Monday, July 23, 2012

Malaysia - Bid to find crashed Eurocopter EC120 - Dept seeks help of experts to locate and retrieve wreckage from river

Kuching, Malaysia - THE recovery of the Eurocopter EC120 helicopter wreckage from Sungai Batang Lupar is crucial for investigations into the aircraft's crash in which all three passengers died, Department of Civil Aviation director-general Datuk Azharuddin Abdul Rahman said yesterday. 

 In an interview with TV3, he said his department was seeking the help of agencies that had the expertise to pin-point the exact location of the wreckage underwater and then help his department recover the wreck.

"We have not found the wreck," said Azharuddin.

The four-year-old, single-engine European-built helicopter plunged into the river near Kampung Triso last Friday, killing quantity surveyor Siti Khuzaimah Annuar, 27, architect Henry Loh, 42 and a vice-president of Parti Keadilan Rakyat Peter Ato Mayau, 53.

The 35-year-old pilot survived the crash.

Recovery of the wreckage would allow crash investigators to determine what caused the accident.

Azharuddin said investigators had already interviewed the pilot, German national Rico Steger, here last Saturday and they had also visited the crash site.

"I can't say much or speculate because we have yet to look at what could have caused the crash."

He was surprised when asked if Sebiro Holdings, the company that owned the helicopter, had permission to park the aircraft in its compound in a residential area next to a busy highway.

"I thought it took off from the Kuching International Airport. I will have to look into that."

The helicopter took off from the Sebiro compound in Simpang Tiga at 8.57am and crashed 25 minutes later.

Authorities learnt of the crash in the afternoon.

Steger swam for several hours to Kampung Tebelu to seek help.


Source:   http://www.nst.com.my/nation/general/bid-to-find-crashed-copter-1.111781

Sky Star Kitfox 4, N602JT: Accident occurred July 22, 2012 in Crosslake, Minnesota

http://registry.faa.gov/N602JT

NTSB Identification: CEN12LA466  
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 22, 2012 in Cross Lake, MN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/13/2013
Aircraft: TOMAN JACK JR SKYSTAR KITFOX 4, registration: N602JT
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airplane was observed flying low and slow over a lake. The airplane stalled and entered a spin before it impacted the water. The passenger was able to exit the airplane on his own, but the pilot was pinned in the wreckage. A first responder was able to keep the pilot's head above the water until an ambulance arrived, but the pilot later succumbed to his injuries. Examination of the airplane and engine found no mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. The medical examiner found drug paraphernalia in the pilot's shirt pocket. Postaccident toxicology testing was consistent with impairment of the pilot due to his use of marijuana prior to the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain adequate airspeed, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's impairment due to marijuana.

On July 22, 2012, at 0951 central daylight time, an experimental-amateur built Sky Star Kitfox 4 sustained substantial damage after it lost control and impacted Upper Whitefish Lake near Cross Lake, Minnesota. The private pilot was fatally injured and the passenger was seriously injured. No flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed from Pine River Regional Airport (PWC), Pine River, Minnesota, at 0938. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight conducted under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The passenger stated the purpose of the flight was to look for fishing spots in the lake and check out some property on the shoreline. The passenger said that as they headed toward the shoreline, the airplane was in a slight nose up attitude and climbing, but he did not recall how fast they were going. The doors of the airplane were open, and the passenger was looking outside "watching everything." Up to this point, it was a normal flight. He said that the airplane then suddenly jerked violently to the left, rolled, and spun down toward the lake. As soon as they hit the water, the passenger unbuckled his seatbelt and got out of the airplane. Almost immediately, a boat pulled up and he was lifted onto the boat.

There were several eyewitnesses who saw the airplane spin toward the water. One witness, who had taken flight lessons, was in his boat when he first observed the airplane. He said it was flying about twice the height of the tree tops and was headed east. The witness said the airplane's attitude was tail down and nose high. The airplane appeared to be "wallowing" and about to stall. The witness momentarily took his eyes off the airplane, but when he looked back up, the airplane was spinning nose down toward the water. He immediately drove his boat to the accident site and assisted the passenger and the pilot.

A handheld Garmin global positioning system (GPS) was found in the airplane and sent to the Safety Board’s Research and Engineering laboratory in Washington DC to be downloaded. The accident flight was recorded from the time it departed Pine River Regional Airport at 0938.28 up until 0951.13 when the unit stopped recording. A review of the last minute of the flight revealed that at 0950:20, the airplane was at an altitude of 1,624 feet mean sea level (msl), or approximately 328 feet above the water headed southeast at a ground speed of 39 knots. Over the next 53 seconds, the airplane began to make a shallow descent to 1,496 feet msl (approximately 200 feet above the water) and slowed to a ground speed of 34 knots before the data ended just northwest of the shoreline.

Examination of the airplane by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors revealed the airframe sustained substantial damage from impact with the water. No pre-impact mechanical anomalies were noted.

According to the pilot's autopsy report, the cause of death was multiple traumatic injuries resulting from an airplane crash. No significant natural disease was identified, but the medical examiner identified an object found in the left shirt pocket as a “one hit” pipe.

The toxicology results from an independent lab used by the medical examiner found evidence of tetrahydrocannabinol (Marijuana) in the urine and performed a test that quantified the amount in the pilot’s peripheral blood with a result of 0.0056 ug/ml ,along with 0.0059 ug/ml of its primary metabolite, tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid.

Femoral and heart blood was sent to the FAA's Civil AeroMedical Institute’s toxicology lab in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, along with tissue specimens. The CAMI lab found the blood unsuitable for the quantification of tetrahydrocannabinol. However, 0.046 ug/ml of tetrahydrocannabinol was found in lung and tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid, the primary metabolite, was found in urine (0.0952 ug/ml), liver (0.0873 ug/ml), lung (0.0094 ug/ml), and blood (0.0111 ug/ml).


NTSB Identification: CEN12LA466 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 22, 2012 in Cross Lake, MN
Aircraft: TOMAN JACK JR SKYSTAR KITFOX 4, registration: N602JT
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On June 22, 2012, at 1103 central daylight time, an experimental-amateur built Sky Star Kitfox 4 sustained substantial damage after it lost control and impacted the water near Cross Lake, Minnesota. The private pilot was fatally injured and the passenger was seriously injured. No flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed from Brainerd Lakes Regional Airport (BRD), Brainerd, Minnesota, and an undetermined time. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight conducted under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector performed an on-scene examination of the airplane and talked to several witnesses. According to the inspector, the airplane was observed flying about 300-500 feet above the lake and it appeared to be in a slight climb. The airplane then banked hard to the left and entered a nose dive into the water. The airplane sustained substantial damage to most of the airframe.


FAA IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 602JT        Make/Model: EXP       Description: EXP- KITFOX
  Date: 07/22/2012     Time: 1442

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: CROSS LAKE   State: MN   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES. CROSS LAKE, MN

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                 # Crew:   0     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:   1
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Pleasure      Phase: Maneuver      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: MINNEAPOLIS, MN  (GL15)               Entry date: 07/23/2012 
 








   

CROW WING COUNTY, Minn. - Authorities have identified the man who died in a Sunday morning plane crash near Brainerd. 

The Crow Wing County sheriff's office says Dan Morgan Steffen, 55, died after the experimental airplane he was flying crashed into Upper Whitefish Lake Sunday morning. 

Steffen was featured in a story on KARE 11 in October of 1995. The story, by veteran reporter Ken Speake and photojournalist Mark Anderson, told of a special relationship Steffen had with a Canadian goose named Daisy. 

The day after the fatal plane crash, Speake returned to KARE 11 to talk to Julie Nelson about his memories of that story. 

The only other passenger on the plane at the time of the crash, 61-year-old Frederick Graham Hammer Jr., suffered non-life threatening injuries and is expected to recover.

Story, photo and video:    http://www.kare11.com 

Oil field thieves hunted from the sky: Aircraft camera allows deputies close up from afar





HOBBS, N.M. (KRQE) - One of the state's biggest money-making industries has become a livelihood for thieves, as they pick apart the equipment in seclusion. Now, law enforcement is taking to the sky to catch them in the act. 

Lea County Sheriff's Deputies survey the land in a Cessna 206 Stationair, looking for criminal activity.

"That's part of this Sheriff's department's philosophy on crime fighting, is to take a proactive approach on things," explained Major Jim Wilmeth, Lea County Undersheriff. "We have a strong interest in helping our strongest industry stay successful in the county."

Which is why deputies have taken to the sky. Oil field thefts are one of the main problems Lea County Sheriff's Deputies deal with. But, with Forward Looking Infrared, or "FLIR," on a high definition camera, it's the criminals who are being hunted.

The HD camera located on the right wing of the aircraft, allows deputies to track movement from the ground from up to 11,000 feet away. Activity on the ground can be seen close-up on a laptop by an operator and investigators can track and record action from afar.

At night, the camera senses heat, which shows deputies exactly where cars and people are, that would otherwise go unnoticed.

"They're busy doing whatever they're doing on the lease, they may not catch on that there's a small aircraft that's floating around on top of them, filming what's going on" Wilmeth said.

Deputies in the air often have investigators on the ground, working in tandem. They patrol on ATVs, looking for anything out of the ordinary.

"A lot of times they'll cut the line to the box that goes to the pump jack, and we look for that," said one investigator.

Wilmeth said 150 lbs. of copper can net a thief more than $500, and three times as much for the higher-grade copper. However, he emphasized, replacing the equipment and fixing the damages costs companies far more than that.

Wilmeth says common oil field tools, such as a set of tongs, could cost around $20,000 and can be sold for $5,000 to $7,500 on the black market. The department hopes to thwart these crimes.

"We work very diligently to make sure that the criminal element knows that we're out there, we are looking for them," said Wilmeth.

The Sheriff's Department won't say how many thieves they've caught in the act using the plane, but Wilmeth did say that it's provided them some good leads.

Oil field crimes have cost companies more than $200,000 over the last year.

Story, photo, video and comments:    http://www.krqe.com

Piper PA-25-235, N7313Z: Accident occurred July 23, 2012 in Westerly, Rhode Island

NTSB Identification: ERA12LA474 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 23, 2012 in Westerly, RI
Aircraft: PIPER PA-25-235, registration: N7313Z
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On July 23, 2012, about 1500 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-25, N7313Z, registered to and operated by Simmons Aviation, was presumed substantially damaged following a forced landing into the Atlantic Ocean, near Westerly, Rhode Island. The certificated airline transport certificated pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the local flight, which originated from Westerly State Airport (WST), Westerly, Rhode Island, about 1445. The banner tow flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot stated that he departed with 25 gallons of fuel, for a 45 minute flight, and had not taken on any fuel that day. About 12 minutes into the flight, the engine began running "roughly", and then it sounded as though the engine misfired before it lost power completely. The pilot subsequently ditched the airplane approximately 6 miles from shore. The pilot transmitted a distress call, and was later rescued by a civilian boat. The airplane was last seen floating east, and to date has not been recovered.

http://registry.faa.gov/aircraftinquiry/NNum_Results.aspx?NNumbertxt=N7313Z




 
Credit: NBC 10 News 
A pilot (in the orange shirt) whose plane ditched in Block Island Sound on Monday, July 23, 2012, leaves the U.S. Coast Guard Station Point Judith.
 
 




 NARRAGANSETT, R.I. -- 

A pilot whose plane experienced engine trouble and ditched in Block Island Sound on Monday was rescued from the water.


The pilot was picked up by a private boat at about 4 p.m.  A Coast Guard boat transferred the pilot to Point Judith.

The pilot walked out of the Coast Guard station, got into a truck and drove away about an hour later.  He told NBC 10 News that he was OK.

Two men came out of the station carrying two airplane wheels.

The single-seat plane, which was pulling a banner with a marriage proposal, went down in the water between Watch Hill and Block Island.  It had taken off from Westerly Airport at about 3 p.m.

Several mayday calls were made before the plane went down. The pilot reported engine trouble.

The plane's tail number is registered to Simmons Aviation of Pawcatuck, Conn.

The pilot's name and hometown were not immediately available.



Story, photo and video:    http://www2.turnto10.com
Pilot rescued with help from 8-year-old son

A Good Samaritan boater and the pilot’s 8-year-old son took part in rescuing a pilot whose plane went down in Block Island Sound Monday afternoon.

Lt. Bryan Swintek, a Coast Guard Spokesman at Sector Southeastern New England at Woods Hole, Mass., said the Coast Guard took a call from New England Air Control at about 3:21 p.m., reporting that they had overheard a radio transmission between a pilot and a young child who was later identified as the pilot’s son.

Swintek said the pilot was reporting he was in distress.

Swintek said the pilot was heard to tell his son. “I’m going down.”

New England Air Control was able to provide a probable flight path of the craft.

The Coast Guard was able to contact the boy whose name they did not release. The son was able to report that his dad had put out the distress call about two minutes after takeoff, which helped the Coast Guard’s search.

Swintek said an “urgent marine information broadcast” was put out on the universal marine radio channel 16.

Boats from Coast Guard stations at Castle Hill, Point Judith and Block Island were deployed for the search, along with a helicopter from Cape Cod. He said first responders from area towns were also alerted.

“We basically sent everyone in the area,” he said. “We didn’t have a good location.”

He said a civilian boater rescued the plot from the water about 3 miles south of Ninigret Pond in Charlestown, R.I.

The pilot was then brought aboard a Coast Guard vessel and taken to Point Judith for medical evaluation.

“He was alert and oriented when they got him,” Swintek said. “He was speaking and did not appear to have any serious injuries, but he is going to Point Judith for further evaluation.”

Swintek credited the son with being a big help in the mission.

“He was incredibly calm,” Swintek said. “He played a key role in helping his dad.”

Swintek said the aircraft had not yet been located or recovered.

“We’re now making the transition from a search-and-rescue mission to a pollution and debris response,” he said.
Source:    http://www.theday.com

Report: Plane carrying proposal sign crashes

Went down in the waters off Westerly

Coast Guard crews were called to the waters off Westerly Monday afternoon after reports of a small plane crash.

USCG Lt. Bryan Swintek told Eyewitness News the plane had just gotten airborne and the pilot was believed to be talking to his 8-year-old son over the radio when he broadcast a mayday.

The FAA confirmed the plane was carrying a "Will You Marry Me" banner when it went down into the Block Island Sound.

Swintek told Eyewitness News New England Airline heard the mayday and then notified the Coast Guard.

While boaters were put on alert to look for the plane, Coast Guard officials were able to speak to the pilot's son to get a general idea where his father was.

Swintek said a good Samaritan aboard the boat "The Stampede" was able to pull the pilot - who was alert and conscious - from the water.

The pilot was then taken to Pt. Judith, where an ambulance from Narragansett EMS was waiting onshore.

After evaluating the the pilot, EMS advised him that he did not need to be transported to the Hospital.
Story, photo and video:    http://www.wpri.com

Piper PA-18-150, N8048D: Accident occurred July 15, 2012 in North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

http://registry.faa.gov/N8048D

NTSB Identification: ERA12LA453
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 15, 2012 in North Myrtle Beach, SC
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/04/2012
Aircraft: PIPER PA-18-150, registration: N8048D
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot stated that he was conducting a banner-tow flight; he turned on final approach at 300 feet above ground level (agl) and reduced the power to the idle position. His airspeed was between 60 and 70 mph. The carburetor heat was not activated, which the pilot indicated was company policy. The company refuted the pilot’s statement regarding carburetor heat. The airplane descended to about 10 feet agl and was 50 feet from the banner pick up poles. He added full power and noticed that the rpm was at 2,500, which was 100 rpm less than full power. He pitched the nose up and the airplane climbed to about 200 feet. The rpm continued to decrease to 1500 rpm. The pilot lowered the nose and checked the throttle, and it was full forward. He increased the mixture, and there was no change in rpm. The airplane would not maintain altitude, and he informed the tower that he was going down. He reduced the throttle to the idle position and lowered the flaps to the full down position. He made a forced landing beyond the banner tow grass area, clearing a berm and colliding with the airport perimeter fence. The airplane nosed over and came to a complete stop and the engine stopped running. The pilot turned the fuel off at the fuel selector valve. The pilot stated that he did not experience any mechanical problems with the airframe or flight controls before the accident. A carburetor icing chart indicated that the airplane was at risk of serious icing at glide power given the weather conditions at the time of the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's inadequate use of carburetor heat during cruise flight, which resulted in a partial loss of engine power and subsequent forced landing.

On July 15, 2012, at 0900 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-18-150, N8048D, registered to Barnstormers Flite Signs Inc., operating as Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 banner tow flight experienced a partial loss of engine power while attempting to pick up a banner. The airplane collided with an airport perimeter fence and sustained substantial damage. The commercial pilot reported no injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Grand Strand Airport (CRE), North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina at 0845.

The pilot stated he turned on final approach at 300 feet above ground level (agl) and reduced the power to the idle position. His airspeed was between 60 to 70 mph. The carburetor heat was not activated, which is company policy. When the airplane reached about 10 feet (agl) and 50 feet from the banner pick up poles, he added full power and noticed the rpm was at 2,500 which was 100 rpm less than full power. The pilot pitched the nose up and climbed to 200 feet and the rpm continued to decrease to 1500 rpm. He lowered the nose and checked the throttle and it was full forward. He increased the mixture and there was no change. The airplane would not maintain altitude and he informed the tower that he was going down. He reduced the throttle to the idle position and lowered the flaps to the full down position. He made a forced landing beyond the banner tow grass area, clearing a berm and colliding with the airport perimeter fence. The airplane nosed over and came to a complete stop and the engine stopped running. The pilot turned the fuel off at the fuel selector. The pilot stated he did not experience any mechanical problems with the airframe or flight controls before the accident.

The registered owner stated "It has never been the company policy of Barnstormers Flite Signs to advise a pilot "NOT" use the carb heat in the event of any emergency situation for obvious reasons."

The temperature at the time of the accident was 73 degrees Fahrenheit and the dew point temperature was 72 degrees Fahrenheit. According the carburetor icing chart the airplane would encounter serious icing at glide power.

Review of Advisory Circular 91-51A EFFECT OF ICING ON AIRCRAFT CONTROL AND AIRPLANE DEICE AND ANTI-ICE SYSTEMS states in paragraph 5 DISCUSSION b. " There are two kinds of icing that are significant to aviation: structural icing and induction icing....c. Small aircraft engines commonly employ a carburetor fuel system or a pressure fuel injection system to supply fuel for combustion. Both types of induction systems hold the potential for icing which can cause engine failure. (1) The pilot should be aware that carburetor icing can occur at temperature between 13 degrees Celsius (C) (20 degrees Fahrenheit (F) and +21C (70F) when there is visible moisture or high humidity. This can occur in the carburetor because vaporization of fuel, combined with the expansion of air as it flows through the carburetor, causes sudden cooling, sometimes by a significant amount within a fraction of a second. Carburetor ice can be detected by a drop in rpm in fixed pitch propeller airplanes and a drop in manifold pressure in constant speed propeller airplanes. In both types, usually there will be a roughness in engine operation. Some engines are equipped with carburetor heat for use in both prevention and removal of ice."

 ==========

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH, SC (WMBF) - The banner plane that crashed into the ocean in North Myrtle Beach was removed from the ocean floor Sunday afternoon. 

 It crashed last Wednesday. A boat pulled the banner plane from 44th Avenue South in North Myrtle Beach to Cherry Grove. The plane's expected to be pulled from the water near the Intracoastal Waterway.

People at the beach had mixed reaction Sunday to there being a plane so close to where they swim.

"I think it's crazy. It's not something you see everyday, that's for sure," Kristen Swisher said.

People lined the beach to watch as dive teams and the owner of the plane spent hours trying to figure out just how they were going to get that plane off the ocean floor.

North Myrtle Beach Patrol Lifeguard Coordinator Monty Reed said the plane owner ended up attaching air bags to the plane, attached it to a boat and drove relatively slow all afternoon. They ended the trip in Cherry Grove where the boat is expected to be removed from the water completely.

Quentin McIlvaine said he is worried about what's going to happen as a result of a plane crashing into the water where he swims.

"The oil. The oil spilling up on the water and getting on people or getting on the fish. And then like just like the safety if someone was swimming and they get cut by glass because the plane crashed and it got broken down," McIlvaine said.

Officer Reed said Beach Patrol is keeping a close eye on the area where the plane sat, to ensure there are no safety issues. Reed said there is no reason for concern.

"It's marked. It's several hundred yards out. Lifeguards won't let them swim that far out so I don't think it's gonna be an issue. Only issue there could be is maybe possibly a fuel spill or anything like that but right now we don't have any reports or anything," Reed said.

Nobody was hurt in that banner plane crash last Wednesday. The pilot of the plane was the only person inside when it crashed, and he made it out safely with the help of some people in the water.

Story, photos and video:   http://www.wistv.com


NTSB Identification: ERA12LA453 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 15, 2012 in North Myrtle Beach, SC
Aircraft: PIPER PA-18-150, registration: N8048D
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On July 15, 2012, at 0900 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-18-150, N8048D, registered to Barnstormers Flite Signs Inc., operating as Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 banner tow flight experienced a partial loss of engine power while attempting to pick up a banner. The airplane collided with an airport perimeter fence and sustained substantial damage. The commercial pilot reported no injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Grand Strand Airport (CRE), North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina at 0845.

The pilot stated he turned on final approach at 300 feet above ground level (agl) and reduced the power to the idle position. His airspeed was between 60 to 70 mph. The carburetor heat was not activated, which is company policy. When the airplane reached about 10 feet(agl) and 50 feet from the banner pick up poles, he added full power and noticed the rpm was at 2,500 which was 100 rpm less than full power. The pilot pitched the nose up and climbed to 200 feet and the rpm continued to decrease to 1500 rpm. He lowered the nose and checked the throttle and it was full forward. He increased the mixture and there was no change. The airplane would not maintain altitude and he informed the tower that he was going down. He reduced the throttle to the idle position and lowered the flaps to the full down position. He made a forced landing beyond the banner tow grass area, clearing a berm and colliding with the airport perimeter fence. The airplane nosed over and came to a complete stop and the engine stopped running. The pilot turned the fuel off at the fuel selector. The pilot stated he did not experienced any mechanical problems with the airframe or flight controls before the accident.

The airplane has been recovered pending further investigation.


All Nippon Airways Grounds Dreamliners: Rolls-Royce to replace parts in some Boeing 787 Dreamliners

Japan's All Nippon Airways said on Monday it grounded part of its fleet of 787 Dreamliners after tests revealed a risk of engine corrosion, but Boeing Co, the aircraft's manufacturer, said it does not expect the timing of deliveries of the jetliner to be affected. 

The engines on the ANA planes, Trent 1000s, were supplied by Rolls-Royce, which said it was replacing a component on a number of its engines.

ANA, the launch customer for the 787, the world's first passenger jet built mainly from lightweight carbon fiber, said the action stemmed from a flawed process that could leave part of its UK-manufactured engines vulnerable to early corrosion.

The airline grounded five of its 11 Dreamliners, but three of the twinjet airplanes have been fixed and are flying again. The other two are waiting for parts from Rolls-Royce and could be out of action for a few weeks, an ANA spokesman said.

The glitch is the latest disruption to Boeing's flagship jet as the Chicago-based company recovers from a series of production delays that have come to typify the latest models being produced by Boeing and its European rival, Airbus .

“The extent of the issue with ANA appears relatively minor at this stage, given that (three) of the aircraft have already returned to service,” said RBC Capital Markets analyst Rob Stallard in a note on the incident.

Alex Hamilton, managing director with boutique investment firm EarlyBirdCapital, said he didn't think Boeing share weakness was tied to the ANA announcement, as the broader market sold off.

“My guess is the problem is fixable,” Hamilton said.

Shares of Rolls-Royce fell 2.7 percent, while Boeing was down 1.5 percent in afternoon trading in New York. Shares of General Electric Co, which offers an alternative engine for the 787, were up nearly 1 percent on Monday, outperforming the broader market.

The 787 engine problem involves a gearbox supplied by Hamilton Sundstrand, part of U.S. conglomerate United Technologies, but for now is contained to one batch.

Two people familiar with the matter said concerns over corrosion came to light during endurance testing in the UK on one of the Trent 1000 engines designed by Rolls-Royce.

During the ground test, corrosion was discovered on part of the gearbox used to drive ancillary systems. Investigators traced this to a new manufacturing process that was immediately reversed, the people said, asking not to be named.

Boeing said it was aware of the findings made by Rolls during engine testing that revealed the corrosion.

“We don't expect timing of any deliveries to be affected by this,” Boeing's Scott Lefeber, a spokesman with 787 Communications, said by email.

“The replacement is expected to be complete in the days ahead,” Boeing added in a statement. “No airplanes will be delivered with affected parts.”

SUSPECT BATCH

Boeing said that currently, All Nippon is the only customer operating 787s with Rolls-Royce engines.

Of the 859 Dreamliners that have been ordered or delivered at this point, Rolls-Royce engines have been selected for about 228 planes, while General Electric engines have been chosen for 370 planes, according to Boeing data. Rolls spokesman Richard Hedges said by email there were 287 firm orders on hand for 787s with Trent 1000 engines.

“We have seen no such problems with our 787s. But we have found out that out of the eleven 787s we own, five of them are carrying those parts,” Japan's ANA said in a statement. “For those five aircraft, we have switched them with other aircraft and are continuing to operate the flights.”

A total of 17 engines contain gear boxes from the same suspect batch as the one used in the endurance test, eight of which have been delivered to ANA, industry sources said.

“We have identified that a component on Trent 1000 engines fitted to Boeing 787 Dreamliners has a reduced service life. As a proactive measure, this component is being replaced in a number of engines,” a Rolls-Royce spokesman said.

United Tech's Hamilton Sundstrand arm said it was working with the other aerospace suppliers to solve the problem.

As of end-June, only Japanese carriers were operating the 787 Dreamliner, which entered service with ANA in October.

Japan Airlines, which has four Boeing 787s in its fleet, uses engines built by GE and therefore does not face problems similar to those affecting ANA, said Seiji Takaramoto, a Japan Airlines spokesman.

GLITCHES

The grounding the five Dreamliners by ANA is but one of several problems with aircraft that have delayed production and have come to typify flaws in new jetliners made by Boeing and Airbus.

In November, ANA reported a landing gear problem weeks after taking delivery of the first $194 million Dreamliner. 1/8 ID:nN1E7A60QX 3/4

In March, Boeing disclosed delamination or stress in part of the 787's fuselage, forcing it to repair dozens of jets.

In June, ANA complained that the 787's electronic dimmable windows were not dark enough for long flights.

A blowout on a different type of Rolls-Royce engine on the Airbus A380 in November 2010 led to delivery bottlenecks for the world's largest passenger plane as engineers swapped dozens of engines on the production line.

Rolls competes with GE to power both the A380 and the 787 Dreamliner.
Story:   http://www.chicagotribune.com

Beginner's (bad) luck: Paraglider breaks both legs as he plunges down 50ft cliff on first ever flight - near Pebble Beach, Barton on Sea, Hampshire

A paraglider's first ever flight turned to disaster on Sunday as he plunged 50 feet down a cliff, breaking both his legs and sustaining serious injuries. 

 These dramatic pictures show emergency services scrambling to assist the stricken pilot in a tricky cliff side operation.

The unnamed man in his 40s remained conscious as he waited for rescuers to reach him on the ledge that broke his fall.

He had performed a daring loop the loop manoeuvre and landed before rolling over the edge of the cliff, near Pebble Beach, Barton on Sea, Hampshire.

Specialists from the ambulance service's Hazardous Area Response team lowered the man to the ground by 7.20pm in a painstaking 90 minute effort before a helicopter from the Hampshire and Isle of Wight air ambulance flew him for treatment at Southampton General Hospital.

Photographer Matt Hardy, who lives nearby and witnessed the dramatic fall and rescue operation, said the man had landed in a difficult position for rescuers.

Mr Hardy, 24, said: 'He took off and did a loop the loop round and when he came in to land somehow rolled down the cliff.

'He stopped about three-quarters of the way down.

'The emergency services took about an hour to an hour and a half to bring him up, probably because of his broken leg.

'There were people everywhere.'

A Lymington coastguard member was first at the scene before being joined by rapid response teams from the South Central Ambulance Service and crews from the coastguard and Maritime Agency from nearby Southbourne.

The British Hang Gliding and Paragliding Association website says that trainee paragliders undergo ten days of flying and sit an exam covering flight theory, meteorology and basic air law  to get their pilot's rating, which allows them to fly in their clubs around the UK.

 

Story, photos and comments: http://www.dailymail.co.uk

Two gliders in mid-air collision over Newmarket - UK

 The glider which landed safely following the mid-air collision over Newmarket.

Two gliders have collided over Newmarket this afternoon during a national gliding competition.

 The East of England Ambulance Service said the two pilots escaped without life-threatening injuries.

Cambridge Gliding Centre, based in Little Gransden, Bedfordshire, confirmed that the pilots were taking part in a national gliding competition.

A spokesman said: “Two gliders were involved in a mid-air collision near Newmarket. One of the pilots landed the glider safely and the other pilot parachuted out and is safe too and that’s all we know at this stage.

He said the police, ambulance and Air Accident Investigation Branch had all been informed.

Ambulance crews were called to the incident just before 4pm after eye witnesses reported at least one person had ejected from one of the gliders.

Both casualties were located in a field near the Al Bahathri gallop.

One escaped injury and the other was initially unconscious but regained consciousness and did not suffer any traumatic injuries. That patient was taken to Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge, by land ambulance.

One witness said there were about 20 gliders flying over the town shortly before the collision, with reports they had also been seen over Fordham and Soham.

Suffolk Police were initially involved in the incident, but was passed over to Cambridgeshire. First calls came into Suffolk Police at 4pm.

The incident they believe was at 3.57pm.

Story and photo:  http://www.newmarketjournal.co.uk


 
 A map of the crash scene

A pilot has been found and brought to safety after his glider was involved in a mid-air collision with another during a competition. 

The wreckage of the two aircraft was found near Snailwell in Cambridgeshire, near Newmarket on the border with Suffolk.

One of the pilots parachuted to safety, while a hunt was launched for the other who was briefly unaccounted for.

Police and paramedics were called to the scene at about 4pm, including an air ambulance, and the Air Accidents Investigation Branch had been informed.

Lorna Marsh, spokeswoman for the East of England Ambulance Service, said both pilots had now been found in a field on the east side of Newmarket gallops.

"One sustained no injuries and the other was initially unconscious but regained consciousness and did not suffer any traumatic injuries," she said.

"That patient was taken to Addenbrooke's Hospital by land ambulance," she added.

A force spokeswoman said it was understood a glider competition had been taking place in the area.

She said the alarm was raised after "a parachute had been seen coming down near Snailwell in Cambridgeshire".

"There was a report two gliders had collided," she said.

"It would appear he (the parachutist) was one of the pilots.

"Both gliders have been found in Cambridgeshire."


Watch Video:  http://www.itv.com

Story:    http://news.sky.com


Pilots safe after gliders collide 

 Two pilots have been found after their gliders collided above Cambridgeshire

Two pilots escaped without serious injury after their gliders collided, the ambulance service has said.

The wreckage of the two aircraft was found near Snailwell in Cambridgeshire, near Newmarket on the border with Suffolk.

One of the pilots parachuted to safety but the other was briefly unaccounted for after police and paramedics were called at about 4pm.

Lorna Marsh, spokeswoman for the East of England Ambulance Service, said both casualties had now been found in a field on the east side of Newmarket gallops.

She added: "One sustained no injuries and the other was initially unconscious but regained consciousness and did not suffer any traumatic injuries. That patient was taken to Addenbrooke's Hospital by land ambulance."

A Suffolk Police spokeswoman said they understood there had been a glider competition taking place in the area when they were called to the scene.

"We were called just before 4pm to a call that a parachute had been seen coming down near Snailwell in Cambridgeshire," the police spokeswoman said.

"There was a report two gliders had collided. It would appear he (the parachutist) was one of the pilots.

"Both gliders have been found in Cambridgeshire."

She said an air ambulance was at the scene with land ambulances and that the Air Accidents Investigation Branch had been informed

Story:  http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk

Microlight strikes power line during emergency landing in Fife

A pilot escaped unscathed after the engine of his microlight failed as he flew over north-east Fife. 

 As he made an emergency landing the aircraft struck power lines at Pilgrims Lodge, Lathones, near St Andrews.

The drama occurred around 2pm on Saturday shortly after take-off from nearby Kingsmuir Airfield. It is now being investigated by the Air Accident Investigation Branch.

A spokesman for Fife Police said: ''The microlight suffered engine failure and the pilot attempted an emergency landing.

''He was unable to avoid collision with high voltage power lines, causing the lines to come down, but he managed to land the aircraft without further problem.

''He was able to land completely uninjured.''

ScottishPower was called out to repair the damage and return power to nearby homes, which were disconnected for around an hour.

A spokesman for the firm said: ''About 105 properties were affected. We had engineers out and worked to get them back on as quickly as possible.''

A spokesman for the Air Accident Investigation Branch confirmed the incident had been reported to it and it had launched an investigation.
 

Story and photo:   http://www.thecourier.co.uk

Cessna A185F Skywagon, N5168E: Accident occurred July 22, 2012 in Mapleton, Maine

 http://registry.faa.gov/N5168E

NTSB Identification: ERA12LA480  
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 22, 2012 in Mapleton, ME
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/13/2013
Aircraft: CESSNA A185F, registration: N5168E
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

During a cross-country flight at an altitude of about 2,500 feet mean sea level and about 5 nautical miles from the destination airport, the pilot observed a sudden decrease in engine power. After activating the high-power fuel boost pump setting and subsequently switching fuel tanks, the pilot performed a forced landing to a nearby field; the boost pump remained activated for the rest of the flight. During the landing, the airplane collided with trees, resulting in substantial damage to the fuselage and right wing. Fuel normally flows by gravity from each wing’s fuel tank to a three-position selector valve. The selector valve then allows fuel flow from either the left wing tank, the right wing tank, or both tanks simultaneously. A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed no fuel in the right wing tank, 10 to 12 gallons of fuel in the left wing tank, and unobstructed fuel lines from the left wing tank to the fuel selector. A visual engine examination and engine test run with fuel supplied directly to the fuel selector revealed no engine operating anomalies, indicating that the pilot likely had the right fuel tank selected when the engine first lost power. When the pilot attempted to regain engine power, he left the auxiliary fuel pump activated for the rest of the flight, well beyond the 3- to 5-second interval dictated by the airplane’s engine restart procedures, which likely resulted in the engine flooding.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s improper fuel management, which resulted in fuel starvation and a total loss of engine power, and his use of an improper engine restart procedure.


On July 22, 2012, about 1430 eastern daylight time, a Cessna A185F, N5168E, was substantially damaged following a partial loss of engine power and collision with terrain in Mapleton, Maine. The private pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight originated at a private airstrip in Ashland, Maine about 1330, and was destined for Presque Isle Airport (KPQI), Presque Isle, Maine.

According to the pilot, he departed with about 26 to 28 gallons of fuel onboard for the one hour flight to PQI, where he intended to refuel the airplane. While flying north of PQI at an altitude between 2,500 and 3,000 feet mean sea level and an engine power setting of 2,500 rpm, the pilot noticed a sudden decrease in engine power that sounded like the engine was being “throttled back.” At the time, he observed that the right wing fuel tank indicated a “very low” fuel level and the left tank fuel gauge indicated about one-quarter tank full.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, the pilot initially reported having the fuel selector on the left tank. After the loss of engine power, the pilot switched to the right tank and activated the fuel boost pump. The engine appeared to regain some power, but lost power shortly after at which point the pilot placed the fuel selector in the “Both” position.

In his statement to the NTSB, the pilot noted that after the initial power loss, he turned the fuel selector from the “Both” setting to the left tank position, activated the high power setting of the fuel boost pump and then rotated the fuel selector to the right tank setting. The boost pump remained engaged and in the high power setting for the remainder of the flight. After observing the engine continue to produce low power, the pilot performed a forced landing in a field. During the landing, the airplane collided with trees, resulting in substantial damage to the fuselage and right wing.

An FAA inspector examined the airplane at the scene, which was located about 2 nautical miles north of PQI. The inspector confirmed substantial damage to the airframe and fuel in the left wing tank, but could not verify fuel in the right tank due to its inaccessibility. An examination of the left and right tank fuel vents revealed no obstructions.

According to the pilot, 3 days after the accident, the airplane was recovered from the trees and about 10 to 12 gallons of fuel were drained from the left wing tank while the right wing tank was empty. According to a mechanic, neither wing tank had been breached.

The fuel bowl and selector were drained, and no evidence of contamination was noted. There was also no evidence of contamination of the fuel tanks and screens. An external fuel tank was connected directly to the fuel selector and a propeller was installed on the engine. The engine was started and allowed to warm up for 2 to 3 minutes before tests were conducted. A magneto check revealed no anomalies. The engine was run for approximately 15 minutes at various power settings, during which, it accelerated without hesitation and ran smoothly. Unobstructed fuel flow was confirmed from the fuel tanks to the fuel selector, which was operated through its full range with no anomalies. After the engine run, a subsequent examination revealed no abnormalities with the spark plugs or engine fuel filter bowl.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate and had accumulated about 430 hours total flight time, of which 202 hours were in the accident airplane make and model. His most recent third class FAA medical certificate was issued on September 9, 2010.

The 1845 automated weather observation at PQI included winds from 220 degrees at 10 knots with gusts to 15 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; broken cloud layers at 7,000 feet and 8,000 feet; temperature 27 degrees Celsius (C); dew point 13 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.95 inches of mercury.

The airplane was manufactured in 1979, and was equipped with a Continental IO-520-D, 300-horsepower reciprocating engine, and amphibious landing gear. According to maintenance records, the airplane’s most recent annual inspection was completed on May 12, 2012. The airframe had accrued a total time of 3,437.4 hours and the engine had accrued a total time of 3,382.2 hours at the time of inspection.

According to the description of the Cessna A185F fuel system found in the pilot’s operating handbook,

“Fuel flows by gravity from the two wing tanks to a three-position selector valve labeled LEFT TANK, RIGHT TANK, AND BOTH ON. With the selector valve in the LEFT TANK, RIGHT TANK, or BOTH ON position, fuel flows through an accumulator tank, fuel shutoff valve, fuel strainer and through a bypass in the auxiliary fuel pump (when it is not in operation) to an engine-driven fuel pump. The engine-driven fuel pump delivers the fuel to the fuel control unit where it is metered and directed to a manifold which distributes it to each cylinder. Vapor and excess fuel from the engine-driven fuel pump and fuel control unit are returned by way of a vapor return lie to an accumulator tank and to both wing tanks.”

Air start procedures for the Cessna A185F in accordance with the pilot’s operating handbook included:

“To ensure a prompt engine restart after running a fuel tank dry, immediately switch to a tank containing fuel at the first indication of fuel pressure fluctuation and/or power loss. Then place the right half of the auxiliary fuel pump switch in the “ON” position momentarily (3 to 5 seconds) with the throttle at least ½ open. Excessive use of the auxiliary fuel pump at high altitude and full rich mixture can cause flooding of the engine as indicated by a short (1 to 2 seconds) period of power followed by a loss of power. This can later be detected by a fuel flow indication accompanied by a lack of power. If flooding does occur, turn off the auxiliary fuel pump switch, and normal propeller windmilling should start the engine in 1 to 2 seconds.”



NTSB Identification: ERA12LA480 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 22, 2012 in Mapleton, ME
Aircraft: CESSNA A185F, registration: N5168E
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On July 22, 2012, about 1430 eastern daylight time, a Cessna A185F, N5168E, was substantially damaged following a loss of engine power and collision with terrain in Mapleton, Maine, en route to Presque Isle Airport (KPQI), Presque Isle, Maine. The certificated private pilot was not injured. The airplane was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated at a private airstrip in Ashland, Maine, at about 1330.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, the pilot reported that he was flying to his destination airport to refuel the airplane. While in flight, the pilot experienced a reduction in engine power, which he attempted to troubleshoot by first engaging the fuel boost pump and then switching fuel tanks, but could not regain power. After determining that he would not make the airport, the pilot performed a forced landing in a field and the airplane collided with a tree, resulting in structural damage to the airframe.

The FAA examined the wreckage at the accident site and confirmed substantial damage to the right wing and fuselage. The wreckage was recovered to a maintenance facility in Greenville, Maine, where a subsequent examination of the engine will be performed.


FAA IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 5168E        Make/Model: C185      Description: 185 Skywagon
  Date: 07/22/2012     Time: 1830

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Substantial

LOCATION
  City: PRESQUE ISLE   State: ME   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT LOST POWER AND LANDED IN A FIELD. PRESQUE ISLE, ME

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Pleasure      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: PORTLAND, ME  (EA65)                  Entry date: 07/23/2012 



 
Maine State Police 
Pilot Patrick Driscoll of Ashland walked away from this crash Sunday evening in Mapleton when the single engine on his Cessna A185F failed. There was damage to a pontoon, fuselage, propeller and right wing. 

 
Maine State Police 
Pilot Patrick Driscoll of Ashland walked away from this crash Sunday evening in Mapleton when the single engine on his Cessna A185F failed. There was damage to a pontoon, fuselage, propeller and right wing

 
Maine State Police
Pilot Patrick Driscoll of Ashland walked away from this crash Sunday evening in Mapleton when the single engine on his Cessna A185F failed. There was damage to a pontoon, fuselage, propeller and right wing.



MAPLETON, Maine — A pilot of a Cessna A185F walked away uninjured when the plane’s single engine failed and the aircraft crashed in a field off Route 227 in Mapleton.

Pilot Patrick Driscoll, 39, of Ashland attempted to land the plane, which was equipped with pontoons, on Hanson Lake, but didn’t have enough altitude to get there, according to a press release from Maine State Police in Houlton.

Driscoll’s private plane came to rest in a small group of trees, sustaining damage to at least one float, the fuselage, propeller and right wing, police said in the release.

Trooper Robert Flynn was assisted at the scene by Trooper Nick Casavant and Sgts. Dan Marquis and John Cote. An investigator from the Federal Aviation Administration is expected to visit the crash site today.

Story and photos: http://bangordailynews.com

Piper PA-28R-180 Cherokee Arrow, N4906J: Aircraft lost power and was forced to land on a highway - Escondido, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N4906J

FAA  IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 4906J        Make/Model: PA28      Description: CHEROKEE, ARROW
  Date: 07/23/2012     Time: 0630

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Substantial

LOCATION
  City: ESCONDIDO   State: CA   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT LOST POWER AND WAS FORCED TO LAND ON A HIGHWAY. ESCONDIDO, CA

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   3     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: SAN DIEGO, CA  (WP09)                 Entry date: 07/23/2012 
 
 

Jul 23, 2012 by Scott Rodriguez 
"Cops were flying in both directions all over the 15 freeway for about 10 minutes. Plane landed on the freeway about a minute in front of me." 

 
This 1968 Piper airplane suffered minor damage by a 74-year-old Poway man driving a 1995 Dodge Dakota that clipped the left wing of the airplane as it was sticking out into a traffic lane after it made an emergency landing on Interstate 15 just north of El Norte Parkway around 11:25 p.m. Sunday. 
DON BOOMER,  nctimes.com




A light airplane made an emergency landing late Sunday night on Interstate 15 in northern Escondido, authorities said.  

 The airplane was on the side of the road Monday morning while authorities figure out a way to remove it, said to California Highway Patrol Officer Jim Bettencourt. The agency issued a traffic alert for the area.

A 1968 Piper from Mammoth with four people on board made an emergency landing on the freeway just north of El Norte Parkway around 11:25 p.m. Sunday, according to the CHP.

Orange resident Ken Gheysar, 48, was piloting the airplane en route to Palomar Airport in Carlsbad when the airplane ran out of fuel, prompting the emergency landing, Bettencourt said in a statement.

"Since traffic was light at that hour he was able to land safely and make it to the right shoulder of the freeway just north of El Norte Road," Bettencourt said.

About 7:15 a.m., traffic backed up several miles to Gopher Canyon Road as morning commuters slowed to see the plane.

"It's not everyday people see a plane on the side of the road," Bettencourt said.

The officer said it could be several hours until authorities figure out the best way to remove the plane from the area.

No one was hurt and no vehicles damaged in the emergency landing but shortly afterwards a 74-year-old Poway man driving a 1995 Dodge Dakota clipped the left wing of the airplane as it was sticking out into a traffic lane, Bettencourt said. According to the officer, there was minor damage to the pickup but the driver was uninjured.

"The airplane was able to be pushed to the right shoulder and will remain on the right shoulder until it is determined how to safely remove it," Bettencourt said.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board were notified of the emergency landing.


Story, photos and comments:   http://www.nctimes.com

 
ESCONDIDO — A pilot whose single-engine rental plane ran out of gas made an emergency landing on south Interstate 15 in Escondido late Sunday night.  

Ken Gheysar of Orange was heading to Palomar Airport from Mammoth Lakes with three family members when he landed the 1968 Piper aircraft on the roadway about 11:25 p.m., California Highway Patrol Officer Jim Bettencourt said.

Gheysar, another man and two women got out of the plane without injury, Bettencourt said.

A short time later a 74-year-old man clipped the left wing of the plane as he drove south in a 1996 Dodge Dakota but only minor damage was reported.

The plane is on the right shoulder of the highway as authorities discuss how best to remove it. Traffic is backed up almost to Deer Springs Road as people slow to look at the out of place aircraft and take pictures.

Bettencourt said he did not know what time the plane will be moved off the freeway and that it was up to the plane’s owners to remove it.

Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board officials have been notified, the officer said.

This is the second this weekend that a plane made an emergency landing on a county highway.

On Saturday, a 79-year-old pilot landed a small homemade Europa aircraft on north state Route 67 near the Woodside Avenue exit in Santee.

A CHP officer who saw that the plane was flying low over the highway about 10 a.m. started a traffic break that allowed the pilot to land safely, the CHP said.

He told officers that he had power issues shortly after taking off from Gillespie Field and was attempting to return to the airfield when the engine locked up, the CHP said.

Story and comments:  http://www.utsandiego.com

 

 Plane carrying 4 lands safely on S. Calif. freeway
  Authorities say a plane carrying four people that landed on a Southern California freeway ran out of fuel.
 
ESCONDIDO, Calif.  -   Authorities say a plane carrying four people that landed on a Southern California freeway ran out of fuel.

The 1968 Piper landed safely at about 11:30 p.m. Sunday on the southbound lanes of Interstate 15 in Escondido.

California Highway Patrol Officer Jim Bettencourt tells City News Service that traffic was light and no cars were hit. However, Bettencourt says a driver later clipped the left wing and his pickup received minor damage.

The single-engine plane was pushed onto the freeway shoulder, where it remains Monday morning until it can be removed. All lanes are open.

Bettencourt says the pilot, 48-year-old Ken Gheysar of Orange, was heading to Palomar Airport in Carlsbad when the plane ran out of fuel.

Escondido is about 30 miles north of San Diego.


Source:  http://seattletimes.nwsource.com

Cessna F172M, United Kingdom registration G-ROUP: Accident occurred July 21, 2012 in Portreath, United Kingdom

NTSB Identification: CEN12WA478 
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Saturday, July 21, 2012 in Portreath, United Kingdom
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: G-ROUP
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors.

On July 21, 2012, at 1421 UTC, a Cessna F172M, United Kingdom registration G-ROUP, was substantially damaged when it impacted a cliff near Portreath, Cornwall, England. A post impact fire ensued. The pilot, the sole person on board was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight which departed Perranporth Airfield.

This investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the British government. Any further information may be obtained from:

Air Accidents Investigations Branch
Farnborough House
Berkshire Copse Road
Aldershot, Hampshire
GU11 2HH, United Kingdom
Telephone: +44 1252 510300
Facsimile: +44 (0) 1252 376999
E-mail: investigations@aaib.gov.uk

This report is for informational purposes only and contains only information released by, or obtained from, the Air Accidents Investigation Branch of England.


 
Andrew Stillwell-Cox's light aircraft crashed into cliffs in Cornwall on Saturday 

Police officers investigate the burnt out wreckage of the light aircraft which crashed into the cliffs at Nancekuke, near Portreath, in Cornwall. Witnesses reported seeing the plane on fire before it crashed 

 
The plane can be seen at the top of the cliffs at Nancekuke. Police have not yet named the man but have said they believe he is from nearby St Austell


A pilot who died when his light aircraft plunged into cliffs may have deliberately taken his own life. 

Former Royal Navy officer Andrew Stillwell-Cox died when his plane crashed close to RAF Portreath just minutes after taking off at nearby Perranporth airfield, in Cornwall, on Saturday.

Emergency services found the burning wreckage dangling precariously close to the cliff edge at Sheep Rock, surrounded by pockets of fire.

Devon and Cornwall Police confirmed that suicide is one of the lines of inquiry being pursued by detectives.

A force spokesman said: “Police scene investigators are working together with the fire service. The Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) are also doing their own investigation.”

The plane took off from Perranporth airfield at 4.05pm on Saturday and crashed shortly afterwards.

A major rescue operation was launched involving a search and rescue helicopter from RNAS Culdrose, Devon and Cornwall Police, Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service and Falmouth Coastguards. Nobody else was thought to have been in the aircraft and there were no casualties on the ground.

The family of Mr Stillwell-Cox paid tribute to the “highly respected” former Royal Navy officer. Mr Stillwell-Cox was aged 55 and from the St Austell area of Cornwall, police confirmed.

“Andrew was a retired commander from the Royal Navy,” they said in a statement released by police. “His last posting was at RNAS Culdrose where he was 1st lieutenant, retiring in 2007. He was highly respected and lived his life for the Navy. On retirement he qualified as a private pilot flying out of RAF Spitfire Station at Perranporth where he was very highly thought of.

“Andrew was generous and greatly supportive of his friends and they will miss him enormously. He was the stalwart of the Spitfire Society having organised this year’s major events at Polesden House near Dorking, Surrey, in celebration of the Spitfire and the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee.”

Story and photo:    http://www.shropshirestar.com


Pilot killed after aircraft crashes into cliff and bursts into flames shortly after takeoff

Cessna Turbo Skylane RG, C-FMGV: Two survive crash of plane taking off from Mascouche, Québec, Canada: Injuries 'minor," police said, and men extracted selves from wreckage

 
Two men survived the crash of a single-engine lane less than an hour after sunrise Monday, as they were taking off from the small airport in Mascouche, northeast of Montreal. 
Photograph by: Phil Carpenter, The Gazette




 
Two people survived the crash of a light plane in Mascouche on Monday morning, off the eastern tip of a runway at the Mascouche airport. 
Photograph by: Google, Google Maps

MONTREAL – Two men survived the crash of a small plane less than an hour after sunrise Monday as it was taking off from the small airport in Mascouche, northeast of Montreal. 

 "They suffered minor injuries, and got out of the wreck on their own," Assistant Police Chief Jean-Marc Desnoyers said.

The apparent cause, he added, was pilot error.

The initial call to local police was received at 6:21 a.m.

"We got there" – to the crash site, in a wooded area just off the eastern tip of the runway – "four minutes later," Desnoyers said, "at 6:25."

One man is about 40 and the other about 50, Desnoyers said.

"I don't know who was flying" or whether he was a novice, the assistant chief added.

Weather conditions were not abnormal.

The men have been taken to an area hospital "for observation," Desnoyers said, adding that he could not provide the model of the plane.

Sgt. Ingrid Asselin of the Sûreté du Québec said normal morning commuter rush-hour traffic – which had been diverted on an Exit 44 ramp of Highway 640, at Louis Hébert St., adjacent to the crash site – had been ordered restored about 7 a.m.

The airport's runways run parallel to Highway 640, between Highway 25 and Louis Hébert.

Story and photos: http://www.montrealgazette.com
 

Aircraft wreckage discovered near Mascouche Airport this morning 

Mascouche police confirming the discovery of the wreckage of a small plane this morning.

It was spotted by  a passerby near Louis Hebert Street off Autoroute 640 about a kilometre north of the Mascouche Airport.

Two occupants of the plane were taken to hospital by ambulance .

A police spokesman says he does not know their condition.

Story and photos:    http://www.cjad.com