Saturday, February 12, 2022

Taylorcraft BC12-D, N96552: Incident occurred in Talkeetna, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances. 


Date: 06-FEB-22
Time: 00:00:00Z
Regis#: N96552
Aircraft Make: TAYLORCRAFT
Aircraft Model: BC12
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: TALKEETNA
State: ALASKA

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aircraft was found inverted on snow covered ground. Alaska State Troopers made contact with owner who explained he crashed under unknown circumstances on January 05, 2022.


Date: 06-FEB-22
Time: 00:00:00Z
Regis#: N96552
Aircraft Make: TAYLORCRAFT
Aircraft Model: BC-12D
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: TALKEETNA
State: ALASKA



Alaska State Troopers were notified on Sunday, February 6th of an ELT beacon activation from an unidentifiable aircraft. The signal was identified as somewhere east of the Parks Highway near Willow and Talkeetna. Troopers determined that there were no distress calls or reports of overdue aircraft in the area. The Alaska Civil Air Patrol, equipped with specialized equipment to determine ELT beacon locations, patrolled the area starting that day to attempt to find the ELT beacon source.

Eight CAP volunteer aircrew members searched for a total of five hours over multiple days, often being affected by high winds and poor visibility due to severe weather in the area, and also conducted a 13-hour ground search in an attempt to identify and locate the beacon. Over the search period, the Alaska Wildlife Troopers deployed their helicopter to the area to search for the beacon source, but couldn’t find it. Additionally, the Alaska Army National Guard deployed a helicopter crew to the area to attempt to locate the beacon, but were also unsuccessful. 

After multiple days of searching by the Army National Guard, Civil AIr Patrol, and Alaska Wildlife Troopers, on the afternoon of February 10th, CAP volunteer pilots located a 1946 Taylorcraft BC12-D that was damaged and overturned in the area of Lynx Peak near Hatcher Pass. 

A rescue team immediately flew to the area from the Alaska Air National Guard. Upon arrival, rescue teams discovered an empty plane, with no apparent signs of injuries having occurred. The Air Guardsmen followed human tracks up the mountain where they stopped and weren’t able to locate any indication of the pilot’s current location.

The Alaska State Troopers and Alaska Wildlife Troopers immediately began efforts to determine if the pilot coordinated his own extraction, and was no longer in the field. At 6:35 p.m. on February 10th, the pilot was contacted via telephone, who stated that while attempting to land, his plane experienced a mechanical problem causing a hard landing. 

The aircraft was no longer airworthy, and the unnamed pilot departed the area with another pilot in a different plane. The owner is working to remove the aircraft from the area, and the NTSB was notified of the incident. 

The Alaska State Troopers and Alaska Wildlife Troopers want to remind pilots to notify the FAA if they are planning to leave an unsecured aircraft in Alaska wilderness or if they crash but can self-rescue through a private party. The search and rescue efforts resulting from this operation reportedly cost thousands of dollars and took multiple Troopers, Guardsmen, and CAP volunteers away from other duties to coordinate and respond to the multi-day search.

Dassault Mirage F1CR, N633AX: Accident occurred February 10, 2022 near Luke Air Force Base, (KLUF), Glendale, Maricopa County, Arizona

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
  • Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona
  • Airborne Tactical Advantage Company (ATAC); Luke AFB, Arizona 
  • USAF-HAF-AFSEC/SEF; Albuquerque, New Mexico 
  • Airborne Tactical Advantage Company; Ft Worth, Texas

Airborne Tactical Advantage Company LLC


Location: Glendale, Arizona
Accident Number: WPR22FA094
Date and Time: February 10, 2022, 11:05 Local
Registration: N633AX
Aircraft: DASSAULT AVIATION MIRAGE F1 CR
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Public aircraft

On February 10, 2022, about 1105 mountain standard time, an experimental Dassault Aviation Mirage F-1 CR Turbo-jet, N633AX, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Luke Air Force Base, (LUF), Glendale, Arizona. The pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane was operated as a public-use aircraft in support of the United States Air Force’s simulated combat flight training.

According to the accident pilot, he flew in the number two position in a flight of two aggressor jets. The formation took off and proceeded to the Military Operating Area (MOA), where the two airplanes split up into separate areas. Near the completion of the area work, the number two airplane’s pilot reported a discrepancy between the two fuel quantity indications in the cockpit. Shortly thereafter, the number two airplane recovered separately and before the lead airplane, since it reached its briefed minimum fuel status first. While exiting the MOA, and enroute on the recovery, the pilot reported a loss of fuel pressure and shortly afterwards the engine flamed out.

The pilot attempted to restart the engine but was unsuccessful. When the pilot determined that he could not make the runway at LUF, he accomplished a left turn to an uninhabited area and successfully ejected from the airplane. Subsequently, the airplane struck desert terrain about 16 miles northwest of LUF; there was no post-crash fire. The airplane wreckage was recovered to a secure facility for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: DASSAULT AVIATION
Registration: N633AX
Model/Series: MIRAGE F1 CR
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLUF,1085 ft msl 
Observation Time: 10:58 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C /-5°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / , 30°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.11 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Glendale, AZ (LUF) 
Destination: Glendale, AZ

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 33.705778,-112.63488 (est)






BUCKEYE, Arizona - Officials with Luke Air Force Base say an aircraft crashed about 15 miles northwest of the base on February 10.

In a statement, officials say the Mirage F1 aircraft, which operated out of Luke Air Force Base, was on a routine training mission before the crash.

"The pilot was able to safely eject," read a portion of the statement. We have learned that the pilot suffered minor injuries, and is expected to make a full recovery,

Base officials say Buckeye Police, along with support teams from the 56th Civil Engineer Squadron fire department, 56th CES explosive ordnance disposal unit, and 56th Security Forces Squadron, responded to the crash scene.

"Our Airmen and partners are our most important resource and we are committed to conducting our mission to train the world’s greatest fighter pilots as safely as possible," said Brig. Gen. Gregory Kreuder, 56th Fighter Wing Commander, in the statement.. "We are thankful for the continued outstanding support Luke receives from our community partners, especially during difficult situations like this. Finally, I’m grateful nobody was hurt on the ground and the pilot was safely recovered with only minor injuries."

Records from the FAA show the aircraft is owned by Airborne Tactical Advantage Company, and the aircraft was used in adversary training exercises.

Beech B200 Super King Air, N277GE: Incident occurred February 10, 2022 at Camarillo Airport (KCMA), Ventura County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California

Struck a bird on takeoff roll and aborted takeoff. Minor damage to tail cone. 

RLTWF LLC


Date: 10-FEB-22
Time: 19:29:00Z
Regis#: N277GE
Aircraft Make: BEECHCRAFT
Aircraft Model: BE200
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
City: CAMARILLO
State: CALIFORNIA

Sonex Xenos, N137RC: Incident occurred February 10, 2022 at Melbourne Orlando International Airport (KMLB), Brevard County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

After landing Runway 27R, made a right turn approximately 1800' from approach end and exited into grass. Towed to the ramp with unknown damage.  


Date: 10-FEB-22
Time: 16:52:00Z
Regis#: N137RC
Aircraft Make: CALDWELL RICHARD A
Aircraft Model: XENOS
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: MELBOURNE
State: FLORIDA

Piper PA-31 Navajo: Incident occurred February 10, 2022 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida 

While on customs ramp, the left engine started on fire. Airport operations responded and extinguished fire.

Date: 10-FEB-22
Time: 17:00:00Z
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA-31
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: FIRE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: FORT LAUDERDALE
State: FLORIDA

Beechcraft 58 Baron: Incident occurred February 10, 2022 at Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport (KBTR), Louisiana

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Attempted to depart Runway 22L when a throttle got stuck and aircraft veered off runway into the grass. Aircraft towed to parking. 

Date: 10-FEB-22
Time: 20:07:00Z
Aircraft Make: BEECHCRAFT
Aircraft Model: BARON 58
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
City: BATON ROUGE
State: LOUISIANA

Cirrus SR22T, N317KJ: Accident occurred February 10, 2022 near Lincoln Airport (KLNK), Nebraska

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska

CC Equipment Holdings LLC
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska 
Accident Number: CEN22LA117
Date and Time: February 10, 2022, 20:06 Local
Registration: N317KJ
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22T
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On February 10, 2022, at 2006 central standard time, a Cirrus SR22T, N317KJ, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Lincoln, Nebraska. The pilot and a passenger were uninjured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot stated that the flight was uneventful, and the airplane was operating [normally] with all gauges indicating proper operating limits. At 10,000 ft mean sea level (msl) and about 60 nautical miles east of Lincoln Airport, Lincoln, Nebraska, there was a brief “stutter” of the engine, and the engine began to run rough. He contacted Omaha approach control and told them the engine was running rough and would like to divert to Plattsmouth Municipal Airport/Douglas V Duey Field (PMV), Plattsmouth, Nebraska (PMV was located about 39 nm and 080° from LNK). 

The pilot said he a received clearance to fly direct to PMV and to descend and maintain 4,000 ft msl. About 40 nm miles from LNK and 8,000 ft msl, the pilot said he told Omaha approach control that the engine smoothed out, and he would like to continue the flight to LNK at 6,000 ft. msl. The pilot said as the flight continued to LNK, the engine’s number 3-cylinder head temperature indicated 0° Fahrenheit. About 15 nm east of LNK, the engine began to run rough again, and the pilot asked Omaha approach control if he could begin a slow descent toward LNK. He was cleared to descend and maintain 3,000 ft msl. About 12 nm from LNK, he was issued a clearance for a visual approach to runway 17 and subsequently a clearance to land. As he continued the descent to 2,500 ft msl, the engine began to run rough, the oil pressure rapidly decreased, and the airplane’s indicated airspeed decreased. About 6 nm from LNK, he told LNK air traffic control that he would be unable to attain the runway and was going to look for a field to land on. He located a field and deployed the airframe parachute. The airplane touched down in the field and sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP 
Registration: N317KJ
Model/Series: SR22T 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: LNK,1219 ft msl 
Observation Time: 20:05 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 12°C /-1°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 8000 ft AGL 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 15 knots / , 220°
Lowest Ceiling: 10000 ft AGL
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting: 29.62 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 40.850889,-96.759111 (est)





LINCOLN, Nebraska (KLKN) – Officials say a plane had to make an emergency landing in a field just northeast of Lincoln.

Lincoln Fire and Rescue, Waverly Fire and Southeast crews responded to the crash near N 112th Street and Havelock Avenue just after 8 o’clock Thursday evening.

There were two male passengers on the plane. Both escaped with minor injuries.

The pilot of the Cirrus SR22T plane tells Channel 8 that he and a friend were flying from Indiana to Lincoln to make a pit stop overnight before planning to head to the West Coast tomorrow morning. He says the engine of the plane went out at between 2000 to 2500 feet in the air, forcing him to make an emergency landing.

Both individuals say they are relieved that the situation was not worse.

An LSO official tells Channel 8 that the Federal Aviation Administration will be stopping by the scene of the crash on Friday morning to investigate.                     

Scanner reports say the plane deployed the airframe parachute and had about 25 gallons of fuel left.

Officials say there were two people on board, who suffered minor injuries.

Lincoln Fire and Rescue, Waverly Fire and Southeast crews were all dispatched to the scene.

According to the scanner, Lincoln health officials are also on the scene to help with an approximate 25 gallon fuel leak.

Cessna 180, N4750B: Accident occurred February 10, 2022 at Carrizozo Municipal Airport (F37), Lincoln County, New Mexico

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque, New Mexico 


Location: Carrizozo, New Mexico
Accident Number: WPR22LA095
Date and Time: February 10, 2022, 14:30 Local
Registration: N4750B
Aircraft: Cessna 180 
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N4750B
Model/Series: 180 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Unknown
Passenger Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 33.383,105.5237 (est)

Grob G 120TP, N405TP: Incident occurred February 09, 2022 at Buckeye Municipal Airport (KBXK), Maricopa County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aircraft landed hard. 


Date: 09-FEB-22
Time: 20:00:00Z
Regis#: N405TP
Aircraft Make: GROB
Aircraft Model: G 120TP
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: BUCKEYE
State: ARIZONA

Mooney M20J, N201VJ: Accident occurred February 09, 2022 at Paradise Skypark Airport (CA92), Butte County, California

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California


Location: Paradise, California 
Accident Number: WPR22LA097
Date and Time: February 9, 2022, 09:30 Local
Registration: N201VJ
Aircraft: Mooney M20J
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Mooney 
Registration: N201VJ
Model/Series: M20J 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 39.705681,-121.61675 





BUTTE VALLEY, California — A pilot suffered minor injuries when the small plane they were flying crashed in Butte County Wednesday morning, according to the Cal Fire Butte unit.

The crash happened at the Paradise Skypark airport in Paradise around 9:45 a.m., officials said. The plane crashed short of the runway while it was landing, the FAA told KCRA 3.

The pilot was the only person in the plane, officials said. No other details were released on the pilot.

The plane was a Mooney M20J, according to the FAA.

The FAA and NTSB are investigating the crash.

Hughes 369D, N9159F: Accidents occurred February 09, 2022 and April 25, 2020

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland
Rolls Royce; Indianapolis, Indiana 
Haverfield Aviation; Gettysburg, Pennsylvania


Location: Bel Air, Maryland 
Accident Number: ERA22LA117
Date and Time: February 9, 2022, 16:28 Local
Registration: N9159F
Aircraft: Hughes 369D 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Positioning

On February 9, 2022, about 1628 eastern standard time, N9159F, a McDonald Douglas MD369D helicopter, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Bel Air, Maryland. The commercial pilot was not injured. The helicopter was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 positioning flight.

The pilot stated that while conducting powerline inspection work earlier in the day, line personnel reported that the helicopter was making a strange "whistle" noise. The pilot inspected the helicopter, and no anomalies were noted or observed. The pilot continued with normal operations, but the noise continued and one of the operator’s superintendents took a video, which recorded the “whistle” sound. The pilot landed and ceased all human external cargo operations. He then reviewed the video, re-examined the helicopter, and spoke with company maintenance personnel. Though no obvious mechanical issues were observed, the pilot “parked” the helicopter for the remainder of the workday.

At the end of the workday, the pilot again inspected the helicopter and found no mechanical reason not to reposition the helicopter back to its normal base of operations. He and another company helicopter departed as a flight of two. Several minutes into the flight, the pilot said the ENGINE CHIP light illuminated. He told the other pilot that even though the engine seemed to be operating normally, he would need to land as soon as practicable. Shortly after, the engine began to make a “grinding” noise along with an odor of engine oil, which eventually became smoke in the aft section of the passenger compartment. With the presence of smoke and the potential for an inflight fire, the pilot initiated an emergency decent-to-land to a suitable landing area. During the decent the engine noise and smoke in the aft section of the cabin intensified and began moving to the forward section of the cockpit. Descending through the landing flare, as the pilot leveled the helicopter to land, the engine stopped producing power and smoke filled the cockpit, which reduced his visual reference to the ground. The pilot attempted to slow the rate of descent and impacted the ground in a near level attitude.

During the ground run, the front portion of the skids dug into the ground causing the helicopter to pitch forward. The pilot applied aft cyclic to keep from rolling over and kept the helicopter level. During the landing sequence, the main rotor blades struck the tail boom, which resulted in the horizontal and vertical stabilizers, and tail rotor assembly separating from the helicopter.

The helicopter was recovered and secured for further investigation.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Hughes
Registration: N9159F
Model/Series: 369D 
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built:
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Rotorcraft external load (133), Commuter air carrier (135)
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: APG,44 ft msl
Observation Time: 16:58 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 9 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 10°C /-2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 190°
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 7 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.92 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Bel AIr, MD 
Destination: Hartford CO, MD (0W3)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 39.5359,76.3483 (est)




BEL AIR, Maryland  — A helicopter made a hard landing Wednesday evening in Harford County, according to the sheriff's office.

Authorities reported the crash around 4:32 p.m. in the 2000 block of Calvary Road in the Bel Air area.

SkyTeam 11 Capt. Roy Taylor reported the helicopter ended up doing what's called an auto rotation and the helicopter's skids touched the ground, chopping off the tail.

There are no reports of injuries.











Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board
   
The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland
Rolls-Royce Corp; Indianapolis, Indiana
MD Helicopters; Mesa, Arizona
Haverfield Aviation; Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

TVPX Aircraft Solutions Inc 
Owner Trustee for benefit of Haverfield  

Haverfield International Incorporated doing business as Haverfield Aviation 


Location: Pylesville, Maryland 
Accident Number: ERA20LA160
Date and Time: April 25, 2020, 12:40 Local 
Registration: N9159F
Aircraft: Hughes 369
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel starvation
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 133: Rotorcraft ext. load

Analysis

The commercial helicopter pilot was attempting, via a long line, to move a conductor wire while it remained in contact with the ground, which is classified as a Class C rotorcraft-load combination (RLC) operation. According to the pilot, while he maneuvered the helicopter about 150 ft above ground level, he pitched the helicopter nose up about 5° to 10°, with no lateral banking, for about 10 to 15 seconds. The engine then experienced a total loss of engine power. In the autorotation, which the pilot estimated to be about 4 to 5 seconds, the pilot was only able to release one of two mechanisms that secured the long line to the helicopter. As a result, just before touchdown, the long line became taut and caused the helicopter to roll over onto its left side. The tailboom, main rotor, and tail rotor sustained substantial damage, andthe pilot was uninjured. 

Postaccident examination of the helicopter found 146 lbs of fuel onboard. The pilot later reported that the helicopter had about 200 lbs of fuel (slightly less than half of a full load) when he began the flight about 1.5 hours before the accident. An engine test run found no evidence of mechanical malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation of the engine.

The investigation identified four previous accident investigation reports that extensively documented loss of engine power due to fuel starvation on MD369 series helicopters while they were maneuvered in Class C RLC long line operations. In these past accidents, the remaining fuel on board ranged between 93 to 151 lbs. The investigations of these accidents found varying levels of pitch up and/or lateral banking (common maneuvers during Class C RLC operations) could interrupt normal fuel flow to the engine (that is, unport) at fuel levels well above the standard fuel minimums required for visual flight rules operation.

Based on information provided by the helicopter manufacturer, with 146 lbs of fuel onboard, a 28.5° positive pitch attitude, with no lateral banking, could unport the fuel supply to the engine in static conditions. Therefore, in dynamic conditions, such as maneuvering, unporting could occur at lower pitch attitudes.

The operator’s operating limitations at the time of the accident stated that for any Class C RLC operation, the flight must begin with a full fuel load and last no more than 1 hour and explains the policy by citing the risk of uncovering the fuel port due to lateral banking during these operations. The accident pilot believed that, similar to the operation he had completed earlier in the flight, moving the conductor wire was a Class B operation because it would not require any lateral banking of the helicopter. Because the pilot misconstrued the RLC class of operation he was performing, he erroneously believed that he only needed a minimum of 100 lbs of fuel at landing, which is the fuel minimum he selected on the operator’s job hazard analysis form before beginning the accident flight; the form contained no references to RLC classes. 

As a result of the accident, the operator updated its minimum fuel policies on its job hazard analysis form and in its RLC flight manual. The policies now provide specific references toClass B and C long line operations and detailed examples to help pilots’ understanding of which fuel minimums apply for specific operations.

Thus, without evidence of malfunctions that would preclude the engine from producing or maintaining power and given the occurrence of fuel starvation during other Class C RLC long line operations with similar levels of fuel onboard, it is likely that the accident helicopter's maneuvering and nose-up attitude during the pilot’s attempt to move the conductor wire led to unporting of the remaining fuel, which resulted in fuel starvation and the loss of engine power.

Additionally, it is possible that the pilot could have successfully landed the helicopter following the loss of engine power had the long line been released. The pilot had to pull two separate release mechanisms to detach the long line because the helicopter was previously configured for human external cargo (HEC) long line operations, although the specific operation being performed when the accident occurred did not involve HEC and redundancy to secure the long line was not needed (HEC operations were being performed earlier in the flight). As a result, the pilot did not have sufficient time to activate both release mechanisms, and the helicopter was substantially damaged during the attempted landing.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The loss of engine power due to fuel starvation as a result of unporting of the fuel tank supply pickup while the helicopter was maneuvered to move a conductor wire. Contributing to the accident was the helicopter’s inappropriate configuration for the type of operation being conducted, which impeded the pilot’s ability to release the long line and perform a successful emergency landing.

Findings

Aircraft Fuel - Fluid level
Aircraft (general) - Capability exceeded
Aircraft Configuration - Incorrect use/operation
Organizational issues (general) - Not specified
Personnel issues Knowledge of procedures - Pilot

Factual Information

History of Flight

Maneuvering-hover Fuel starvation (Defining event)
Autorotation External load event (Rotorcraft)
Autorotation Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

On April 25, 2020, at 1240 eastern daylight time, a Hughes 369D helicopter, N9159F, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Pylesville, Maryland. The pilot was not injured. The helicopter was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 133 as a rotorcraft external load operation.

The pilot reported that while he was performing human external cargo (HEC) long line operations, he heard on the radio that ground personnel were having difficulty moving a conductor power line (wire) nearby. He proceeded to the landing zone, which was about 300 to
400 ft from the area requiring assistance, and dropped off the HEC. Then, while hovering, he picked up a conductor hook via the long line (with assistance from ground personnel) and continued to the area that needed support.

He reported that after the hook was attached to the conductor wire, he began maneuvering for about 10 to 15 seconds to move the wire a short distance laterally, as a crane was supporting the weight of the wire. According to the pilot, while maneuvering, he applied "slight aft and up pressure" to move the conductor wire and there was no lateral banking. He believed the pitch attitude during the maneuvering was about 5° to 10° nose up. After the conductor wire was moved to the desired area, the pilot maneuvered to remove the hook from the wire, but before the hook was free, the helicopter entered a left yaw and the engine began "spooling down."

The pilot reported that he subsequently heard the "engine out alarm" and entered an autorotation by "slamming the collective down." The pilot reported that the loss of engine power occurred about 150 ft above ground level (agl) and that he immediately pulled the belly band release lever—one of two levers needed to release the long line (the belly band was a secondary cable support system the operator used for HEC operations to provide redundancy in the event of an inadvertent release of the cargo hook; see figure). The pilot stated that he did not have sufficient time to pull the second (mechanical release) lever on the cyclic control to release the long line.

As the helicopter entered the flare, the pilot pulled the collective up to complete the autorotative landing, but the long line, which remained attached to the helicopter and conductor wire, became taut and caused the helicopter to roll onto its left side. The main rotorblades impacted the ground. 

Multiple witnesses on the ground reported that they heard the helicopter's engine lose power while the pilot was maneuvering, and they subsequently observed the helicopter begin a rapid descent. One witness stated that when the helicopter was about 3 ft from the ground, “the long line got tight and started to tip the aircraft over.”

The following figure shows the belly band around the fuselage, the main hook, and long line.



Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 34,Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: April 19, 2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: March 8, 2020
Flight Time: 12549 hours (Total, all aircraft), 8736 hours (Total, this make and model), 12500 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 141 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 101 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1.7 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Hughes
Registration: N9159F
Model/Series: 369 D 
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 1979
Amateur Built:
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 1090605D
Landing Gear Type: None; Skid 
Seats: 5
Date/Type of Last Inspection: April 6, 2020 100 hour 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Turbo shaft
Airframe Total Time: 17015 Hrs as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Allison Gas Turbine (RollsRoyce)
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 250-C20B
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 420 Horsepower
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Rotorcraft external load (133)
Operator Does Business As: Haverfield Aviation 
Operator Designator Code:

The accident helicopter’s fuel system was composed of two interconnected fuel tanks installed beneath the passenger seats. Fuel was delivered to the engine from a fuel pick-up port on the left side of the left tank. The rotorcraft flight manual stated that the total usable fuel was 421.9 lbs.

Manufacturer Guidance

In November 2015, MD Helicopters, the type certificate holder at the time, published Operational Safety Notice OSN2015-002, “Fuel Starvation Due to Unporting of Fuel Supply Pick-Up.”

The notice warned operators that when the helicopters are used to conduct operations with a “long line” attached to pull or tow objects on the ground, a significant side load can be placed on the helicopter. These side loads can create high fuselage pitch and roll angles as well as uncoordinated flight, which in turn can increase the amount of unusable fuel and result in fuel starvation due to unporting of the fuel supply pick-up. 

The notice further stated in part: MDHI Helicopters are not specifically certified for operations with the potential for sustained high fuselage pitch and roll angles in uncoordinated flight, such as powerline stringing operations. To help mitigate the possibility of fuel starvation and the potential safety risk, consider modifying fuel management procedures for such operations. Instead of allowing such operations with minimum fuel safety margins associated with normal flight attitudes during coordinated flight, consider increasing minimum fuel level requirements when operations will involve high deck angles in pitch and roll during uncoordinated flight.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC) 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: THV, 486 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 26 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 12:53 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 301°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 3600 ft AGL
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 120° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 8°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Pylesville, MD (NONE) 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Pylesville, MD 
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 12:30 Local
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:39.697223,-76.392776(est)

Photographs provided by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector who examined the helicopter at the accident site found that the helicopter had rolled over and come to rest on its left side, and the long line remained attached from the main hook on the helicopter to the power line. The tail boom and main/tail rotors sustained substantial damage. There was no evidence of fuel spillage at the accident site.

Additional examination of the helicopter supervised by the NTSB investigator-in-charge found that the cyclic, collective, and throttle each had continuity through the full range of motion. The main hook release lever opened the hook normally when activated.

There were no obstructions observed in the turbine air inlet. The oil filter and fuel filters were clear of any remarkable debris. Pressure and leak tests were performed on the engine’s pneumatic and fuel system; no leaks were observed on either system. The electrical fuel pump (start pump) would not activate when electrical power was supplied to the helicopter. Areplacement electrical fuel pump was installed on the helicopter and functioned normally. With the new electrical fuel pump installed, a total of 146 lbs (21.5 gallons) of fuel was pumped from the helicopter. This volume was consistent with the fuel gauge, which displayed about 150 lbs.

The engine was subsequently removed and test run under the supervision of the NTSB investigator-in-charge. The engine produced idle through takeoff power, with no anomalies observed, and all engine parameters remained within tolerances throughout the test run.
For a portion of the test run, the positive pressure fuel supply was eliminated to simulate conditions similar to an electrical fuel pump failure. The engine continued to produce takeoff thrust consistent with the previous data when positive fuel pressure was available.

Additional Information

FAA Regulations and Guidance

Advisory Circular (AC) 133-1B, Rotorcraft External-Load Operations, provided the following two definitions for Class B and C Rotorcraft-load combinations (RLC):

Class B RLC. The external load is jettisonable, carried above or below the skids, and lifted free of land or water during the rotorcraft operation. An air conditioner unit being lifted onto the roof of a tall building is an example of a Class B load (§ 1.1).

Class C RLC. The external load is jettisonable and remains in contact with land or water during the rotorcraft operation. Wire stringing, dragging a long pole, and boat towing are some examples of Class C loads (§ 1.1).

AC 133-1B does not contain minimum fuel standards based on the specific type of RLC class to be flown.

Part 133 requires no additional fuel minimums beyond that required in 14 CFR 91.151, Fuel Requirements for Flight in VFR Conditions.

Tests and Research

As part of this investigation, MD Helicopter provided the NTSB a computer model that outlined a combination of static pitch and roll angles and corresponding fuel levels at which the fuel pick-up point may become unported. According to this information, with about 21.5 gallons of fuel onboard, at 0° lateral banking, the pitch up attitude required to unport the fuel pick up was 28.5°. The computer model could not account for dynamic flight operations that may affect the movement of fuel in the tanks (for example, maneuvering, turbulence, or uncoordinated flight, which would allow for fuel to move freely within the fuel tank).

A search of the NTSB’s aviation accident database for 14 CFR Part 133 fuel starvation events involving any rotorcraft type performing Class C RLC operations found three reports relevant to this investigation.

In 1990, the NTSB investigated a helicopter accident involving a MD369D that was conducting external long line operations (LAX91LA054). The report stated that by duplicating the helicopter's pitch attitude and fuel load of 115 lbs postaccident, the fuel pick-up point became unported at fuel quantity levels at or below 115 lbs. The exact pitch attitude was not specified in the report.

In 2012, the NTSB investigated a helicopter accident involving an MD369E that was conducting external long line operations (WPR12LA328). The report stated that 117 lbs of fuel remained on board and previous investigations of similar accidents determined that the fuel tank supply pickup can become unported with a fuel load of less than 151 lbs when pitch-androll attitudes approach 20ยบ.
In 2017, the NTSB investigated a helicopter accident involving an MD369E that was conducting external long line operations (ERA17LA209). The report stated that 14 gallons (93 lbs) of fuel remained on board and that the low fuel level light illuminated when pitch up attitudes similar to those during the accident were duplicated.

Additionally, in 2008, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau investigated a helicopter accident involving a MD369ER (Aviation Occurrence Investigation AO-2008-025) that was conducting power line stringing operations. The investigation found through testing that it was possible to introduce air into the fuel system through the fuel tank pick-up point when fuel quantity was less than 85L (151 lbs) and subjected to a 20° nose up and 20° right roll attitude.

Organizational and Management Information

The accident helicopter operator’s FAA-approved RLC flight manual (RLCFM) and corporate policy manual required that for all flight operations, the MD 500D helicopter land with no less than 100 lbs of fuel. For Class C RLC operations, the RLCFM specifically required the following:

Always start any Class C external load with a full tank of fuel. As the aircraft leans over in a steep bank to the right, this may easily uncover the fuel sump. There should be a maximum of one hour of flight time while performing any Class C external load.

The operator required that its Job Hazard Analysis form be completed before each flight. The “Fuel Check Off and Limitations” section of the form contained two options for the MD 500:

100 lbs Landing Minimum” and Wire/ Rope Pull and Wreck Out Operations: Maximum 1 hr (45 min F/FF_ flight time with max fuel load. The form completed before the accident flight indicated that the option for 100 lbs landing fuel minimum had been selected.

The form contained no references to RLC classes.

During postaccident interviews, the pilot reported the following concerning his understanding of when the more restrictive fuel minimums (maximum 1 hour of flight time with a maximum fuel load) would be required:

…when we are doing Side Pull Operations. This is for when the hook is relocated from the bottom of the aircraft and installed on the side. This would be for pulling of rope or a small steel cable for powerline construction. There is a lot of right lateral banking when pulling the rope and steel cable during this flight profile.

This operation that we were conducting on the accident day was more in line with Class B operations. I understand when you have a load attached to a fixed object it becomes a C Load, but this situation did not fit that flight profile (hook on side and a high right lateral bank). The flight profile was more along the lines of a slight nose up attitude, no lateral or banking took place.

After this accident, the operator updated the Job Hazard Analysis form and the RLCFM to specifically associate fuel minimums with RLC classes (for example, Class B or C). In addition, specific examples of long line operation (for example, water bucket, lifting/moving wire, rope pull) are provided in the fuel minimum policies.

The operator also reported that safety briefings were held with relevant operational staff to ensure their understanding with the revised fuel minimum policies.

Cessna 170B, N135JB: Incident occurred February 09, 2022 at Montgomery County Airpark (KGAI), Gaithersburg, Maryland

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland

Aircraft taxiing for departure struck the right wing of Cirrus SR22,  N1556J, which was parked. 


Date: 09-FEB-22
Time: 15:00:00Z
Regis#: N135JB
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 170
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: GAITHERSBURG
State: MARYLAND

Cirrus SR22, N987AA: Accident occurred February 09, 2022 at Moore County Airport (KSOP), Pinehurst, Moore County, North Carolina













WARRANTY:
There is no warranty, express or implied for the information provided herein or the condition, useability, workability, operability or marketability of the aircraft salvage. All times are approximate and the logbooks and aircraft should be inspected by each bidder BEFORE BIDDING. Failure of the bidder to view the salvage or wreckage, or confirm any information provided is NOT grounds for a claim or withdrawal of bid after bid closing date.
 
HOURS estimated from logbooks or other information - not guaranteed or warranted

AIRCRAFT:  2003 Cirrus SR22 N987AA, s/n: 0513

The last Annual Inspection is dated 08/06/2021 at Hobbs 2409.4. 

The last log entry on 02/10/2022 records Hobbs 2567.9

ENGINE: Continental IO-550N, s/n: 686819. 

The last annual inspection entry is date 08/06/2021 and notes Hobbs 2409.4

PROPELLER:  Hartzell PHC-J3YF-1RF, s/n: FP2163B 

Prop Annual inspection recorded in the engine log on 08/06/21 at Hobbs 2409.4

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  On February 09, 2022, N987AA was damaged while landing at Moore County Airport, North Carolina                                                     
LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:  AMF Aviation LLC, Springfield, Tennessee

REMARKS:  

Insurer reserves the right to reject any and all bids. 

Salvage is as is/where is. 

The posting information is the best to our knowledge. 

An inspection of the salvage is highly recommended. 

Logbooks may not be complete.

Read more here:   http://www.avclaims.com

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina

CraigAir LLC


Location: Southern Pines, North Carolina
Accident Number: ERA22LA125
Date and Time: February 9, 2022, 17:48 Local 
Registration: N987AA
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP
Registration: N987AA
Model/Series: SR22 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Dusk
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSOP,461 ft msl 
Observation Time: 17:56 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 10°C /-1°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Erwin, NC (HRJ)
Destination: Southern Pines, NC

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 35.237423,-79.389034 (est)






Scotty Malta at the Moore County Airport.
~


Whispering Pines resident Cassie Stingle was on the way home Wednesday evening, going down Airport Road after having picked up her daughter from The O’Neal School, when she heard a low-flying aircraft.

“I immediately slowed down to watch an Apache helicopter flying really low to the ground and straight down the middle of the airport. It suddenly picked up speed and disappeared to my right.”

Stingle then saw the lights of a small plane coming from behind her. “Within just a few seconds, the plane hit the ground and my heart sank. I stopped my car and got out to see if anyone was hurt or if there was anything I could somehow do.”

Watching the smoke and a trail of fire, she snapped a picture while she waited for someone to arrive.

“I could hear the sirens coming almost immediately but I was still so relieved to see these two people standing outside their plane. It could have been so much worse.”

The Cirrus SR 22 single-engine plane, owned and piloted by Pinehurst resident Mark Craig, crash landed and came to rest nose down in a grass area just off the runway. The landing caused a small grass fire, which Southern Pines firefighters quickly extinguished. Neither Craig nor an unidentified passenger were injured.

J.A. Brecher shared a similar story and photo minutes after Stingle arrived on the scene.

“I saw the (helicopter) before I took the photo.”

Moore County Airport Manager Scotty Malta, a veteran airport manager with almost 20 years’ experience, quickly closed the airport runway after the crash. He sent out the official NOTAM — Notice to Airmen — turned off all runway lights, and instructed his staff to put large fabric Xs down the runway to ward off any additional air traffic.

Because there is no air control tower — the Federal Aviation Administration deems Moore County to have an “uncontrolled” airport — there are different guidelines to communicate with pilots. The FAA’s official position is that pilots “should” communicate with positions and intentions.

“Moore County Airport is relieved that there were no injuries and both the passenger and the pilot were able to walk away,” he said. “At this time, the FAA has released the plane, but the investigation continues regarding the extent of the communication and or any interaction with another aircraft. Again, we are thankful for the professionalism of the emergency responders and staff and appreciate the concern and assistance of local residents.”

Malta said the pilot did not report any mechanical issues with his plane. Helicopters operating around the airport at the time could have affected the plane’s landing. The military regularly uses the airport property for various operations.

“It appears that the pilot was caught in a small microburst and was just a victim of circumstances,” Malta said.

Debris had been removed by Thursday morning and normal operations restored.

“Pilots and clients have been especially patient and understanding,” Malta said. “We were able to secure a unique sweeper for this type of clean-up, but before we were able to locate one, both Whispering Pines and Pinehurst offered us the use of similar equipment. Throughout the last 24 hours, the airport is fortunate to have these reports to share instead of recounting something much worse.”