Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Aviation sector woes - Nigeria

The deregulation of the aviation industry in Nigeria about two decades ago saw a substantial increase in the number of private airliners. But in recent years, the industry is in retreat.  While generally, harsh business environment has contributed to the death of many airlines, we are worried that the situation has been aggravated in recent years. It is even more worrisome that despite the multi-billion naira Federal Government intervention in the sector, the situation seems to have deteriorated. As such, there is this incongruity of massive investment in exchange for greater woes in the aviation industry.

Recently, the Federal Government set up a multi-billion naira lifeline to aid the ailing aviation sector, and the impression from government officials was that the industry was headed for a rebound. Despite this intervention, nearly all the private airlines have packed up, leaving only about three (of the 18 that were granted licenses to operate in the country in the last 10 years) in operation.

The result is a throwback to the pre-deregulation era when travelling by air was such a tedious process, and also exploitative, as desperate passengers were compelled to bribe touts to gain access to the limited seats in the aircraft. With few airlines now running on major routes, Nigerians are suffering and the matter is made worse by the inefficiency of other means of transport.

Even more annoying is that many of the airlines which benefited from the Federal Government’s intervention fund seem to have diverted the money to other ventures. While the aviation ministry has accused some airline owners of such diversion, it has not taken any concrete steps to bring those involved to account. Intriguingly, many of those accused of the diversions have also denied ever receiving the funds, without the federal authorities shutting them up with provable facts of their receipt of the money. Some that received the fund, still closed shop.

Part of the fallout is the unprecedented increase in the number of private jets in the country. According to press reports, Nigeria is presently competing with China as the biggest market destination for private jets in the world. Indeed, a report in a national newspaper said that in 2007, there were a total of 20 private jets in Nigeria, which has now risen to 150. It also gave the average cost of a jet as 50 million dollars, which saw Nigerians spending about 225 million dollars on private jets between March 2010 and March 2011.

The result is that the wealthy that could influence positive changes in the industry have all migrated to owning private airlines, leaving the rest of Nigerians at the mercy of the uncertainty and inefficiency in the commercial airline sector.

The report also said that about 40,000 passengers daily suffer as a result of the inefficiency in the sector. Many Nigerians rue the decapitation of the Nigeria Airways, and the inability of the Federal Government to healthily regulate the private sector that took over the industry. Indeed, recently, one of the airlines that had issued tickets to passengers, simply closed shop, leaving their passengers stranded; without a word. A few of the airlines also died following their involvement in air disasters.

While the defunct Nigeria Airways remains a sad commentary on how a public corporation with high hopes can be ruined by indiscipline and corruption, the private airlines appear not to have fared any better. With road and railway transportation still a nightmare, Nigerian air travellers may have to brace up for more hardship in the near future.

http://www.osundefender.org

Story behind the Redlands Air Show

Eric Wroolie, former Redlands Air Show treasurer

I have had a number of people ask me recently, "When is the next Redlands Air Show?" The answer is, "Never." The air show committee was driven into bankruptcy and was dissolved.

This past weekend marked a sad anniversary. One year ago, the 2011 Redlands Air Show was canceled as a direct result of the actions of a number of city staff. The full story of what happened has never been told. After the cancellation, those within city government responsible for causing the cancellation engaged in a campaign of covering up their actions while smearing the all-volunteer members of the air show organizing committee. The Redlands Daily Facts dutifully published every statement made by city staff without fact-checking a word of it, while spiking a story by one of their own reporters that would have revealed the truth.

For those who attended the 2010 Redlands Air Show, you will remember an event that was quite spectacular in spite of a limited budget and staff. The air show committee had hoped to build upon the success of the 2010 air show to present an even better show for 2011, and annually thereafter, with the goal of rivaling Riverside's annual air show.

The sporadic shows conducted at the Redlands Municipal Airport over the past 20 years had always taken place with the full cooperation and support of the airport manager, the Quality of Life Department and the Redlands Police and Fire departments.

That all changed in 2011. Gone were Airport Manager Todd  Housely, Quality of Life Director Gary Van Dorst and Chief of Police Jim Bueermann. In their place the committee found bureaucrats who were at the very least indifferent and at the worst hostile toward the airport and the air show. The only one who enthusiastically supported the show, as he had always done, was Fire Chief Jeff Frazier.

Members of the air show committee met with new Quality of Life Director Alfredo Cardenas his first week on the job, explaining what we needed from his department. From April of 2011 until the cancellation, we had multiple contacts with Quality of Life staff, the Airport Advisory Board and representatives of the Redlands Police and Fire departments.

We repeatedly asked about fees (which we had never been asked to pay in the past) and were assured that there would be none. We obtained a permit to sell beer at the event, a permit that was signed off by the Quality of Life Department, the city manager's office, the Redlands Police Department and ultimately given the seal of approval by the Redlands City Council.

The first sign of trouble came less than two weeks before the show when Sgt. Ricky Smith of the Redlands Police Department put a hold on the processing of our permit application with the state Alcoholic Beverage Control office until we agreed to changes that were in direct contravention of the conditions that the City Council had approved.

Next, the participation of the Redlands Police Air Unit (Air 10) was withdrawn, followed shortly thereafter by the cancellation of the mock-pursuit and suspect take-down that had been part of previous shows. Then, less than 10 days before the show, the committee was presented with a bill for nearly $5,000 in city fees.

I want to make it clear that the air show committee never requested a waiver of those fees. We agreed to pay every penny, but since we hadn't budgeted for them, we asked to pay the fees out of the proceeds of the show. We negotiated a payment agreement in good faith with the Quality of Life staff, the Police Department and the city attorney, only to have City Manager N. Enrique Martinez renege on the agreement and demand full payment, in advance, or no air show. The committee had no choice but to cancel the show.

The reaction of city staff was immediate, and the cover-up went into full swing. Statements issued by Cardenas and Martinez were misleading at best, and in the case of a letter to the editor of the Daily Facts written by Martinez, were flat-out falsehoods bordering on libelous. Martinez linked the crash (it was not an accident) of an airplane in front of the Hangar 24 brewery to the air show when he knew for a fact that that plane and that pilot had absolutely nothing to do with the air show.

Perhaps the most egregious example came from Mayor Pete Aguilar. A member of the air show committee had been in contact with the mayor during the discussions about the fees and the potential that they could cause the cancellation of the air show. The mayor's response? "Bummer." At a City Council meeting subsequent to the cancellation, Mayor Aguilar made a big show of saying, "If only I'd known beforehand, I would have done something."

Keep all this in mind when you vote for candidates for Redlands City Council.

Eric Wroolie, former Redlands Air Show treasurer


Redlands


Story and comments:  http://www.redlandsdailyfacts.com

Now THAT'S formation flying! Squadron of RAF Typhoon jets skim across colourful fields in perfect symmetry

They can normally be seen as only a dot in the sky. But these dramatic photos give a completely new picture of the brave work of the Royal Air Force servicemen and women. These astonishing pictures, entered into the annual Royal Air Force Photographic competition, give a glimpse behind the scenes of the dangerous work carried out which makes up the normal day in the Force.

See photos:   http://www.dailymail.co.uk

Interjet hopes to build on Hispanic travelers

The Orange County-Mexico connection: A new airline serving John Wayne Airport will fly to and from Mexico's two largest cities. It's reaching out to the region's large Hispanic population as a first step in growing business.

Teresa Hernandez was a rarity among passengers on Interjet's first flight from Orange County to Mexico City last week. She already was familiar with the Mexican airline.

"I flew Interjet before," said the 43-year-old Long Beach resident. "I would go to Tijuana to fly."

Although Interjet is Mexico's second-largest airline, the carrier is virtually unknown in Southern California. Rather than launching a broad-based marketing campaign like that of AirTran – the other airline offering service to Mexico at John Wayne Airport – Interjet is focused on Hispanic consumers.

"Obviously our natural market for sales is to Hispanics," said Interjet CEO Jose Luis Garza.

More companies are recognizing the marketing potential in the Hispanic community, said Ruben Alvarez, a Santa Ana marketing expert and owner of the Stay Connected OC social network.

"It's a good strategy," he said. "There's a lot of money in the Hispanic community."

Much of that spending power is in Southern California. By the Census Bureau's count, 8.7 million Hispanics, most of Mexican heritage, live in the Southern California area that includes Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego counties.

HispanTelligence, a marketing research firm, placed U.S. Hispanic buying power at $870 billion in 2008 and projected it will jump to as much as $1.3 trillion by 2015. Total spending is likely much higher because the firm's estimates do not include undocumented immigrants.

Alvarez said Mexican companies are smart to take advantage of the ties that many local residents have to Mexico. "They can establish a foothold here because of the large number of Latin Americans who already know them," he said.

For a Mexican airline in particular, targeting Hispanics makes sense, said Felipe Korzenny, who used to own a Hispanic marketing firm in Santa Ana and now heads the Center for Hispanic Marketing Communications at Florida State University. Even if Hispanics are unfamiliar with Interjet, they generally will be open to flying a Mexican carrier, he said.

Korzenny said offering the service from John Wayne Airport also may prove to be beneficial.

"Driving to Orange County from the L.A. area is not that bad, and the Los Angeles airport is so complicated," he said. "(John Wayne's) parking is cheaper, it's not that hard to park and you have a smaller airport that is easy to navigate."

Tom Parsons of BestFares.com said Interjet was wise to start with only two daily flights to Mexico City and Guadalajara. They are Mexico's two largest cities with millions of potential customers who might want to travel to Southern California.

"Why do the whole world when you have enough of the world to take care of?" Parsons said.

Interjet, which fancies itself the Jet Blue of Mexico, expects to attract non-Hispanic travelers as word of mouth spreads about its low-cost service and amenities, such as allowing two checked bags up to 55 pounds each for free.

To promote its service at John Wayne Airport, Interjet advertised in Spanish-language newspapers and on Spanish-language television in Southern California and offered incentives to Hispanic travel agencies.

"If it gets (non-Hispanics), it will just be icing on the cake," Parsons said.
 

http://www.ocregister.com

Benefis to upgrade Mercy Flight system

Beginning early next year, Benefis Health System will upgrade its air ambulance services to improve medical transport capabilities for patients in Great Falls and northcentral Montana.

A twin-engine Cessna Citation Mustang medical jet will replace the twin-engine turboprop King Air B200 currently in use. It will be the first medical jet to be used in Montana and will be faster and more fuel efficient than the current jet.

The helicopter is the latest version of the Eurocopter EC135. The twin-engine helicopter will be able to transport two patients compared to the one-patient capability of the current helicopter. The new helicopter will have a greater range and operate at higher speeds, higher altitudes and higher temperatures.

Benefis expects the new medical jet to be in service shortly after the first of the year and the new helicopter several months after that.

http://www.greatfallstribune.com

Pilatus PC-12 NG Spectre: Texas police buy high-flying, high-tech spy plane

While the nation disputes if, when and where the government should use drones over U.S. soil, Texas state police are taking their surveillance efforts to the next level.

In a little-noticed July purchase, officials at the Texas Department of Public Safety inked a $7.4 million contract with the Swiss company Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. for a high-altitude spy plane. Unique technology affixed to the state’s new aircraft could raise the ire of civil libertarians and privacy advocates. Among its features is a $1 million array of surveillance cameras with high-resolution and thermal-imaging capabilities, and a $300,000 downlink system that enables the plane’s crew to send real-time surveillance images anywhere in the state, according to records obtained by the Center for Investigative Reporting through the Texas Public Information Act. The package will also come with four sets of night-vision goggles worth about $60,000, records show.

The latest fleet addition for Texas has a single engine instead of two, which saves on costs while still permitting a relatively large payload. The Pilatus cabin is also pressurized so it can fly at higher altitudes, up to 30,000 feet in the air.

Story and comments:  http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2012/10/spy-planes-domestic/

Woody Pusher, N10RY: Accident occurred October 16, 2012 in Cloverdale, Indiana

NTSB Identification: CEN13LA015
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, October 16, 2012 in Cloverdale, IN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/24/2014
Aircraft: YOUNG ROBERT HERMAN WOODY PUSHER, registration: N10RY
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

While in cruise flight, the amateur-built airplane’s engine experienced a total loss of power and the pilot executed a forced landing to a field. During the landing the airplane nosed over and the pilot was seriously injured. A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. The recorded temperature and dew point at the time of the accident were conducive for the formation of moderate carburetor icing at cruise power.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The total loss of engine power due to carburetor icing.

On October 16, 2012, about 1430 eastern daylight time, an amateur-built Young Woody Pusher, N10RY, sustained minor damage during a forced landing to a field following a loss of engine power near Cloverdale, Indiana. The pilot received serious injuries during the event. The aircraft was registered to and operated by an individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight originated from a private airstrip in Cloverdale, Indiana, about 1425.

The airplane was in cruise flight about 800 feet above ground level when the engine experienced a total loss of power. The pilot selected a field and performed a forced landing. During the landing, the tailwheel equipped airplane nosed over and came to rest on it's back. 

The airplane was an experimental amateur-built design that employed a single strut braced wing. The engine was mounted in a pusher configuration on the wing with the pilot station at the front of the fuselage. The engine used on the airplane was a Continental Motors C-85 engine.

A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

A weather reporting station located about 23 miles south of the accident site recorded the temperature and dew point about the time of the accident as 19 and 6 degrees Celsius, respectively. According to a carburetor icing probability chart the conditions were conducive for moderate carburetor icing at cruise power settings and serious carburetor icing at glide power settings.


http://registry.faa.gov/N10RY

NTSB Identification: CEN13LA015 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, October 16, 2012 in Cloverdale, IN
Aircraft: YOUNG ROBERT HERMAN WOODY PUSHER, registration: N10RY
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 16, 2012, about 1430 eastern daylight time, an amateur-built Young Woody Pusher, N10RY, sustained minor damage during a forced landing to a field following a loss of engine power near Cloverdale, Indiana. The pilot received serious injuries during the event. The aircraft was registered to and operated by an individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from a private airstrip in Cloverdale, Indiana, about 1425.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: N10RY        Make/Model: WOPU      Description: WOODY PUSHER

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: Minor     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: CLOVERDALE   State: IN   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  ENGINE FAILURE

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   1     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA


  FAA FSDO: INDIANAPOLIS, IN  (GL11)              Entry date: 10/17/2012  





 
A single-passenger small plane crashed after the pilot experience complete engine failure and was forced to land in an open field.




PUTNAMVILLE, Ind. (WTHI) - A 90-year-old airplane pilot survived an emergency landing crash but was injured, after his plane turned over onto its top.
Indiana State Police responded to a call of a plane crash near the 2400 block of East C.R. 1000 South in Cloverdale, Ind.

Preliminary investigation revealed the pilot, Vernon E. Bothwell Jr., 90, experienced complete engine failure on his 1986 fixed wing, single engine, model Woody Pusher, and was forced to make an emergency landing on an open field.

The 90-year-old Bothwell was able to make the landing; however, upon touchdown, the plane flipped and came to a stop on its top-side.

Bothwell was able to free himself from the wreck and was transported to the Putnam County Hospital for treatment of a possible ankle fracture and head laceration.

Troopers believe Bothwell is an experience pilot, dating back to World War II, and his injuries didn’t appear to be life threatening.

The Federal Aviation Administration will aid, and eventually take over the investigation to discover the cause of the engine failure.

The ISP crash investigation was completed by Senior Trooper DuJuan Presley-McFadden. Assisting were the Putnam County Sheriff’s Office, Putnam County EMS, Cloverdale Fire/Rescue, Cloverdale Police Department and the Federal Aviation Administration. 


Story, photos, comments:   http://www.wthitv.com

Piper PA28-140, N15037: Accident occurred October 12, 2012 in Allentown, Pennsylvania

NTSB Identification: ERA13LA025 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 12, 2012 in Allentown, PA
Aircraft: PIPER PA-28-140, registration: N15037
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On October 12, 2012, about 1835 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-140, N15037, operated by Ace Pilot Training Inc., was substantially damaged during a forced landing to a corn field, following a partial loss of engine power during initial climb from Lehigh Valley International Airport (ABE), Allentown, Pennsylvania. The certified flight instructor (CFI) and private pilot were not injured. The instructional flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned local flight.

The CFI stated that the airplane was fueled to 36 gallons prior to the flight. The engine start-up, taxi, and run-up were normal. While departing from runway 31, about 200 feet above ground level, the CFI noticed that the throttle lever did not appear to be completely forward. He and the private pilot pushed the throttle lever full forward with resistance, which was followed by engine sputtering. The CFI then applied carburetor heat; however, the engine continued to sputter. He then elected to land in a corn field. During the landing, the engine firewall and right aileron were damaged.

Examination of the airplane was planned following its recovery from the corn field.



Published on October 12, 2012 

Catasauqua, PA. - Around 18:48 hours, a resident in the area of Walnut Street and Cambridge Place reported a small aircraft crashed in the wooded area behind his home.

Lehigh County transmitted a "Plane Crash" followed by an alert 1 for an aircraft down in this area.

Catasauqua Chief 201 staged at Walnut and Cambridge while all apparatus staging was on Race Street at Willow Brook Road.

The Air Traffic Control Tower confirmed there was an aircraft down north of the airfield. Han-Le-Co Chief 3301 staged on Willow Brook Road as units started a search. By 19:10 hours, two people emerged from the corn field, the pilot and a passenger, uninjured.

Crews remained on scene searching for the aircraft that was lost in the high corn field.

Units on Scene: Lehigh County 2, 33, 42, 75, 62, 41, Allentown and Whitehall. Northampton County stations 45 and 46.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 15037        Make/Model: PA28      Description: PA-28 CHEROKEE
  Date: 10/12/2012     Time: 2235

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Minor

LOCATION
  City: ALLENTOWN   State: PA   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AFTER TAKEOFF THE AIRCRAFT HAD TO RETURN TO THE AIRPORT BUT WAS FORCED TO 
  LAND IN A FIELD. ALLENTOWN, PA

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   2     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Training      Phase: Take-off      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: ALLENTOWN, PA  (EA05)                 Entry date: 10/16/2012 

http://flightaware.com/live/flight/N15037

http://registry.faa.gov/N15037

Cessna 182P Skylane, N1264S: Aircraft struck a stump, became airborne and hit a fence- Maryville, Tennessee

IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: N1264S        Make/Model: C182      Description: 182, Skylane
  Date: 10/16/2012     Time: 1510

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: MARYVILLE   State: TN   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT STUCK A STUMP, BECAME AIRBORNE AND HIT A FENCE.

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   2     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: NASHVILLE, TN  (CE19)                 Entry date: 10/17/2012 

http://registry.faa.gov/N1264S

http://www.midwestflyer.com/?page_id=22

 
A small aircraft crashed at Smoky Mountain Speedway this morning. 
The passengers were unharmed.


Two passengers walked away apparently unharmed after a small airplane crashed at the Smoky Mountain Speedway at 809 Brick Mill Road this morning.

The single-engine Cessna 182 aircraft, registered to Nicholas P. Lyons of Centralia, Ill., was landing at the track when the incident occurred, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. 


The plane had two people on board, but, according to officials, they appeared to be unharmed and were not transported to the hospital. The FAA will investigate the crash.

Blount County Sheriff’s Office, Blount County Fire Department, and Greenback Volunteer Fire Department responded along with Rural/Metro Ambulance Service.


Story, photo and comments:  http://www.thedailytimes.com

Sonex, N198PC: Accident occurred October 16, 2012 in Crossville, Tennessee

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items  -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

National Transportation Safety Board  -  Aviation Accident Data Summary:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA13LA024
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, October 16, 2012 in Crossville, TN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/04/2013
Aircraft: CASHMER PHILIP M SONEX, registration: N198PC
Injuries: 2 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Three days before the accident, a witness heard the airplane’s engine stop while the airplane was taxiing for departure and then restart before the airplane departed uneventfully. On the morning of the accident flight, another witness heard the airplane attempting to depart from the accident airport. During the departure, the engine power reduced suddenly while the airplane was at an altitude of about 15 feet. The airplane then continued to fly at that altitude until reaching the midpoint of the runway, before the engine power again increased, and the airplane began an abrupt climb. Shortly thereafter, another witness reported seeing the airplane in a spin just before it impacted the ground beyond the departure end of the runway.

Postaccident examination of the airplane showed damage signatures consistent with the airplane being in a left-turning aerodynamic stall/spin at impact. Additionally, a witness report, the condition of the cockpit canopy, and the postaccident position of the pilot’s restraints suggested that the pilot was likely not wearing the restraints at impact. Examination of the engine revealed no evidence of any obvious mechanical deficiencies. A definitive determination of the engine’s operational state at impact could not be established based on available evidence; however, the manufacturer of the airplane kit advised pilots to discontinue a takeoff if there were any signs of abnormal engine operation and to investigate the cause before attempting another takeoff.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s failure to maintain control of the airplane, which resulted in a low-altitude aerodynamic stall/spin. Contributing to the accident was a loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined during postaccident examination and the pilot’s decision to depart with a known deficiency. Contributing to the pilot’s injuries was his failure to use the installed restraint system.


On October 16, 2012, about 0820 central daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Sonex, N198PC, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from Crossville Memorial Airport (CSV), Crossville, Tennessee. The certificated private pilot/owner and the passenger were seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which was presumed to be destined for Winter Haven’s Gilbert Airport (GIF), Winter Haven, Florida. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to personnel from a fixed based operator (FBO) located at Martin Campbell Field (1A3), Copperhill, Tennessee, the pilot and passenger arrived in the accident airplane at their facility on October 12. The pilot stated that they were enroute to a fly-in event at CSV, but had to divert to 1A3 due to deteriorating weather conditions. The following morning, the FBO personnel watched as the pilot taxied the airplane for departure and noted that as the airplane approached the runway, the engine “stopped.” The personnel listened as the pilot then re-started the engine, back-taxied down the runway, and departed without further incident.

On the morning of the accident flight, a pilot-rated witness observed as the accident airplane attempted to depart from runway 26 at CSV. The witness stated that he heard the airplane’s engine increase in power, and then heard a sudden reduction of power that caused him to turn his attention toward the airplane. He then observed the airplane about 1,000 feet from the approach end of the runway at an altitude of about 15 feet. The airplane continued to fly at that altitude until about the mid-field point, when the engine power again increased and the airplane “climbed abruptly,” before disappearing from view. The witness walked further out on the flight line in an attempt to regain sight of the airplane, but was advised by other individuals on the airport that the airplane had crashed near the departure end of runway 26, outside of the airport perimeter fence.

Another witness, who was driving on a road adjacent to the airport, observed the accident airplane in a tail-low attitude before it began to “spin around” about 2 or 3 times. The airplane then impacted the ground, and the witness stopped to contact local authorities and render assistance. Another witness who stopped to render assistance noted that the pilot had been partially ejected from the cockpit, and did not appear to have been wearing any restraints.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector examined the wreckage following the accident. According to the inspector, the airplane impacted terrain beyond the departure end of the runway, in a ravine. The left and right wing roots displayed compression buckling at their aft and forward fuselage connection points, respectively. The outboard leading edge of the left wing leading edge displayed aft crush damage. The propeller was fragmented consistent with ground contact. The fuselage remained intact, with the majority of the damage concentrated within the area of the engine and firewall. A hole approximately 12 inches in diameter was broken through top of the overhead cockpit canopy. The left side of the left seat restraint was found tucked inside a side wall pocket.

Continuity of the engine valvetrain and powertrain were confirmed, and rotation of the engine utilizing the starter showed no binding or other faults. Operation of the ignition system to the bottom spark plugs was confirmed, though operation of the top spark plugs could not be confirmed as the required engine speed could not be attained. The spark plugs appeared to be in new condition. Examination of the fuel system showed that fuel was available to the engine, with no anomalies noted.

An electronic flight instrument system was recovered from the airplane and forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory for further examination. Power was applied to the intact unit; however, no data were present as the data recording feature had not been enabled.

A review of maintenance records revealed that the pilot was also the builder of the experimental amateur-built, kit airplane, which was completed in June 2011. Between that time and October 4, 2012, when the most recent airframe log entry was made, the airplane had accumulated 60 hours of flight time. The airplane’s most recent condition inspection was completed by the pilot in June 2012, at 59 total flight hours.

Airman records retained by the FAA showed that the pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single engine land, as well as a repairman experimental aircraft builder certificate for the accident airplane. The pilot’s most recent third-class medical certificate was issued in August 2011, and at that time the pilot reported 525 total hours of flight experience. No further records of the pilot’s flight experience were available for review; however, all of the flight hours recorded in the airframe maintenance log were recorded by the pilot.

Crossville Memorial Airport was comprised of a single asphalt runway oriented in an 8/26 configuration. The runway was 5,418 feet long by 100 feet wide. The weather conditions reported at CSV, at 0853, included clear skies, calm winds, temperature 11 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 8 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.04 inches of mercury. Consultation of a carburetor icing probability chart published by the FAA showed that the possibility of serious icing at cruise power settings, and also fell within the range specified for icing in pressure-type carburetors.

According to the kit manufacturer’s flight manual, takeoff procedure, “It is important to check full-throttle engine operations early in the take-off run. If there are any signs of rough engine operation or sluggish engine acceleration, discontinue the take-off. Investigate the cause of the poor engine operation before attempting another take-off.”


 NTSB Identification: ERA13LA024 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, October 16, 2012 in Crossville, TN
Aircraft: CASHMER PHILIP M SONEX, registration: N198PC
Injuries: 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 16, 2012, about 0820 central daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Sonex, N198PC, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from Crossville Memorial Airport (CSV), Crossville, Tennessee. The certificated private pilot and the passenger were seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to personnel from a fixed based operator (FBO) located at Martin Campbell Field (1A3), Copperhill, Tennessee, the pilot and the passenger arrived in the accident airplane at their facility on October 12. The pilot stated that they were enroute to a fly-in event at CSV, but had to divert to 1A3 due to deteriorating weather conditions. The following morning, the FBO personnel watched as the pilot taxied the airplane for departure and noted that as the airplane approached the runway, the engine “stopped.” The personnel listened as the pilot then re-started the engine, back-taxied down the runway, and departed without further incident.

On the morning of the accident flight, a pilot-rated witness observed as the accident airplane attempted to depart from runway 26 at CSV. The witness stated that he heard the airplane’s engine increase in power, and then heard a sudden reduction of power that caused him to turn his attention toward the airplane. He then observed the airplane about 1,000 feet from the approach end of the runway at an altitude of about 15 feet. The airplane continued to fly at that altitude until about the mid-field point, when the engine power again increased and the airplane “climbed abruptly,” before disappearing from view. The witness walked further out on the flight line in an attempt to regain sight of the airplane, but was advised by other individuals on the airport that the airplane had crashed near the departure end of runway 26, outside of the airport perimeter fence.

Another witness, who was driving on a road adjacent to the airport, observed the accident airplane in a tail-low attitude before it began to “spin around” about 2 or 3 times. The airplane then impacted the ground, and the witness stopped to contact local authorities and render assistance.

http://www.americansonexassociation.org/events/index.html

http://www.sonexaircraft.com/news/images/Cashmer_1101_1.jpg

http://registry.faa.gov/N198PC

http://www.sonexaircraft.com/news/images/Cashmer_1101_3.jpg

http://www.sonexaircraft.com/news/newsarchive99.html

 
"Had he been any less of a pilot he would have died in that hill," said Davis.

 The plane was removed by a crane later in the afternoon.










Story, photos and comments:  http://www.wate.com


CROSSVILLE (WATE) - A small plane crashed Tuesday morning in Cumberland County.  Director Keith Garrison of the Cumberland County Emergency Management Agency told 6 News a small, experimental plane crashed at the Crossville Memorial Airport around 9:40 a.m. EST, 8:40 a.m. CST.  The 20-foot plane just missed power lines and a nearby wooded area.

"They had just taken off from the runway when this happened and luckily they landed in this grassy area," said Crossville Fire Chief Mike Turner.  The airport is located on Highway 70 between Crossville and Sparta.    Husband and wife Phillip and Marian Cashmer, both 72, of Winter Haven, Florida were injured and were airlifted to Erlanger Medical Center in Chattanooga.

The couple was reported to be in critical condition at the hospital on Tuesday afternoon.  A friend and fellow experimental plane pilot said the Cashmers survived because of the pilot's quick thinking.  "Had he been any less of a pilot he would have died in that hill, but he landed it flat which is the key to surviving a plane crash," said John Davis of the American Sonex Association.

Davis was with the Cashmers this weekend at the ninth annual American Sonex Association's Fly In at the Crossville airport. 

He said they had just finished building the plane this summer, and this was the first year they were able to show it off at the Fly In.

"You have to fly 40 hours off before you can leave the 25 mile-radius of your home base. He had finished that and made all the appropriate log book entries and he and Marian flew up here," said Davis.

Davis has a Sonex plane and said the planes are built like tanks. He doesn't understand how this could happen.

"Why, why, why?" asked Davis. "I want to get my hands on that plane to see what happened to Phil."



The airport was closed to deal with the incident, but has since been reopened.


The FAA said an experimental amateur-built aircraft crashed on takeoff from runway 26 at the Crossville Airport Tuesday morning. 

While the plane may have been an amateur-built aircraft, Crossville Fire Chief Mike Turner said they are fairly common, and are airworthy.   Turner said a husband and wife from Winterhaven, Florida were on board the plane.  They were both flown to Erlanger Medical Center in Chattanooga.  He did not have their names or current conditions.

Investigators do not know yet why the couple were in Crossville, or what caused the plane to crash.  The FAA will be at the airport this afternoon to determine what happened.  The airport was shut down for about an hour after the crash, but it is now back open.

Previous story

A spokesperson with Crossville EMS tells 10News two people who were on board a plane that crashed at the Crossville Airport are being transported by Lifestar and Lifeforce to Erlanger Hospital in Chattanooga.

Few other details are being released at this time.

According to authorities, the crash happened around 8:30 a.m. central time.

Previous story

Crossville emergency crews are responding to a plane crash at Crossville Memorial Airport-Whitson Field.

Few details are being released at this time but both the Crossville Police and Fire Departments say it happened around 8:30 a.m. central time.   


CROSSVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Authorities are investigating a small plane crash in Cumberland County that injured two people, one of two plane wrecks in Tennessee on the same day.

Emergency Management Director Keith Garrison told The Associated Press that the experimental plane crashed during takeoff Tuesday morning at Crossville Memorial Airport.

Officials said a male and a female involved in the crash were airlifted to Erlanger Medic
al Center in Chattanooga, which is about 60 miles from Crossville.

Garrison didn't have any more information about the victims.

He said the Federal Aviation Administration was to send inspectors to the scene.

The second aviation accident occurred Tuesday morning when a private craft flipped onto its top after landing in a parking lot of the Smoky Mountain Speedway in Blount County.

The FAA told The Daily Times the single-engine Cessna 182 was registered to Nicholas P. Lyons of Centralia, Ill., and was trying to land when the accident occurred.

There were two people on board, who appeared unhurt and were not taken to a hospital.
 

Cumberland County plane crash sends two to hospital 
 
A Florida husband and wife both were flown to a Chattanooga hospital with serious injuries after their small, private airplane crashed on takeoff from a Cumberland County airport this morning, authorities said.

The occupants, Phillip and Marian Cashmer, both 72, of Winter Haven, Fla., were transported to Erlanger Medical Center, according to Crossville Fire Chief Mike Turner.

The victims' conditions were not immediately available.

The crash occurred at 8:25 a.m. CDT at the Crossville Memorial Airport.

The coupe's airplane — a two-seat, hand-built Sonex experimental aircraft — crashed into a deep ravine, about 50 feet short of a tree line beyond the end of the runway, Turner said.

"And they just missed the power lines," he added.

The couple apparently were attending the ninth annual American Sonex Association Fly-In, which was held Thursday and Friday in Crossville, according to the association's website.  The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

Aeropro Cz A240 , N72AH: Accident occurred October 15, 2012 in Half Moon Bay, California

NTSB Identification: WPR13FA013 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation  
Accident occurred Monday, October 15, 2012 in Half Moon Bay, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/13/2014
Aircraft: AEROPRO CZ A240, registration: N72AH
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The non-instrument-rated sport pilot was departing on a cross-country flight about the time local weather reports indicated 3/4 mile visibility, mist, and an overcast ceiling at 300 feet above the ground. Recorded radar data showed the airplane ascending after takeoff and turning left to an altitude of 1,100 feet mean sea level (msl). As the left turn continued, the airplane descended to an altitude of about 600 feet msl. The last recorded radar data for the accident airplane occurred less than 1/4 mile from the accident site. The airplane wreckage was located about 400 yards west of the departure airport on a bluff that overlooked and paralleled the runway. Examination of the accident site revealed ground scars and airplane damage consistent with a continuous descent from the last recorded radar data to impact. A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

The restricted visibility and low ceilings that were reported in the area at the time of the accident would have been conducive to the development of spatial disorientation and the pilot’s subsequent loss of airplane control while turning, most likely in an attempt to return to the runway.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The non-instrument-rated pilot’s decision to depart into instrument meteorological conditions, which resulted in spatial disorientation and a subsequent loss of airplane control.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On October 15, 2012, about 0515 Pacific daylight time (PDT), a light sport, Aeropro CZ A240 airplane, N72AH, impacted terrain near Half Moon Bay, California. The sport pilot was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage during the accident sequence and post impact fire. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The cross-country personal flight departed Half Moon Bay Airport (HAF), Half Moon Bay, California about 0513 with a planned destination of Apple Valley Airport, Apple Valley, California.

The airplane did not reach its destination at its expected time, and became the subject of an Alert Notice (ALNOT) issued by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). A search was conducted by the Civil Air Patrol and the Coast Guard, and the airplane was subsequently located the morning of October 16. The wreckage was located about 400 yards west of HAF on a west facing slope. The slope was part of Pillar Point Bluffs that overlook and parallel the runway west of HAF.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

A review of FAA airman records revealed that the 75-year-old-pilot held a sport pilot certificate with an endorsement for airplane single-engine land. The most recent FAA medical certificate was issued to the pilot in March 1985, with the limitation that he must wear corrective lenses for near and distant vision.

According to the FAA, the pilot was medically eligible to fly as a light sport pilot as long as he had a valid driver’s license and was in compliance with 14 CFR 61.53 “Prohibition on operations during medical deficiency”.

The pilot submitted his last medical application on March 7, 1985. He reported he had a total time of 157 hours with 28 hours logged in the last 6 months.

According to FAA documentation, on January 17, 1992, the sport pilot voluntarily surrendered his Mechanic-Powerplant; Private Pilot-Single Engine Land and Glider-Aero Tow; and Senior Parachute Rigger Certificates due to failing eye sight.

A review of the pilot’s logbook revealed that the last entry was on August 29th, 2012; at that time the pilot had accrued 822.6 hours of total flight time.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was a light sport Aeropro CZ, serial number 32511. The aircraft logbook reported that the airplane had a total airframe time of 122.7 hours at the most recent annual inspection. The last entry in the aircraft logbook showed 144.9 hours of total time.

The engine was a Rotax 912ULS, serial number 6777485. Total time recorded on the engine at the most recent annual inspection was 122.7 hours of total time. According to the last entry in the aircraft logbook, the engine oil and filter was changed at 144.9 hours of total time in service.

Fueling records at the Half Moon Bay Airport established that the airplane was last fueled on October 9, 2012 at 1703 with the addition of about 13 gallons of 100LL fuel. Subsequent to the accident, fuel was tested at the HAF fueling facilities for contaminates and tested OK for use.

METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS

An aviation routine weather report was recorded at HAF, near the time of the accident. It indicated at 0555 PDT, wind was from 360 degrees at 6 knots, 3/4 miles visibility, mist, with an overcast ceiling at 300 feet, temperature 13 degrees C, dew point 13 degrees C, and an altimeter setting at 30.08 inches of mercury.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The FAA Digital Airport/Facility Directory indicated that HAF Airport had an Automated Weather Observation System (AWOS)-3, which broadcast on frequency 127.275.

The FAA Digital Airport/Facility Directory indicated that HAF runway 30 is ,5000 feet long and 150 feet wide. The runway surface was asphalt and concrete, and had a displaced threshold of 762 feet.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and an inspector from the FAA examined the wreckage at the accident scene. The first identified point of contact (FIPC) was a pattern of broken and displaced brush and limbs about 35 feet in length. Paralleling the pattern was a narrow swath about 15 feet in length. A red colored lens assembly was found near the (FIPC). The pattern and swath led uphill to the principle impact crater (PIC) which was about 5 feet in diameter. Multiple propeller blade fragments were found near the PIC. The main wreckage was found further uphill surrounded by undamaged trees and bushes about 10 feet in height. Thermal damage was contained only to the main wreckage and was not found in the debris path.

Aileron control continuity was established through the impact damaged control rods. The rudder control cables were continuous and remained attached to the rudder horn and the rudder pedals. The elevator control rods were separated at the mid-section connecting supports.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory Forensic Toxicology Research Team, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing of specimens of the pilot. Analysis of the specimens detected Warfarin, an anticoagulant medication. Ethanol was tested and none was detected in the specimens. No tests were performed for carbon monoxide or cyanide.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The engine was examined at Plain Parts, Sacramento, California on October 25, 2012. At the conclusion of the examination no mechanical malfunctions or anomalies were found with the engine components. A full report is contained within the public docket for this accident.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The NTSB investigator-in-charge reviewed recorded radar data from the Northern California TRACON. Ten targets made up the radar track were recorded with altitude varying from 600 up to 1,100 feet mean sea level (msl) at about the time of the accident. The recorded radar data indicated that after the target departed from HAF, it entered a climbing left turn. After turning 90-degrees arc, at the highest altitude of 1,100 feet msl, the target continued its left turn, decreasing in altitude with the last target in direction of HAF in the area of the accident site.

According to FAA Advisory Circular (AC) 60-4A "Pilot's Spatial Disorientation," "Surface references and the natural horizon may at times become obscured, although visibility may be above visual flight rule minimums. Lack of natural horizon or surface reference is common on over-water flights, at night, and especially at night in extremely sparsely populated areas or in low visibility conditions. A sloping cloud formation, an obscured horizon, a dark scene spread with ground lights and stars, and certain geometric patterns of ground lights can provide inaccurate visual information for aligning the aircraft correctly with the actual horizon. The disoriented pilot may place the aircraft in a dangerous attitude."



NTSB Identification: WPR13FA013
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, October 15, 2012 in Half Moon Bay, CA
Aircraft: AEROPRO CZ A240, registration: N72AH
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 15, 2012, about 0600 Pacific daylight time a light sport, Aeropro CZ A240, N72AH, impacted terrain near Half Moon Bay, California. The sport pilot was operating the airplane under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage during the accident sequence, and was consumed by a post impact fire. The cross-country personal flight departed Half Moon Bay Airport (HAF), in Half Moon Bay, California with a planned destination of Apple Valley Airport, Apple Valley, California. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The airplane did not reach its destination at its expected time, and became the subject of an Alert Notice (ALNOT). A search was conducted by the Civil Air Patrol and the Coast Guard, and the airplane was subsequently located the morning of October 16. The wreckage was located about 400 yards west of HAF on a west facing slope. The slope was part of a ridge line that overlooked and paralleled the runway at HAF.

Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board and an inspector from the Federal Aviation Administration examined the wreckage at the accident scene. The first identified point of contact (FIPOC) was a pattern of broken and displaced brush and limbs about 35 feet in length. Paralleling the pattern was a narrow swath about 15 feet in length. A red colored lens assembly was found near the (FIPOC). The pattern and swath led uphill to the principle impact crater (PIC) which was about 5 feet in diameter. Multiple propeller blade fragments were found near the PIC. The main wreckage was found further uphill surrounded by undamaged trees and bushes about 10 feet in height. Thermal damage was contained only to the main wreckage and was not found in the debris path.

An automated surface weather observation at HAF, (elevation 66 feet msl, about 1/4 mile west of the accident site). It indicated wind from 360 degrees at 6 knots, 3/4 miles visibility, mist, with an overcast ceiling at 300 feet, temperature at 13 degrees C, dew point 13 degrees C, and an altimeter setting at 30.08 inches of mercury.


 HALF MOON BAY -- Authorities on Thursday confirmed the remains found among the charred wreckage of a small plane belong to a Florida man missing since he took off from Half Moon Bay airport Monday. 

 Andrew Charles Hayden, 75, of Punta Gorda, Fla. was identified through dental records because his remains were badly damaged by fire, San Mateo County Coroner Robert Foucrault said. The burnt frame of Hayden's plane was found Tuesday about a mile north of Pillar Point Harbor and less than a mile west of the airport in a broad dip on a coastal bluff.

Authorities have not said what may have caused the single engine Aeropro CZ A240 to go down. But the wreckage's position at the crash site appears to indicate it might have been headed back toward the airport. The crash remains under investigation by Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board authorities, officials said.

Hayden took off around 5:50 a.m. Monday and when he didn't arrive at his destination -- Marana Regional Airport near Tucson, Ariz. -- his wife reported him missing. Efforts to reach Hayden's family have been unsuccessful.

Foucrault said Hayden's cause of death is undetermined because there was not enough left of his body to perform a full examination.

Hayden's plane was discovered by a San Mateo County park ranger who was part of the search effort launched after the pilot's disappearance. The Coast Guard carried out air and sea searches. 


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: N72AH        Make/Model: A240      Description: AEROPRO CZ
  Date: 10/15/2012     Time: 1230

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: HALF MOON BAY   State: CA   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT IMPACTED TERRAIN UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: OAKLAND, CA  (WP27)                   Entry date: 10/17/2012 


http://registry.faa.gov/N72AH

HALF MOON BAY -- Authorities have found what they believe may be the single engine plane that disappeared early Monday en route to Arizona.

San Mateo County rangers reported finding the aircraft around 11:45 a.m. near on the beach near the intersection of Ocean Boulevard and Bernal Avenue, a short distance from Half Moon Bay airport, Sheriff's Detective Rebecca Rosenblatt said.

The search by air and water had continued Tuesday morning for the plane that left Half Moon Bay a day earlier but never showed up to its destination in Arizona.

The Coast Guard dispatched two vessels, a 47-foot motor lifeboat and a patrol cutter, which have combed the waters west of Half Moon Bay since Monday night. The agency also briefly sent out a helicopter and had plans to launch a fixed-wing aircraft but those efforts have been hampered by weather conditions.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the Civil Air Patrol and local law enforcement also conducted search operations in the area.

The Aeropro CZ A240 left around 5:50 a.m., and the pilot's wife said he intended to make a fuel stop in Apple Valley, according to the FAA. The woman reported the aircraft as overdue when it failed to arrive on schedule at Marana Regional Airport in Tucson, Ariz.

The FAA said airport officials in Half Moon Bay and Marana searched for the airplane at both facilities but did not locate it.

The Aeropro is considered a "light sport aircraft," with folding wings and two seats. The aircraft's tail number is N72AH, and is registered to Andrew Hayden of Punta Gorda, Florida.


http://www.mercurynews.com

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA: Boshears Skyfest back for more fun in air, on land

Eyes will be on the skies this weekend for the 20th annual Boshears Skyfest at Daniel Field in Augusta. Gates open at 9 a.m. with opening ceremonies at 1:30 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday.

Committee member Tony Gay said each year 10,000 to 15,000 attend the event and this year organizers are expecting it to grow even more.

“We’re excited,” he said. “We have a good line-up and a good static aircraft display. It’s one of Georgia’s largest air shows.”

Attractions include performances both days by Gary Ward Aerobatics, the Trenton Flyers (who also have a display), Team RV (the world’s largest air show team), and Greg Connell (a local pilot who performed in the 2006 Boshears event).

The event offers excitement in the air as well as on the ground. One of the more popular ground activities is a favorite with runners, the Boshears Ground Loop Road Race, along with the Kid’s Fun Race. It was established to raise money for the Boys and Girls Clubs of the CSRA and is held on Saturday morning of the Skyfest. Each registrant receives a free ticket to Boshears Skyfest.

In addition, festival-goers will enjoy carnival rides, aircraft rides, aviation displays, sponsor exhibits, monster truck rides and comedy acts. On Saturday morning, a car show by the GASCAR Antique Automobile Club will have everything from a horseless carriage to a muscle car.

Gay said every year organizers try to provide something new to the event. This year, the new feature is the Flagship Detroit (N17334), which began service with American Airlines in March 1937. It is believed to be the oldest DC-3 in the world still flying. Retired American Airlines pilot and captain Tony Desantis said the airline has been restored to its original condition. Twenty pilots fly the plane and a number of flight attendants work on it. It is used in fly-ins for air shows.

Day said anyone with an ultra-light or vintage aircraft is invited to fly in during the weekend.

The event was established in 1992 when friends and aviators wanted to hold a fly-in to honor Buster and Forrest Boshears, local heroes who contributed not only to this area but to general aviation throughout the Southeast. The show has grown from there.

Tickets are $15 in advance and $18 at the gate. Greg Hodges Pavilion VIP tent tickets are $50 a day adults; $20 a day children, with paid admission. Tickets are available at Augusta Aviation and Circle K stores or online at boshears.com using Pay Pal. Tickets purchased online can be picked up at the will call line at the main gate and require a receipt and proof of ID.

Boshears Skyfest will be held on the north side of Daniel Field, so attendees should enter through the Wrightsboro Road entrance.

No pets, alcohol, coolers, bikes, or pop-up tents are allowed, but chairs, blankets and strollers are welcome. For more information, go to www.boshears.com.

 http://chronicle.augusta.com

Piper PA-34-200 Seneca, Nadeau Air Service, C-GNAS: Accident occurred October 15, 2012 in Princeville - Canada

Instructor and student received non-life threatening injuries, one person got out on their own, the 2nd took rescuers one hour to cut him out. Both transported to hospital.


Oct 15 C-GNAS Piper 34 Seneca Nadeau Air Service Inc. Trois-Rivieres QC training flight

Crashed in a corn field during training for unknown reasons, instructor and student seriously injured.



Deux personnes ont été blessées à la suite d'un accident d'avion, survenu lundi après-midi, à Princeville, dans le Centre-du-Québec. 

Un instructeur de vol et son élève se trouvaient dans un appareil de type Cessna vers 14 heures lorsqu'un des deux hommes aurait perdu la maîtrise du petit avion, a expliqué une porte-parole de la Sûreté du Québec (SQ), Éloïse Cossette.

L'appareil s'est brusquement posé dans un champ près de la route 116. D'après Mme Cossette, les deux hommes étaient conscients au moment où ils ont été transportés à l'hôpital.

Une enquête est actuellement en cours pour tenter de déterminer les circonstances exactes entourant cet incident. 


http://www.lapresse.ca

 
 (Princeville) Deux personnes ont été gravement blessées à la suite d'un accident d'avion, survenu hier après-midi, à Princeville, dans le Centre-du-Québec. 

Selon La Tribune, l'avion de type Piper Seneca a tenté d'atterrir d'urgence sur la route 116, entre Princeville et Victoriaville, mais il s'est plutôt écrasé dans un champ, près de la route 263.

C'est un élève de l'école de pilotage Nadeau Air Service qui était aux commandes. Il était accompagné de son instructeur.

Selon la sergente Éloïse Cossette, porte-parole de la Sûreté du Québec, les deux hommes étaient conscients au moment où ils ont été transportés à l'hôpital. L'un d'eux a réussi à sortir de lui-même de l'appareil. Quant au deuxième, il a fallu environ une demi-heure pour que les secouristes parviennent à l'extirper de ce qu'il restait de l'avion.

Ils souffriraient de blessures graves, mais on ne craindrait pas pour leur vie, selon la sergente Cossette.

Une enquête est en cours pour tenter de déterminer les circonstances exactes entourant cet incident. Deux enquêteurs du Bureau de la sécurité des transports se sont d'ailleurs rendus sur place. Les premières hypothèses envisagées sont celles d'une erreur humaine ou d'un problème mécanique.

Malgré plusieurs appels, il n'a pas été possible, hier, de parler à un des dirigeants de Nadeau Air Service. 


http://www.lapresse.ca
 


http://www.lapresse.ca/la-tribune

http://www.lapresse.ca/le-nouvelliste

Felix Baumagartner Helmet Cam

http://i845.photobucket.com/albums/ab20/bizjets101/FelixBaumagartnerHelmetCam.jpg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFmy9netDeE