Saturday, January 28, 2012

U.S. Air Force JTAC Calling In Close CAS Intense Footage Afghanistan

Video by SuaSponte88 on Jan 27, 2012

U.S. Air Force JTAC (Joint terminal attack controller) calling in close air support from A-10 Warthog aircraft on Insurgent positions in Afghanistan.

Volunteers fly, unload Quest drop bags in Eagle

A volunteer helps unload drop bags Friday in Eagle for the 2012 Yukon Quest. Eagle is the only checkpoint on the trail not accessible by road in the winter. Air Arctic donates the pilots, planes and fuel.

Volunteers unload drop bags Friday in Eagle for the 2012 Yukon Quest.


FAIRBANKS — Matt Atkinson and a handful of other employees of Air Arctic acted as a bucket brigade, scooping up dozens of frozen 2012 Yukon Quest food drop bags and loading them on a plane bound for Eagle.

“It’s just like hauling bags of corn, right?” joked Atkinson, marketing coordinator for Air Arctic.

Filled with everything from frozen fish to frozen socks and plastic sled runners, the bags were far from corn. They are essential for the 24 mushers signed up to race in this year’s Quest.

Two Piper Navajo Chieftain planes flew to remote Eagle on Friday, each carrying 1,200 pounds of drop bags, with some leftovers that will be shipped out in a third plane today.

Eagle, the last checkpoint on the Alaska side of the trail, also is the only checkpoint not accessible by driving. The Taylor Highway, the only road in and out of Eagle, is not maintained during the winter.

The drop was the third one to Eagle done by Air Arctic in as many years. Air Arctic donates the pilot, planes and fuel. Since the company focuses on charters, the trip to Eagle is a once-a-year event.

“For us, to do a couple planes is relatively small in the scope of things,” Atkinson said. “It’s sort of a bigger deal for us — everyone is all hands on deck to make it happen, but it’s fun.”

In Eagle, John Borg and a small crew waited for the planes to land. He, Ed Christiansen and a crew of locals helped load the bags into pickup trucks. From there they were transported to Borg’s yard, where they will be organized and kept until the Quest checkpoint is ready for their delivery.

They have some time. The race starts in downtown Fairbanks Feb. 4.

Schweizer 2-33A, Pleasant Valley Soaring LLC, N17873: Accident occurred January 28, 2012 in Peoria, Arizona

NTSB Identification: WPR12CA084 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, January 28, 2012 in Peoria, AZ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/02/2012
Aircraft: SCHWEIZER SGS 2-33A, registration: N17873
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The glider pilot stated that he set the altimeter to the field elevation of 1,600 feet mean sea level (msl) before takeoff. He planned to have the glider towed to 4,000 feet above ground level (agl), which would be 5,600 feet msl, then to release the tow line. During the tow, the pilot released from the tow plane when the altimeter read 4,000 feet (which was 2,400 feet agl). During the return glide back to the airport in a headwind, he realized he was too low to make it to the airport and executed a landing 2 miles short of the runway into desert terrain. On final approach for landing, the pilot maneuvered the glider to avoid a canal. The glider landed hard, and the fuselage sustained substantial damage. The pilot stated that he mistakenly released from the tow at 4,000 feet msl, when he should have released at 4,000 feet agl. He also stated that the glider had no mechanical failures or malfunctions during the flight.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The glider pilot released from the tow airplane at a lower altitude than the planned altitude, which resulted in an off-airport landing.





PEORIA, Ariz. - A glider plane crash-lands in Peoria, sending one person to a local hospital on Saturday. 

 The glider made a forced landing in the desert, southwest of the runway at Pleasant Valley Airport.

Both people onboard suffered minor injuries during the difficult landing, but are OK.

One of them was taken to a nearby hospital for an evaluation.

VIDEO: Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum

Video by Canada History

Here the perfect example of WW2 Aircraft in the museum the most Famous is the Avro Lancaster the only two flying Condition in the world, also they are Prepare for the Hamilton Airshow is going to be the largest one in Canada!!

South Australia: Pilot killed in plane crash at Murray Bridge airstrip at Pallamana

A pilot has died in an aircraft crash at Pallamana near Murray Bridge in South Australia.

The pilot of a single engine aircraft was killed when it crashed into a paddock at Pallamana, near Murray Bridge. Pic: Bryan Littlely


The accident happened near the Pallamana airstrip on the Palmer Rd, 9.3km northwest of Murray Bridge, just after 11am.

The pilot of the plane was killed when it crashed into a farm paddock. He was the only occupant.

The Murray Bridge Light Aircraft Flying School, which operates from the airstrip, declined to comment on the crash when contacted by AdelaideNow.

The crash will be investigated by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau and police are preparing a report for the coroner.

CALIFORNIA: Apple Valley bids farewell to pilot


Ron Caraway, a pilot for more than 40 years and a resident of the High Desert since the 1970s, performs a 60-degree turn, pulling two Gs over Apple Valley in a Marquart MA5 biplane.




Ron Caraway spent most of the past 30 years in the skies above Apple Valley, and will be remembered by his friends as a natural pilot who could fly anything with two wings.

Caraway, who died Dec. 27, was an avid aviation enthusiast, test pilot, flight instructor and aerobatic barnstormer who called Apple Valley Airport his second home.

“I knew Ron for about 30 years and he was one of the best pilots that I’ve ever flown with,” said fellow aviator and author Norman Goyer, 85. “Some people have to think when they fly, but Ron was like a bird — he just knew what to do in the air.”

Goyer said Caraway, 74, was one of the few formation pilots he trusted during photo shoots, as Caraway flew near the subject aircraft while the author tried to get the right shot.

“It is so dangerous and I’ve only met three or four people that I’ve trusted. Ron was one of them,” Goyer said. “When you’re hanging out of a Cessna 180 with a camera, you better have the best.”

Born in San Antonio, Texas, Caraway got his first taste of aviation in the 1950s as an Army mechanic in Korea, then went on to earn his private and commercial pilot’s license via the GI Bill when he returned home.

“My dad had a hard time reading, so we bought him the Evelyn Wood Speed Reading program and that helped him get through school,” said Caraway’s son, Darrell, who lives in Northern California. “He’s worked on engines, built planes and knew how to fly — he was special.”

After working in Oregon, the elder Caraway moved his family to California where he worked at Lockheed Martin before moving his family to Apple Valley in 1978.

According to Ans Scott, manager of Midfield Aviation, Ron Caraway was a mainstay at the airport, helping pilots in the air and on the ground.

“Ron was also a highly respected test pilot for new airplanes,” Goyer said. “Ron knew his way around an aircraft and he could fly anything with two wings. He was a superb pilot and everyone knew it.”

Darrell Caraway said his father loved to travel, taking trips to various fly-ins across the country and even helping a pilot to fly across the Atlantic in the mid-80s, leaving New York on their way to Spain.

“He flew aerobatics with non–aerobatic planes. It was fairly safe aerobatic stuff, but there was still a chance that something could go wrong,” Darrell Caraway said. “He told me that he even had a close call when both wings touched. Nothing could keep my dad on the ground.”

A celebration of life is scheduled for noon Sunday at the Apple Valley Airport, 21600 Corwin Road.

Family of CEO visits site of fatal plane crash. Cessna 340A, N340HF. Ocala, Florida.



The family of P. Allen Golson gathered Saturday afternooon at the site where their loved one and former chief executive officer was killed in a plane crash that injured his wife on Friday.

Golson’s brothers, a sister and their spouses, who arrived in a white van and were chaperoned by Marion County Sheriff’s Office crisis intervention specialist Cindy Turner, said they wanted to see the area where Golson died.

“I’m going to miss him so much,” Elaine Harris, Golson’s sister, said, sobbing. “He had a big heart, was generous and kind and loved his family so much.”

Golson’s wife, Carol Golson, is recovering at West Marion Community Hospital from non-life-threatening injuries and is aware of what occurred, said the family, adding that she’s dealing with the loss as best as she can.

Golson, who the family said owned several planes and loved flying, had been tapped to become CEO of Ocala Health System, which includes Ocala Regional Medical Center, West Marion Community Hospital and outpatient facilities such as Family Care Specialists and Advanced Imaging Centers.

Golson’s appointment as new CEO was announced earlier this month. The leadership transition was set to be complete on Feb. 20.

A U.S. Navy veteran, graduate of the University of Alabama and pilot for the last 15 to 20 years, the 55-year-old Golson was “well-liked by everyone,” his family said, and a “great people person who never had anything bad to say to anyone.”

As the family surveyed the spot where Golson’s twin-engine Cessna 340 crashed, two flatbed trucks were leaving the area, hauling pieces of the aircraft to a facility in Groveland, where it will be carefully examined by experts to help determine why it suddenly crashed.

From Macon, Ga., where he had been CEO of Coliseum Health System for seven years, Golson and his wife had boarded the plane in Macon and were approaching the Ocala International Airport.

Family members said the couple was coming to Ocala to look for a home.

The plane had been cleared for a landing, said National Transportation Safety Board Senior Air Safety Investigator Ralph Hicks, one of the investigators at the crash site on Saturday.

Witnesses said the plane suddenly veered from its course, before plowing into an open field south off Southwest 38th Street, which is just south of the airport.

Law enforcement officials said Golson’s last contact with the airport tower was at 12:26 p.m., and there was no indication of distress.

Hearing a loud noise, workers from businesses located across the street rushed out with fire extinguishers in an attempt to save those inside the plane.

They managed to pull Carol Golson and their luggage from the plane, but the smoke and fire prevented them from reaching her husband.

For the rescuers’ efforts, the family on Saturday expressed their gratitude, and wanted to thank those who risked their lives to try to save Golson and to thank law enforcement officials for responding so quickly to the scene.

At a 4 p.m. press briefing held by Hicks on Saturday, the investigator said they have salvaged all the plane’s major components. Hicks said Golson’s wife was sitting in one of the back seats of the six-seater aircraft.

Hicks said that, as of June 2011, Golson had a little more than 1,000 hours of flight time as a pilot.

At this point, Hicks said the investigation, which is also being handled by the Federal Aviation Administration, is entering its fact-finding phase, in which they will be gathering information from a variety of sources, such as the weather.

Asked what may have caused the crash, Hicks declined to speculate or offer a possible scenario, saying he didn’t want to draw any conclusion without the facts.

He said a preliminary finding will be released soon on the NTSB website.

There’s no indication that the plane had a recording device on board, as investigators did not find one. Typically, the kind of plane Golson was flying does not have one, Hicks said.

The family of P. Allen Golson gathered Saturday afternooon at the site where their loved one and former chief executive officer was killed in a plane crash that injured his wife on Friday.

Golson’s brothers, a sister and their spouses, who arrived in a white van and were chaperoned by Marion County Sheriff’s Office crisis intervention specialist Cindy Turner, said they wanted to see the area where Golson died.

“I’m going to miss him so much,” Elaine Harris, Golson’s sister, said, sobbing. “He had a big heart, was generous and kind and loved his family so much.”

Golson’s wife, Carol Golson, is recovering at West Marion Community Hospital from non-life-threatening injuries and is aware of what occurred, said the family, adding that she’s dealing with the loss as best as she can.

Golson, who the family said owned several planes and loved flying, had been tapped to become CEO of Ocala Health System, which includes Ocala Regional Medical Center, West Marion Community Hospital and outpatient facilities such as Family Care Specialists and Advanced Imaging Centers.

Golson’s appointment as new CEO was announced earlier this month. The leadership transition was set to be complete on Feb. 20.

A U.S. Navy veteran, graduate of the University of Alabama and pilot for the last 15 to 20 years, the 55-year-old Golson was “well-liked by everyone,” his family said, and a “great people person who never had anything bad to say to anyone.”

As the family surveyed the spot where Golson’s twin-engine Cessna 340 crashed, two flatbed trucks were leaving the area, hauling pieces of the aircraft to a facility in Groveland, where it will be carefully examined by experts to help determine why it suddenly crashed.

From Macon, Ga., where he had been CEO of Coliseum Health System for seven years, Golson and his wife had boarded the plane in Macon and were approaching the Ocala International Airport.

Family members said the couple was coming to Ocala to look for a home.

The plane had been cleared for a landing, said National Transportation Safety Board Senior Air Safety Investigator Ralph Hicks, one of the investigators at the crash site on Saturday.

Witnesses said the plane suddenly veered from its course, before plowing into an open field south off Southwest 38th Street, which is just south of the airport.

Law enforcement officials said Golson’s last contact with the airport tower was at 12:26 p.m., and there was no indication of distress.

Hearing a loud noise, workers from businesses located across the street rushed out with fire extinguishers in an attempt to save those inside the plane.

They managed to pull Carol Golson and their luggage from the plane, but the smoke and fire prevented them from reaching her husband.

For the rescuers’ efforts, the family on Saturday expressed their gratitude, and wanted to thank those who risked their lives to try to save Golson and to thank law enforcement officials for responding so quickly to the scene.

At a 4 p.m. press briefing held by Hicks on Saturday, the investigator said they have salvaged all the plane’s major components. Hicks said Golson’s wife was sitting in one of the back seats of the six-seater aircraft.

Hicks said that, as of June 2011, Golson had a little more than 1,000 hours of flight time as a pilot.

At this point, Hicks said the investigation, which is also being handled by the Federal Aviation Administration, is entering its fact-finding phase, in which they will be gathering information from a variety of sources, such as the weather.

Asked what may have caused the crash, Hicks declined to speculate or offer a possible scenario, saying he didn’t want to draw any conclusion without the facts.

He said a preliminary finding will be released soon on the NTSB website.

There’s no indication that the plane had a recording device on board, as investigators did not find one. Typically, the kind of plane Golson was flying does not have one, Hicks said.

Source:  http://www.ocala.com

Plane spotters takes pictures of Spanair airplanes stand parked on the tarmac at the El Prat International Airport in Barcelona.

Getty Image

BARCELONA, SPAIN - JANUARY 28: Plane spotters takes pictures of Spanair airplanes stand parked on the tarmac at the El Prat International Airport in Barcelona on January 28, 2012 in Barcelona, Spain. Around 22,770 passengers on 212 flights are estimated to have been left stranded as Spanish airline Spanair announced on January 27, 2012 it had ceased operations, after Qatar Airways left rescue deal negotiations and the regional government stated it could no longer continue financing the carrier.

Recruited British workers laid off

Defence Minister Peter MacKay, right, chats with David Gossen, president of IMP Aerospace at an event to mark a milestone in a project to extend the service life of the CP 140 Aurora aircraft at IMP Aerospace in Enfield, N.S. on Friday, Dec. 9, 2011. (ANDREW VAUGHAN / CP)

An avionics technician laid off by IMP Aerospace this week says he and other British workers lured to Nova Scotia were compelled to spend their own money to earn residency status here.

“British families sold houses, gave up lives in England to be brought over here,” Andrew McMillan of Fall River said Saturday.

“I’ve been here two and a half years now and now I’ve got no job, spent all of that money ..... to get permanent residency. That’s a very drawn out procedure and it costs thousands and thousands of dollars,” Andrew McMillan said Saturday.

He said it was the same for “all of the families.”

“IMP had a recruiting drive back in England in 2008 and they brought over a lot of Brits on work permits. Then they pretty much insisted, once the work permits were close to expiring, that we all get our residency, at a cost of anything up to $5,000 per family. So we’ve all done that and we’ve spent all this money, now to be laid off.”

IMP Aerospace president David Gossen called the layoffs “short term” when they were announced on Friday. But McMillan said workers are hearing differently. He said Kevin Lemke, IMP’s senior director fixed wing production, told “40 or 50” unionized workers that more bad news is on the way.

“We got told (Friday) that it wasn’t short term and that there’s likely to be more layoffs in March, up to another 20 people,” McMillan said. “And yet Dave Gossen, ..... , in your paper, is quoted as saying these are short term and they’ll be back to work real soon.”

But Lemke, reached at home on Saturday, denied telling workers there’ll be more layoffs.

“Absolutely not,” he said. “That is the exact opposite of what I said.”

IMP, which employs more than 1,500 people, is in the middle of a contract with the military worth $1.5 billion to refurbish Aurora aircraft. McMillan said the pace of work on that contract has slowed because of concerns about work quality on one of the planes.

“The air force, the DND, have slowed down input to IMP because of some work issues,” he said. “There’s problems with that aircraft and DND aren’t happy with that. That’s why things have slowed down. They won’t release another aeroplane until this one is resolved and that’s why a lot of people have been laid off. There’s nothing for them to do because DND have slowed down the program.”

Tom Galley, IMP’s vice-president of production, said the Canadian military is the company’s biggest and best customer, and the most vocal. Any concerns DND has about work are just the normal “to-ing and fro-ing” of contracts, Galley said.

“We don’t have any big issues with them. Actually, they’re quite happy with our work and they’re continuing to put aircraft into the plant. We have a very close working relationship with them and there are times when they want to bring up areas where they feel there could be some improvements. It’s nothing out of the ordinary. It’s just part of being in a performance-based contract.”

He said the workload at the plant is quite strong.

“We are of course going through a rebalancing of some of the labour force,” Galley said.
While it was unfortunate that the seven avionics techs had to be laid off, he said the company has “been in the process of hiring 20 mechanics over the past couple of months.”

“We expect our workforce to continue to grow over the next number of months as the work comes to fruition that we’re constantly trying to bring into the company.”

Man conceals 6 gold bars in his body, caught

CHENNAI: Air customs on Saturday seized 600gm of gold bars worth 17 lakh from a passenger at the Chennai airport who arrived from Colombo.

Kader Mohideen Syed Mohamed Buhari, an Indian national who concealed six gold bars in his rectum and tried to pass through the green channel, was arrested.

Customs officials had increased surveillance of passengers arriving from sensitive airports. As Colombo was classified as sensitive, officials were monitoring passengers who arrived by a Jet Airways flight when they saw Kadar Mohideen passing through green channel. When questioned, he appeared to be nervous. He later confessed to carrying gold bars hidden in his rectum.

The gold bars had foreign markings saying they were 999.0 pure. "The passenger, in his voluntary statement, confessed he was a carrier and concealed six gold bars in his rectum for a pecuniary consideration and with an intention to avoid Customs duty. The passenger was arrested under the Customs Act, 1962," said a press release.

Chennai airport has seen a rise in the number of gold smuggling cases in the last two years. Sixty-three cases were registered in connection with gold smuggling attempts since April 2011 against 45 cases in 2010.

Passengers who have stayed more than six months abroad are often used as couriers and Sri Lankan nationals and Indian labourers returning from Malaysia were involved in most cases registered here, officials said. The arrested Lankans were smuggling gold to convert it into Indian rupee, which is twice in value compared to the Lankan currency.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com

Audio: Cessna 172 Emergency


Cessna 172 Emergency by Snickers1967


Cessna 172 Emergency by "Snickers1967"
Pilots when it comes to IFR Flying keep yours eyes on the Gat! Dam!! Dash!!! Board!!!!

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xo4lmv_cessna-172-emergency_tech

Aircraft diverted to Boise after engine troubles

BOISE -- An American Airlines flight from Chicago to Seattle was diverted to Boise Saturday afternoon after the pilot reported an engine out.

A spokeswoman for the Boise Airport says the MD-80 aircraft, with 141 passengers and crew onboard, landed safely and without incident.

Those 141 passengers are now in the process of being rebooked on other airlines to get them to Seattle.

In the meantime, the spokeswoman said American Airlines is flying another MD-80 aircraft to Boise.

That plane will have parts and mechanics on board to fix the aircraft stranded in Boise.

Piper PA-31-310 Navajo C, Owner/operator: Secure Aviation Inc., N30DC: Accident occurred January 28, 2012 in West Palm Beach, Florida

NTSB Identification: ERA12LA165 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, January 28, 2012 in West Palm Beach, FL
Aircraft: PIPER PA-31-310, registration: N30DC
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On January 28, 2012, about 1430 eastern standard time, a Piper PA-31-310, N30DC, was substantially damaged during a forced landing to a beach near West Palm Beach, Florida, following a loss of engine power in both engines. The certificated airline transport pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Secure Aviation, Inc., under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a visual flight rules fight plan was filed for the personal flight, which originated at San Salvador International Airport (MYSM), San Salvador, Bahamas, around 1220. The intended destination was St. Lucie County International Airport (FPR), Fort Pierce, Florida.

According to the pilot, prior to the flight, the preflight inspection and engine run up were "normal." After departing the airport, and climbing to 10,500 feet, the left engine was unable to maintain more than 55 percent power. The pilot reduced the power setting of the right engine to match the left engine, and noted a 4 gallon per hour reduction in fuel consumption. He initiated a 400 feet per minute descent about 60 nautical miles from FPR, and about 40 nautical miles away the left engine began to surge. The pilot turned on the fuel boost pump and selected fuel cross feed, and the power in the left engine was restored.

The pilot determined that the closest airport was Palm Beach International Airport (PBI), West Palm Beach, Florida, and continued the flight toward PBI. He contacted Palm Beach Approach Control and continued to descend. The left engine subsequently lost power, followed by the right engine. The pilot turned on the fuel boost pumps and moved the fuel selector to several different settings, but was unable to restart the engines. He feathered both propellers and elected to land on a beach. The pilot completed the landing check, selected full flaps, and touched down on the beach in a nose high attitude. The airplane spun to the left and came to rest upright.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration inspector who examined the airplane, the right engine firewall was substantially damaged. The airplane and engines have been retained for examination.



A PA-31-310 made a quiet landing on the beach Saturday afternoon on the island's North End.

Meghan McCarthy/Palm Beach Daily News


Palm Beach Police and Fire-Rescue responded to a call of a twin-engine plane that made an emergency landing on the beach in the 1500 block of North Ocean Boulevard Saturday afternoon, police Capt. Curtis Kravel said. The pilot, whose identity was not immediately available, was not injured.

A witness said the plane quietly crashed on the sand while stunned beachgoers watched. The crash occurred at about 2:46 p.m.

Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board officials are investigating.

According the FAA website, the plane is a multi-engine Piper belonging to Secure Aviation in Tequesta.

According to a Palm Beach Fire Department spokesman, the pilot landed the twin-engine plane safely just south of the Lake Worth Inlet.

There were no reported injuries.

Crews said the plane will have to be dismantled to be moved off the beach.

http://www.palmbeachdailynews.com

Air Force inviting public comment on F-35 proposal

BOISE -- The U.S. Air Force is again looking at bringing the F-35A training aircraft to Gowen Field. During February, you'll have three chances to learn about the impact to the area and voice your opinion.

The Air Force is holding three public hearings on  the draft environmental impact statement for the proposed basing of the aircraft at Gowen Field.

The proposal includes establishing a pilot training center where Air Force pilots and personnel would learn to safely and effectively operate the new F-35A.

The public hearings will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. They will include a presentation on the proposed impact, followed by a formal comment session at 6 p.m. 

Two meetings will be held in Boise. One will be on February 27 at the Capital City VFW Post 63. The other will be on February 28 at the Boise Hotel and Conference Center.

An additional meeting will be held in Marsing on the 29th. That meeting will be at the Marsing American Legion Community Hall.

For more information, you can click here.

Clearwater, Florida: Plane crashes in field near elementary school

 My Fox -Tampa Bay
Witnesses told deputies the plane did not have its landing gear down when it crashed in a field near Highpoint Elementary School.

CLEARWATER - A small plane went down in a field near Highpoint Elementary School in Clearwater Saturday afternoon.

Fortunately nobody on in the aircraft or on the ground was injured.

Damage to the plane appeared to be minimal.

According to a Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office report the single-engine plane landed in a field near the school just after 2pm. Deputies were dispatched to the area after several residents in the area called the 9-1-1 dispatch center.

Stephen Oynearson was walking nearby when the incident occurred and was startled.

“I was going down the sidewalk and the plane went right over my head,” he said. “I ducked down and when I looked up I saw no wheels on the bottom of the plane.”

Another witness said the plane went sideways for approximately 50 yards before it went down in the field.

PCSO deputies secured the scene until federal authorities arrived. Investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board will collect data as they try to determine what happened.

http://www.myfoxtampabay.com

Bahrain's Gulf Air faces having its wings clipped after review

The government of Bahrain and its biggest sovereign wealth fund are expected to announce within days whether it will close down, sell off or undertake a wholesale restructuring of the struggling carrier Gulf Air.

"Gulf Air has faced challenges in recent times, in common with other carriers around the world and combinations of unprecedented regional and economic factors have made business increasingly difficult," Gulf Air said.

"Given this, Gulf Air, its shareholder Mumtalakat and the government, both through the cabinet and parliament, are all working towards a common goal - to secure Gulf Air's long-term sustainability and to actively address the airline's loss-making position. A range of strategic options are currently under consideration."

They include downsizing Gulf Air or dissolving it, injecting more state funds into it, or even selling it off, according to the Bahraini newspaper Gulf Daily News.

"We expect that [this] week there will be some announcement," Samer Majali, the chief executive of Gulf Air told Bloomberg News.

Analysts said major changes would need to be made to salvage the carrier.

"It's likely that one possible option is to inject more state aid into the carrier," said Saj Ahmad, the chief analyst at StrategicAero Research.

"After all, Emirates, Etihad and Qatar Airways have all started life through state aid and are currently among the world's fastest-growing carriers … and so there is a perception that Gulf Air can and should emulate its GCC peers and stage some sort of recovery with a new management focus."

He said Gulf Air, which once had the biggest network in the Gulf region, had struggled to compete against its GCC rivals, including low-cost airlines such as flydubai and Air Arabia.

The International Air Transport Association has forecast that Middle East carriers will post a profit of US$300 million (Dh1.1 billion) this year, down from a previous forecast of $700m, with long-haul market conditions likely to deteriorate, particularly those linked to weak economies in Europe.

"Gulf Air has been for too long living off past glories," Mr Ahmad said.

"In this competitive, cut-throat day and age, that simply isn't good enough and the carrier needs to radically change the way it flies or face entering the history books."

Coast Guard Air Station Recognition

WTOC-TV 11 in Savannah files an excellent report on two local Coast Guardsmen recognized for their work in Haiti immediately after the earthquake there. Savannah Navy League members were on hand to help with recognitions. Thanks to reporter Teri Hornstein for her great story.

Airport authority adopts budget

REYNOLDSVILLE - Clearfield and Jefferson Counties Regional Airport Authority adopted its 2012 budget at yesterday's business meeting.

The spending plan is balanced with both income and operating costs projected at $688,126.60.

Revenue includes allocations of $90,000 from the Clearfield County Commissioners and $88,750 from Jefferson County and $178,750 from the sale of two parcels of land in the authority's air commerce park.

Voting to adopt the budget were Jeff Bellmore, Loren Bishop, Jay Chamberlin, Gene Mineweaser, David Stern and Rick Wise. Members Todd Arnold and Joe Barber were absent.

Prior to the vote, Chamberlin, the authority's treasurer, noted the executive committee had spent a great deal of time refining the budget noting the document presented for the authority's consideration was its fourth draft. "I think this one is a good budget for us," he stated.

Ed Nasuti of Lee Simpson and Associates Inc., DuBois, the authority's engineer, presented a six-year plan for the airport's capital improvements projects. The scope was recently reviewed with the Federal Aviation Administration. Bob Shaffer, manager at the DuBois Regional Airport, said FAA requests an annual examination of projects the authority expects to fund using its annual federal entitlement stipend of $150,000. The authority receives $150,000 because the annual number of passengers who fly out of DuBois Regional Airport using commercial air service is less than 10,000. If the airport had more than that number it would receive $1 million in entitlement funds.

Shaffer said if the authority fails to spend its allotment, without prior permission from FAA, it would lose that money and the money would become part of FAA's discretionary funds and likely be given to another airport's project.

This year the authority expects to upgrade the DuBois Regional Airport's water treatment plant at an expected cost of $75,000 and replace perimeter fencing and gates at a cost of $50,000. Next year, rehabilitation of its T-hangar and taxiway and the acquisition of a security vehicle at a total cost of $208,000 are the projects planned. In 2014, the authority suggests installation of a visual lighting system for one of its runways and directional signs that would be used by pilots at a cost of $158,000. An upgrade of runway lighting enhanced by purchasing an emergency generator at a cost of $158,000 is planned for 2015 and rehabilitation of the parallel taxiway on runway No. 7 at a cost of $450,000 is intended for 2016. A snow blower purchase is on tap for 2017 at a cost of $300,000.

Nasuti said if the projects do not change, the authority would be requesting discretionary funds from FAA in both 2016 and 2017 to help pay for the improvements.

In other business, the authority:
• approved the purchase of fire damage coverage from Matson Insurance Co., Brookville. The annual policy provided through Travelers Insurance costs $20,206 - $500 less than what was paid in 2011.
• heard Shaffer report work would soon begin to assist Sandy Township supervisors with implementing airport hazard zoning for a small parcel of property located in the township bordering the airport.

State law requires municipalities whose lands are adjacent to airports to amend their zoning designations to establish an airport hazard area. Earlier this year, Washington Township in Jefferson County implemented ordinances to establish the distance and height for any development on properties surrounding the airport's land and its navigable airspace.

Both Washington and Sandy townships received $3,000 grants from the state Department of Transportation's Bureau of Aviation to help defray the costs of engineering, legal work and advertising.

The authority's next business meeting is Feb. 24 at 8:30 a.m. at the DuBois Regional Airport conference room.

http://www.theprogressnews.com

Premier hiring workers for aircraft maintenance

Premier Aviation has already started hiring workers for its aircraft maintenance, repair and overhaul business at Windsor Airport and is scheduled to take possession of the massive $22-million 140,000-square-foot hangar on March 1, according to the airport's president and CEO.

Federika Nazzani said Premier officials visited Windsor two weeks ago for a walk-through of the hangar, a deficiency walk-through is planned for next week with a completion date set for Feb. 13.

"They received about 130 applicants for various positions and found many with the skill sets which are needed," said Nazzani. "I expect they'll start with about 50 people on one shift and ramp up from there."

Company officials, meanwhile, declined to confirm details and timing of their plans.

Premier's clients include WestJet, Sunwing and Air Canada Jazz in addition to other operators.

Premier has its headquarters and a repair hangar in Trois-Rivieres and another repair facility in Rome, N.Y.

The Windsor Airport structure, which will be able to accommodate Boeing 777-300 aircraft, will include 93,000 square feet of open space and two floors of offices.

Designed to house wide-body aircraft, the hangar's cavernous main area will have a 74-foot ceiling with doors measuring 46 feet tall and 225 feet wide.

Construction began in July.

Tribal students of Jharkhand duped by pilot training institute

Ranchi, Jan 28 (ANI): Thirty tribal students from Jharkhand, have been duped by a pilot training institute.

The Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) disqualified the institute after it had reportedly spent 18 lakh rupees training each students.

Raj Kumar, a student of the institute, blamed the administration for mishandling the entire situation.

It was the entire fault of the administration. We only get orders from them that we have to go for training. Only later, we came to know that the flying club has been shut down on the instructions of the Deputy Commissioner for Central Government inspection, said Kumar, a student.

The students were selected by the Tribal Welfare Department in 2009, and belonged to Scheduled Caste, Scheduled Tribe, and Other Backward Classes.

Initially, they were sent to an institute in Hyderabad for training. However, within two months, it was discovered that the institute was not eligible to provide training to commercial pilots.

The students were then sent to the 'Sai Flytech Aviation Private Limited' in Bilaspur, Chhattisgarh, for the pilot-training programme, and after one year, the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) disqualified the institute for failing to maintain certain parameters.

Tribal Welfare Department authorities said they were hopeful that the students would not career were not ruined

It is unfortunate that it has happened twice, and we believe, that such an incident would not be repeated. The students will complete the course soon, said Jharkhand Government's Tribal Welfare Secretary, Rajiv Arun Ekka. (ANI)

http://news.smashits.com

Video: Ed Strongman, Chief Test Pilot Military, Airbus



by AeroSocietyChannel on Jan 25, 2012

On the eve of the A400M's type certification, an exclusive interview with Ed Strongman, Chief Test Pilot, Airbus Military on the 'Grizzly' flight test programme, how Europe's new military transporter compares to the C-130, and chucking his boss, Tom Enders, out of the rear ramp (with parachute).

We caught up with Ed to ask him about flight test progress and flying the Grizzly, which is scheduled to be delivered to the French Air Force in 2013.

With the A400M set to enter service with the RAF, and with significant British content (engines & wings) Ed also explains why one of his proudest moments was as a British test pilot bringing it 'home' to Farnborough in 2010 to show it off to the UK.

For more aerospace news and insight, or to find out more about the Royal Aeronautical Society, visit www.aerosociety.com

Aero Commander 100, N5551M: Accident occurred January 28, 2012 in Seguin, Texas

 http://registry.faa.gov/N5551M

NTSB Identification: CEN12LA192 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, January 28, 2012 in Seguin, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/29/2012
Aircraft: AERO COMMANDER 100, registration: N5551M
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot, the engine lost power shortly after takeoff. During the forced landing to a field, the airplane struck a wire fence and nosed over. The weather and the field conditions where the airplane nosed over prevented the recovery of the airplane and hindered investigators in examining the engine and fuel system. A review of the carburetor icing probability chart revealed that the airplane was not operating in an area favorable for the formation of carburetor icing.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:A loss of engine power for undetermined reasons.


On January 28, 2012, at 1023 central standard time, an Aero Commander 100, N5551M, was substantially damaged during a forced landing to a field near Seguin, Texas. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The pilot received minor injuries. The personal flight was being conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. The flight had just departed a private airstrip near Page, Texas, and was en route to Huber Airpark, Seguin, Texas.

According to the pilot, the engine lost power shortly after takeoff. The pilot did not observe a mechanical noise, surging, or backfiring with the loss of engine power. During the forced landing to a field the airplane struck a wire fence and nosed over. The vertical stabilizer was crushed and the firewall was wrinkled.

The Federal Aviation Administration inspector who responded to the accident reported that the airplane had not been flown since its last annual inspection in June of 2011. He stated that 10 gallons of fuel were added to the right wing and the purpose of the flight was to relocate the airplane to a nearby airport for more fuel. The pilot stated that the engine ran for 15 minutes on the ground, without any problems, prior to departure.

The weather and the field conditions where the airplane nosed over prevented the recovery of the airplane and hindered investigators in examining the engine and fuel system.

A review of the carburetor icing probability chart, located in the FAA's Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin CE-09-35, dated 6/30/2009, revealed that the airplane was not operating in an area favorable for the formation of carburetor icing.




William Bell, pilot and owner of an airplane that crash-landed Saturday morning south of Farm Road 78 west of McQueeney, retrieves some of his belongings from the plane, an Aero Commander 100. Bell suffered a bloodied nose in the crash but declined to be transported by Seguin EMS.



GUADALUPE COUNTY, Texas -  A pilot crashed his small plane in a field near McQueeney in Guadalupe County Saturday morning.

The Texas Department of Public Safety said the plane crashed around 10 a.m. in a field off F.M. 78 and Highway 725.

The pilot said he had just taken off from a private airstrip and was headed for Seguin when the plane developed engine trouble.

He said he tried to land in a field, but clipped a wire causing the plane to flip and crash.

The pilot had a bloody nose but was otherwise unhurt.

Cessna 310R, N100TK: Accident occurred April 10, 2011 in McComb, Mississippi

CARDIOVASCULAR EXTREME LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N100TK

 NTSB Identification: ERA11FA232 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 10, 2011 in McComb, MS
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/27/2011
Aircraft: CESSNA 310R, registration: N100TK
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The instrument-rated pilot and two passengers arrived at the departure airport about 0320 after going to a bar. The pilot did not obtain a weather briefing or file an instrument flight rules flight plan; night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the destination airport. The airplane departed uneventfully at 0408. At 0423, the pilot reported to air traffic control that he had the destination airport in sight and elected to cancel flight following services. At that time, the destination airport was 24 miles away and under two broken cloud ceilings and an overcast ceiling; thus, the pilot most likely did not have the destination airport in sight. The airplane subsequently overflew the destination airport and initiated a left turn. The last radar target was recorded at 0432, at an altitude of 2,600 feet mean sea level, which was above the two broken cloud ceilings and slightly below the overcast ceiling. Examination of the wreckage and data recovered from an onboard engine analyzer did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions. Toxicological testing revealed that the pilot was impaired due to alcohol ingestion.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The pilot's impairment due to alcohol ingestion and his failure to maintain airplane control during an approach at night in instrument meteorological conditions.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On April 10, 2011, at 0434 central daylight time, a Cessna 310R, N100TK, owned and operated by the commercial pilot, was substantially damaged when it collided with trees during approach to McComb Airport (MCB), McComb, Mississippi. The certificated commercial pilot and two passengers received fatal injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport (MSY), New Orleans, Louisiana, at 0408.

According to an employee at a fixed based operator at MSY, the pilot and two passengers arrived via rental car about 0320. The employee spoke briefly to the pilot, and he remarked that they went to a bar to watch a band play and had a nice time. The pilot and passengers boarded the airplane about 0335 and the employee marshaled them out of the parking area about 0338.

Review of air traffic control recordings and radar data revealed that the pilot contacted MSY Clearance delivery about 0404 and received a VFR clearance to MCB at 3,500 feet. The flight was cleared for takeoff about 0407 and transferred to MSY Departure at 0408, which the pilot acknowledged. The pilot then established radio contact with MSY Departure as the airplane was climbing through 600 feet mean sea level (msl). About 0413, the pilot reported to the MSY Departure controller that the airplane was level at a cruise altitude of 4,500 feet, which the controller acknowledged. At 0416, the MSY Departure controller instructed the pilot to contact Houston Center, which he did.

At 0423, the pilot reported to the Houston Center controller that he was beginning his descent for MCB. He also reported the airport was in-sight and elected to cancel flight following. At that time, MCB was 24 miles north of the airplane, below two broken cloud ceilings and an overcast ceiling. The airplane continued on a northwesterly track and overflew the airport about 4 miles. The airplane then initiated a left turn and the last radar target was recorded at 0432, at an altitude of 2,600 feet msl. The wreckage was located about 4 miles northwest of MCB, near the extended centerline for runway 15.

PILOT INFORMATION

The pilot, age 52, held a commercial pilot certificate, with ratings for airplane multiengine land and instrument airplane. He also held a private pilot certificate, with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on August 25, 2010. At that time, the pilot reported a total flight experience of 3,500 hours. The pilot's logbook was not recovered.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The six-seat, low-wing, retractable-gear airplane, serial number 310R0915, was manufactured in 1977. It was powered by two Continental IO-520, 285-horsepower engines, equipped with McCauley propellers. The airplane maintenance logbooks were not recovered. According to a maintenance invoice, the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on August 20, 2010. At that time, the airplane's hour meter indicated 1,734.5 hours. The hour meter was not recovered at the accident site.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The reported weather at MCB, at 0434, was: wind from 180 degrees at 6 knots; visibility 8 miles; broken ceiling at 800 feet, broken ceiling at 1,200 feet, and overcast ceiling at 2,900 feet; temperature 22 degrees Celsius; dew point 22 degrees Celsius; altimeter 30.01 inches of mercury.

There was no record of the pilot obtaining a weather briefing or filing a flight plan with either flight service or direct user access terminal.

WRECKAGE INFORMATION

A debris path originated with tree strikes, and extended on an easterly course for approximately 400 feet to the main wreckage. Sections of the right wingtip were located along the right side of the debris path and sections of the left wingtip were located along the left side of the debris path; however, sections of the left wing were also found on the right side of the debris path near its end. The debris path also consisted of an approximately 18-inch diameter tree that was cut at a 45-degree angle, and exhibited black paint transfer. The airplane came to rest inverted in a creek, on a heading of 300 degrees magnetic, and was significantly consumed by a postcrash fire.

All major components of the airplane were accounted for at the scene. The left engine had separated and was located in front of the main wreckage. The right engine had also separated and was located in shrubs to the east of the wreckage. The empennage and sections of the left wing remained partially intact. The cockpit and cabin area were consumed by fire. Rudder, rudder trim, elevator, and elevator trim control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit area to their respective bellcranks or actuators at the rear of the airplane. Rescue personnel stated they cut cables near the mid-cabin area to extract the occupants. Left aileron control cable continuity was established from the aileron bellcrank to the wing root. The right wing was destroyed and the aileron cable was not recovered from the creek.

Measurement of the rudder trim jackscrew revealed a 5-degree rudder trim tab right position. Measurement of the elevator trim jackscrew revealed an approximate 25-degree tab down position. Examination of the landing gear actuator revealed that the landing gear was in the extended position. Examination of the flap actuator revealed that the flaps were in the 15-degree flap extended position. The left and right fuel selectors were destroyed.

The left propeller hub separated from its engine; one blade separated from the left propeller hub and was bent forward. The other two blades remained attached to the hub and did not exhibit damage. The right propeller hub remained attached to the right engine and all three blades remained attached to the right propeller hub. One blade exhibited s-bending and was separated about mid-span. The separated portion was not recovered. Another blade exhibited rearward tip bending and the third blade was curled rearward.

The engines were subsequently examined at a recovery facility. All valve covers were removed from both engines. Six top and three bottom sparkplugs were removed from the left engine, and six top sparkplugs were removed from the right engine. Their electrodes were intact and light to medium gray in color. The vacuum pump from each engine was removed and disassembled, and their vanes were intact, except for one vane in the left vacuum pump, which was fractured consistent with impact forces. Additionally, both vacuum pump drive couplings were intact. The attitude indicator was disassembled and its gyro housing exhibited rotational scoring. The crankshafts were rotated by hand on both engines. Camshaft, crankshaft and valvetrain continuity was established to the rear accessory sections, and thumb compression was attained on all cylinders. Both magnetos from the left engine had separated and were found submerged in the creek. They could not be tested; however, one magneto remained attached to the right engine and sparked at all towers when rotated by hand. The other magneto from the right engine had separated and was not recovered.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot on April 11, 2011, by the State of Mississippi Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Jackson, Mississippi.

Toxicological testing was performed on the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Science Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Review of the toxicology report revealed"

123 (mg/dL, mg/hg) ETHANOL detected in Blood (Heart)
126 (mg/dL, mg/hg) ETHANOL detected in Urine
150 (mg/dL, mg/hg) ETHANOL detected in Vitreous
1 (mg/dL, mg/hg) METHANOL detected in Vitreous…
…Amlodipine detected in Blood (Heart)
Amlodipine detected in Urine
1.075 (ug/ml, ug/g) Citalopram detected in Blood (Heart)
Citalopram detected in Liver
N-Desmethylcitalopram detected in Liver
0.353 (ug/mL, ug/g) N-Desmethylcitalopram detected in Blood (Heart)
Nordiazepam detected in Urine
Nordiazepam NOT detected in Blood (Heart)…
…0.057 (ug/ml, ug/g) Oxazepam detected in Urine
Oxazepam NOT detected in Blood (Heart)"

Additionally, the pilot's serotonin metabolite ratio was "480 (pmol/nmol) Serotonin Metabolite Ratio detected in Urine," which was indicative of ethanol ingestion.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

A digital engine analyzer was recovered from the cockpit and forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory, Washington, DC, for data download.

Data was successfully downloaded and the following parameters were plotted: cylinder head and exhaust gas temperature for each engine; fuel flow for each engine; fuel used for each engine; and oil temperature for each engine. The unit recorded data at an interval of once per every 6 seconds.

Review of the data for the last 4 minutes of the recording revealed that the fuel flow and exhaust gas temperatures were consistent with both engines operating at a cruise power setting, until the end of the data.

Dr. Taylor Pickett was traveling with his wife and her sister from New Orleans to McComb, Mississippi, when the Cessna 310R went down a few miles from the McComb airport Sunday, April 10, 2011 about 4:30 a.m. All 3 were killed.



MCCOMB, MS (WLBT) - An investigation has determined a Texas doctor that crashed his plane near McComb in 2011 had been drinking.

According to the NTSB report, the pilot arrived at the New Orleans Airport after going to bar and he did not obtain a weather briefing or file an instrument flight rules flight plan.

Taylor Pickett, 52, overflew the airport in McComb then took a left turn before crashing.

Pickett, his wife and his sister in law died in the accident.

Taxpayers asked to put up $300K for new airline

Bloomington, Normal and McLean County leaders will vote Monday on kicking in $300,000 for an incentive package they hope will convince an unidentified airline to replace AirTran Airways at Central Illinois Regional Airport.

That money would be pooled with $150,000 already pledged by several local businesses, including State Farm Insurance Cos., in the new Community Air Service Initiative, or CASI. The money would then be used to temporarily subsidize new air service at CIRA, a strategy that successfully brought American Airlines service to Dallas-Fort Worth to the Twin Cities in 2008.

“An air transportation company (Airline) has expressed interest to CIRA in providing air transportation services in exchange for financial assistance to be provided by the Chamber,” city of Bloomington staff wrote in a memo provided to aldermen Thursday. “The term of such agreement shall be one year from the date Airline begins providing air transportation services at CIRA.”

Frontier Airlines has been approached about adding CIRA service, but officials on Friday declined to confirm reports it was close to finalizing a deal. Frontier ran daily service from CIRA to Denver until March 2001.

“Actually, there have been several airlines that (the CASI fund) been discussed with,” said Bloomington Mayor Steve Stockton. “It’s designed to be flexible in case one airline does not go forth.”

“Frontier has been on the list of airlines we’d like to consider, yes,” he added.

Special sessions are scheduled for Monday for the Normal Town Council (noon), Bloomington City Council (5 p.m.) and McLean County Board (6:30 p.m.). Each will consider a memorandum of understanding pledging up to $100,000.

McLean County Board Chairman Matt Sorensen said the reason for the special sessions were because of one specific airline expressing interest. But Sorensen declined to identify the airline and said it had asked not be named publicly yet.

Normal Mayor Chris Koos said Friday that negotiations have progressed further with one airline than they have with others, but said other carriers have been “reached out” to as well.

A message left with Frontier was not immediately returned Friday. CIRA spokeswoman Fran Strebing said Friday that officials there “have been talking to a host of airlines. Several of them have expressed interest in various things.”

Charlie Moore, CEO of the McLean County Chamber of Commerce, said Frontier is one of a “number of airlines that have been talked to.” But Moore said he didn’t know how far negotiations had progressed with any airline.

He stressed that the clock was ticking, with AirTran exiting in June.

“If we want to start having serious conversations with airlines while they’re considering their summer schedule, while they’re considering other communities that have also lost (air) service, we need to be prepared,” Moore said.

Financial incentives
Bloomington officials say the money could be used for what’s called a revenue-guarantee program, similar to what was used to bring American to CIRA in 2008. A certain revenue goal is set for a service, and the airline can withdraw from a community fund if the actual revenue falls short of that goal, Stockton said.

Bloomington and Normal each kicked in $200,000 for the American/Dallas service fund. The Bloomington airport used a combination of financial assistance, from marketing incentives to fee abatements, to land the American service, CIRA executive director Carl Olson said. That subsidized period lasted 12 months, and CIRA has retained the daily service.

“So for the last two and a half years, it’s survived on its own and been profitable on its own,” Olson said.

Low-fare carrier AirTran was CIRA’s second-largest airline in 2011, its 235,341 passengers making up about 40 percent of total airport traffic. Its low fares also were believed to lower the cost of flying on other CIRA carriers too.

The CASI coalition fears the economic impact of losing AirTran without lining up a suitable replacement.

Key CASI investors include the Chamber of Commerce, Economic Development Council of the Bloomington-Normal Area, the Bloomington-Normal Convention and Visitors Bureau, State Farm, Country Financial, Afni Inc., Illinois Wesleyan University, McDonald’s Corp., and Fox and Hounds Salon and Day Spa.

Source:  http://wjbc.com

Santa Maria Airport Could Get a Facelift



The Santa Maria Airport could get a facelift.

The airport district board of directors is talking about improving the public viewing area at the terminal.

Right now... it's just an open grass area ... with a concrete slab at the entrance.

Plans for the area could include more landscaping ... with tables and benches.

There would also be space for booths ... that could draw trade shows... and chamber mixers.

Santa Maria Airport manager, Chris Hastert says, "Right now, it's in the very preliminary stages, so we're looking at different ideas, but it could range anywhere from $14,000 up to probably at most $40,000. We've already had companies willing to volunteer their time and to get us started with the program."

If approved ... renovations could begin sometime after July first.


Total Traffic LA Hiring Airborne Reporter

If you’re looking for a job, Total Traffic LA has a position that they are hiring for:

Airborne Traffic Reporter

Get paid for looking out the window and reporting on traffic conditions in picturesque Southern California. Total Traffic Los Angeles is seeking an airborne reporter to spot traffic and deliver traffic reports from a Cessna 172. Do you have what it takes? You need to be able to handle extreme multi-tasking, and have an intimate knowledge of the freeways and side streets from San Luis Obispo to Oceanside, from Los Angeles to Victorville, and from Orange County to Lancaster. You MUST have two years large market broadcast experience. Audio demo and resume to airwatchjobs@clearchannel.com. Put “Airborne” in the subject line. No calls.

Total Traffic Los Angeles is an equal opportunity employer.

Cessna 152 hits errant motor tricycle taxi while landing in Central Luzon airfield

A motor tricycle figured in an accident with a light aircraft as the former was landing at an airfield in Central Luzon and authorities are puzzled how another vehicle had turned up inside a known restricted area

Manila: A motor tricycle figured in an accident with a light aircraft as the former was landing at an airfield in Central Luzon and authorities are puzzled how another vehicle had turned up inside a known restricted area.

A single engine, two-seat Cessna 152 flown by flight instructor Queenie Gaviola and student pilot Joseph Valledor Jr was on a landing approach at an airfield in Lingayen Pangasinan after a training flight from Las Pinas City in Metro Manila, when motor-tricycle headed for the same direction suddenly appeared from nowhere.

Minor injuries

According to a report by the station, Bombo Radyo, the aircraft grazed the motor-tricycle leaving Gaviola and Valledor Jr. with minor injuries. Likewise the accident damaged the aircraft's horizontal stabiliser.

Authorities said certain airfield emergencies involving the presence of astray vehicle inside the restricted area could cause bigger damage and even loss of lives.

Charges are being readied against the motor-tricycle driver in connection with the accident.

The report said air transportation officials are conducting an investigation how the motor tricycle was able to enter the airfield, a known restricted area.

There had been a noticeable increase in accidents involving light aircraft in recent years as more Filipinos take flying lessons.

Some of the students are foreigners and most come to the Philippines because flight training lessons in the country are relatively cheaper compared to other countries.