Friday, November 27, 2020

Bell UH-1H Iroquois, N711GH: Fatal accident occurred August 19, 2020 near New Coalinga Municipal Airport (C80), Fresno County, California

Michael John Fournier


This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fresno, California 
Cal Fire; Sacramento, California 
Guardian Helicopters; Van Nuys, California 
Honeywell; Phoenix, Arizona 


Location: Coalinga, CA 
Accident Number: WPR20LA280
Date & Time: August 19, 2020, 09:45 Local
Registration: N711GH
Aircraft: Arrow-Falcon Exporters, Inc. UH1H 
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Public aircraft

On August 19, 2020 about 0945 Pacific daylight time, an Arrow-Falcon Exporters, Inc. UH-1H, N711GH, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Coalinga, California. The pilot, the sole occupant was fatally injured. The helicopter was operated as a public use firefighting flight.

The accident flight was the pilot's first day working the Hills Fire, which had started four days prior. The pilot departed at 0846 followed by another pilot that was flying a Bell 212 helicopter for another operator.

Investigators reviewed flight track data covering the area of the accident during the time surrounding the accident. Additionally, the Bell 212 pilot had an app recording his track that he provided to investigators. After departure, both helicopters flew south until reaching a small lake/reservoir (the dip site) to fill up the external load buckets attached to their respective helicopters (bambi buckets). Thereafter, they flew to a predetermined areas and began to unload their water on the fire. After releasing the water, they would return back to the dip site. After the accident pilot delivered about two buckets of water to a division he moved to another division delivering about five buckets of water.

The Bell 212 pilot recalled that after he departed the dip site with a bucket of water, he heard the accident pilot communicate over the air-to-air radio that he felt "abnormal noises and vibrations" and that he was going to make a precautionary landing. The Bell 212 pilot dumped his water and then caught up to the accident helicopter with the intention of assisting the pilot find a good area to land; he remained a few hundred feet behind and above the accident helicopter. The accident helicopter was about a 1,000 ft above ground level (agl) and maneuvering at an airspeed between 60 to 70 kts. The accident pilot then stated that the helicopter's "temps and pressures are good." A few seconds later the accident pilot stated "it's my hydraulics." The Bell 212 pilot relayed that that he should make a right turn and fly down the ravine to less mountainous terrain (the flats). 

The helicopter started to make a right turn and then banked back to the left while losing airspeed. The Bell 212 pilot noticed the helicopter still had its 100 ft longline and bambi bucket attached and told the accident pilot to "release your long line and get forward airspeed," The accident pilot then stated "Mayday, Mayday, Mayday." The left turn steepened remaining in a level pitch attitude, and the helicopter began to make three or four 360° rotations (rapidly swapping the front and back), while drifting north-east. The helicopter then pitched in a nose-low, near vertical attitude and collided into terrain. A fire immediately erupted and the Bell 212 pilot made multiple trips to the dip site to fill his bucket and drop water on the accident site. 

The helicopter came to rest on a 35° slope with the main wreckage about 25 yards downslope from the initial impact. A majority of the wreckage was consumed by fire; the tail rotor assembly was intact. The tail rotor blades were intact, with no evidence of rotational scoring. The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further investigation.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Arrow-Falcon Exporters, Inc.
Registration: N711GH
Model/Series: UH-1H 
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Rotorcraft external load (133), On-demand air taxi (135), Agricultural aircraft (137)
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time: 09:00 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 11 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 3 miles
Altimeter Setting: 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Coalinga, CA (C80) 
Destination: Coalinga, CA (C80)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Latitude, Longitude: 35.969165,-120.322502 (est)
  

Diamond DA40 Diamond Star, N386MA: Accident occurred August 19, 2020 at Benson Municipal Airport (E95), Cochise County, Arizona


This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah
Diamond Aircraft; London, Ontario

K2 Aviation LLC


Location: Benson, AZ 
Accident Number: WPR20LA290
Date & Time: August 19, 2020, 21:50 Local
Registration: N386MA
Aircraft: Diamond DA40 Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

On August 19, 2020, about 2150 mountain standard time, a Diamond DA40 airplane, N386MA, sustained substantial damage when it was involved in an accident in Benson, Arizona. The certified flight instructor (CFI) and pilot undergoing instruction (PUI) were not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 instructional flight.

The CFI stated that they departed from Tucson, Arizona with the purpose of landing in Benson for the PUI to fulfill a night cross-country flight time requirement toward his commercial license. The PUI completed a normal approach to runway 10 and started the landing flare at about 65 kts. The main landing gear touched down on the runway surface first and as soon as the nose lowered, they heard a loud noise. The PUI held the control stick aft in an attempt to keep the nose up as the airspeed was slowing, but they soon heard the strut scraping along the runway. Upon egressing the airplane, they observed that the nose gear has separated at the pivot axle (see Picture 1). 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Diamond 
Registration: N386MA
Model/Series: DA40 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot school (141)
Operator Designator Code: 470K

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTUS,2555 ft msl 
Observation Time: 03:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 31 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 38°C /8°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 330°
Lowest Ceiling:
None Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.86 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Departure Point: Mesa, AZ (FFZ)
Destination: Benson, AZ (E95)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 31.999444,-110.36

Grand Canyon West, Papillon bring back helicopter flights with pontoon tours


Grand Canyon West and Papillon Grand Canyon Helicopters welcomed back aerial and pontoon tours on Wednesday.

The West Rim offers a unique opportunity for guests to explore the Grand Canyon by air and by land. Guests begin the adventure by flying via helicopter below the rim of the Canyon where they will land and board pontoons to experience the wonders of the Grand Canyon from the calm waters of the Colorado River.

“We are proud to have the opportunity to relaunch our exclusive relationship with Grand Canyon West, allowing our shared guests to experience the Grand Canyon from above and below the rim. We continue to move forward in these challenging times while ensuring the highest levels of safety for our guests, our employees and the local communities we serve,” says Brenda Halvorson, chief executive officer, Papillon Grand Canyon Helicopters.

The Helicopter-Pontoon tour is available seven days a week and departs from the Grand Canyon West Airport in Peach Springs, Ariz. Pricing per person begins at $199 and includes a round-trip helicopter flight to the bottom of the Grand Canyon and a 15-minute pontoon boat ride along the Colorado River. Guests can also book a package price with park entry from Papillon.

To book this tour, click here or call (702) 736-7243. For more information about Grand Canyon West media familiarity opportunities, please contact (928) 227-2519 or pr@grandcanyonresort.com.


Loss of Control on Ground: Cessna 182B Skylane, N710NA; accident occurred August 20, 2020 at Odessa Airport-Schlemeyer Field (KODO), Ector County, Texas















 


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock, Texas

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Odessa, Texas
Accident Number: CEN20CA355
Date & Time: August 20, 2020, 09:50 Local 
Registration: N710NA
Aircraft: Cessna 182 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private 
Age: 55
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Single-engine sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: July 31, 2020
Flight Time: 1530 hours (Total, all aircraft), 799 hours (Total, this make and model), 1439 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 45 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 16 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N710NA
Model/Series: 182 B 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1959
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 52297
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: March 4, 2020 Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2348 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4681.9 Hrs as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-470 SERIES
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power:
Operator: 
On file Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KODO
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 16:53 Local
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 11 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 170° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 9°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Gainesville, TX (KGLE)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Odessa, TX (ODO)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 07:10 Local
 Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Odessa Airport-Schlemeyer ODO
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 3003 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 16 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5003 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 31.922222,-102.384719(est)

Landing Gear Not Configured: Northrop F-5E Tiger II, N926TA; accident occurred August 24, 2020 at Reno-Stead Airport (KRTS), Washoe County, Nevada






Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

Tactical Air Support Inc


Location: Reno, Nevada
Accident Number: WPR20CA286
Date & Time: August 24, 2020, 10:03 Local 
Registration: N926TA
Aircraft: Northrop F5 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing gear not configured 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline transport
Age: 47,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Single
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: March 23, 2020
Occupational Pilot: Yes 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: June 5, 2020
Flight Time: (Estimated) 2838 hours (Total, all aircraft), 17 hours (Total, this make and model), 2350 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 17 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Northrop 
Registration: N926TA
Model/Series: F5 E 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1975 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental (Special) 
Serial Number: 75-0493
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: August 13, 2020 100 hour 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 15320 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Turbo jet
Airframe Total Time: 2335.1 Hrs at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: General Electric
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: J85-21C
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 5000 Lbs thrust
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRTS,5050 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 05:55 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 30°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: Unknown / Unknown
Altimeter Setting: 30.11 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 6°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Reno, NV (RTS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Reno, NV (RTS) 
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 09:00 Local
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: Reno/Stead RTS 
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 5050 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 14 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 9000 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 39.680831,-119.879997(est)


Alan Cottle: Pilot flies passengers on missions that are out of this world with NASA


When Alan Cottle flies, he often takes his passengers on missions that are out of this world.

Cottle, 59, of Lake Geneva, works as a pilot for NASA and flies the space program’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy aircraft— which is a “specialized performance” 747 airplane that is used for scientific research.

The aircraft— also known as SOFIA— takes a team of scientists about 45,000 feet above the Earth’s atmosphere to study stars, planets, galaxies, blackholes, magnetic particles and cosmic winds.

SOFIA features a telescope that is 9 feet in diameter and other specialized equipment that allows the scientists to conduct their research.

“We have the ability to look at what no other telescope can do— ground-base or space-base,” NASA pilot Andrew Barry said.

The aircraft recently was involved with a mission in which water was found on the moon; however, Cottle said he was not involved with that study.

Cottle began working as for NASA in January and served as an aircraft commanded for his first two SOFIA flights in August.

He said, as aircraft commander, he is responsible for the aircraft and its crew and making sure it is flying at an appropriate height.

“Most of my job is to fly the airplane smoothly, get it as high up as we possibly can, so we can see good and hold good, and maintain speed,” Cottle said.

He said, during one mission, scientists studied the magnetic fields of dust clouds located in the Orion constellation.

“They believe these magnetic fields are forming stars,” Cottle said.

During another mission, crews studied different galaxies and blackholes.

“Quite frankly, sometimes they’re looking at things I don’t understand,” Cottle said. “It’s so complicated.”

Cottle said most SOFIA missions last between eight to 10 hours. He said, despite being about 45,000 feet in the air, the crews do not have to wear any special equipment.

“We all wear flight suits and the NASA stuff,” Cottle said. “Some of the scientists just wear regular clothes.”

The SOFIA program is based out of NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California. The aircraft’s flights take off and return at an airbase facility in Palmdale, California.

“We’re not flying from L.A. to Chicago. We’re not flying from Point A to Point B,” Barry said. “We’re just taking one big sweeping arch across the sky. We’re just looking at one celestial object or a couple.”

Cottle said because of the coronavirus several safety precautions have been put in place for each flight.

He said each flight is limited to 14 crew members, and they are required to wear face masks during the entire flight, and only one crew member can get something to eat or drink at a time.

Cottle said— before each flight— crew members are required to have their temperature taken and they have to complete mask-wearing training.

“It’s NASA, so you can imagine that it’s pretty technical,” he said.

Raquel Cottle, Alan’s wife, said she is proud of her husband flying for NASA, as she feels it is a great career opportunity for him.

She said her husband has shared stories of his flights when he has returned home.

“It’s exciting for us,” Raquel Cottle said. “It’s NASA. His father did some work for NASA, so it’s kind of full circle for him.”

Cottle said he has enjoyed flying for NASA and working with the scientists and other crew members.

“It’s a great organization,” Cottle said. “I don’t think I’ve been involved in any other organization where you look around and you see the quality of pilots, flight engineers, scientists and trainers. They’re tip-top.”

Cottle said one of the more difficult aspects of the job is when the aircraft hits turbulence, which shutdowns the telescope for several minutes and causes scientists to lose sight of the object they were researching.

“If you’ve been waiting five years to do this and you lost 10 minutes of your time, you’re upset,” Cottle said. “That 10 minutes may have been the only time that thing in space was available to you, and you can’t get that time back.”

Cottle said he flew the final SOFIA mission of the year in August. He said the aircraft currently is in Hamburg, Germany for maintenance work and will remain stationed there until the program’s next mission next spring.

Cottle said he is set to fly the spring mission, which will include NASA scientists and scientists from Deutsches Zentrum fur Luftund Raumfahrt, which is Germany’s aerospace program.

He also will pilot a SOFIA mission during the summer, which will fly out of Christ Church, New Zealand.

Before working for NASA, Cottle was a fighter pilot for the U.S. Airforce for about six years, then worked as a commercial pilot for American Airlines for about 24 years.

Cottle said he learned about the SOFIA program from pilots he worked with in the U.S. Airforce.

“They said, ‘You should really come out and try this,’” Cottle said. “I didn’t think I would have a chance to get hired. I mean it’s NASA. I was fortunate enough to get invited out, and they hired me.”

Cottle began training as a NASA pilot in January.

Barry said, as part of the training— which takes about four weeks to complete— pilots attend classroom instruction, practice in a simulator and fly with an instructor.

He said most NASA pilots have previous flying experience with the military or a commercial airline.

“That’s the norm rather than the exception,” Barry said. “People come here with thousands and thousands of hours with flying dozens of planes under their belts.”

Barry said he has not had an opportunity to fly with Cottle on a mission, but he has worked with him on a flight simulator.

“He has a wealth of experience as do all of our pilots,” Barry said. “I look forward to returning to normalcy, like we all do, and getting to know him better as an individual and fly with him.”

Cottle said he became interested in working as a pilot during his childhood when his father worked as an aerial space engineer for NASA’s Mercury and Gemini projects.

“So this has been my whole life,” Cottle said. “This is like a 50-year realization of a dream for me.”

Raquel Cottle said she and her husband met while she worked as a flight attendant for American Airlines.

She said even though Alan Cottle can be gone for about a month because of his work with NASA, she realizes it is a part of the job.

“We’re use to it. We’ve both worked in the airline industry,” Raquel Cottle said. “Working for NASA, it’s kind of the cherry on top of his career.”

Besides working for NASA, Cottle conducts charter flights for businesses and corporations.

Cottle and his wife also operate a farm in Lake Geneva, in which they raise horses, mules, chickens and cattle.

“I ride my horse on my off days, and I ride a 747 on my work days,” Cottle said.

Magic Valley Regional Airport (KTWF) prepares for winter weather


TWIN FALLS, Idaho (KMVT/KSVT) - The Magic Valley Regional Airport is working to make sure the airport is open and available no matter what the weather is outside.

The Magic Valley Regional Airport begins preparing for the winter weather, in the summer months. First they perform maintenance on all their equipment.

“After that we do a lot of training with our six different personnel,” said Matt Barnes, the operations supervisor at the airport. “To make sure that we adhere to all FAA standards and we are ready to react to all different kinds of snow and ice control that we may have to perform during the winter season.”

If there is a storm approaching, they will adjust the schedules, to ensure they are ready to go, no matter what time it is.

“We will respond, 24/7, 365 to make sure that the airfield is safe to operate for all the aircraft,” said Barnes.

The Magic Valley Regional Airport not only has flights daily to and from Salt Lake City, they also have package haulers, and private planes.

They also act as a transfer airport, if the weather is bad for planes at the Boise airport, or the Hailey airport.

“We are an alternate for the Boise airport and the Hailey airport, so if weather is severe enough, aircraft may be diverted here, and we will do our best to make sure the runways are open and ready for them,” said Barnes.

The airport purchased the equipment through grants offered through the FAA.

“After that, we maintain them, we train with them, and we are ready to respond with them to remove any kind of contaminate that may come,” said Barnes.

Virginia woman pleads guilty to directing laser pointer at police plane

RICHMOND, Virginia -- A 33-year-old Henrico woman faces up to five years in prison for aiming a laser pointer at a police airplane during the period of social unrest in Richmond.

Amanda Robinson pleaded guilty in federal court Monday, according to the United States Attorney's Office.

"According to court documents, on June 4, Robinson traveled to the Robert E. Lee Monument traffic circle located in Richmond. While at the traffic circle, Robinson pointed her laser pointer at a 2006 Cessna aircraft flying above her location operated by police officers of the Metropolitan Aviation Unit," according to the U.S. Attorney. "The Metropolitan Aviation Unit officers were conducting aerial surveillance patrols during a period of civil unrest. In aiming the laser pointer, Robinson struck the aircraft on at least two separate occasions and disrupted the pilot’s vision. Using an onboard camera, the police officers identified Robinson as the individual aiming the laser pointer and directed police units to her location. Upon arriving to the Robert E. Lee Monument traffic circle, police patrol units detained Robinson and recovered a green laser pointer from her possession."

Robinson is scheduled to be sentenced on March 23, 2021.

TSA stops man with loaded gun from boarding plane at John Glenn Columbus International Airport (KCMH)


COLUMBUS, Ohio (WCMH) — A man was stopped by Transportation Security Administration (TSA) officers from boarding a plane with a loaded gun at John Glenn International Airport this week.

According to TSA, the man was carrying a loaded 9mm handgun with eight bullets onto the plane in his carry-on bag Wednesday at approximately 6:30 a.m.

Airport police confiscated the weapon and escorted the man away from the checkpoint.

TSA issues civil penalties to people who bring guns to an airport checkpoint, with a first offense for a loaded handgun being $4,100.

This was the 13 firearm detected at John Glenn this year.

Passengers are permitted to travel with firearms in checked baggage if they are unloaded, packed separately from ammunition in a locked hardback case and declared at the airline check-in counter.

Winter Haven to open 97 acres at regional airport to developers

Winter Haven Regional Airport General Manager Alex Vacha said It would like to attract a repair facility to work on multi-engine planes and corporate jets that are becoming a growing part of the airport’s traffic.


WINTER HAVEN, Florida – The city of Winter Haven is going into the real estate development business.

The City Commission has hired Hanson Professional Services Inc., a Maitland aviation industry consultant, to draw up a development plan for 97 undeveloped acres around the Winter Haven Regional Airport. The city will retain the local marketing agency Clark Nikdel Powell Inc. to promote the availability of the property to developers.

Hanson will take the next six months to produce a full service development plan for the airport property, including an inventory of current facilities and their conditions; an assessment of the airport’s strengths and weaknesses; and identifying strategic initiatives best suited for the airport. It also will work with Clark Nikdel Powell on developing a marketing plan.

The 520-acre airport property has three areas suitable for development, said Alex Vacha, the airport general manager, on Wednesday.

They are a 44-acre property in the northwest next to the main terminal and a seven-acre site on the northeast, both of which front U.S. 92 West, he said. Another 46-acre site on the east along 21st Street NW could be developed.

Other vacant areas of the airport property must be kept that way under Federal Aviation Administration regulations governing runway operations, Vacha said.

The city is looking for private aviation and non-aviation companies willing to build facilities on the property under a long-term lease, he said.

The inside properties close to the airport would be ideal for aviation companies, such as a flight school or maintenance and repair facility, Vacha said. The Winter Haven Airport has repair and maintenance companies working on single-engine general aviation aircraft, the most frequent users.

It would like to attract a repair facility to work on multi-engine planes and corporate jets that are becoming a growing part of the airport’s traffic, he said.

“As the airport continues to grow, we’re looking at companies to service larger aircraft,” Vacha said. “Right now, we’re focused on small, single-engine aircraft.”

Non-aviation companies would best suit the outside acreage fronting U.S. 92 West and 21st Street NW, he said. That includes manufacturers and a hotel.

The airport’s existing master plan envisions a hotel on the 44-acre northwest site, Vacha said.

The city also hopes to partner with Polk State College, Winter Haven High School or some other education organization to build an aviation facility, he said.

Polk State operates an Aerospace Program at the Lakeland Linder International Airport, Vacha said, and the high school has an aviation program with more than 150 students.

An educational facility would become particularly valuable as a feeder for aviation companies at the Winter Haven Airport, he said.

“All those schools will feed into those businesses,” Vacha said. “It would help the whole airport expand.”

New airport developments will add to Polk County’s aviation profile and not compete with similar businesses in Lakeland Linder and the Bartow and Lake Wales airports, he said.

“We’re going to complement one another,” he said. “As long as there’s aviation growth in Winter Haven, Bartow, Lake Wales or Lakeland, we all succeed.”

Hanson is a 66-year-old aviation company offering management, financial and marketing services to airports nationwide, Blake Swafford, its chief executive for the Southeast Region, told the City Commission on Nov. 18. Its staff includes six former airport managers, including Swafford, and one current airport manager.

The city retained Hanson under a $75,667 contract, according to city records. Clark Nikdel Powell will get $4,000 for its marketing services.

Mayor Brad Dantzler expressed enthusiasm about the agreement as a way to bring more economic development and tax revenue to the city. The airport is an underused asset for a public-private partnership, he said.

“I’ve always thought we are land-rich but cash-poor,” Dantzler said.

American Airlines won't return to New York Stewart International Airport (KSWF), spokesman says

The Stewart passenger terminal in April 1990 welcomed American, the first airline to provide commercial service.


STEWART AIRPORT – American Airlines was the first commercial carrier to provide regularly scheduled service to New York Stewart International Airport on April 17, 1990, and now, it has withdrawn its service to the Mid-Hudson Valley airport.

The airline suspended its flights in October as it awaited aid from the federal payroll support program.

But, the company determined the Stewart service was not “financially viable… for the foreseeable future.”

Therefore, American airlines will not be returning to Stewart, Williamsport, Pennsylvania, or New Haven, Connecticut, spokesman Brian Metham told Mid-Hudson News.

He termed the decision to terminate the service “difficult.”

When American Airlines began the commercial Stewart service, it operated routes to Chicago and Raleigh-Durham. In the years that followed, both of those routes were terminated and in recent years when American merged with US Airways, it continued the Stewart to Philadelphia route until the COVID-19 pandemic crippled the travel industry earlier this year.

Loss of Control on Ground: Cessna 180C, N334SC; accident occurred August 25, 2020 at Sunrise Skypark Airport (ID40), Givens Hot Springs, Owyhee County, Idaho

 

 


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise, Idaho

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Givens Hot Springs, Idaho 
Accident Number: WPR20CA297
Date & Time: August 25, 2020, 07:15 Local 
Registration: N334SC
Aircraft: Cessna 180
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 73,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Single-engine sea; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: November 27, 2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: March 11, 2019
Flight Time: (Estimated) 4656 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1475 hours (Total, this make and model), 4557 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 39 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 26 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N334SC
Model/Series: 180 C 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1960
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 50691
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: January 14, 2020 Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2550 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3899 Hrs at time of accident 
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated 
Engine Model/Series: O-470 SERIES
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 230 Horsepower
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMAN,2537 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 13 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 14:55 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 39°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 140° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 7°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Givens Hot Springs, ID (ID40)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Yellow Pine, ID (3U2) 
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 07:15 Local
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: SUNRISE SKYPARK ID40
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 2240 ft msl
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 30 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2892 ft / 40 ft 
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 43.416389,-116.706665(est)

American Aviation AA-1A Trainer, N9485L: Incident occurred November 21, 2020 at Yellow River Airstrip (FD93), Holt, Okaloosa County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Alabama and NW Florida

Aircraft rolled off the end of grass Runway 27 during landing. Aircraft struck a fence causing damage to the right wing spar, propeller and spinner. 


Date: 21-NOV-20
Time: 16:00:00Z
Regis#: N9485L
Aircraft Make: AMERICAN AVIATION
Aircraft Model: AA1A
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: HOLT
State: FLORIDA

Cessna 172RG Cutlass RG, N4791V: Incident occurred November 25, 2020 at Palm Beach International Airport (KPBI), West Palm Beach, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Aircraft landed on Runway 9R with the landing gear retracted. 

American Eagle Realestate & Financing Corporation


Date: 25-NOV-20
Time: 16:43:00Z
Regis#: N4791V
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C72R
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: WEST PALM BEACH
State: FLORIDA

Aero Commander 500, N777CM and Cessna 172F Skyhawk, N8125U: Accident occurred November 25, 2020 at Dekalb-Peachtree Airport (KPDK), Atlanta, Georgia

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia 

Central Airlines Inc
  
 

Location: Atlanta, GA
Accident Number: ERA21LA056
Date & Time: November 25, 2020, 00:09 Local
Registration: N8125U (A1); N777CM (A2)
Aircraft: Cessna 172 (A1); Aero Commander 500 (A2)
Injuries: 1 None (A1); 1 None (A2)
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal (A1); Part 135: Air taxi & commuter - Nonscheduled (A2)
  
On November 25, 2020, at 0009 eastern standard time, a Cessna 172, N8125U, was substantially damaged when it collided with an Aero Commander 500, N777CM, while landing at Dekalb-Peachtree Airport (PDK), Atlanta, Georgia. The Aero Commander sustained minor damage. The pilots of both airplanes were not injured. The Cessna was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR)Part 91 personal flight. The Aero Commander was operated as a Title 14 CFR Part 135 flight.
    
According to the pilot of the Cessna, PDK was his home airport. While en route, he deviated around some fog, which delayed his planned arrival time until after the control tower had closed. Upon arrival near PDK, he listened to the airport terminal information service (ATIS) recording and recalled that he “wrote down the radio channels and headed in, thinking how much (he) hated being without air traffic control.” As he neared the airport, he activated the pilot-controlled lighting, and the runway lights “lit up.” He saw green lights at the approach end of what he believed to be runway 21R, and stated that these lights indicated the direction he was supposed to land on the active runway. He then “switched radio channels” and made “routine calls.” He did not hear any radio transmissions advising of other traffic operating at or near PDK. He recalled that the airplane’s landing lights and navigation lights were on while on approach. During landing, at an altitude of about 10-15 ft above the runway, about 200 ft past the runway numbers, and at a speed of about 65 knots, he saw a “tiny white light approaching extremely fast.” About 3 seconds later, he heard a “bang” and the “plane pitched hard to starboard.” He maneuvered the airplane back to the runway centerline and landed. He stated that he exited the runway at taxiway F, did not make any further radio calls, and taxied to his parking spot. An airport security guard then informed him that he had collided with another airplane.
  
According to the pilot of the Aero Commander, he opted to land on runway 3R “because other aircraft were landing on 3R.” He followed an EMS helicopter that was landing on runway 3R. He entered the right downwind leg of the traffic pattern and “made the appropriate CTAF [common traffic advisory frequency] calls on frequency 120.9.” He entered the right base leg of the traffic pattern and then turned onto a 1/2-mile final approach leg for runway 3R, “announcing each leg [on the CTAF frequency].” He reported that he typically does not adjust the intensity of the runway lights when landing at PDK, and he noticed that the light intensity increased while on approach. After landing, he saw “some lights” though he was initially not sure what they were. He subsequently “realized it was an oncoming aircraft landing on runway 21L.” He indicated both airplanes swerved, and the right wingtip of the Cessna contacted the right outboard wing of the Aero Commander.
  
A review of preliminary Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) tracking data revealed that the Cessna approached the airport from the northeast and flew a straight-in approach to runway 21L.
  
A review of FAA recordings of the CTAF frequency 120.9 revealed that at about 0005, the pilot of the Aero Commander initially announced that he was on the left downwind of the traffic pattern for runway 21L. About 2 minutes later, N649AE, an EMS helicopter, advised that he was on a modified base leg of the traffic pattern for runway 3R. The pilot of the Aero Commander then advised that he was on final approach for runway 21L. N649AE then advised that he had the Aero Commander in sight, acknowledged the potential conflict, and offered to approach the “shorter runway” (3L) instead. The pilot of the Aero Commander acknowledged, and informed N649AE that he would instead go-around, and enter the right downwind leg of the traffic pattern for runway 3R. The pilot of the Aero Commander subsequently transmitted his position as he entered the downwind leg of the traffic pattern and again as he made the turn onto the final approach leg. Just after his turn to final, N649AE announced that he was clear of the runway and hovering over the ramp. The Aero Commander pilot acknowledged and advised that he had N649AE in sight. FAA tracking data showed that at the time the Aero Commander pilot advised that the had N649AE in sight, the Cessna was on final approach, about 1/2-mile from the displaced threshold of runway 21L. The recording did not include any radio calls from the Cessna pilot.
  
Examination of both airplanes by an FAA inspector revealed that the Cessna sustained substantial damage to the right wing tip, including the outermost wing rib, and bending of the right aileron. Post-accident testing of all lights (with the exception of the right wing tip navigation light, which was separated from the wing) revealed no anomalies. Testing of the single communication radio revealed successful transmission and reception. Examination of the Aero Commander revealed minor scrapes/paint transfer to the underside of the right wing near the outboard edge of the wing flap, and minor damage to the right wing flap.
  
According to the airport/facility directory, the CTAF frequency at PDK is published as 120.9, which is the same frequency for the air traffic control tower when it is operating. When the tower is closed, the high intensity runway lights (along the runway edges) for runway 3R/21L are turned on and preset to medium intensity. The pilot controlled lighting system uses a separate radio frequency, 120.0, which can be used to: 1) increase the intensity of the runway edge lights, 2) activate the runway 21L approach lights (Medium Intensity Approach Lighting System with Sequenced Flashers or MALSF), which include green lights that mark the runway threshold, and 3) activate the taxiway lights. The green threshold lights, oriented transverse to the runway centerline, denote the location of the (displaced) runway threshold and are not an indication of the “active runway” in use. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information (A1)
  
Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N8125U
Model/Series: 172 F 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:
  
Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information (A2)
  
Aircraft Make: Aero Commander 
Registration: N777CM
Model/Series: 500 B 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand air taxi (135)
Operator Designator Code:
  
Meteorological Information and Flight Plan
  
Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: PDK,1002 ft msl
Observation Time: 23:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 8°C /2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 90°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.26 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:
  
Wreckage and Impact Information (A1)
  
Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 33.876002,-84.302031 (est)
  
Wreckage and Impact Information (A2)
  
Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 33.876002,-84.302031 (est)