Monday, December 7, 2015

CubCrafters CCK-1865, N541TC: Fatal accident occurred December 07, 2015 near Merrys Pymatuning Airport (PA01), Linesville, Conneaut Township, Crawford County, Pennsylvania

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

HARTFORD AVIATION LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N541TC

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Allegheny PFSDO-03


NTSB Identification: ERA16FA063

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, December 07, 2015 in Linesville, PA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/25/2016
Aircraft: TIMOTHY C WILLIAMS CCK-1865, registration: N541TC
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


The noninstrument-rated pilot not receive a weather briefing before taking off on a personal flight on a dark, moonless night in instrument meteorological conditions. Review of GPS and engine monitor data revealed that, during the last 2 minutes of the 13-minute flight, the airplane descended to 500 ft above ground (agl) level and continued toward the destination airport, which had one turf runway with no lighting. The airplane then overflew the destination airport at 300 ft agl, continued on its course, and then impacted trees about 1 mile beyond the departure end of the airstrip. Examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions. The engine monitor data also showed that the engine was operating with cruise power up to the end of the data.


The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The noninstrument-rated pilot's improper decision to attempt a flight under visual flight rules at night in instrument meteorological conditions to an unlit airstrip, which resulted in controlled flight into terrain.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT


On December 7, 2015, at 1827 eastern standard time, an experimental, amateur-built CCK-1865, N541TC, was substantially damaged when it impacted wooded terrain, while maneuvering near Merrys Pymatuning Airport (PA01), Linesville, Pennsylvania. The private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to Hartford Aviation LLC and operated by a private individual as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned flight to PA01. The flight originated from Greenville Municipal Airport (4G1), Greenville, Pennsylvania, at 1814.


According to the manager of the fixed-based-operator at 4G1, the passenger had flown his airplane to 4G1 during the morning of the accident for maintenance and had stayed throughout the day. The passenger had planned to drive home in the evening while maintenance continued, but the accident pilot, who was a friend of the passenger, happened to land at 4G1 about 1700. After visiting for about 1 hour, the accident pilot offered the passenger a flight home in lieu of the passenger driving.


The owner of a farm, located about 1 mile north of PA01, stated that she heard an impact sound about the time of the accident, but didn't see anything as it was dark and foggy. Rescue personnel later located the wreckage about 2030 in a wooded area adjacent to the farm.


PILOT INFORMATION


The pilot held a private pilot certificate, with a rating for airplane single-engine land. He did not possess an instrument rating. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate was issued on November 17, 2015. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 600 hours. Review of the pilot's logbook revealed that the most recent entry was dated October 27, 2015. He had accumulated about 575 hours of total flight experience; of which, about 200 hours were in the same make and model as the accident airplane. According to the logbook, the pilot had flown about 38 hours during the 90-day period preceding the accident. All of those hours were flown in the same make and model as the accident airplane.


AIRCRAFT INFORMATION


The two-seat, high-wing, fixed tailwheel airplane, serial number CCK-1865-0075, was assembled from a kit in 2014 and issued an FAA experimental airworthiness certificate on January 29, 2015, which was its most recent annual condition inspection. It was powered by a Cub Crafters CC-340, 180-horsepower experimental engine, equipped with a Catto two-blade, fixed-pitch wood-core composite propeller. Further review of the aircraft logbook revealed that the most recent oil change was completed on September 30, 2015. At that time, the airframe and engine had accumulated 181 hours of operation.


METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION


Northeast Ohio Regional Airport (HZY), Ashtabula, Ohio, was located about 13 miles northwest of the accident site at an elevation of 924 feet. The recorded weather at HZY, at 1834, was: wind calm, visibility 7 miles; overcast ceiling at 1,000 feet; temperature 4 degrees C; dew point 2 degrees C, altimeter 30.17 inches Hg. The previous recording at 1753 included an overcast ceiling at 800 feet.


Additionally, the National Weather Service in Cleveland, Ohio, had issued a dense fog advisory for the area including the accident site at 1543. There was also an airmen's meteorological information, issued at 1545, valid for instrument meteorological conditions for the accident location.


According to the U.S. Naval Observatory, the official sunset at PA01 was 1651 and the end of civil twilight was 1723. Moonrise did not occur until 0340 the following day.


There was no record of the pilot receiving a weather briefing from flight service or direct user access terminal.


AERODROME INFORMATION


Merrys Pymatuning Airport was located at an elevation of 1,203 feet and consisted of one turf runway (4/22), which was 1,815 feet long and 120 feet wide. There was no runway lighting and no instrument approach procedure at the airport.


WRECKAGE INFORMATION


A debris path was observed; beginning with freshly cut tree branches from trees that were approximately 50 feet tall. A section of right wingtip was also located at the beginning of the debris path and the path extended approximately 120 feet on a magnetic heading of north to the main wreckage. The main wreckage was inverted at an elevation of 1,115 feet. The right wing separated and the left wing remaining attached to the airframe. The right aileron and right flap separated from the right wing, while the left aileron and left flap remained attached to the left wing. The left wing and empennage were entangled around a tree. The elevator and rudder remained attached to the empennage


Control continuity was confirmed from the pilot's cockpit control stick to the elevator attach-point, with one elevator cable remaining attached and the other cable exhibiting a broomstraw separation. Rudder control continuity was confirmed from the rudder pedals to the rudder attach-point, with one rudder cable remaining attached and the other exhibiting a broomstraw separation. The lower left aileron cable remained attached from the control stick to its left aileron attach-point. The lower right aileron cable remained attached from the pilot's control stick and right aileron attach-point; however, it exhibited two broomstraw separations along the length of the cable. The upper right aileron cable remained attached from the right aileron attach-point to cockpit turn-buckle. The upper left aileron cable exhibited a broomstraw separation about 6 inches from the turn-buckle. Measurement of the elevator trim jackscrew corresponded to an approximate neutral to nose-up trim position.


The cockpit was crushed, but both four-point harnesses remained intact. The magneto switch remained in the both position and the fuel selector was positioned to both fuel tanks. The throttle and carburetor heat control levers were in the forward position while the mixture control was in the lean position. The primer control was in and locked. The engine remained attached the fuselage. The two-blade wooden and composite propeller separated from the hub and shattered. The engine sustained impact damage to the underside. The carburetor was impact damage and approximately half of it was not recovered. Fuel was found in the gascolator and consistent in odor and color to 100-low-lead aviation gasoline. The propeller hub was rotated by hand and continuity was confirmed to the rear accessory section of the engine.


A GPS, video recorder, and engine monitor were recovered from the wreckage and forwarded to the NTSB Recorder Laboratory, Washington, DC, for data download.


The video recorder's memory card was fractured and no data were recovered; however, data from the GPS and engine monitor were successfully downloaded and plotted. Review of the data plots revealed that the airplane traveled north on a course to PA01, about 2,000 feet above ground level (agl). During the last 2 minutes of data, the airplane descended to approximately 500 feet agl, and continued north toward PA01. The airplane flew over PA01 about 300 feet agl and continued north for 1 mile, where the accident site was located. The last GPS target was recorded at 18:27:18, about .7 mile south of the accident site, indicating an altitude of 400 feet agl. Review of engine data revealed that the engine rpm was at 2,090 at the end of the data.


MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION


An autopsy was performed on the pilot by the Crawford County Coroner's Office, Saegertown, Pennsylvania, on December 9, 2015. The autopsy report noted the cause of death as "blunt force trauma."



Toxicological testing was performed on the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Science Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The results were negative for alcohol and drugs.

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA063 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, December 07, 2015 in Linesville, PA
Aircraft: TIMOTHY C WILLIAMS CCK-1865, registration: N541TC
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On December 7, 2015, about 1815 eastern standard time, an experimental, amateur-built CCK-1865, N541TC, was substantially damaged when it impacted wooded terrain, while maneuvering near Merrys Pymatuning Airport (PA01), Linesville, Pennsylvania. The private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to Hartford Aviation LLC and operated by a private individual as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Night Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned flight to PA01. The flight originated from Greenville Municipal Airport (4G1), Greenville, Pennsylvania, about 1800.


According to the manager of the fixed-based-operator at 4G1, the passenger had flown his airplane to 4G1 for maintenance work and the pilot was flying him home to PA01. The owner of a farm, located about 1 mile north of PA01, stated that she heard an impact sound about 1815, but didn't see anything as it was dark and foggy. Rescue personnel later located the wreckage about 2030 in a wooded area adjacent to the farm. A debris path was observed; beginning with freshly cut tree branches and a section of right wingtip, and extended approximately 120 feet on a magnetic heading of north to the main wreckage. The main wreckage was inverted, with the right wing separated and the left wing remaining attached to the airframe. The right aileron and right flap separated from the right wing, while the left aileron and left flap remained attached to the left wing. The left wing and empennage were entangled around a tree. The elevator and rudder remained attached to the empennage


Control continuity was confirmed from the pilot's cockpit control stick to the elevator attach-point, with one elevator cable remaining attached and the other cable exhibiting a broomstraw separation. Rudder control continuity was confirmed from the rudder pedals to the rudder attach-point, with one rudder cable remaining attached and the other exhibiting a broomstraw separation. The lower left aileron cable remained attached from the control stick to its left aileron attach-point. The lower right aileron cable remained attached from the pilot's control stick and right aileron attach-point; however, it exhibited two broomstraw separations along the length of the cable. The upper right aileron cable remained attached from the right aileron attach-point to cockpit turn-buckle. The upper left aileron cable exhibited a broomstraw separation about 6 inches from the turn-buckle. Measurement of the elevator trim jackscrew corresponded to an approximate neutral to nose-up trim position.


The cockpit was crushed, but both four-point harnesses remained intact. The magneto switch remained in the both position and the fuel selector was positioned to both fuel tanks. The throttle and carburetor heat control levers were in the forward position while the mixture control was in the lean position. The primer control was in and locked. The engine remained attached the fuselage. The two-blade wooden and composite propeller separated from the hub and shattered. The engine sustained impact damage to the underside. The carburetor was impact damage and approximately half of it was not recovered. Fuel was found in the gascolator and consistent in odor and color to 100-low-lead aviation gasoline. The propeller hub was rotated by hand and continuity was confirmed to the rear accessory section of the engine.


The pilot held a private pilot certificate, with a rating for airplane single-engine land; however, it was revoked at the time of the accident. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate was issued on November 17, 2014. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 600 hours.


The two-seat, high-wing, fixed tailwheel airplane, serial number CCK-1865-0075, was assembled from a kit and issued an FAA experimental airworthiness certificate in 2014. It was powered by a Cub Crafters CC-340, 180-horsepower experimental engine, equipped with a Catto two-blade, fixed-pitch wood-core composite propeller.


Northeast Ohio Regional Airport (HZY), Ashtabula, Ohio, was located about 13 miles northwest of the accident site. The recorded weather at HZY, at 1753, was: wind from 040 degrees at 3 knots, visibility 7 miles; overcast ceiling at 800 feet; temperature 4 degrees C; dew point 2 degrees C, altimeter 30.16 inches Hg. According to the U.S. Naval Observatory, the official sunset at PA01 was 1651 and the end of civil twilight was 1723. Moonrise did not occur until 0340 the following day.


A GPS, video recorder, and engine monitor were recovered from the wreckage and forwarded to the NTSB Recorder Laboratory, Washington, DC, for data download.



Tim Williams





Funeral services for Tim Williams are under the direction of Galloway-Onstott Funeral Home of Hartford, Ohio, with calling hours Friday from 4 to 8 p.m. and Saturday from 10 to 11 a.m. at the Orangeville, Ohio, United Methodist Church. A memorial service is scheduled at 11 a.m. Saturday at the church. 


Nathan Koontz 


Nathan Robert Koontz 
Born: Wed., May 19, 1982 
Died: Mon., Dec. 7, 2015 

Nathan Robert Koontz, 33, of Linesville, flew from Earth to Glory on Monday, December 7, 2015. 


He was born on May 19, 1982, the son of Robert and Carol Grose Koontz.  He married Jaime Thompson on July 29, 2006.  Together they operated Forestview Restaurant in Linesville.  Nathan previously had worked for Meadville Land Service. 

Nathan was a fun-loving guy with a heart for helping others.  He loved his family dearly and will be Truely missed by many. 

Survivors include his best friend, soulmate and wife, Jamie, and their son and pride and joy, True; his father, Robert Koontz of New Castle; a sister, Nicole Koontz of Transfer; and several aunts, uncles and cousins. 

He was preceded in death by his mother, Carol Koontz, his grandparents and his flight pal, his dog Pop Tart. 

There will be no calling hours.  A memorial service will be held at the convenience of the family. 

Arrangements are under the direction of Royal-Coleman Funeral Home, 6028 U. S. Highway 6, Linesville.

Please share a condolence or memory for the family at royalcolemanfuneralhome.com.

  
The Crawford County Coroner has identified the victims of a plane crash, near Linesville, last night.   

The pilot, Timothy Williams, 59,of Burghill, Ohio, and a passenger, Nathan Koontz,33, of Linesville, both died in the accident.  According to Linesville Fire Chief Bill Mickle,  Koontz had flown his plane from Linesville to the Greenville airport, for repairs. Williams picked up Koontz in Greenville, and was flying him back to Linesville. The small, single-engine plane went down in a wooded area, near the Linesville Airport, around 6:30 last night.   


100 people, with all-terrain vehicles, joined firefighters in the search.  Most, if not all, knew Koontz.  He owned a restaurant near Linesville. Chief Mickle knew Koontz since high school. He says he did not initially know Koontz was on the plane.


"Not at first.  Not at first", said Mickle. "After we started my investigation with an assist from the State Police, to get a good look at where to go, that's when I found out who it was."


It took searchers three hours to find the plane.  Koontz leaves behind a wife and a young son.


Story and video: http://www.erienewsnow.com


CONNEAUT TOWNSHIP — It may take more than a year for federal investigators to determine what caused Monday's double fatality crash of an experimental airplane that had been built by its pilot.


Autopsies are scheduled to be performed today on the remains of the two men onboard, pilot Timothy C. Williams, 59, of Burghill, Ohio, and Nathan Robert Koontz, 33, Linesville, according to Crawford County Coroner Scott Schell. The two were killed Monday when the plane went down near Linesville around 6:45 p.m. after hitting several trees. Preliminary examination of the remains determined each man died of multiple blunt force trauma, Schell said.


Formal investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board began Tuesday, but FAA representatives already had left the site off Airport Road in Conneaut Township by late Tuesday morning. Police have been keeping the media and the public away from the scene while the investigation takes place.


"It will be about a year or more before a full report is complete," Terry Williams, an NTSB spokesman, said Tuesday afternoon. "Our investigator is en route. We'll investigate all aspects involved — man, environment and machine. Everything from the site to pilot records to maintenance records. We'll take the engine apart and examine the engine and aircraft thoroughly. We'll interview any witnesses."


The NTSB's on-scene investigation of the crash site will take two to three days with the wreckage then moved off site for further evaluation, he said.


The plane Timothy Williams was piloting was classified as a Cu
bCrafters CCK-1865, according to an emailed statement from Arlene Salac, spokeswoman for the Federal Aviation Administration.


According the FAA Registry of aircraft, the plane was a fixed-wing single-engine aircraft built by Williams, classified as experimental by the FAA and categorized by the agency as amateur built. It was deemed airworthy Jan. 29, according to the FAA Registry. Cub Crafters Inc. of Yakima, Wash., manufactures the CCK-1865 and sells it as a kit.


The aircraft was owned by Hartford Aviation LLC, which had the same mailing address as Williams. Hartford Aviation LLC registered in Ohio as a limited liability company whose purpose is aircraft building and photo work with T.C. Williams listed as the company's agent, according online records with the Ohio Secretary of State.


Large amounts of scattered debris were located one-quarter to half mile off Airport Road, according to Schell. It is believed the men had planned to land at Merry-Pymatuning Airport, a grass strip airport south of the crash site. They were coming from Greenville in Mercer County.


The plane hit several trees, and it appears that the last tree hit was struck by the plane 60 to 70 feet above ground level, Schell said. The plane did not catch fire following the crash, Schell said. Both men were wearing seat belts and the men were found in separate pieces of fuselage, Schell said.


The crash site was located about three hours after residents of the area reported what they thought was a small plane crashing around 6:45 p.m Monday. The search was hampered by heavy fog in the area and the fact the plane went down in a spot away from area roads.


Source:  http://www.meadvilletribune.com


















While an October aircraft accident at Titusville Airport remains under investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration, the NTSB has ruled a pilot's "improper decision" to fly was the probable cause of a double fatal airplane crash near Linesville last December.

The final report on the crash of a single-engine plane as it attempted to land at Titusville Airport on Oct. 24 has yet to be completed by investigators. 

Six people, including the pilot, William D. Fritz, 68, of Franklin, escaped injury after the plane crashed as it was attempting to land, but became stuck in the soft ground about 200 feet short of the runway. The plane was inside the airport's security fence when it crashed.

The final report of probable cause of a fatal airplane crash near Linesville on Dec. 7, 2015, that claimed the lives of pilot Timothy C. Williams, 59, of Burghill, Ohio, and passenger Nathan Robert Koontz, 33, of Linesville, was because of Williams' decision. The plane crashed into a wooded area while maneuvering near Merry's Pymatuning Airport, an unlit airstrip, near Linesville that evening.

According to the report, Williams was not rated to fly on instruments, but it was "a dark, moonless night in instrument meteorological conditions."

The NTSB determined the probable cause of the crash was "The noninstrument-rated pilot's improper decision to attempt a flight under visual flight rules at night in instrument meteorological conditions to an unlit airstrip, which resulted in controlled flight into terrain."

The two men had taken off from Greenville Municipal Airport at 6:14 p.m. that day with Williams at the controls when the plane crashed into trees near Linesville at 6:27 p.m., according to the report.

A review of data found that during the last two minutes of the 13-minute flight, the airplane descended to 500 feet above ground level and continued toward Merry's Pymatuning Airport, which had one turf runway with no lighting, the report said. The airplane then overflew Merry's Pymatuning Airport at 300 feet above ground level, continued on its course, and then impacted trees about one mile beyond the departure end of the airstrip, the report said.

An examination of the plane airframe and engine did not find any pre-impact mechanical malfunctions, the report said. The engine monitor data also showed that the engine was operating with cruise power up to the end of the data, according to the report.

New carriers offering low-cost flights, nonstop regional flights signal room for growth at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport (KMSY)



Within days of a new charter operator launching regional Gulf Coast flights from Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport, a low-fare, high-fees carrier announced plans to immediately begin nonstop flights to Las Vegas and add Los Angeles by next year.

While New Orleans-based GLO’s daily nonstop flights to Shreveport; Little Rock, Arkansas; and Memphis, Tennessee; are designed to lure business travelers, budget carrier Spirit Airlines is eyeing vacation passengers.

The recent service expansions highlight two areas where local airport officials and industry experts predict the New Orleans airport has room to grow: targeting budget-conscious leisure travelers as well as underserved regional areas that will attract businesspeople and others eager for an alternative to driving or multiple-stop flights.

Even more recently, the New Orleans airport unveiled its 50th nonstop destination: Another budget carrier, Allegiant Air, will begin flying to Pittsburgh in February, with fares starting at $39.

After Southwest Airlines and Spirit expanded local flights in 2013, the New Orleans airport became the fastest-growing facility in the country in terms of its passengers count, according to Airports Council International statistics.

A year later, it ranked No. 4 nationwide, according to an Airline Weekly analysis.

Seth Kaplan, a managing partner at the industry publication, said several anomalies separated New Orleans from the top spot. Namely, that Dallas’ Love Field Airport, which was No. 1, had started offering more long-haul flights after a federal law prohibiting them was repealed in late 2013. Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, at No. 3, is steadily breaking its own records amid an ongoing turf war between Delta Air Lines and Seattle-based Alaska Airlines.

In 2014, New Orleans’ passenger count rose almost 7 percent, said Kaplan, who predicts the airport’s growth will slow somewhat by next year. “Not surprisingly, after you’ve had growth like that, it would level off at some point,” he said.

He credited low fuel prices for spurring expansions among no-frills carriers like Spirit and Frontier Airlines. “When you have those airlines growing rapidly and looking for places to allocate that growth, and you have a market like New Orleans, it’s kind of perfect for them,” he said.

This year, the New Orleans airport is on track to break the 10 million-passenger mark, its highest in the airport’s nearly seven-decade history, said Iftikhar Ahmad, who has served as aviation director in New Orleans since 2010. That number is up 36 percent from six years ago.

The New Orleans airport offers 50 nonstop flights, including four international destinations. It handled about 80 percent of the state’s passengers in 2014.

Nationwide, the airport’s ranking has seesawed in the past decade due to Hurricane Katrina’s devastation. In 2005, it was No. 40. After Katrina, it fell to No. 56.

By last year, the airport had climbed to No. 37. The goal, Ahmad said, is to get into the top 30, a select group that handles at least 1 percent of the nation’s passengers.

A key to accomplishing that goal will be the airport’s new three-story, 650,000-square-foot terminal, a $650 million project that will replace the existing facility. The terminal is slated to open in time for the city’s tricentennial celebration in 2018.

The terminal is designed to be about half the size of the current facility, which will mean lower maintenance and cooling costs, but offer a more efficient layout. That will help increase revenue from auxiliary sources, the thinking goes, to keep fees charged to airlines low and ultimately draw more flights to the Crescent City.

Airport officials hope the new terminal will allow them to add more international flights, a business that has largely left New Orleans since the 1970s in favor of Houston.

“I would not tell you that I would like to see one airline add more service than the other. We’re equal opportunity,” Ahmad said. “They all have their niche business. They’re not the same flavor. Some folks are looking for really cheap price and no-frills, some folks are looking for frills and they’re not that sensitive to the price.”

For years, airport officials and business leaders have been in talks with international carriers like British Airways about adding regular service to an overseas destination such as Frankfurt, London or Paris.

If that panned out, the service would likely offer three or four flights a week, said Michael Hecht, president and CEO of Greater New Orleans Inc., a regional economic development group.

“As long as the demand through the airport continues to generally go up, then it is just a question of when, not if,” Hecht said of adding international flights.

That setup is in line with what Copa Airlines has offered. This year, Copa started nonstop service four times per week between New Orleans and Copa’s hub at Tocumen International Airport in Panama. The route gives local travelers access to more than 55 destinations in Central and South America and the Caribbean.

It also opens the door to other possibilities. For example, an expansion at Ochsner Health System could spur Latin American citizens to travel to New Orleans for medical treatment, Ahmad said.

Eventually, additional flights may be added to GLO’s three regional destinations. The company uses 30-passenger Saab 340B aircraft operated by a third party, Corporate Flight Management Inc.

GLO’s founder and CEO Trey Fayard said he chose the destinations after extensive research, which included driving to dozens of cities and airports in the South to gauge the potential demand for the service. He has ideas for potential new routes, but declined to elaborate on specifics.

Ahmad, the airport director, believes GLO is choosing the “right time and right business model” to begin offering the regional service, coming as many larger airlines have gotten out of the game.

“I think they’re coming in with eyes wide open, but in the end, marketing is going to be key,” he said.

Not surprisingly, Fayard agrees.

“There’s a vacuum there that’s being created by all of the mergers,” he said on a recent morning as he stood at the back of his planes while nearby staff sorted through bottles of water and snacks. “Smaller, secondary cities in the Gulf and mid-South are just losing … service left and right.”

Fayard expects that local business travelers who need to go somewhere like Shreveport will jump at the chance to get there — and back — in an 81-minute flight, even if it’s more expensive than a commercial flight.

GLO’s service to Memphis has started and will begin in Shreveport this month. Promotional one-way fares to Shreveport start at $189, including taxes. On weekdays, GLO will offer two flights per day to each city.

When his first plane landed at the New Orleans airport last month, dozens of airline workers and airport staff greeted it on the runway, an arrival that Fayard had worked toward for six years.

“When you have an idea, you make an announcement, you have a business plan, that’s wonderful,” he said, “but when it shows up, it’s real.”

Story and photo gallery:  http://www.theneworleansadvocate.com

Trey Fayard, chief executive officer of GLO Airlines

Cessna 140, N90123: Fatal accident occurred December 06, 2015 in Keytesville, Chariton County, Missouri

Andrew Joseph Beautte

Dawn Lynn Harl



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Kansas City, Missouri
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N90123

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA054 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, December 06, 2015 in Keytesville, MO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/20/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 140, registration: N90123
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The non-instrument-rated pilot and one passenger departed at an unknown time from an unknown location into dark night conditions that were forecast to be marginal visual flight rules to instrument flight rules conditions. A witness observed the airplane circling overhead, and stated that the appearance of the airplane's exterior lights suggested that it was flying in clouds or fog. During the airplane's third orbit, the exterior lights became brighter as it descended out of the clouds, then abruptly descended to ground contact. An examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane.

The pilot's logbooks were not recovered, and his total flight experience could not be determined. The pilot had a history of substance abuse and dependence involving methamphetamine, including multiple arrests and convictions related to drug use. However, he was reportedly in recovery at the time of his last medical examination in 2012. Toxicological testing on the pilot was positive for methamphetamine and its metabolite, amphetamine, at levels which suggested recreational use. Symptoms of recreational methamphetamine use follow a typical pattern. In the early phase, users experience euphoria, excitation, exhilaration, hallucinations, delusions, psychosis, increased alertness, a heightened sense of well-being, and poor impulse control. All of the symptoms caused by high doses of methamphetamine are impairing, but the fact that the noninstrument-rated pilot chose to take off without a weather briefing at night and flew into low clouds before losing control indicates the pilot was deliberately attempting a flight beyond his capabilities. Consistent with his very highly elevated blood levels, this suggests his poor decision-making was influenced by the euphoria and grandiosity conferred by the early phase effects of methamphetamine. Witness observations of the airplane circling in clouds or fog then descending to ground contact suggest that the impaired pilot most likely experienced spatial disorientation and a subsequent loss of airplane control.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The non-instrument-rated pilot's decision to operate in dark night conditions with low clouds, which resulted in a loss of control due to spatial disorientation. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's use of methamphetamine, which impaired his decision-making abilities.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On December 6, 2015, about 2110 central standard time, a Cessna 140 airplane, N90123, impacted terrain near Keytesville, Missouri. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight . Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed in the area, and the flight operated without a flight plan. The flight's point of origin and destination could not be determined.

A witness saw the airplane approach from the northeast and begin to make clockwise turns overhead. The diameter of the turns was estimated to be between ¼- and ½-mile wide. The lights of the airplane were visible overhead, but it appeared as though the airplane was in the clouds or fog. During the third overhead circle, the airplane's lights became brighter, as though it had flown out of the clouds, and the airplane turned south away from the witness. The airplane then abruptly descended toward terrain, and the witness heard the sound of an impact . The witness reported that the engine sounded normal before impact. He remarked that, due to the clouds, the stars were not visible; however, he could clearly see the lighted top of a 400-ft-tall tower.

The pilot was not in radio contact with any air traffic control facility.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot's logbook was not located during the course of the investigation, and his total flight experience and time flown at night could not be determined. The pilot did not hold an instrument rating and his instrument experience and training received are also not known. .

On his application for his medical certificate, the pilot reported having no flight time. He also reported a convictions for driving under the influence on February 29, 2012, and possession of a controlled substance on May 14, 2001, February 10, 2005, and July 14, 2008. In addition, he reported last using methamphetamines on October 28, 2011.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane's maintenance logbooks were not recovered during the investigation and the date of the last annual inspection could not be determined. In addition, it is unknown if any recent maintenance was performed on the airplane.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 2115 automated weather observation at Marshall Memorial Municipal Airport (MHL), located about 30 nautical miles southwest of the accident site, included wind from 350° at 4 knots, ceiling broken at 300 ft above ground level, temperature 39°F, dew point 37°F, and an altimeter setting of 30.33 inches of mercury. These conditions were likely representative of those at the accident site at the time of the accident. An AIRMET was valid for the area of the accident site from 2100 to 0300, with forecast ceilings below 1,000 ft and visibility below 3 miles with mist and fog. There was no record of the pilot obtaining a weather briefing from an access-controlled source before the flight.

The National Weather Service (NWS) Surface Analysis Chart for 2100 depicted a low pressure system to the east of the accident site over Indiana with an occluded front extending southward and turning into a cold front across Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, into Louisiana, and off the Texas Gulf coast. An extensive area of low clouds extended from the low to the west and over the accident site. The station models in northern Missouri indicated northwest winds at 10 knots or less, overcast skies, with temperatures around 40°F with temperature-dew point spreads of less 6°F.

The NWS Weather Depiction Chart for 2200 depicted an extensive area of instrument flight rules (IFR) conditions over Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Iowa, Illinois, and northern Missouri, with marginal visual flight rules (MVFR) conditions surrounding the area and extending into central and eastern Missouri and over the accident site. The closest reporting station indicated overcast clouds with a ceiling at 2,100 ft. The Low-Level Significant Weather Prognostic Chart at the time expected MVFR to IFR conditions over northern Missouri.


The North American Mesoscale (NAM) numerical model for 2100 indicated a relative humidity greater than 80% from the surface to 3,000 ft, with an expected cloud base at 50 ft above ground level. The model depicted surface conditions with wind from 320° at 5 kts, temperature 3.6°C (38.5°F), dew point 3.5°C (38.3°F), and relative humidity of 99%. The model supported fog and low stratiform clouds. The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite system (GOES-13) infrared image at 2115 indicated an area of low stratiform clouds and/or deep fog extended over northern Missouri and Iowa and over eastern Missouri and Illinois with cloud tops near 2,000 ft.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The wreckage was located in an open hayfield. Impact signatures were consistent with a near-vertical impact with the terrain. All major components of the airplane were found at the accident site. Flight control continuity was established from the flight controls to their respective control surfaces. Both wings displayed accordion crushing along the entire length of their leading edges. The flaps appeared to be in the retracted position. The fuel selector was found in the right fuel tank position. Both wing fuel tanks contained fuel. The airspeed indicator read in excess of 160 mph. The altimeter Kollsman window read 30.00 inches.

The engine's upper spark plugs were removed and displayed normal wear. Engine continuity and compression were confirmed throughout the engine. One blade of the propeller was curled and displayed leading edge polishing of the blade. The other blade was missing several inches of its tip. No anomalies were detected with the airframe and engine.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was conducted on the pilot by the Boone/Callaway County Medical Examiner's Office, Springfield, Missouri, as authorized by the Chariton County Coroner. The cause of death was listed as blunt force injuries sustained in an aircraft accident, and the report stated that methamphetamine use may have contributed to the accident. In addition, thickening of the left ventricle of the heart was described in the autopsy report.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed forensic toxicology on specimens from the pilot. Testing was negative for carbon monoxide and ethanol. The following drugs were detected:

Amphetamine detected in liver
0.536 (ug/ml, ug/g) amphetamine detected in blood
8.49 (ug/ml, ug/g) methamphetamine detected in liver
5.07 (ug/ml, ug/g) methamphetamine detected in blood

Methamphetamine is a Schedule II controlled substance and is used medically to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and narcolepsy. Prescribed oral doses typically produce blood levels in the range of 0.02-0.05 ug/ml. Recreational users seeking intense euphoria snort, smoke, or inject the drug, and may often reach blood levels above 2.00 ug/ml. Methamphetamine levels reach peak blood concentration differently depending on mode of administration. Peak blood methamphetamine concentrations occur shortly after injection and a few minutes after smoking it. Peak blood concentrations of its psychoactive metabolite, amphetamine, occur around 10 hours after methamphetamine use.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Spatial Disorientation
The Airplane Flying Handbook (FAA-H-8083-3A) stated, "…the VFR pilot is, in effect, in IMC anytime he or she is inadvertently, or intentionally for an indeterminate period of time, unable to navigate or establish geographical position by visual reference to landmarks on the surface. These situations must be accepted by the pilot involved as a genuine emergency, requiring appropriate action…If the natural horizon were to suddenly disappear, the untrained instrument pilot would be subject to vertigo, spatial disorientation, and inevitable control loss."

The FAA Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, chapter 16, "Aeromedical Factors," stated, "Under normal flight conditions, when there is a visual reference to the horizon and ground, the sensory system in the inner ear helps to identify the pitch, roll, and yaw movements of the aircraft. When visual contact with the horizon is lost, the vestibular system becomes unreliable. Without visual references outside the aircraft, there are many situations in which normal motions and forces create convincing illusions that are difficult to overcome…Unless a pilot has many hours of training in instrument flight, flight should be avoided in reduced visibility or at night when the horizon is not visible. A pilot can reduce susceptibility to disorienting illusions through training and awareness, and learning to rely totally on flight instruments."

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA054
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, December 06, 2015 in Keytesville, MO
Aircraft: CESSNA 140, registration: N90123
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 6, 2015, about 2110 central standard time, a Cessna 140G airplane, N90123, impacted terrain near Keytesville, Missouri. The private pilot and passenger were both fatally injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. The flight operated without a flight plan. The flight's point of origin and destination are not known.

A witness saw the airplane approach from the northeast and begin to make clockwise turns overhead. The diameter of the turns was estimated to be between ¼ and ½ mile wide. The lights of the airplane were visible overhead but appeared as though the airplane was in the clouds or fog. On the third circle overhead the airplane's lights became brighter as though it had flown out of the clouds and the airplane turned towards the south away from the witness. The airplane then abruptly descended towards the terrain and the sound of an impact was heard. Prior to the accident, the witness reported that the engine sounded normal. He remarked that due to the clouds, the stars were not visible, however he was able to clearly see the lighted top of a 400' tall tower.

The wreckage was located in an open hay field. Impact signatures were consistent with a near vertical impact with the terrain. All major components of the airplane were found at the accident site. The airplane was examined and moved to a secure location.

The nearest aviation weather stations were 35+ nautical miles from the accident and did not reflect the weather described by the witness. A weather study will be conducted for the accident site.

At 2115, an automated weather reporting station located 37 nautical miles from the accident site reported a calm wind, visibility 7 miles, a clear sky, temperature 41° Fahrenheit (F), dew point 41° F, and a barometric pressure of 30.30 inches of mercury. At 2135, it reported wind from 300° at 4 knots, visibility 5 miles with mist, a broken ceiling at 700 feet, temperature 40° F, dew point 40° F, and a barometric pressure of 30.30 inches of mercury.

  Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov





CHARITON COUNTY - A Marceline pilot has released aerial photos to KOMU 8 News of wreckage following a plane crash Sunday night near Keytesville. 

Pilot Martin Cupp took aerial photos of the crash site in his Cessna 172 Monday afternoon from 2,500 feet above ground.

Cupp said he initially drove by the scene to make sure it wasn't one of his planes or someone he knew and later in the day when the sky cleared he took his plane up.

Cupp operates Cupp Aviation and has been taking aerial photography for about two years.

The photos of the wreckage are the first aerial shots of this type of situation Cupp has taken and he said he hopes it is his last.

After flying for 20 years, Cupp said he's never witnessed a crash like Sunday's up close and he hasn't seen one like it for a while.

The National Transportation Safety Board said pilot Andrew Beautte and passenger Dawn Harl were pronounced dead on the scene.

The NTSB is still investigating the details of the crash, including where it took off from and where it was supposed to land.


CHARITON COUNTY – The National Transportation Safety Board said Tuesday the pilot of a flight that crashed Sunday night, killing him and one passenger, did not have a flight plan and was not rated by the Federal Aviation Administration.

NTSB was working to determine where pilot Andrew Beautte took off from and where he was headed.

NTSB said it examined the plane engine and systems Tuesday and planned to remove the plane from the crash scene to investigate more.

NTSB also said the pilot was not FAA rated for the use of flying instruments. Officials said that doesn’t necessarily mean the pilot was not trained or did not know how to use the instruments.

Missouri State Highway Patrol Troop B said it received a report at 9:15 p.m. Sunday that a plane crashed eight miles northeast of Keytesville.

State troopers, Chariton County deputies and other emergency rescue personnel responded to the scene and found a 1946 Cessna 140 single-engine airplane in a hayfield.

Beautte, 40, from La Plata and passenger Dawn Harl, 38, from Des Moines, were pronounced dead at the scene.

Beautte was married to Jill Beautte and had a daughter in high school and a son in elementary school.

Source:  http://www.komu.com

CHARITON COUNTY - A spokesperson with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) confirmed Monday the agency was investigating a plane crash that left two dead.

According to the Missouri State Highway Patrol, Troop B Headquarters received a report around 9:15 p.m. Sunday night about a small aircraft crashing roughly eight miles northeast of Keytesville.

State troopers, Chariton County deputies and other emergency rescue personnel responded to the scene and located the wreckage of a 1946 Cessna 140 single-engine airplane in a hayfield.

The Boone County Medical Examiner said Andrew Beautte, 40, of La Plata and Dawn Harl, 38, of Des Moines, Ia. were pronounced dead at the scene.

Troopers believed Beautte piloted the plane.

NTSB spokesperson Keith Holloway said officials don't know which airport the plane was headed to or which airport it originated from. He said investigators are collecting information and the investigation is in its preliminary stages.

Holloway said NTSB officials were notified of the crash at around 1 a.m. Monday. MSHP said it expected Federal Aviation Administration investigators to arrive on the scene to conduct a complete investigation Monday.

Source:  http://www.komu.com

Aviation enthusiasts pedal human power: Half Moon Bay Airport (KHAF), San Mateo County, California

Alec Proudfoot and a host of volunteers tested their human-powered airplane for the first time on Saturday, and they did it at Half Moon Bay Airport.



There is nothing simple about human-powered flight, but that is the intriguing goal behind a remarkable aircraft that lifted off the ground for the first time on Saturday at Half Moon Bay Airport.

The project – dubbed Dead Simple Human-Powered Airplane – is the brainchild of Alec Proudfoot. It’s been years in the making and Saturday’s achievement was a soaring one for him and the 300 volunteers who designed and built the aircraft over 12,000 hours – all of it dreaming of such a day.

Volunteers from around the Bay Area gathered at the airport as early as 4 a.m. on Saturday. They had arranged for the runways to be closed from 6 to 8 a.m. so that they could see the fruition of their dream.

The aircraft is essentially a super-light recumbent bicycle with wings. The crew brought it to Half Moon Bay in a specially designed trailer, but some assembly was required. They came to the Coastside airport because the runway was long enough – designed to accommodate commercial aircraft – and with so little traffic on an early weekend morning that it could be closed for a private endeavor.

The other thing the dreamers needed was a still morning. Anything more than a 5-mph breeze would scuttle the test. Saturday’s weather held.

The result was a triumphant flight of 765 feet that never got higher than five feet off the ground. By comparison, the famed Wright brothers’ first flight was a mere 120 feet, and it would change the world. Proudfoot was ecstatic when it was all over.

“It was really great,” Proudfoot said. “As a first flight, that was sort of amazing.”

It was a big step for a crew that set out to build a human-powered aircraft as quickly as possible for no more than the price of a new car, and to have fun doing it.

There have been many attempts to build human-powered flying machines, some of them successful. But it remains a daunting task.

“This is much, much harder to do than people think,” said Glenn Reynolds, a past president of the Half Moon Bay Pilots’ Association and a vice president of the Experimental Aircraft Association, Half Moon Bay Chapter. “It’s the equivalent of a solo space flight.”

The problem is simple. It has to do with the power-to-weight ratio. How do you generate enough power to lift the weight of the pilot and plane? DaSH project engineers have designed an airplane that is half the weight of the pilot but has a wingspan of a modern 737 jet.

Proudfoot says a pilot would need to generate about 300 watts to maintain flight. To give a rough comparison, he says that is similar to a bicyclist riding up Tunitas Creek Road to Skyline … “fast.” Coastsiders who take the beachcomber out for a leisurely ride on the Coastal Trail are generating about 100 watts. Proudfoot said that a particularly athletic, elite pilot could conceivably keep the aircraft airborne for hours.

“I’m out of shape and overweight, but I could probably pilot it to the end of the runway,” said Proudfoot, who was the pilot for Saturday's maiden voyage.

Proudfoot has his own engineering consultancy and is a former Google engineer. He’s also worked on alternative fuel vehicles and has piloted helicopters, airplanes, gyro-copters and other insults to gravity.

He says the project is, in part, a nod to his original professional inspirations. In 1979, an American engineer named Paul MacCready Jr. designed a very similar-looking aircraft, the Gossamer Albatross, which was pedaled across the English Channel. Subsequent successful human-powered aircraft often have been multi-million-dollar projects. Originally, Proudfoot said he wanted to construct his for about the price of a new car.

“Well, it’s an expensive new car,” he said on Monday. “This is my Tesla.”

Proudfoot and his team had hoped to fly again on Sunday morning. They repaired a malfunction with a tail mount and were ready to give it a go, but rain precluded a Sunday morning flight.

The next steps include longer flights and training more athletic pilots, he said. He would like to fly again in the first couple of months of 2016, and they might return to Half Moon Bay, he said. He is also looking into salt flats or other flat, windless desert locations conducive to lift off.

Whatever happens to his project from here out, Proudfoot considers the project a success.

“It’s been a fun, educational and social experience,” he said.

Source:  http://www.hmbreview.com