Sunday, June 4, 2017

AutoGyro Cavalon, N509PH, Airgyro Aviation LLC: Incident occurred June 04, 2017 near Spirit of St. Louis Airport (KSUS), Chesterfield, St. Louis County, Missouri

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Saint Louis, Missouri

Airgyro Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N509PH

Aircraft force landed on a road.

Date: 04-JUN-17
Time: 14:08:00Z
Regis#: N509PH
Aircraft Make: AUTOGYRO
Aircraft Model: CAVALON
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: CHESTERFIELD
State: MISSOURI




A gyrocopter crashed near Spirit of St. Louis Airport in Chesterfield on Sunday morning. 

Authorities say the crash happened just after 9 a.m., and that everyone was able to walk away without significant injuries. 

It is unknown how many people were in the aircraft at the time of the accident. No other information is available. 

Original article can be found here:  http://www.kmov.com

Piper PA-28-180, N4871L: Fatal accident occurred June 04, 2017 in Moorpark, Ventura County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Piper Aircraft, Inc.; Vero Beach, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N4871L

NTSB Identification: WPR17FA120
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 04, 2017 in Moorpark, CA
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-180, registration: N4871L
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 4, 2017, about 1545 Pacific daylight time a Piper PA28-180, N4871L, collided with the ground in a residential neighborhood in Moorpark, California. The commercial pilot and his 15-year-old son passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was being operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. The cross-country flight departed Camarillo Airport, Camarillo, California, about 1445. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot reported to friends that he planned to fly to Santa Cruz Island (about 40 miles southwest of Camarillo), and then back over an equestrian neighborhood in Moorpark, where his daughter was receiving horse riding lessons.

The pilot's daughter was on her horse in an outdoor horse arena, and was accompanied by two riding instructors, one who was at her side, and another in an adjacent wash rack area. Both instructors reported seeing the airplane approach from the northwest and fly over the arena in a southeast direction. They stated that the pilot had flown over the area before, and although they could not definitively judge the airplane's altitude, it was about the same as on those prior occasions. The airplane then began a 180° left turn, tracking back past the arena and to the northwest. The pilot's daughter exclaimed to them that she could see her brother in the front left seat as the airplane passed by.

The airplane continued on the same track for about 1/3 of a mile, and as it overflew a house on the top of an adjacent hill it began to turn left. The witnesses reported that the engine started to "sputter," and then stop producing a sound. The airplane continued the turn, until it was now lined up on the original inbound track. The witnesses then heard the engine sound increase, as the airplane flew directly towards the arena, but now at a much lower altitude. The airplane continued to descend with the engine operating, and flew about 100 ft directly overhead, startling the horses.

Electrical power transmission lines were situated just to the east of the arena. Prior to reaching the lines, the airplane began a steep right turn, such that the witnesses could see the complete wing profile. One witness stated that the turn and engine sound were reminiscent of an airplane performing aerobatic maneuvers at an airshow. The turn progressed, with the nose pointing up, and then dropping back down, as the airplane passed out of view behind trees. The witnesses then heard two loud thuds, and immediately ran in the direction of the noise. They found the airplane in the center of another sand-covered horse arena, on an adjacent property, about 600 ft to the south of their arena.

Another witness, who was located on the accident property, recounted similar observations. He stated that the left turn following the initial pass was very aggressive, and that the engine was operating at that time. As the airplane came in for the second pass, he was shocked at how low it was flying. After overflying the arena, and just above the tree line, the airplane pulled up before reaching the power lines, and immediately rolled aggressively to the right.

The airplane came to rest in the middle of the arena, which was 175 ft long and 85 ft wide, and oriented north-south. Both horse arenas were bound to the east by three separate sets of power transmission lines running north-south. The lines were positioned 60, 85, and 180 ft east of the arena edges. The closest two sets of lines were hanging at an elevation of about 65 ft above ground level (agl), with the farthest line about 75 ft agl.

The first identified point of impact was a metallic 4-ft-long transfer mark on the closest power line. Fragments of sheet metal were found directly below that mark. The outboard right wingtip was about 30 ft south of that mark, and exhibited striation damage to the leading edge consistent with power line contact.

The airplane came to rest about 120 ft southwest of the initial power line impact location. The empennage was largely intact and upright. The remaining forward section of the airplane had folded back over the tailcone, and was inverted. The engine, instrument panel, and leading edges of both wings had sustained crush damage.

The pilot's son was located in the left seat of the airplane, which according to family members, was not unusual, as he had flown with his father from the left regularly since the age of 13. The airplane was equipped with dual controls.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



CALABASAS, Calif. (KABC) -- The wife and mother of a Calabasas father and son killed in a single-engine plane crash in Ventura County Sunday confirmed the identities of the two victims.

The occupants of the plane were 57-year-old Jim Harlan from Calabasas and his 15-year-old son, Dylan. The coroner also independently released the victims' names.

Loved ones say Dylan lived life to the fullest. He was a member of the Burbank Bears Club hockey team, where he had recently made the AAA team.

"Plays hockey, surfs, dives, travels the world," said Dylan's hockey coach Peter Torsson. "On the day he died, he surfed in the morning and flew in the afternoon."

Dylan had a bright future ahead. According to Torsson, he was well on his way to becoming a student athlete at a Division 1 college.

Torsson said he always taught the boys he coached to play like it was their last shift. "I guess it was his last shift," Torsson said of Dylan, through tears.

The plane that the two were aboard, described as a single-engine Piper PA-28, crashed around 3:30 p.m. Sunday on private property near the 2700 block of Marvella Court, in an area of Ventura County near Thousand Oaks.

Witnesses reported seeing the plane fly low over the area before the crash. The aircraft clipped at least one power line before it crashed into a horse arena, according to authorities.

No one on the ground was injured.

Authorities did not have immediate information on the likely cause of the crash. The FAA and NTSB continue to investigate.


Story and video:  http://abc7.com







A father and son died Sunday afternoon after a small plane they were flying in  crashed in the Santa Rosa Valley, according to Ventura County Fire Department.

The victims, both from Calabasas, were a 57-year-old man and his 15-year-old son, said Capt. Garo Kuredjian, a spokesman for the Ventura County Sheriff's Office. There were no other occupants on the plane.

Authorities were alerted to the crash at 3:30 p.m. along the 2700 block of Marvella Court, near the Norwegian Grade on Moorpark Road.

This is the second fatal plane crash in Ventura County in four days. On Thursday, a single-engine Cessna 180 crashed in the hills east of Solimar Beach, killing the pilot later identified as Michael Brannigan, 52, of Lake Sherwood.

Authorities said the single-engine Piper PA-28 Cherokee originally took off from the Camarillo Airport. The cause of the crash was under investigation, according to authorities.

The plane crashed in a gated community called Hidden Meadow Estates, where properties include large portions of land, many with horse stables. 

According to Sheriff's officials, most of the airplane landed in the horse arena of a nearby residence. A piece of the wing landed on the other side of a nearby chain-link fence, and a third piece of debris landed about 100 feet away from the crash site, authorities said.

Officials from Southern California Edison confirmed one of their power lines had been struck by debris from the crash, causing minor damage. No other structures were reported to be damaged from the incident.

Steve Swindle, a fire engineer and spokesman with county fire, said the plane caught on fire after crashing but neighbors quickly extinguished the fire.

A neighbor in the area, Gary Blackwell was throwing a graduation party for his son at the time when he said he heard the plane crash. 

"I saw a plane flying super low," Blackwell said. "I heard it circle once, then twice, and then I heard a gigantic thud."

Blackwell said he didn't think much of it until his guests alerted him that they saw the plane go down.

Anne Carter, of Camarillo, was flying with her son and saw the plane before it crashed. She said her son had been flying their aircraft at 2,500 feet and she could see the Piper aircraft below them.

"I looked down and thought 'What are they doing? They're way too low. It's dangerous. You could crash into houses,'" Carter said.

Crews removed the bodies from the aircraft shortly before 8 p.m. Sunday night. They later worked to remove the aircraft from the location.

Officials with the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the cause of the crash. 

The California Highway Patrol also responded to the incident.

Story and video: http://www.vcstar.com



MOORPARK, Calif. - [Update: 6:15 p.m.] The two males that died in a single-engine plane crash Sunday afternoon in Ventura County were a father and son.

The 57-year-old father was piloting with his 15-year-old son when their plane went down in the Santa Rosa Valley near the towns of Camarillo, Thousand Oaks and Moorpark.

The father and son took off from Camarillo Airport. Their destination is unclear at this time.

Authorities say the two are both from Calabasas. Their families have been notified.

Two men are dead following a plane crash near Moorpark on Sunday afternoon.

The small plane went down at around 3:30 p.m. near Marvella Court in the Santa Rosa Valley.

The plane, described as a single-engine piper aircraft, crashed inside a horse enclosure on private property.

Two male occupants of the plane were pronounced dead at the scene. No one on the ground was injured.

Ventura County Fire, Ventura County Sheriff's Office and California Highway Patrol responded to the scene.

Fire hose crews were on hand but the crash did not spark a fire.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board have been notified and are en route.

This is the second fatal plane crash in Ventura County in less than a week.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.keyt.com


Two people died after a small plane crashed Sunday in eastern Camarillo, on the edge of the Santa Rosa Valley, firefighters said.

Officials responded to a downed aircraft on private property 2700 block of Marvella Court around 4 p.m., according to alerts from the Ventura County Fire Department and California Highway Patrol.

The plane’s two occupants, a 57-year-old father and his 15-year-old son, were dead on arrival, VCFD Capt. Garo Kuredjian said.

Kuredjian could not identify the victims except to say they were Calabasas residents.

No bystanders on the ground were injured, officials said.

It was unclear what led to the crash, which occurred in an open, hilly area behind the Norwegian grade.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board were traveling to the crash scene to investigate the incident.

Cessna 150H, N6511S, Olde New England Properties LLC: Accident occurred June 04, 2017 at Plum Island Airport (2B2), Newburyport, Essex County, Massachusetts

Additional participating entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston, Massachusetts

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Olde New England Properties LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N6511S

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA326
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 04, 2017 in Newburyport, MA
Aircraft: CESSNA 150, registration: N6511S
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The solo student pilot reported that, during the takeoff roll the pilot's side window blew open as full power was applied. He added that he "reached over with [his] right hand to close [the] window," but as he did so, the airplane veered off the runway to the left into a wooded area and impacted terrain. The student pilot reported that he had noticed on previous flights that the window latch was loose, and he had planned to get it fixed, but had not done so.

Both wings sustained substantial damage.

The student pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.




NEWBURYPORT, Mass. (AP) — A small plane crashed into some bushes at the Plum Island airport.

The Federal Aviation Administration said a Cessna C150 ran off the end of the runway around 10:45 a.m. Sunday.

The pilot, Tim Gillette, said he was on his takeoff run at Plum Island Airport when a window popped open. He lost control of the single-engine plane as he tried to close the window, and the plane skidded off the runway, he said.

No injuries were reported.

The plane reached about 40 mph and stopped after it crashed into the bushes.

Gillette is a student pilot from Ipswich.



PLUM ISLAND – An Ipswich man was unharmed after a botched takeoff Sunday morning at Plum Island Airport sent his single-engine plane into bushes just off the runway. 

Student pilot Tim Gillette said he was on a takeoff run in his Cessna 150 from the airport's paved runway about 11 a.m. when a window popped open. As Gillette tried to close the window, he lost control of the plane and it skidded off the runway. 

The plane, with an estimated value of $15,000, had reached about 40 mph and only stopped after striking thick bushes. 

"The window went open and I lost my focus," Gillette said. 

Gillette, who was busy sawing away brush in preparation for the plane being towed, said he was fine after the crash. Gillette added that he bought the plane a few months ago and the flight Sunday morning was one of his first flying solo. 

"I sure learned something today," he said. 

John Murray, the airport's chief flight instructor, said the runway was closed while emergency responders were at the scene. The airport's grass runway remained open.

The airport was expected to feature 10 landings and takeoffs Sunday, according to Murray. 

Original article can be found here:   http://www.newburyportnews.com

NEWBURYPORT, Mass. —  A small plane crashed into the bushes at the Plum Island Airport Sunday morning.

The Federal Aviation Administration said a Cessna C150 ran off the side of the runway in Newburyport at 10:45 a.m. 

The pilot, identified as Tim Gillette, told WCVB photographer Stanley Forman he was taking off when the window on his door opened. Gillette said he got distracted and ended up in the bushes. 

No injuries were reported, but the plane did sustain extensive damage. 

The FAA is investigating.

Original article can be found here: http://www.wcvb.com

Cessna 172K Skyhawk, N79534, MacAir Aviation LLC: Accident occurred October 19, 2014 at Greene County–Lewis A. Jackson Regional Airport (I19), Xenia, Ohio

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 


MacAir Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N79534


Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cincinnati, Ohio

NTSB Identification: CEN15LA024
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 19, 2014 in Xenia, OH
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/04/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 172K, registration: N79534
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


The private pilot reported that, during takeoff for the local personal flight, his seat unexpectedly moved rearward, and the seat back tipped rearward. As the seat slid rearward, the pilot inadvertently applied aft yoke and his feet came off the rudder pedals, which resulted in a loss of directional control. The airplane went off the left side of the runway and struck a ditch, which resulted in substantial damage to the airplane. 


A postaccident examination of the pilot seat revealed that the forward outboard metal tang on the seat base that retained the base to the track was deformed. The forward outboard position of the base also contained the locking pin mechanism that adjusted the seat fore and aft and locked the seat into position. The deformation of the metal tang likely allowed the seat to become detached from the track and disengaged the locking pin, which allowed the seat to slide rearward. The seat back structure would not lock in any position after the accident. The reason why the seat back could not lock in position could not be determined. 


The Federal Aviation Administration had previously issued an airworthiness directive (AD), which required repetitive inspections of the seat mechanism, including inspections of the tangs on the seat base. A review of airplane’s maintenance records showed that the inspections had been performed in accordance with the AD. The deformation of the tang was consistent with a lateral deformation due to a sideways force, but it could not be determined if the deformation was present during the most recent inspection. 


A review of the airplane maintenance discrepancy records showed that, the day before the accident, a different pilot had entered a maintenance discrepancy, which noted that the "left seat slid back three times during flight." The following day, a mechanic repaired the hold-down spring and returned the airplane to service. After that repair and before the accident flight, another pilot entered a maintenance discrepancy, which noted that the "left front seat was in the reclined position and would not lock in the upright position." The records showed that the discrepancy had not been corrected before the accident flight. It could not be determined whether or not the accident pilot was aware of the previous discrepancy reports.


The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The failure of the seat track mechanism, which led the pilot to inadvertently apply aft yoke and lift his feet off the rudder pedals and resulted in a loss of directional control during takeoff. 

On October 19, 2014, about 1805 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172K airplane, N79534, was substantially damaged during a loss of control on takeoff at the Greene County-Lewis A. Jackson Regional Airport (I19), near Xenia, Ohio. The pilot, who was the sole occupant, received serious injuries. The aircraft was registered to and operated by MacAir Aviation LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that during takeoff, about the time that he was rotating for takeoff, the seat unexpectedly slid rearward and the seat back tipped aft. This resulted in his inadvertent application of rearward yoke, his inability to reach the rudder pedals, and the subsequent loss of control. The airplane went off the left side of the runway and struck a ditch bank, resulting in substantial damage to the airplane. 

Aircraft records showed that on the day before the accident, a different pilot had entered a maintenance discrepancy with a notation that the "left seat slid back three times during flight". On the following day, prior to the accident flight, a mechanic made a repair to the hold-down spring and returned the airplane to service. After that repair and prior to the accident flight another maintenance discrepancy was noted by another different pilot that the "left front seat was in the reclined position and would not lock in the upright position". Records showed that discrepancy had not been corrected before the accident flight. It was undetermined whether or not the accident pilot was aware of those previous discrepancy reports.

Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that a metal tang adjacent to the forward outboard seat track roller had deformed. The tang was part of the seat base and the formed lip retained the seat base to the T-shaped seat track. The deformation was consistent with lateral deformation due to a sideways force. It was not possible to determine if the deformation would have been present during the examination required by the AD. The forward outboard position of the base also retained the pin mechanism that allowed for fore-aft adjustment of the seat position. The pin engaged holes in the track to lock the fore/aft position of the seat. Postaccident examination also showed that the pilot's seat back structure could not be locked in any position. No determination was made as to why the seat back would not lock. 

The seat mechanism in the accident airplane was the subject of an Airworthiness Directive (AD) AD 2011-10-09, implemented by the Federal Aviation Administration to prevent seat slippage or the seat roller housing from departing the seat rail. The AD stated that such a failure could cause the pilot/copilot to be unable to reach all the controls and lead to the pilot/copilot losing control of the airplane. The AD instituted repetitive inspections of the seat mechanism to prevent such occurrences. One of the items to be inspected was the tang length from the inner edge of the tang to the outer edge (the bend area) of the roller housing. The AD specified a minimum tang length that would affect the width of the opening between the outer and inner tangs. 

Review of an airworthiness directive compliance sheet for the accident airplane confirmed that the inspections detailed in the AD had been complied with within the required time frame.

F-35: good for South Carolina; good for America




Bill Bethea
Guest Columnist

Columbia, SC --  It was thrilling to see the world’s most advanced aircraft, the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, light up South Carolina’s skies at a recent Beaufort Air Show. The F-35 is having a tremendous impact on America’s national security and on South Carolina’s economy.

The F-35 is critical to maintaining America’s air superiority. While our adversaries in China and Russia are trying to develop a fifth-generation fighter, America and our closest allies already are flying the F-35. The fighter offers advanced radar and infrared capabilities, tested against the existing and likely threats for which we must prepare.

The F-35 rightly has been called the world’s most advanced aircraft, and South Carolina is central to its deployment. Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort was selected as one of the first bases in the country for the F-35. Today, there are 26 F-35Bs stationed in Beaufort, and the base eventually will be home to a total of 70 F-35Bs, four squadrons. As the F-35 program grows, McEntire and Shaw are contenders to host squadrons as well.

Along with housing a squadron of F-35s, the Beaufort Air Station is home to the Lockheed Martin Corps Pilot Training Center, an international hub for pilot training for the F-35. In South Carolina, the next generation of fighter pilots from the United States and our allies are gaining skills to fly these cutting-edge aircraft.

The first class of pilot graduates completed training in February, and eventually there will be 60 graduates a year. The F-35 pilot training program in Beaufort is helping to prepare mission-ready Marines, who will be instrumental in defending our nation.

The pilot training center is equipped with electronic classrooms and five high-fidelity full mission simulators to prepare pilots for their missions. Lockheed Martin has more than 100 employees supporting the F-35 training in Beaufort.

The new economic impact study by the S.C. Military Base Task Force shows that the Beaufort Air Station represents $787 million in annual economic activity and approximately 7,253 jobs.

The fact that the F-35 will replace the F-18 in Beaufort as those jets are phased out is key. Because the air station is heavily engaged in training and transition to the F-35, it bodes well for further growth of that critical economic driver for our state.

As chair of the S.C. Military Base Task Force, I know that the F-35 has strong military and economic value to our state, and our nation. Most importantly, I know that it can help protect our brave men and women in uniform as well as other American citizens.

It’s important, then, that our state and federal leaders fully support the F-35 program as part of South Carolina’s strong and continuing legacy of supporting America’s national security. It keeps our military at the absolute leading edge of technology and provides an increasing economic boost to all South Carolina.

We encourage federal lawmakers to support continued development and production of the F-35, for the good of our service members, our state, our country and the world.

Mr. Bethea chairs the S.C. Military Base Task Force.

Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/opinion

Robinson R22, N601HA: Accident occurred June 04, 2017 at Kenosha Regional Airport (KENW), Kenosha County, Wisconsin

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Robinson Helicopters; Torrance, California
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


A-Z Leasing LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N601HA

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA210
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 04, 2017 in Kenosha, WI
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R22, registration: N601HA
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 4, 2017, about 1630 central daylight time, a Robinson R22 helicopter, N601HA, impacted pavement after an attempted takeoff at Kenosha Regional Airport (ENW), Kenosha, Wisconsin. The commercial pilot sustained serious injuries and the helicopter sustained substantial damage. The helicopter was registered to A-Z Leasing, LLC., and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan had not been filed. 

Witnesses reported that the helicopter was departing from the ramp and climbed about 20 to 30 ft above ground level (agl). The helicopter descended and impacted the pavement on its right side. A nearby helicopter pilot ran to the wreckage and turned off the fuel valve and battery switch. The pilot was airlifted to a local hospital.

An postaccident examination of the wreckage revealed that the tail rotor assembly separated from the tailcone. One tail rotor blade was separated and the other blade sustained damage.

The helicopter was retained for further examination.




A helicopter pilot suffered critical injuries Sunday after his aircraft crash at about 4:30 p.m. at Kenosha Regional Airport.

The pilot, an unidentified male, was the only one on board, Kenosha Fire Department Chief Charles Leipzig said. A Flight for Life medical helicopter was called to transport the man, most likely to Froedtert Hospital in Wauwatosa, Leipzig said.

The pilot was coming back from a flight and started to hover and lose control of the aircraft at about 35 feet, Leipzig said.

The pilot was trapped in the helicopter for about two to three minutes after impact, he said.

According to Sgt. Leo Viola with the Kenosha Police Department, a witness saw the helicopter wobble and lose control.

“We had just landed,” Loren Thompson, another pilot in the area, said.

Thompson said he saw a piece of metal fly off while the the pilot tried to wrestle the helicopter to the ground. Then the side of the helicopter hit the ground.

That piece of metal could have been the tail rotor, which is responsible for the stability of the aircraft, Thompson said.

Thompson compared the crash to a YouTube video.

“You look up and there it is,” he said. “Three seconds and it was over.”

No smoke or flames were present during the crash, he added.

“I’m glad he’s alive. It looked bad,” Thompson said.

The registered owner of the helicopter is A-Z Leasing LLC in Kenosha, according to FAA registry of the craft. It was manufactured with Robinson Helicopter Co. with a certification date of Aug. 24, 2015.  

The investigation has been turned over to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Original article can be found here: http://www.kenoshanews.com





KENOSHA — Kenosha police tell FOX6 News Flight for Life was dispatched to the Kenosha Airport for a helicopter crash that injured a lone male victim on Sunday, June 4th.

The Kenosha Regional Airport is located on 52nd Street near 88th Avenue.

It happened around 4:30 p.m.

Police said the victim was taken to a hospital in Milwaukee, and the Federal Aviation Administration is handling the investigation.

Original article can be found here: http://fox6now.com





KENOSHA, Wis. —  Flight for Life responded to a helicopter crash at the Kenosha Regional Airport, according to police.

A spokesperson with the Federal Aviation Administration says one person was aboard the Robinson R-22 helicopter when it crashed around 4:28pm.

No word yet on what caused the crash or the condition of the pilot.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating and the National Transportation Safety Board has been notified.

Original article can be found here: http://www.wisn.com

Thorp T-18, N25VP: Accident occurred December 20, 2014 at San Rafael Airport (CA35), Marin County, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N25VP




NTSB Identification: WPR15CA066
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, December 20, 2014 in San Rafael, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/11/2015
Aircraft: FERDON THORP T 18, registration: N25VP
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that prior to the flight in the experimental airplane, he unbolted and rebolted the pilot's seat from its middle position to the forward position. He did not check to see if the flight control stick movement would be restricted in this new configuration. 

During the takeoff roll, the airplane would not rotate when he moved the flight control stick aft. Not realizing the seat prevented the flight control stick movement to the full aft position, the pilot adjusted the elevator trim and the airplane subsequently lifted off, however, it would not climb. The pilot then aborted the takeoff; however, the airplane did not have sufficient distance to stop. It departed the runway surface and traversed through a field, impacted trees, and came to rest inverted. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings, rudder, and vertical stabilator. The pilot reported no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's delayed decision to abort the takeoff. Contributing to the accident are an inadequate modification to the seat position, and the pilot's failure to check flight controls for freedom and correct movement.

Marlena Cromwell: High School graduate on her way to becoming a pilot



Of the 22 students taking advanced automotive at North Medford High School this semester, Marlena Cromwell is the only girl.

Marlena started taking auto shop as a freshman, but only because the sculpture class was full. Since then, she’s taken it nearly every semester. At the beginning, she was just taking apart lawn mowers and putting them back together, but this year, she and her classmate repaired a 2001 Toyota Camry.

And on Thursday, her auto teacher and mentor, Tim Ponzoha, awarded her with a toolkit for being the best/most on-task and on-time tech in the class.

“I really enjoy knowing how things work, especially something complicated like a car that most people just turn on and don’t know anything about,” Marlena said.

As a junior, she scored an 89 on the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery test, making her eligible for most military jobs, and placed in the 99th percentile of all females on the automotive section of the test.

Nonetheless, after Marlena, 17, graduates June 10, she’s not headed for a garage or into the military but to Utah Valley University, where she plans to major in aviation science.

Marlena, who maintained a 3.9 GPA throughout high school and is currently taking all honors and Advanced Placement classes, was accepted into five colleges, including Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Northern Arizona University, Oregon State University and Westminster College.

For the last two and a half years, she has served on the Civil Air Patrol and, for her senior project, has been taking flying lessons in Sisters. So far she has booked about 23 hours in the air and needs about 12 more to be eligible for her pilot’s license under Federal Aviation Administration regulations.

“My instructor says I’m getting to the point of flying solo,” she said. “My only real issue is landing.”

By the end of her first semester at Utah Valley, Marlena will have her private pilot’s license. And by the time she graduates, she’ll also have her commercial pilot’s license, her multi-engine rating, her instrument flight rating and her flight instructor license.

Marlena said she thinks it would be fun to fly island hopper planes in Hawaii post-graduation to earn the 1,500 to 2,000 hours necessary to be able fly a medical transport plane or air tanker.

Flying has been her dream since she was about 12 years old, and at 13, she started flying with a family friend, Jim Boeckl, who owns an Aeronca Chief aircraft.

Boeckl said Marlena’s dad approached him and asked whether he would give her an airplane ride. She came back the following year for another ride, and last year, asked him to be her senior project mentor.

“Her ultimate goal was to get her pilot’s license, so I laid out in detail what she would have to do so that she could see that it was not easy and was multifaceted, and she embraced it, so I started flying with her to give her some time in the air,” Boeckl said. “I’m not an instructor so I couldn’t do that, but I connected her with a really good instructor in Sisters.”

Marlena seemed really timid when they first met, Boeckl said, but has become a very mature, level-headed 17-year-old.

“She’s got the kind of calm temperament and intellect that it takes to be a pilot and deal with what comes up,” he said.

Marlena said she finds flying both relaxing and tiring.

“Relaxing because it takes my mind off everything, but tiring because I have to focus for so long,” she said.

However, she still prefers to be in the pilot’s seat rather than a passenger seat, which she finds boring.

As a pilot, “I have a few more things to entertain me up front,” she said.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.mailtribune.com

Lancair Legacy 2000, N169BZ, DA Leasing LLC: Accident occurred June 04, 2017 near Georgetown Municipal Airport (KGTU), Georgetown, Williamson County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

DA Leasing LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N169BZ

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA239 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 04, 2017 in Georgetown, TX
Aircraft: LEVY ADAM V LEGACY 2000, registration: N169BZ
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On June 4, 2017, about 1609 central daylight time, an amateur-built Lancair Legacy 2000, N169BZ, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing following a loss of engine power during cruise flight near Georgetown, Texas. The pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane received damage to its wings and fuselage when the landing gear separated from the airplane. The aircraft was registered to DA Leasing LLC and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The local flight originated from the Georgetown Municipal Airport (GTU), Georgetown, Texas about 1540.




GEORGETOWN, Texas  (KXAN) — A small plane crashed into a Georgetown field Sunday afternoon, said the Georgetown Police Department. The pilot and one passenger were not injured.

Police said the plane – a Lancair Legacy – went down in the field near the area of Sudduth Drive and Industrial Park Circle.

A spokesperson for the Federal Aviation Administration said that the pilot declared an emergency with an engine issue and force landed in the field.

There was no word on where the plane had taken off or where it was going.

The  Federal Aviation Administration and Georgetown Police are investigating.

Original article can be found here: http://kxan.com

Cessna 182L Skylane, N42667: Accident occurred March 10, 2015 at Waycross-Ware County Airport (KAYS), Georgia






Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N42667 

NTSB Identification: ERA15CA152
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, March 10, 2015 in Waycross, GA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/11/2015
Aircraft: CESSNA 182L, registration: N42667
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.


According to the pilot, the runway he intended to depart from was parallel to the taxiway and parking ramp. He assumed that after making
two right turns he would be on the runway. He reported that he did not have any airport diagrams to navigate with, while operating on the airport movement area. Following his second right turn he noticed a runway sign, announced his intention to depart over the common traffic advisory frequency, taxied onto what he assumed was the runway, observed "faded yellow chevrons," and added power for takeoff. During the takeoff roll the pilot observed crossing the runway he assumed he was on, and the paved surface he was on was ending. He retarded the throttle and applied brakes. The airplane exited the paved surface and nosed over, coming to rest inverted; which resulted in substantial damage to the fuselage, left wing, and vertical stabilizer. The pilot reported no mechanical abnormalities or malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation. The airport diagram, and the pilot's own drawing of the accident event, revealed the need to make three right turns prior to being on the runway. According to a Federal Aviation Administration inspector, that traveled to the accident location, the runway was "clearly identifiable" and the markings were visible.


The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to use any airport guidance while taxiing, which resulted in geographic disorientation and a takeoff attempt from an inadequate length and unsuitable surface.
=======

WARE COUNTY, Ga. — The National Transportation Safety Board will investigate after a plane flipped over after a failed takeoff at the Waycross-Ware County Airport on Tuesday afternoon.

The Ware County Sheriff's Office got a call at 3 p.m. about a Cessna 182L Skylane that overturned at the airport, according to Ware County Sheriff Randy Royal.

The preliminary investigation indicates that the pilot, 63-year-old Debasish Banerjee from Sylva, N.C., was attempting to take off from a taxiway he thought was a runway.

After Banerjee had fully committed to takeoff, he realized the taxiway was too short and he swerved into a dirt field, traveling about 60 feet before the nose gear dug into the ground, causing the plane to overturn.

There was one passenger on board, 83-year-old Bob Genes from Sylva, N.C., who suffered a small laceration on his forehead and was treated at the scene. Banerjee was not injured, Royal said.

The plane had just refueled and had 80 gallons of fuel on board. It was on its way from Franklin County, N.C. to LaBelle, Fla.

The area has been secured for the NTSB to conduct its investigation on Wednesday.
=============

A passenger was slightly injured Tuesday when a single-engine plane flipped about 3 p.m. during an attempted takeoff at the Ware County Airport, Sheriff Randy Royal said.

Debashish Banerjee, 63, of Silva, N.C., had landed his Cessna 182L Skylane during a flight from Franklin, N.C., to Labelle, Fla., and refueled at the airport, Royal said. Confused about the airport's layout, Banerjee attempted to take off from a taxiway, which is shorter than the runway, Royal said.

"He had fully committed to takeoff when he realized he was running out of pavement. He tried to swerve the airplane onto a dirt surface,'' Royal said.

The plane traveled about 60 feet on the grass before its nose gear dug into the ground and the plane flipped onto its top, Royal said.

The passenger, Bob Genes, 83, also of Silva and also a pilot, suffered a small laceration on his forehead, but was treated by Ware County EMS at the scene and declined transport to the hospital, Royal said.

Banerjee was not injured, he said

There was no fuel leakage.

Ware County Deputy Paul Carter conducted the initial investigation, and the aircraft was secured in place awaiting Wednesday's arrival of the National Transportation Board for its investigation.