Friday, November 17, 2017

Beech B100 King Air, N86TR, operated by Dexter Air LLC: Accident occurred May 10, 2016 at Dexter Municipal Airport (KDXE), Stoddard County, Missouri

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; St. Ann, Missouri

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Registered Owner: Dexter Air LLC 

Operator: Dexter Air LLC

http://registry.faa.gov/N86TR

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA187

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, May 10, 2016 in Dexter, MO
Aircraft: BEECH B100, registration: N86TR
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 10, 2016, at 1730 central daylight time, a Beech B100, N86TR, impacted runway 18 when the right main landing gear collapsed during landing at Dexter Municipal Airport (DXE), Dexter, Missouri. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The pilot, flight instructor, and two passengers were uninjured. The airplane was operated by Dexter Air LLC under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that last departed from Jonesboro Municipal Airport, Jonesboro, Arkansas at 1650 and was destined to DXE.

The pilot stated that the purpose of the flight was a Beechcraft B100 initial training flight with a second pilot who occupied the right pilot seat. According to the Federal Aviation Administration inspector, the flight instructor was in a non-seated position between both pilots.

The left seat pilot stated that they flew about 3 hours and had taken turns performing turns, stalls, slow flight and approaches. He stated that the accident landing was the third landing of the day that he performed. He said that during the left downwind approach for landing on runway 18, he performed the airplane checklist items that the flight instructor read to him. The left seat pilot said that the landing gear extended, and the three landing gear position indicator lights illuminated green. The left seat pilot said that during touchdown, the right side of the airplane descended lower than the left side and then the right main landing gear collapsed. The airplane veered off and into a grass area adjacent to the runway.

The aircraft came to rest approximately 2,518 feet from runway 18 touchdown end and 100 feet west of the runway edge in a field of grass. The right hand main gear was collapsed, right hand prop blades were bent and the right wing leading edge and tip was damaged. Evidence of fuel leakage was noted surrounding the right wing in the grass. The wing top skin outboard of the engine nacelle displayed evidence of wrinkling.

Post-accident examination revealed the bottom right wing skin to the integral fuel tank was torn resulting in an approximate five by three inch hole. The right main gear actuator assembly exhibited numerous bent parts and was broken out of its mounting structure. The inboard top actuator mounting structure was torn away from the airframe. The right nacelle fuel tank bulkhead was ruptured with the top of the gear actuator resting inside the tank area. The top wing skin wrinkling was not as evident post recovery but still shows signs of damage. Puncture damage to the fuselage pressure vessel was noted in 5 places below the copilot side window and a two-inch crack or tear was found on the belly skin approximately centered between the main gear legs.

The rigging for the landing gear system could not be checked nor could functional gear swing test be performed due to damage incurred to the system from the accident.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA187
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, May 10, 2016 in Dexter, MO
Aircraft: BEECH B100, registration: N86TR
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 10, 2016, at 1730 central daylight time, a Beech B100, N86TR, impacted runway 18 when the right main landing gear collapsed during landing at Dexter Municipal Airport (DXE), Dexter, Missouri. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The pilot, flight instructor, and two passengers were uninjured. The airplane was operated by Dexter Air LLC under 14 Code of Federal Regulations as an instructional flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that last departed from Jonesboro Municipal Airport, Jonesboro, Arkansas at 1650 and was destined to DXE.

Cessna 182P Skylane, N9434M: Accident occurred June 22, 2016 in Humansville, Polk County, Missouri

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Kansas City, Missouri
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N9434M

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA229
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 22, 2016 in Humansville, MO
Aircraft: CESSNA 182P, registration: N9434M
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 22, 2016, about 1130 central daylight time, a Cessna 182P airplane, N9434M, was substantially damaged following a forced landing near Humansville, Missouri. The commercial rated pilot and passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an air race. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight. The cross-country flight departed the Dexter B Florence Memorial Field Airport, Arkadelphia, Arkansas, and was en route to the Skyhaven Airport, Warrensburg, Missouri.

The pilot reported that while in cruise flight at 500 ft above ground level (agl) for about 1 hour and 42 minutes, the engine surged and lost partial power. The pilot attempted to restore power by adjusting the throttle, propeller, mixture, and carburetor heat. Unable to restore power, the pilot diverted to the closest airport. The engine did not respond, and the airplane sank through 250 ft agl, so the pilot conducted a forced landing to a field. The landing surface was hard and deeply rutted resulting in the separation of the nose wheel and the airplane nosed over. The fuselage was substantially damaged during the forced landing.

The airplane was examined by the responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector and a representative from Textron Aviation, no preimpact anomalies were detected with the airframe. Data from the airplane's JPI engine monitoring system was downloaded by the National Transportation Safety Board laboratory. A review of the data revealed that about 1120, the fuel flow fluctuated. Two minutes later, the fuel flow decayed from about 19 gallons per hour to a final value of 2.7.

A test run of the airplane's engine was conducted by the FAA inspector, with assistance from a local airframe and powerplant mechanic and a representative from the engine manufacturer. A new propeller, engine mounts, throttle cable, and battery were installed on the airplane. An external fuel supply was plumbing into the left wing root. The engine was primed once and started on the first attempt. A magneto check was performed and the propeller pitch cycled. The throttle was advanced to full power and the engine achieved approximately 27 inches of manifold pressure; the tachometer was inoperative, so the maximum rpm could not be determined. The FAA inspector noted that a fuel line from the gascolator to the carburetor had a tight 160° turn, but the fuel line did not appear "kinked" to impede fuel flow. Shop air was applied to the fuel lines and no obstructions were found.

A review of the Carburetor Icing Probability Chart in the Federal Aviation Administration Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin CE-09-35, Carburetor Icing Prevention found that the airplane was operating in an area conducive for the formation of icing at glide and cruise power.

The reason for the loss of engine power could not be determined.


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA229
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 22, 2016 in Humansville, MO
Aircraft: CESSNA 182P, registration: N9434M
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 22, 2016, about 1130 central daylight time, a Cessna 182P airplane, N9434M, conducted a forced landing near Humansville, Missouri. The commercial rated pilot and passenger sustained no injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an air race. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight. The cross-country flight departed the Dexter B Florence Memorial Field Airport, Arkadelphia, Arkansas, and was en route to the Skyhaven Airport, Warrensburg, Missouri.

The flight was part of the Air Race Classic competition. The pilot reported that while in cruise flight at 500 feet above ground level, the engine began to surge and lost partial power. She began flying towards the closest airport and attempted to restore engine power. The engine was not responsive and she elected to conduct a forced landing to a field.

An initial examination of the airplane found substantial damage to the fuselage. The airplane and engine were retained for further examination.

Nieuport 11, N124TG: Accident occurred June 17, 2016 at Gardner Municipal Airport (K34), Johnson County, Kansas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Kansas City, Missouri

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N124TG



NTSB Identification: CEN16LA230
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 17, 2016 in Gardner, KS
Aircraft: GLAESER NIEUPORT 11, registration: N124TG
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 17, 2016, at 2040 central daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Nieuport 11, N124TG, experienced a hard landing and an impact with terrain during a precautionary landing at Gardner Municipal Airport (K34), Gardner City, Kansas. The pilot performed the precautionary landing after he felt a vibration from the horizontal stabilizer while in the airport traffic pattern. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The pilot was uninjured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The local flight originated from K34 at 2015.

On June 16, 2016, the pilot trailered the airplane to K34 for an upcoming weekend event. On the day of the accident, the airplane was untrailered and reassembled mid-day. The pilot then preflighted the airplane and taxied it to a parking area at the airport for an evening flight. 

The pilot stated that before takeoff he performed an engine run-up and checked the flight controls for a takeoff using runway 17. After takeoff, the pilot flew the airplane in a left-hand airport traffic pattern and completed two circuits over the airport with "no problems." He said that during the upwind leg, parallel to runway 17, he "noticed some vibration," and saw the horizontal stabilizer shaking/vibrating. He varied the engine throttle setting while the airplane was near the departure end of runway 17 to cease the vibration, but the vibration continued. The pilot then heard, but did not see, an inbound aircraft that made a radio transmission referencing runway 26. Due to the inbound aircraft, the pilot thought that it was "unsafe to land" on runway 26, so he flew a left base to runway 17 for landing. As the airplane neared the left side of runway 17, the pilot initiated a "shallow" left turn for a "modified" final over runway 17, and the airplane "quickly began to sink." The said that the airplane experienced an "aerodynamic stall." The pilot added full engine power, which induced a yaw and a roll. The airplane descended and impacted the ground coming to rest short and on the left side of runway 17. 

The pilot stated that he did not lose elevator control authority during the flight and his attention to flying the airplane was "distracted" by a fear that parts/empennage may be separating from the airplane, which led to his stalling the airplane. He said that the airplane model was "super draggy" and "super light" and without engine power, the airplane slows down rapidly.

The pilot stated that the airplane was built from plans that were based upon a 100-year old airplane. The plans depicted and the airplane was manufactured without the left and right elevators connected to each other. A single control cable linked the two elevators via a Y-connection. The single control cable was not supported for "a number of feet" through guides/fairleads, which can make the elevators "flutter." The pilot said that following the accident several other airplane owners with the same model of airplane have modified the elevator control system by either installing a bellcrank in the elevator control system or by connecting the left and right elevators together.

The pilot said that neither the plans nor any subsequent modification to those plans in the building of the accident airplane resulted in the installation of a stall warning system in the airplane.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA230
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 17, 2016 in Gardner, KS
Aircraft: GLAESER NIEUPORT 11, registration: N124TG
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 17, 2016, about 2040 central daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Nieuport 11, N124TG, experienced a hard landing and impact with terrain during a precautionary landing at Gardner Municipal Airport (K34), Gardner City, Kansas. The pilot performed the precautionary landing after he felt a vibration from the horizontal stabilizer while in the airport traffic pattern. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The pilot was uninjured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The local flight originated from K34 at time unknown.

Delta Air Lines, Boeing 757-200, N706TW: Incident occurred July 07, 2016 at John F. Kennedy International Airport (KJFK), New York

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this incident.

Aviation Incident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Delta Air Lines Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N706TW

NTSB Identification: ENG16IA027
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier operation of DELTA AIR LINES INC
Incident occurred Thursday, July 07, 2016 in New York, NY
Aircraft: BOEING 757, registration: N706TW
Injuries: 157 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators traveled in support of this investigation and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft incident report.

On July 07, 2016, about 1307 UTC, a Delta Air Lines (DAL) Boeing B757, N706TW, experienced a No. 2 (right) engine undercowl fire shortly after takeoff from John F Kennedy International Airport at Jamaica, NY (JFK). The flight crew reported receiving a right engine fire warning at approximately 300 feet agl. An emergency was declared and the flight returned to JFK and landed without incident. No injuries were reported to the six crew members and 151 passengers. The airplane sustained minor damage. The flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a Federal Aviation Administration instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight.

Cessna P210N Pressurized Centurion, N323DC: Accident occurred August 05, 2016 at Waco Regional Airport (KACT), McLennan County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N323DC

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA356
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 05, 2016 in Waco, TX
Aircraft: CESSNA P210N, registration: N323DC
Injuries: 5 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 5, 2016, about 1700 central daylight time, a Cessna P210N airplane, N323DC, was substantially damaged when the landing gear collapsed during landing on runway 19 (7,107 feet by 150 feet, concrete) at the Waco Regional Airport (ACT), Waco, Texas. The pilot and four passengers onboard were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan. The flight originated from the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) about 1630. The intended destination was the Austin-Bergstrom International Airport (AUS), Austin, Texas.

The pilot reported that the airplane electrical system began to indicate a discharge condition during cruise flight. He elected to divert to ACT. The wing flaps and landing gear were lowered before the airplane lost electrical power completely. Landing gear extension seemed to be normal, which included a green down position indicator light and visual verification of the landing gear in the extended position. He executed an uneventful visual approach and landing touchdown. However, after touching down, the landing gear collapsed. The airplane subsequently departed the left side of the runway before coming to rest.

A postaccident examination of the aircraft electrical system revealed that the alternator was not functioning properly and the voltage regulator was inoperative. Examination of the landing gear system revealed that the right main landing gear down lock mechanism had failed. None of the components were provided to the NTSB for further examination, which precluded any determination of the root cause of the failures. The alternator was repaired and the voltage regulator was replaced. The landing gear down lock mechanism was repaired. The airplane was subsequently returned to service and no further anomalies were reported to the National Transportation Safety Board.

Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub, N9473D: Accident occurred October 15, 2016 near Jasper County Airport (KJAS), Texas



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N9473D



NTSB Identification: CEN17LA018
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 15, 2016 in Jasper, TX
Aircraft: PIPER PA 18-150, registration: N9473D
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 15, 2016, about 1430 central daylight time, a Piper PA 18-150 airplane, N9473D, conducted a forced landing near Jasper, Texas. The private rated pilot received minor injuries and the airplane was substantially damaged during the accident. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time.

The pilot reported the flight had just departed from the Jasper County Airport (KJAS), Jasper, Texas. After reaching an altitude of about 1,000 ft, the engine starting "missing." He switched fuel tanks and pumped the throttle; the engine continued to run, but was not making power. Unable to maintain altitude, he turned back towards the airport. Realizing he would not clear trees, he selected an area for the forced landing. The airplane came to rest with in a slight right wing down, nose low attitude among several trees. 

Substantial damage was noted to the airplane's fuselage and wings. Fuel was present on site. 

The airplane was recovered and transported to a salvage facility, where an examination was conducted by the NTSB Investigator in Charge and an FAA inspector. 

A review of aircraft records revealed the last annual inspection was completed on August 31, 2016. At the time of the inspection, the engine had accrued 44.87 hours since a top overhaul. The aircraft's tachometer had accumulated 1.49 hours, since the last annual inspection. 

Examination of the airplane noted that the wood under the battery box, located in the aft section of the airplane, appeared rotted. The engine's muffler had hole(s) rusted through it; exhaust signatures on the inside of the muffler shroud and cabin heat duct, were consistent with exhaust gas leakage. Welding on the muffler-exhaust pipe appeared to have holes in and around the weld. When the engine was rotated by hand, thumb compression and suction was noted on each cylinder; engine continuity was also established through the valve train and engine. The intake and exhaust rocker arms were removed from each cylinder; two of the four cylinders had the exhaust rocker arm on the intake valve, and/or the intake rocker on the exhaust valve. Both left and right magnetos were removed and produced a spark at each terminal when rotated by hand. The carburetor inlet screen was removed and the carburetor separated. The carburetor bowl and screen were clear of any debris and contamination, the bowl contained a small amount of liquid; light blue in color, consistent with 100LL avgas. Both wing fuel tank gas caps were an aftermarket type, and were absent an FAA-PMA marking; additionally, the fuel caps appeared to be a 'non-vented' type. Air was blown into the fuel lines near the fuselage/wing root, both left and right fuel lines were clear to the gascolator.

At 1415, the automated weather station at KJAS recorded; temperature 92.5 degrees F, and a dew point of 69.6 degrees F, 10-mile visibility, wind from 170 degrees at 7 knots, and altimeter setting of 30.06.

The carburetor icing probability chart included in Federal Aviation Administration Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin No. CE-09-35, Carburetor Icing Prevention, indicated that the airplane was operating in an area that was associated with a risk of carburetor ice formation, at glide and cruise power settings.

The examination did not find a specific reason for the loss of engine power. 





NTSB Identification: CEN17LA018
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 15, 2016 in Jasper, TX
Aircraft: PIPER PA 18-150, registration: N9473D
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 15, 2016, about 1400 central daylight time, a Piper PA18-150 airplane, N9473D, conducted a forced landing near Jasper, Texas. The private rated pilot received minor injuries and the airplane was substantially damaged during the accident. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time. 

The pilot reported to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector that the flight had just departed from the Jasper County Airport (KJAS). After reaching about 1,000 ft, the engine lost power. He was unable to restore full engine power and maintain altitude, so he selected an area for the forced landing. The airplane impacted trees, coming to rest with slight right wing down, nose low attitude, among several trees. 

Substantial damage was noted to the airplane's fuselage and wings. Fuel was present on site. 

The airplane was retained for further examination.

Piper PA-28R-201T, N5966V: Accident occurred November 16, 2017 in Nipton, San Bernardino County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Las Vegas, Nevada

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N5966V

NTSB Identification: WPR18LA033
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, November 16, 2017 in Nipton, CA
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28R-201T, registration: N5966V
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 16, 2017, about 1800 Pacific standard time, a Piper PA-28R-201T, N5966V, was substantially damaged following an emergency landing as a result of a total loss of engine power near Nipton, California. The commercial pilot and the sole passenger were not injured. Instrument meteorological conditions (IFR) prevailed at altitude, while visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site. The cross-country flight was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and an IFR flight plan was filed and active at the time of the accident. The flight departed North Las Vegas Airport (VGT), Las Vegas, Nevada, about 1655, with an intended destination of Brackett Field (POC), La Verne, California.

In a telephone interview with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge shortly after the accident, the pilot reported that while in cruise flight at 10,000 feet he noticed the JPI indicator revealed that the #5 cylinder had spiked. This was followed shortly thereafter by the engine running rough, and then a total loss of engine power. The pilot subsequently made an emergency landing to the west on interstate highway I15, about 20 miles north of Baker, California. During the landing roll the airplane exited the right side of the highway and into some soft dirt. An onsite damage assessment by Federal Aviation Administration inspectors assigned to the Las Vegas Flight Standards District Office revealed that the airplane's right wing spar was substantially damaged.

The airplane was recovered to a secured storage facility in Phoenix, Arizona for further examination.

Courtesy Photo
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LAS VEGAS (KSNV News3LV) — Emergency crews are responding to a small plane down near the California-Nevada border, south of Las Vegas.

According to the San Bernardino County Fire Department, the incident was reported in the Halloran Springs area, on I-15 south of Nipton Road.

The single-engine plane had two people on board and neither were injured.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the Piper PA-28R-201T made an emergency landing on I-15 just east of Yucca Grove around 6 p.m. Thursday. The pilot reportedly experienced engine problems.

California Highway Patrol and the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department are enroute to the scene to investigate.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://news3lv.com

Sikorsky S-76C, N911LK, Monroe County Sheriff's Office: Incident occurred November 13, 2017 in Key West, Monroe County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Rotorcraft on landing at hospital helipad, sustained minor damage from a birdstrike.

Monroe County Sheriff's Office: http://registry.faa.gov/N911LK

Date: 13-NOV-17
Time: 02:00:00Z
Regis#: N911LK
Aircraft Make: SIKORSKY
Aircraft Model: S76C
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: KEY WEST
State: FLORIDA