior was owned and operated by Chandler Air Service Inc., and the Arrow was owned by Aircraft Guaranty Corp., and operated by CAE Oxford Aviation Academy. Both airplanes had a certified flight instructor (CFI) and student pilot on board. No injuries were reported from either airplane. The Warrior departed Chandler Municipal Airport (CHD), Chandler, Arizona about 1335. The Arrow departed Falcon Field Airport (FFZ), Mesa, Arizona about 1230. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for either airplane.


According to the flight instructor of the Arrow, he and the student pilot had just completed a non-directional beacon (NDB) interception exercise with the student wearing a view limiting devise. Shortly after, the flight instructor noticed a very close, fast-moving blurred object approaching from almost directly ahead. The object seemed to be in a left turn and was lower than his airplane. After the impact, the airplane yawed left and wing down. The flight instructor took control and stabilized the airplane.


The flight instructor of the Warrior reported that he had given his student pilot a simulated instrument clearance. The student was wearing a view limiting device. The flight instructor then saw an airplane directly ahead and slightly higher in altitude. He further stated that the airplane appeared to be in a slight left turn. He took the controls and made an abrupt nose down left turn prior to impacting the other airplane.


After the midair collision, the Warrior landed at Gila River Memorial Airport (34AZ), in Chandler, Arizona, with substantial damage to the right wing. The Arrow landed on the Volkswagen Group of America test track in Maricopa, Arizona, with substantial damage to its left wing and horizontal stabilator.


The Warrior’s right wing separated about 3-1/2 feet from the wing tip along with an outboard section of the right aileron. The aileron balance weight was not found during the examination.


The Arrow’s left wing was damaged outboard and adjacent to the wing fuel tank. About 14 inches of the leading edge structure was crushed to the main spar, and a portion of the Warrior’s wing remained within the structure. The Warrior's right wing tip protruded from the top and the bottom of the Arrow’s wing. The leading edge of the left horizontal stabilizer sustained impact damage.


Recorded radar data from the FAA's Phoenix Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) ARTS IIIA radar system was obtained and reviewed. Neither airplane was on flight following or had any radar guidance during the accident flights. Between 1405:39 and 1406:20, two radar beacon targets proceeded on a southwesterly track, one ahead of the other, about 6 miles northeast of the University of Arizona Maricopa Ag Center Airport (3AZ2). The targets were spaced about 2 miles apart, and both indicated mode C reported altitudes of 4,000 feet mean sea level. At 1406:25 the rear target, the Arrow, changed to a westerly heading, and 40 seconds later the forward target, the Warrior, began a right turn into the path of the rear target. At 1407:06 both targets merged and then separated. One target, the Warrior, then departed to the northeast, and then changed heading to the north, disappearing near Gila River Memorial Airport (34AZ). The other target, the Arrow, departed to the southwest, and disappeared from radar 2 miles east of 3AZ2.


The Arrow was equipped with a Portable Collision Avoidance System (PCAS) unit capable of detecting and displaying range, bearing, and altitude information of transponder equipped aircraft in the vicinity of the unit. According to the flight instructor of the Arrow, the unit had alerted him twice during the flight but, did not alert him prior to the midair collision. The unit was sent to the National Transportation Safety Board Materials Laboratory for further examination. Its alert settings were set to a range of 3 nautical miles and a vertical range of 1,500 feet. The external speaker and headset interfaced audio tested properly, and no anomalies were noted with the unit. An examination report is contained in the public docket for this accident.


Neither pilot reported any preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.



NTSB Identification: WPR13LA004A 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 05, 2012 in Chandler, AZ
Aircraft: PIPER PA-28-161, registration: N8115Q
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

NTSB Identification: WPR13LA004B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 05, 2012 in Chandler, AZ
Aircraft: PIPER PA-28R-201, registration: N4184M
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 5, 2012, about 1415 mountain standard time, a Piper PA-28-161, Warrior, N8115Q, and a Piper PA-28R-201, Arrow, N4184M, collided midair approximately 12 miles south of Chandler, Arizona. Both airplanes were being operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as local instructional flights. Each airplane had a certified flight instructor (CFI) and student pilot. No injuries were reported from either airplane. The Warrior departed Chandler Municipal Airport (CHD), Chandler, Arizona about 1335. The Arrow departed Falcon Field Airport (FFZ), Mesa, Arizona about 1230. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight. No flight plan was filed for either airplane.

According to the CFI of the Arrow, he and the student pilot had just completed a non-directional beacon (NDB) interception exercise. Shortly after, the CFI noticed a very close, fast blurred object approaching from almost directly ahead. The object seemed to be in a left turn and was lower than his airplane.

The CFI of the Warrior reported that he had given his student pilot a simulated clearance. The CFI then saw an airplane directly ahead and slightly higher in altitude. He further stated that the airplane appeared to be in a slight left turn. He took the controls and made an abrupt nose down left turn prior to impacting the other airplane.

After the midair collision, the Warrior landed at the Gila River Memorial Airport in Chandler, Arizona, with substantial damage to the right wing. The Arrow landed on the test track at the Volkswagen Group of America in Maricopa, Arizona, with substantial damage to its left wing and horizontal stabilator.


 
 Two planes landed safely after a mid-air collision near Chandler. 














 A small, single-engine aircraft collided with another plane in midair Friday afternoon and was forced to make an emergency landing at the Volkswagen proving grounds east of Murphy Road, said Maricopa Fire Department spokesman Jon Sheaffer,

MFD was dispatched to the scene at 2:25 p.m.

The pilot and passenger on board one of the planes both refused medical transport, Sheaffer said. No information was available about the pilots or people in the second aircraft.

Ian Gregor, FAA communications manager for the Western-Pacific Region, said preliminary information indicates the pilot of a Piper Cherokee reported colliding in midair with another Cherokee around 2 p.m. approximately 12 miles southwest of Chandler Municipal Airport.

One plane landed safely at the Gila River Memorial Airport, and the other landed safely at a vehicle-test track, he said.

“Both aircraft reportedly sustained significant damage,” Gregor said.

The National Transportation Safety Board will be the lead investigative agency, working in conjunction with the FAA.

Neither the FAA nor NTSB releases the identities of people involved in crashes, Gregor said.

Sheaffer, of MFP, said a plane crash generally triggers the dispatch of two or three engines, at least one battalion, water tender and several trucks.

In this case, a ladder from Chandler Fire Department Station 289, a brush truck from Goodyear, another brush truck from San Tan Valley were dispatched in addition to the standard complement of equipment from the Maricopa Fire Department.

When the Maricopa Fire Department crews arrived on the scene, they canceled the other crews.


 
CHANDLER, Ariz. — Authorities say two small planes clipped each other in mid-air over Arizona, but the pilots managed to safely land both aircrafts and there are no reported injuries.

A Federal Aviation Administration spokesman says the pilot of a Piper PA28 landed safely at Gila River Memorial Airport after the collision around 2 p.m. Friday.

The FAA says the pilot identified the other aircraft as a Piper Cherokee and authorities reported that plane went down about 13 miles southeast of the Chandler Municipal Airport. But FAA spokesman Ian Gregor says the other aircraft landed safely at a vehicle test track.

Gregor says there were no reported injuries to anyone aboard either plane.

TV news footage showed one plane with part of its left wing sheared off.



CHANDLER, Ariz. (AP) -- Authorities say two small planes collided in mid-air over Arizona, but the pilots managed to safely land both aircrafts and there are no reported injuries. 

 A Federal Aviation Administration spokesman says the pilot of a Piper PA28 reported he landed safely at Gila River Memorial Airport after the collision around 2 p.m. Friday.

The FAA says the pilot identified the other aircraft as a Piper Cherokee and authorities reported that plane went down about 13 miles southeast of the Chandler Municipal Airport. But FAA spokesman Ian Gregor says the other aircraft landed safely at a vehicle test track.

Gregor says there were no reported injuries to anyone aboard either plane.

Details on how the mid-air crash occurred aren't immediately available and the names of the two pilots haven't been released.

Authorities believe plane wreckage decades old: Residents help with probe into airplane wreckage find

The Fremont County Sheriff's Office has continued its investigation into the discovery of an airplane's tail section Wednesday in the Willow Creek drainage area near Jeffrey City.

Sheriff's Capt. Ryan Lee said he has spoken about the tail section with former deputies who worked in the area in the 1960s.

"They, in turn, were able to make contact with some of the area's residents from that era," Lee said. "A former resident recalled a collision in that immediate area and that he actually assisted with the removal of three deceased victims from wreckage back in the early 1950s."

Other residents will be contacted Friday for insight into the incident.

Lee said he still is waiting for word from Federal Aviation Administration officials, who indicated that they would have to do a hand search in their archival records for information about the tail section, which will take some time.

"We just want to make a positive conclusion that what we are looking at has been reported and is not some wreckage from long ago that went overlooked," Lee said. "So far we have not seen anything on paper, however we are fairly confident that it is something that was known about and investigated about 60 years ago."

Lee said a Fremont County citizen made the initial discovery of the tail section Wednesday. The individual described the object as "rusted and maybe older," according to the sheriff's office dispatch log.

"The tail is of a small aircraft with a complete tail number attached," Lee said.

Source:  http://dailyranger.com


JEFFREY CITY — Wyoming authorities believe a portion of the wreckage of an airplane found Wednesday near Jeffrey City is decades old.

Fremont County Sheriff's Capt. Ryan Lee says a tail section may have come from a plane that crashed in the 1950s, but no further information is available.

Authorities are working with the Federal Aviation Administration to track down information about the wreckage.

Officers are also contacting residents in the area to see if they know what happened.

Beechcraft twin-engine: Patrick Swayze's widow Lisa finds romance again in Florida

A trained pilot, she has reportedly been flying her Beechcraft twin-engine plane into a local Florida airport for dates with her new man. 

Read more here: http://www.hellomagazine.com

Virgin Australia Boeing 737-800: Plane was 'never lost'

AIRSERVICES Australia has denied a Virgin Australia plane disappeared from radar while traveling over northern NSW and past the Gold Coast.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau is investigating an incident in which an aircraft's details were "inadvertently inhibited'' for more than 30 minutes during a flight from Sydney to Brisbane on Friday.

Some media reports suggest the jet was lost by air traffic controllers 
 

But an Airservices Australia spokesman said there was a change in the colour coding of the icon representing the plane but information such as altitude, direction and speed had still been displayed, The Australian reports.

The incident started as the plane flew over Evans Head, south of Byron Bay and lasted about 30 minutes as the jet made its way past the Gold Coast to Brisbane.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau notes there was a "loss of separation assurance''.


"It was reported that the aircraft's details were inadvertently inhibited in the air traffic management system for approximately 30 minutes,'' the ATSB website states.

Website Crikey said the incident saw the plane become an "invisible projectile'' in what was a dangerous incident.

But the Airservices Australia spokesman denied the claims.

"The aircraft was never lost to Airservices air traffic controllers and continued to be displayed on air traffic control displays managing the airspace,'' he said.

The plane landed safely.


Source:  http://www.goldcoast.com.au

Cirrus SR22 GTS G3 Turbo, Gandy Air LLC, N308PJ: Accident occurred October 03, 2012 in Gary, Indiana

NTSB Identification: CEN13FA002
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 03, 2012 in Gary, IN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/16/2014
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N308PJ
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was flying an RNAV/GPS approach when the accident occurred. The air traffic controller did not provide approach clearance to the accident airplane until it was inside the final approach fix (FAF) and 1,000 feet above the FAF crossing altitude. The controller also issued a late turn to intercept the approach course, and he did not issue a descent clearance because his attention was directed to resolving a separation conflict involving two other aircraft. According to data recorded by the airplane's primary flight display, the pilot disconnected the autopilot after receiving the approach clearance, and the airplane then began a rapid descent. About 40 seconds later, the airplane rolled left and tracked left of the approach course. The airplane's ground proximity warning alert activated, and the airplane subsequently rapidly reversed roll and pitch directions consistent with an attempt by the pilot to correct the airplane's hazardous flight path. The airplane continued to roll right and pitch to a nose-high attitude before rapidly transitioning to a nose-down attitude of more than 85 degrees. As the airplane descended below a 900-foot cloud layer, the pilot rolled the airplane to wings level and made a high g-force pullup until ground impact. Given the pilot's high workload due to deficient approach control services and possible distraction while operating in instrument meteorological conditions and the subsequent loss of airplane control, it is likely that the pilot experienced spatial disorientation.

Examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any preimpact failures or malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation. Toxicology testing indicated the pilot used cocaine, hydrocodone, and marijuana at some point in the recent past. However, the use of the cocaine and hydrocodone likely did not affect the pilot's performance at the time of the accident, and the effect of the marijuana use could not be determined from the available evidence.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's loss of control during an instrument approach due to spatial disorientation. Contributing to the accident were deficient approach control services and the pilot's loss of positional awareness.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On October 3, 2012, at 1116 central daylight time, a Cirrus SR22, N308PJ, operated by a commercial pilot, collided with terrain while flying an instrument approach at the Gary/Chicago International Airport (GYY), Gary, Indiana. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed from ground impact and postimpact fire. The flight was being operating under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed during the instrument approach portion of the flight and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the Smyrna Airport (MQY), Smyrna, Tennessee, at 0925.

According to voice recordings provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the pilot first contacted approach control about 35 miles southeast of GYY while in a descent to 4,000 feet mean sea level (msl). After receiving vectors and a further descent to 3,000 feet msl, N308PJ was cleared for the RNAV/GPS Y approach to runway 30 at GYY.

At the point of the first approach clearance by air traffic control (ATC), N380PJ was inside the final approach fix (FAF) and 1000 feet above the recommended FAF altitude. After no response was received from the pilot, ATC repeated the approach clearance to N308PJ. The pilot acknowledged this approach clearance, as well as a frequency change to the tower. No further radio transmissions were recorded on either approach or tower control frequencies.

After the pilot confirmed the approach clearance, radar returns indicated N308PJ in a descent and close to on course laterally. About 40 seconds after starting the descent, radar returns indicated N308PJ initiated a left, descending turn away from course centerline. The last recorded radar return indicated an altitude of 1,700 feet msl, about one mile southeast of runway 30 at GYY, almost overhead of the accident site.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 48, held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land, single-engine sea, and instrument ratings. On May 18, 2012, the pilot was issued a FAA Class 2 medical certificate, which required corrective lenses be worn. At the time of the medical examination, the pilot reported having 1,100 hours of total flight experience, with 50 hours in the last six months. The pilot reported 650 hours of flight experience in the make and model of the accident airplane on his application for aircraft insurance, dated December 5, 2011.

A certified flight instructor (CFI), who flew training flights with the accident pilot, stated that the pilot often struggled to maintain instrument flying proficiency due to an active lifestyle. He stated that the accident pilot was challenged with accomplishing routine instrument flying tasks, such as changing a radio control frequency while conducting an instrument approach.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane, a 2007 Cirrus SR-22, was registered to Gandy Air LLC. A standard airworthiness certificate was issued for the airplane on August 8, 2007. The airplane was equipped with a Continental IO-550-N46B engine. The last annual inspection was performed on the airplane on September 17, 2012, with a total aircraft time of 566.4 hours.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The weather observation station at GYY reported the following conditions at 1140: wind variable at 6 knots, visibility 5 miles, ceiling 900 feet overcast, temperature 17 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 13 degrees C, and altimeter 29.97 inches of mercury.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

A circuit card from the airplane's primary flight display (PFD) and an autopilot unit were recovered from the accident airplane and forwarded to the National Transportation Safety Board's Vehicle Recorder Laboratory for evaluation. The autopilot unit was destroyed by fire and flight data was not recovered. Two flash memory devices were removed from the damaged PFD and read using a memory chip reading device.

The following summary utilized data from the PFD: The airplane departed MQY and climbed to a final cruise altitude of 10,000 feet msl. The GPS steering autopilot mode was used for lateral navigation during the cruise portion of the flight. At 1053 the airplane began a descent, leveling briefly at 8,000 feet msl, 4,000 feet msl, and 3000 feet msl. At 4,000 feet msl, the GPS steering mode deactivated and heading hold mode activated. At 1109, the next waypoint parameter switched from "KGYY" to "WASTU", which was the FAF. Autopilot vertical speed mode was used to descend from 4,000 feet msl to 3,000 feet msl.

The autopilot altitude hold mode was used to maintain 3,000 feet msl. At 1114:07, the autopilot switched from heading hold to approach mode. At 1114:32, the next waypoint parameter switched from "WASTU" to "RONOY", an intermediate stepdown fix on final (ATC transmitted the second approach clearance to N308PJ at 1115:09).

At 1115:25, inside the FAF and still at 3,000 feet msl, the autopilot disconnected. During two periods immediately prior to the disengagement of the autopilot a "TRIMMING" indication was sent by the autopilot. This indication is present when the autopilot has run the pitch trim for a period in excess of four seconds, which is consistent with pushing or pulling on the yoke while the autopilot is still connected.

After the autopilot disconnected, the airplane began a descent that reached 5,000 feet per minute. During this descent, the airplane rolled 37 degrees left and pitched down to 14 degrees nose low. At 1115:50, the airplane reversed both roll and pitch directions, commencing a roll to the right and a pitch up.

The altitude and vertical speed profile at which the roll and pitch reversed corresponded to the activation criteria for the enhanced ground proximity warning system (GPWS), which triggers aural voice and visual annunciator warnings. Initially, the voice alert "Sink Rate" is triggered and a yellow caution alert annunciator lamp illuminates. The pilot guide for the enhanced GPWS installed in the accident airplane is located in the NTSB public docket.

After reversing pitch and roll direction, the airplane continued rolling right and pitched up to a 15-degree nose up attitude. The airplane continued rolling right and transitioned to a nose down pitch of more than 85 degrees nose low and 170 degrees of right roll. As the airplane descended below 900 feet above ground level, a rapid roll to wings level and pitch up occurred. Centrifugal forces during the pitch up were recorded in excess of 4.5 Gs. The last data record was 48 degrees nose down, with a descent rate of about 7,000 feet per minute.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site was located in a wooded area about one mile from the approach end centerline of runway 30 at GYY. The wreckage debris was scattered from the initial impact crater outward on a 164-degree heading. The debris field extended about 100 feet from the impact crater and was about 65 feet wide at its widest point. To the north of the impact crater, trees displayed freshly broken and cut tree limbs. The angle at which the broken and cut tree limbs made with respect to each other and the impact crater was measured as a 52-degree descent.

The airplane was fragmented and mostly consumed by fire. The aileron control cable was fractured on both sides of the console aileron actuation pulley and the right hand aileron actuation pulley. All three turnbuckles were present with safety clips installed. Elevator and rudder control cable continuity was confirmed.

The Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS) parachute was located about 60 feet from the impact crater. The parachute remained partially packed in the deployment bag (D-bag) and exhibited thermal damage. The rocket motor was hanging in some small trees, still attached to the pickup collar, lanyards, and incremental bridle. The motor was determined to be expended. The incremental bridle remained in the sheath and had not "unzipped."

The D-bag straps were attached to the incremental bridle. The ends of the D-bag straps exhibited thermal damage where they separated from the bag. A portion of the suspension lines were hanging in the tree branches and exhibited thermal damage at both ends. The lines were hanging in a straight line between the parachute and the impact crater. Portions of thermally damaged risers were also present in the trees between the impact crater and the parachute.

The flight station bulkhead was located about 28 feet forward of the impact crater. The launch tube, base, and igniter assembly were present. Approximately two feet of the activation cable extended from the igniter assembly. The activation handle was out of the handle holder and approximately 93 inches of activation cable remained attached to the activation handle. The plastic sheath for the activation cable was not present, consistent with the thermal damage to the surrounding components. The safety pin for the activation handle was not observed.

The aluminum cross beam that bolts across the opening to the CAPS enclosure was bowed forward. The reefing line cutters were not observed. The CAPS enclosure cover was located 55 feet from the impact crater and exhibited impact and fire damage. Evidence at the accident site was consistent CAPS deployment due to ground impact forces.

The engine was examined off the accident site. A borescope inspection was conducted on all six engine cylinders. None of the cylinders, cylinder barrels, pistons, or valves displayed any sign of operational distress. The induction system, exhaust system, magnetos, oil sump, and fuel pump were examined, with no pre-impact anomalies noted. The ignition system was destroyed during the accident sequence and ensuring fire.

Examination of the airframe, engine and propeller did not reveal any anomalies associated with a pre-impact failure or malfunction.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

On October 5, 2012, an autopsy was performed on the pilot by the Lake County Coroner. The cause of death was blunt force injuries. Toxicology testing of vitreous as part of the autopsy indicated past use of cocaine and hydrocodone. The FAA's Civil Aeromedical Institute in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology tests on the pilot, which was limited by the lack of available blood or urine. No ethanol was detected in the muscle or liver. Trace amounts of tetrahydrocannabinol (marijuana) was found in lung and its metabolite tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid was detected in the lung and liver.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The air traffic controller stated that while vectoring N308PJ toward the final approach at GYY, he observed two aircraft east of GYY that were "becoming a conflict". A conflict alert (CA) alarm sounded and was displayed on his radar screen, which drew his attention away from N308PJ. After resolving the conflict, the controller stated that he was still a little flustered as he returned to provide approach service to N308PJ. He stated that if not for the loss of separation conflict, he felt he would have given better approach services to N308PJ.


NTSB Identification: CEN13FA002 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 03, 2012 in Gary, IN
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N308PJ
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 3, 2012, at 1120 central daylight time, a Cirrus SR22, N308PJ, operated by a commercial pilot collided with terrain while flying an instrument approach at the Gary/Chicago International Airport (KGYY), Gary, Indiana. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage from impact and postimpact fire. The flight was being operating under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the Smyrna Airport (KMQY), Smyrna, Tennessee, at 0925.

The pilot requested and was cleared for the RNAV(GPS)Y RWY 30 instrument approach into KGYY. The pilot was issued vectors for the approach and was subsequently cleared for the approach by the Chicago TRACON. The pilot was subsequently issued a frequency change and instructed to contact the KGYY air traffic control tower. The pilot did not check in on the tower frequency. The airplane impacted trees and the terrain approximately 1 mile southeast of KGYY.

Weather conditions recorded at KGYY at 1140 were: wind variable at 6 knots, visibility 5 miles, ceiling 900 feet overcast, temperature 17 degrees Celsius, dew point 13 degrees Celsius, and altimeter 29.97 inches of mercury. 



Patsy John Crisafi 
Obituary


Patsy John Crisafi, 48, of St. Augustine, Fla., formerly of Connellsville, died Wednesday Oct. 3, 2012 in Lake County, Ind. He was born Jan. 11, 1964 in Allegheny County, Pa., a son of the late Patsy and Catherine "Kitty" Valvassori Crisafi. Patsy was a loving son, brother, uncle and friend.

Patsy was successful businessman and entrepreneur. Following a successful 18-year career with CSX Transportation, which included positions in Connellsville, Pa., Atlanta, Ga. and Jacksonville, Fla., he left to pursue other business interests in the railroad industry. Patsy served as executive vice president of Utilco Co., in Tifton, Ga. He was the co-founder, principal and executive vice president of Roadway Worker Training, Inc. (RWT), a successful railroad industry consulting, training and support company.

Among his other business interests were; Railroad Protective Services, Inc. (RPS), founder and president, C&C RWT, LLC, co-founder and partner, Crisafi-Maloy Development, Inc., Crisafi Services, Inc., National Pike Properties, LLC, VHMC, LLC and Gandy Air, LLC. Patsy was a commercially rated pilot. His special railroad expertise was railroad operating rules, safety and technical training and the development and implementation of railroad safety policies.

Patsy was a long-time member of St. Rita"s Roman Catholic Church, Elks Lodge, the NRC and AREMA. Patsy was a long-term sponsor and active supporter of Big Brothers and Sisters of St. Augustine, Fla. He was a member of the hunting group, Sugar Bottom in Montgomery, Ala., and a willing and generous contributor to many veterans and children"s causes. Patsy loved and lived for his family and legions of friends. Among his many joys were his dogs, airplanes, motorcycles, hunting, cars, flying and off shore fishing, diving, boating, cooking, entertaining and his passion for his work. Patsy graduated from Connellsville High School in 1981.

He is survived, loved and sadly missed by his sister, Lisa Crisafi Nudo and her husband Ken, and nephew, Devin Nudo, all of Connellsville, Pa.; his fiancŽe, Jackie Carter of St. Augustine, Fla.; and her son, Adam of Millwood, Ga.

Friends will be received from 7-9 p.m. Wednesday and 2-4;7-9 p.m. Thursday in the Brooks Funeral Home, Inc., 111 E. Green St., Connellsville, Pa., where a Blessing Service will be held Friday at 9:30 a.m. followed by a Funeral Mass at 10 a.m. in St. Rita"s R.C. Church, Connellsville. with the Rev. Robert Lubic as celebrant. Interment will follow in St. Rita"s Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers the family suggests memorial contributions be made to St. Rita"s Cemetery Care Fund, the ASPCA, Humane Society or the Big Brothers of America in memory of Patsy John Crisafi.

To sign the guest registry, please visit www.brooksfuneralhomes.com

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VINCENT "VINNIE" VACCARELLO 
Obituary 

 VACCARELLO
VINCENT "VINNIE"


45, of St. Johns, FL, was delivered to God in Heaven along with his dear friend, Patsy Crisafi, on October 3, 2012. Vinnie was a native of Pittsburgh, PA, and a die-hard Steeler fan! He was a graduate of Chartiers Valley High School and Duquesne University. He obtained a Masters degree in business at Jacksonville University. He was an appointed member of the NRC Board of Directors. Vinnie was a very successful entrepreneur and co-owner of All Rail Road Service of Jacksonville, FL. He was the all-time leading tackler (440) and a Hall of Fame member of the Duquesne Dukes football program. Larger than any personal accomplishments was Vinnie's HEART and the LOVE and GENEROSITY he gave to ALL. Our beloved Vinnie is survived by his wife, April; and two sons, Victor and Anthony; mother and father, Mary and John Vaccarello; brothers, John and Eric and their families; mother and father-in-law, Carol and Gene Piscopo; brother and sister-in-law and their families; dear friend and business partner, Mike Heridia; many loving aunts, uncles, cousins and friends. 


Mass will be held on October 20, 2012 at Saint Simon & Jude Church, 1551 Greentree Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15220 at 11:00 a.m. Following church services, all friends and family are invited to the "Celebration of Vinnie's Life" to be held at Hilton Garden Inn - Southpointe, 1000 Corporate Drive, Canonsburg, PA 15317 from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

 In lieu of flowers, donations are being accepted at San Juan Del Rio's "Building Fund", 1718 State Route 13, Saint Johns, FL 32259.

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Photo Courtesy of Roadway Worker Training Inc. 
Plane piloted by Crisafi (right) crashed Oct. 3, killing him and construction business associate Vaccarello in Gary, Ind.

Two rail construction Execs die in private plane crash 

 (Indiana) -- Two veteran rail construction executives based in Florida died Oct. 3 when the private plane they jointly owned and was being piloted by one of them crashed near the Gary, Ind., airport. Killed were Patsy J. "PJ" Crisafi, 45, co-founder and executive vice president of Roadway Worker Training Inc., St. Augustine, Fla., and Vincent “Vinnie” Vaccarello, 48, co-founder and co-president of All Railroad Services Corp., also based there. Crisafi was believed to have been the pilot.  According to Baker, Crisafi’s funeral is set for Oct. 12 in Connellsville, Pa. Services for Vaccarello are set for Oct. 13 in St. Johns, Fla. and a reception will be in Jacksonville. 

 The cause of the crash was under investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board, but witnesses reported either a small explosion or or some sort of engine failure on the plane while it was still in the air,” says Chuck Baker, president of the Washington, D.C.-based National Rail Construction and Maintenance Association, of which both were current board members.

The group’s members include rail and transit construction contractors, engineers and suppliers, says its website.

Crisafi’s firm specializes in railroad consulting, employee training and track safety and support; Vaccarello’s serves short line, transit, and Class 1 railroads, providing pole line removal, tree trimming, maintenance of vegetation at railroad crossings and numerous other services, according to the firms’ websites.

Crisafi was an 18-year management veteran of CSX Transportation, while Vaccarello is a former vice president of operations for Balfour Beatty Rail. Vaccarello's current firm has about 135 employees in the U.S., Canada and Mexico, according to the firm.

“Vinnie and Patsy were both well-known and respected in the industry,” says John August, executive vice president of RailWorks Corp., New York City. He says the executives, who often worked together and co-owned the Cirrus SR-22 aircraft, were en route to the Chicago area for a meeting with Canadian National Railroad engineering officials.

Both of the firms had been subcontractors to RailWorks on past projects, says August.


 According to Baker, Crisafi’s funeral is set for Oct. 12 in Connellsville, Pa. Services for Vaccarello are set for Oct. 13 in St. Johns, Fla. and a reception will be in Jacksonville.

http://www.aggregateresearch.com

 
A smoky haze lingers in the trees as Lake County Coroner Merrilee Frey (second from left) arrives at the site where the Cirrus SR22 GTS G3 Turbo (N308PJ) crashed in a wooded area near 7th Avenue and Clark Street in Gary, Ind. Wednesday October 3, 2012. Officials said the plane originated in Smyrna, Tenn. and was bound for the Gary Jet Center. 


October 01, 2012 5:45 pm • By Susan Brown

 CROWN POINT | Newly named Lake County Coroner Merrilee Frey has wasted no time since her September 15 swearing-in, from revamping office protocol to replacing defective equipment to revising the budget methodology, she said Monday.

Frey and her top staff -- Chief Deputy David Pastrick and Administrative Officer Jessica Metros -- announced the host of changes, some immediate and some in the making, such as establishing closer ties with law enforcement to reduce costs.

Ten days in office, Frey has ordered the inventory of equipment and the immediate replacement of defective equipment, including autopsy carts, as identified by longtime staff.

In the last two weeks, the evidence room has been nearly emptied of stored personal belongings, now returned to families as a means of closure, she said.

Having lost two death investigators and a photographer to cutbacks, she found services to have been eroded, she said.

The remaining staff is limited and will be cross-trained to a defined standard of professionalism, she said.

Metros said she and Pastrick do not hold new positions, as rumored. Rather, they replace two individuals who were dismissed, she said.

A forensic nurse and working on her state certification as a coroner, Frey said a safe working environment will be provided to all employees. Employees are exposed to disease in both the transporting of the deceased and in the conducting of the autopsies, she said.

To minimize the cost of the new protocols, the office is partnering with the Lake County Health Department.

Frey also anticipates working closely with Lake County Prosecutor Bernard Carter and Sheriff John Buncich, both to work as a law enforcement team and to defray costs to taxpayers.

She has requested an audit by the State Board of Accounts to learn the situation of the office's accounts, she said.


Story and comments:  http://www.nwitimes.com


 The Lake County Coroner has identified the plane crash victims as Vincent Vaccarello and Patsy Crisafi, both of St. Augustine, according to a news release.   

The Associated Press -

The two men killed when a small airplane crashed into a wooded area about a mile short of Gary-Chicago International Airport in northwestern Indiana have been identified as being from St. Augustine, Fla.

Lake County coroner Merrilee Frey (fry) said in a news release she used dental records to identify the remains of Vincent Vaccarello and Patsy Crisafi. She didn't release any further information about the men.   A telephone message seeking further information was left Friday night by The Associated Press.
Aviation officials haven't yet released any information about what caused the crash. The single-engine plane was registered to Gandy AIR LLC in St. Augustine, Fla., according to the FAA. The plane last taken off from Smyrna, Tenn.
Previous version:
A St. Johns County businessman could be one of two men killed after a private plane his company owned crashed in Gary, Ind., on Wednesday.

The plane was registered to Gandy Air LLC of St. Augustine, but as of Thursday officials had not released the names of the two victims, pending notification of families.

Managing member of Gandy Air is Patsy J. Crisafi, according to business records. The company has an address on Ryan Road.

The Cirrus SR22 single-engine plane crashed into the woods behind West Gary Lighthouse Charter School around 11:18 a.m. on Wednesday and burst into flames.

The victims had not been identified as of Thursday, said Jessica Metros, administrative officer for the Lake County Coroner’s Office.

Ed Wuellner, executive director at the Northeast Florida Regional Airport in St. Johns County, confirmed that Crisafi has had a hangar at the airport since 2008, but he said he did not know Crisafi personally.

Crisafi is listed as the executive vice president for Roadway Worker Training of Jacksonville, president of Crisafi Services and director of Railroad Protective Services, according to business records.

Stephen Ramsey, who is listed as a business associate, declined to comment and would not confirm whether Crisafi was on the plane. Another person listed on the business records declined to comment.

The Cirrus SR22 left the Northeast Florida Regional Airport around 3 p.m. on Tuesday and was scheduled to arrive in Smyrna, Tenn., around 5:30 p.m., according to flight records.

Smyrna/Rutherford County Airport Director John Black said he didn’t know who owned the plane or who might have been onboard, according to the Associated Press. He said the plane arrived at the airport Tuesday night and departed Wednesday morning.

The plane was enroute from Smyrna to the Gary/Chicago International Airport when it crashed, according to the Gary Police Department.

Investigators have said the plane did not send a distress signal before crashing, according to First Coast News.

Lake County Coroner’s Office officials removed the bodies of two men from the wreckage around 5:35 p.m. Wednesday.

Delores Hinton, who lives nearby and saw the crash, said the plane “exploded in the air” over her house, according to the Associated Press. “I said, ‘What was that?’ The next thing I know, it was down,” she said.

Gary Police Department spokeswoman Cpl. Gabrielle King said there was not an update to the investigation as of Thursday evening.

Cause of the crash is under investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration.


http://staugustine.com