Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Massena International Airport (KMSS), St. Lawrence County, New York: Woman expresses to town board dissatisfaction with Boutique Air, councilors say they are receiving similar complaints

MASSENA — A Massena woman at the Wednesday Town Council meeting criticized Boutique Air for a lack of customer service.

The town last year approved contracting with Boutique Air as the air carrier at Massena International Airport, replacing Cape Air.

Margaret Demo said she contacted Boutique in April and May to ask for hard copies of their flight information, which they said they would send but never did.

“I’m not good with computers,” she said. “It sends a message they aren’t really listening”

She also said she isn’t happy that the air carrier has no physical presence in Massena beyond employees who are occasionally at the airport. Cape Air ran a downtown office.

Boutique offers a flights to and from Massena and Baltimore. Demo said her son took a flight from Baltimore to Massena and claimed Boutique had no physical presence at all at the airport there.

“There was no place to get a boarding pass or to ask anything. There was no one to help him. When it came time to board … he said ‘I have no boarding pass’ because there’s nobody there,” she said.

Demo said her son went to board the airplane without a boarding pass and the pilot took “a cursory look” at his flight itinerary “and said ‘close enough’” and let him on the plane.

Members of the Town Council said they have been receiving complaints about Boutique Air.

“I’ve been approached about no number to get at Boutique Air and a lack of people at the counter, at our airport,” Councilman Thomas Miller said.

“The biggest complaint I’ve heard is unresponsive to calls. They answer the phone. But they don’t seem to follow up,” Councilman Albert Nicola said.

“Your concerns concern me more than what I heard the other day about flights to Baltimore being booked for two months solid,” Town Supervisor Joseph Gray said. “I’ve heard a ton of very positive things, about the plane itself … they’re not perfect and they need to fix some things, it seems.”

“I’ve heard a lot of good things about the Baltimore flight. I thought they had things under control,” Councilman Steve O’Shaughnessy said.

Original article ➤ http://northcountrynow.com

Vodochody L-39 Albatros, N139RT, Float Dancer Inc: Fatal accident occurred September 12, 2015 at Scott Municipal Airport (KSCX) Oneida, Tennessee

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA15FA353
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 12, 2015 in Oneida, TN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/28/2017
Aircraft: AERO VODOCHODY L39, registration: N139RT
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the single-engine, high-performance, jet airplane was scheduled to be the final performer at an air show. Several witnesses who observed the airplane take off reported that the airplane seemed "slow" during climbout. A witness located near the end of the departure runway stated that the airplane did not appear to be climbing as quickly as other jet-powered airplanes he had previously observed. This witness reported that the airplane made a right turn and pitched -up to gain altitude, and then the engine lost power. The airplane subsequently descended nose first and impacted trees and terrain about 2 miles west of the airport. The wreckage was severely fragmented, scattered along a 325-ft debris path, and partially consumed by a postimpact fire.

Examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal evidence of any preimpact mechanical malfunctions. Although bending of fan blades opposite the direction of rotation indicated that the engine was rotating at the time of impact, imprints of fan blade tips on the shrouds with no circumferential rub marks indicated that the engine had little rotational energy and was operating at low power. Extensive damage to the fuel control unit precluded a functional test for any anomalies that could have resulted in or contributed to a loss of engine power.

Although one toxicology laboratory identified ethanol in the pilot's muscle tissue, a second laboratory did not, indicating that the ethanol was from postmortem production and did not play a role in the accident. In addition, metoprolol and diphenhydramine were identified in the pilot's muscle and brain tissue. Metoprolol, a medication for hypertension, is not impairing. Diphenhydramine is a significantly impairing sedating antihistamine; however, without a blood level, no determination could be made as to whether the pilot was impaired by the effects of diphenhydramine at the time of the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain airplane control following a partial loss of engine power during initial climb. The reason for the partial loss of engine power could not be determined due to extensive postimpact damage.

Jay "Flash" Gordon


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville, Tennessee 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Float Dancer Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N139RT




NTSB Identification: ERA15FA353

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 12, 2015 in Oneida, TN
Aircraft: AERO VODOCHODY L39, registration: N139RT
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


HISTORY OF FLIGHT


On September 12, 2015, about 1625 eastern daylight time, an Aero Vodochody L-39C Albatros, N139RT, was destroyed when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from Scott Municipal Airport (SCX), Oneida, Tennessee. The airline transport pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to Float Dancer, Inc., and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local airshow performance flight.

According to witnesses, the pilot flew the airplane to SCX the day before the accident to perform in the Wings Over Big South Fork airshow that was being held on the day of the accident. Witnesses reported that the pilot was scheduled to be the final performer in the airshow.

A friend of the pilot, who had flown the airplane about 1 week before the accident and assisted the pilot on the day of the accident, reported that he removed the safety pins for the front cockpit ejection seat, filled the airplane's smoke system oil tank, and observed the pilot perform a full power engine check and smoke system check before the takeoff from runway 23. He further stated that the takeoff "appeared normal in all respects." As the airplane began to climb, he diverted his attention to the spectators, and when he looked back for the airplane, he could not locate it. Moments later he observed a rising column of smoke.

The airboss, who cleared the airplane for takeoff, reported no distress calls or abnormal communications from the pilot before the accident. Several witnesses reported that a "puff of smoke" exited the airplane's exhaust before the airplane's taxi to the runway and that the airplane seemed "slow" during climbout. A witness located near the departure end of the runway stated that the airplane did not appear to be climbing as quickly as other jet-powered airplanes he had previously observed. He further stated that the airplane made a right turn and pitched up to gain altitude, and "the engine failed." The airplane subsequently entered a "sliding turn" and descended nose first toward the ground.



PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 61, held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multiengine land. He also held type ratings for Cessna CE-525- and CE-525S-series airplanes and had private pilot privileges in single-engine sea airplanes.

The pilot's personal flight logs were not located. He reported 6,000 hours of total flight experience, with 40 hours accumulated during the previous 6 months, on his most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) medical examination, which was conducted on December 23, 2014, and resulted in the issuance of a limited second-class/full third-class special issuance medical certificate. A flight instructor reported that the pilot satisfactorily completed a flight review and pilot proficiency check in the airplane on April 16, 2015.




AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The single-engine, two-seat, high-performance airplane was manufactured in Czechoslovakia as a basic and advanced military jet trainer. It was equipped with an Ivchenko AI-25TL turbofan engine, which had a takeoff thrust rating of 3,792 pounds.

According to FAA airworthiness records, the airplane was manufactured in 1983 and purchased by the pilot on October 7, 1999. It was issued an FAA experimental special airworthiness certificate in the exhibition category on October 23, 1999.

The airplane was maintained under an FAA-approved maintenance program. Review of maintenance records revealed that the airplane's most recent condition inspection was performed on April 2, 2015. The pilot's friend reported that the airplane had been flown about 13 to 15 times and had accumulated about 15 to 18 hours of flight time since the condition inspection.
At that time, the airplane had been operated for about 1,550 total hours and about 325 hours since it was purchased by the pilot. The engine, which was new when it was installed on March 27, 2001, had been operated for about 325 hours. The airplane was not flown between October 25, 1999, and the date the that new engine was installed.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1635, the weather conditions reported at Campbell County Airport (JAU), which was located about 24 nautical miles east-southeast from the accident site, included wind from 310° at 5 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear sky, a temperature of 23°C, a dew point of 4°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.85 inches of mercury.


Crews recover wreckage of Vodochody L-39 Albatros plane that crashed during air show.


WRECKAGE INFORMATION

The airplane impacted trees about 2 miles west of the departure end of runway 23 in the Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area. The airplane was severely fragmented and partially consumed by a postimpact fire. A debris path began around a group of about 75-ft-tall broken trees and continued on a magnetic heading of about 120° for about 325 ft over sloped, uneven terrain to the engine.

Portions of all major parts of the airframe, which included all the flight controls, were identified in the debris path. The fuselage and both wings were fragmented, and the empennage was separated. The vertical stabilizer and rudder were separated from the empennage. The rudder trim tab was separated from the rudder. The left and right elevators remained attached to the horizontal stabilizer; however, the horizontal stabilizer and both elevators displayed crushing damage and tearing consistent with tree and ground impacts. The left aileron remained attached to the outboard portion of the left wing, and the right aileron was separated. Both wing tip fuel tanks were separated. The postimpact condition of the airframe precluded confirmation of flight control continuity.

The airplane was equipped with ejection seats. One ejection seat rocket motor was found discharged, and one parachute was located in the debris path; however, its respective envelope was not inflated.

The engine was impact and fire damaged. It was complete from the inlet case's front flange to the exhaust duct's rear flange. Visual examination of the last stage turbine assembly did not reveal any damage consistent with an internal catastrophic failure. The gearbox was missing from the engine. A small section of the gearbox housing, which included three internal spur gears with no apparent teeth damage, was recovered among the airplane debris.

Additional examination of the engine after it was recovered from the accident site revealed that all the fan ducts were in place, except for an area on the top of the engine between the intermediate case and the rear fan duct that was partially burned away. There was no forward-to-aft linearity of the soot and burn patterns, consistent with a postimpact fire. All of the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd stage fan blades were in place in their respective disks. Five 1st stage fan blades were separated up to 2 inches above their blade root platforms, and the remaining fan blades were bent in the midspan area opposite the direction of rotation. None of the 1st stage fan blades had any soft body or hard body impact damage. The 3rd stage fan blade shroud contained imprints of the 3rd stage fan blades, with no circumferential rub marks.

The fuel control throttle pointer indicated 30 (0-110 scale), and the high-pressure compressor variable stator vane indicator was at 17 (0-30 scale). The fuel control unit remained attached to the engine but sustained both impact and thermal damage.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Knox County Regional Forensic Center, Knoxville, Tennessee, performed an autopsy on the pilot. According to the autopsy report, the cause of death was "multiple blunt force injuries following airplane crash."

Review of the pilot's medical history revealed that he had a history of hypertension, high cholesterol, and severe coronary artery disease, which required surgery in 1997. He reported all those diagnoses to the FAA, as well as the use of several medications, including atorvastatin and atenolol.

Toxicological testing performed by NMS Labs on specimens from the pilot at the request of the medical examiner identified 0.064 gm/dl of ethanol and caffeine in muscle tissue. Ethanol is an intoxicant commonly found in beer, wine, and liquor that acts as a central nervous system depressant. Ethanol may also be produced in body tissues by microbial activity after death.

Toxicology testing performed on specimens from the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Science Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, was limited by the lack of available blood, urine, or vitreous for testing. No ethanol was identified in muscle; however, diphenhydramine and metoprolol were detected in muscle and brain tissue. Metoprolol is a beta-blocking agent similar to atenolol that is used to treat high blood pressure and reduce the risk of recurrent heart attacks. Diphenhydramine is a sedating antihistamine used to treat allergy symptoms and as a sleep aid.










NTSB Identification: ERA15FA353
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 12, 2015 in Oneida, TN
Aircraft: AERO L 39 ALBATROS, registration: N139RT
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September, 12, 2015, about 1625 eastern daylight time, an Aero Vodochody L-39C Albatros, N139RT, operated by a private individual, was destroyed when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from Scott Municipal Airport (SCX), Oneida, Tennessee. The airline transport pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the local airshow performance flight that was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The single engine, two-seat, high-performance airplane was manufactured as a basic and advanced military jet trainer. It was equipped with an Ivchenko AI-25TL turbofan engine.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the accident airplane was manufactured in 1983, and purchased by the pilot on October 7, 1999. It was issued an FAA experimental special airworthiness certificate in the exhibition category on October 23, 1999.

The airplane was flown to SCX by the pilot the day prior, to perform in the Wings Over Big South Fork airshow that was being held on the day of the accident. Witnesses reported that the pilot was scheduled to be the final performer in the airshow and the airplane departed from runway 23, a 5,506-foot-long, asphalt runway. A witness located near the departure end of the runway, stated that the airplane did not appear to be climbing as quickly as other jet-powered airplanes he had previously observed. The airplane made a right turn and pitched-up to gain altitude when "the engine failed." The airplane subsequently entered a "sliding turn" and descended nose first toward the ground. Several witnesses reported that a "puff of smoke" exited the airplane's exhaust prior to the airplane's taxi to the runway. The airboss, who cleared the airplane for takeoff reported no distress calls or abnormal communications from the pilot prior to the accident.

The airplane impacted trees about 2 miles west of the departure end of runway 23, in the Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area. The airplane was severely fragmented and partially consumed by a postimpact fire. A debris path began around a group of about 75-foot-tall broken trees, and continued on a heading about 120 degrees, for about 325 feet, over sloped, uneven terrain, to the engine. Portions of all major parts of the airframe were identified in the debris path. The engine was impact and fire damaged. Visual examination of the last stage turbine assembly did not reveal any damage consistent with an internal catastrophic failure. The airplane was equipped with ejection seats. One ejection seat rocket motor was found discharged and one parachute was located in the debris path; however, its respective envelope was not inflated. The wreckage was retained for further examination to be performed at a later date.

The airplane was maintained under an FAA approved maintenance program. Initial review of maintenance records revealed that the airplane's most recent condition inspection was performed on April 2, 2015.

The pilot reported 6,000 hours of total flight experience on his most recent application for an FAA second-class medical certificate, which was issued in December 2014.

Incident occurred August 15, 2017 at Denver International Airport (KDEN), Colorado



DENVER -- A passenger van and fuel truck collided late Tuesday night at Denver International Airport, injuring 11 people, the Denver Police Department said.

Five of the people involved in the crash are in serious condition.

The incident happened about 10 p.m. at the UPS cargo facility south the of the terminal in a secure location.

The UPS van transports workers at the airport. Officials said 10 of the 11 people who were injured are UPS employees.

The crash did not affect passenger planes and the airport is operating under normal conditions, officials said.

The driver of the tanker will be cited for careless driving, police said.

Story and video:  http://kdvr.com

Cessna P210N Silver Eagle, N731LT, registered to Horst Aviation LLC, but operated by an individual: Accident occurred November 06, 2015 at DeKalb–Peachtree Airport (KPDK), Atlanta, Georiga

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Horst Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N731LT

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA042
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, November 06, 2015 in Atlanta, GA
Aircraft: CESSNA P210, registration: N731LT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 6, 2015, about 1710 eastern standard time, a Cessna P210N, N731LT, was substantially damaged while landing at DeKalb-Peachtree Airport (PDK), Atlanta, Georgia. The private pilot and one passenger were not injured. The airplane was registered to Horst Aviation, LLC, but operated by an individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and the flight was operating on an instrument flight rules flight plan. The flight originated from Smoketown Airport (S37), Smoketown, Pennsylvania, about 1330, and was destined for PDK.

The pilot stated that he expected and was set up for an RNAV approach, but was cleared for the ILS approach to runway 21L. He continued inbound to PDK and upon reaching the final approach fix, he recalled lowering the landing gear, but because of the approach distraction he did not verify that the landing gear was down and locked. He continued the approach, and reported breaking out of the clouds at 2,000 feet. When the airplane was at 200 feet above ground level, he reduced power and did not hear any warning horn. He indicated the landing was normal and very smooth, and after rolling about 400 feet, he heard a "snap" and felt the airplane drop and veer to the left. The airplane rolled off the runway onto grass and came to rest with the nose landing gear down and locked but both main landing gear collapsed. The airplane was raised, and both main landing gear were extended for towing to the ramp.

Following recovery of the airplane, examination of both main landing gear actuators revealed no evidence of leaks or hydraulic residue. A test gauge was plumbed into the aircraft's landing gear hydraulic system and held pressure (1,500+ psi) in the up and down position for more than 10 minutes. The airplane was placed on jacks and several fault-free gear cycles were performed including an emergency extension. The single landing gear down and locked light functioned normally, and left main landing gear down limit switch which felt, "a little sticky", was replaced. There was no report of any damage to either main landing gear downlock hook assembly. A check of the landing gear warning horn revealed it was set 0.3 inch above the flight idle gate, while it is specified to be set 0.6 inch above the flight idle gate. It was adjusted to the specified amount, and although a flight check of the landing gear warning system was not performed during a postaccident maintenance flight check, the repair facility reported it was performed by the owner on the first flight after completion of repairs and no discrepancy was reported.

The airplane's landing gear was hydraulically controlled, and by design the nose landing gear extended aft while the main landing gears extended forward. A representative of the airplane manufacturer reported that during landing gear extension, the nose landing gear locked into place followed by the main landing gear. This was because the nose landing gear extended aft and was assisted by airloads, while the main landing gear extend forward against airloads. During retraction of the main landing gear, the wheel assembly drops about 12 inches below the position when fully extended. Fully locking down of the main landing gear actuator occurs with a downlock hook assembly installed on each main landing gear.

The airplane's last annual inspection was completed on February 26, 2015. There were no reported discrepancies during cycling of the gear that was performed during the inspection. The airplane had accrued about 66 hours since the inspection was performed.

Piper PA-28-180 Cherokee, N7781W: Accident occurred May 19, 2016 at Genesee County Airport (KGVQ), Batavia, New York


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rochester, New York

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N7781W




NTSB Identification: ERA16LA192
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, May 19, 2016 in Batavia, NY
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-180, registration: N7781W
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 19, 2016, about 1320 eastern daylight time, a privately owned and operated Piper PA-28-180, N7781W, was substantially damaged during landing at Genesee County Airport (GVQ), Batavia, New York. The student pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the instructional flight that was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight originated about 1300 from Akron Airport (9G3), Akron, New York.

The student pilot stated that he departed from 9G3 and flew to GVQ where he performed two uneventful touch-and-go landings on runway 28. During a third touch-and-go landing he landed uneventfully, retracted the flaps, and added engine power. He was utilizing some right rudder input as the airplane reached rotation speed (approximately 70 mph), and "pulled hard to the left," which he could not correct with full application of right rudder. As the airplane approached the left side of the runway, he noted runway signage, but because the airplane was at takeoff speed, he thought climbing above the signs would result in a safer outcome and continued the takeoff. The airplane departed the left side of the runway and while attempting to clear the signage off the left side of the runway, both wings collided with separate signs, which breached both fuel tanks. The pilot continued the takeoff and while turning left to land on a nearby road, he noted fuel streaming from the left fuel tank and the engine lost power. He flew under one set of powerlines and then over a second set before landing uneventfully on the road.

Examination of the airport and airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed browning of grass beyond both impacted airport signs, and for a short distance past the point where the airplane became airborne. Both fuel tanks were breached; neither contained any fuel. Flight control continuity was confirmed for all flight controls. Examination of the impacted airport signs revealed their posts were frangible.

The pilot reported the wind to be from north at 8 mph with no gusts, while a weather observation taken about 26 minutes before the accident at an airport located about 22 nautical miles east-northeast from GVQ reported the wind was from 280° at 9 knots.





NTSB Identification: ERA16LA192
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, May 19, 2016 in Batavia, NY
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-180, registration: N7781W
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 19, 2016, about 1320 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-180, N7781W, experienced a loss of control during a touch-and go landing and subsequently collided with airport signage at Genesee County Airport (GVQ), Batavia, New York. The student pilot, the sole occupant was not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated a private individual, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) as a Part 91 instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the flight which originated about 1300 from Akron Airport (9G3), Akron, New York.

The student pilot stated that he departed from 9G3 and flew to GVQ where he performed 2 uneventful touch-and-go landings on runway 28. After the second touch-and-go landing he remained in the traffic pattern for a third to the same runway and turned downwind, base, and final. With the flaps fully extended he landed uneventfully, retracted the flaps, and added power to take off again. With some right rudder input he reported the airplane veered to the left, which he could not correct with full right rudder input. He continued the takeoff and departed the runway. With airport signage ahead he attempted to climb but one wing collided with the sign. He continued and the other wing collided with another sign. He then became airborne, and while turning left to land on a nearby road, he noted fuel streaming from the left fuel tank. The engine subsequently lost power, and he flew under one set of powerlines and then over a second set of powerlines before landing uneventfully on the road.

Postaccident examination of the airport and airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed browning of grass beyond both impacted airport signs, and also for a short distance past the point where the airplane became airborne. Both fuel tanks were breached; neither contained any fuel.

Deputy charged with leaking Fort Lauderdale–Hollywood International Airport (KFLL) shooting video to TMZ

This undated photo provided by the Broward Sheriff’s Office shows Broward Deputy Michael Dingman, who was charged with copying a videotape of a mass shooting at Fort Lauderdale’s airport and leaking it to the website TMZ, Wednesday, August 16, 2017, in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The Broward County sheriff’s office says Deputy Michael Dingman was arrested Wednesday after being accused of leaking to TMZ surveillance video of Esteban Santiago fatally shooting five people and wounding six others last January 6 at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport. 



FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — A Florida sheriff’s deputy copied a videotape of a mass shooting at Fort Lauderdale’s airport last January that killed five people and leaked it to the website TMZ, according to a warrant that led to his arrest Wednesday.

Deputy Michael Dingman, 47, leaked surveillance video of Esteban Santiago opening fire last Jan. 6 inside a baggage claim area at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport to the Los Angeles-based news and celebrity gossip website, investigators said.

TMZ posted the 22-second video two days after the shooting. It shows Santiago pulling a handgun from his waistband and firing three shots as panicked passengers scrambled. He then runs off the screen.

Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel said Dingman’s actions “took away from the amazing performance” done by his deputies and other law enforcement officers after the shooting.

“At the end of the day, this is about one deputy who chose to tarnish the badge,” Israel said. He said the leak did not hinder the shooting investigation. He also said that while TMZ is known to pay large sums for videos, the investigation found no evidence Dingman had been paid.

Deputy Jeff Bell, president of the Broward Sheriff’s Office Deputies Association, the union that represents the county’s deputies, said Dingman will fight the charges.

“We feel very confident that his defense will address every single issue,” Bell said.

Michael Finesilver, Dingman’s attorney, declined comment. TMZ did not return a call and email seeking comment.

Dingman, who has been suspended without pay, was released Wednesday shortly after he surrendered on $2,000 bail on charges of violating Florida public records laws, surreptitiously making the video and tampering with evidence by deleting files from his cellphone then tossing it in his pool.

Under Florida law, criminal evidence such as the shooting video usually only becomes a public record when the investigation is complete.

According to Dingman’s arrest warrant filed by Detective Joshua Webb, investigators noticed that the TMZ video was taken by a cellphone recording it from a computer screen. The reflection showed a sergeant was sitting in front of the screen and that the video had been recorded in the sheriff’s office’s airport station.

Sgt. Scott Yurchuck told investigators he had brought Dingman and two other deputies assigned to the airport into his office early Jan. 8 to show them the video for training purposes, playing it several times. Yurchuck said he remembered Dingman standing behind him in the spot the video appeared to be recorded from and that the deputy was holding his cellphone.

Investigators then searched the websites Dingman visited using his sheriff’s office computer and found he visited TMZ’s website shortly after he left Yurchuck’s office. They say his cellphone records show Dingman’s phone called TMZ and several local news outlets that morning using a system that blocks the user’s identity.

They say Dingman’s phone had four calls that morning with a phone number belonging to TMZ founder, Harvey Levin, less than an hour before the video appeared on the website.

On Jan. 10, a Broward captain, lieutenant, sergeant and Webb went to Dingman’s house to confront him and confiscate his sheriff’s computer and patrol car. Webb said Dingman told them he knew why they were there.

Webb said Dingman told him he had “made a huge mistake” and that his “credibility” was gone, without specifically referencing TMZ.

Webb said Dingman, on advice of his attorney, refused to surrender his cellphone without a warrant. After Webb obtained one, Dingman allegedly gave him a different one than the one he’d had at the airport Jan. 8.

As Webb was leaving, he says Dingman told him, “Do you guys think I made money on this thing? Because if so, I didn’t.”

After the alleged phone deception was discovered, Webb got a search warrant for Dingman’s home on Jan. 13. Dingman pointed him to a phone sitting in a plastic container filled with rice -- a common attempted fix for cellphones that have gotten wet.

Dingman told Webb he had dropped it into the pool on the day the video had been recorded, but “It’s not what you think.”

Webb wrote that a subsequent investigation found that the cellphone had been erased before being submerged in water. Also, all of Dingman’s sheriff’s office emails from that period had been erased, which can only be done by someone with Dingman’s password.

Santiago’s trial for the shooting is scheduled for next year. The FBI says Santiago admitted committing the shootings in recorded interviews with agents.

Original article  ➤ https://www.washingtonpost.com

Piper PA-28-140, N7031R: Accident occurred May 16, 2016 at Homestead General Aviation Airport (X51), Homestead, Miami-Dade County, Florida

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA186
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 16, 2016 in Homestead, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/28/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N7031R
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot and the passenger, a friend who was previously a student pilot but never completed his training, were making their first flight together. The pilot, who sustained serious injuries, did not recall the accident. The passenger reported that the pilot took off from the departure airport and then transferred the controls to him and let him fly for a while. They flew to another airport, and the pilot made one touch-and-go landing on runway 36. During departure, the pilot again transferred control to the passenger and stated, "you make the next landing and I will watch you."

The passenger reported that he was trying to fly the airplane straight to the runway but drifting left due to a quartering tailwind, which was reported as 14 knots, gusting to 22 knots. The passenger tried to correct the flight path but was unable to align the airplane with the runway centerline. He did not remember if the pilot tried to help or not at any point before the airplane impacted the ground.

The airplane came to rest near midfield and about 340 ft left of the runway edge. Examination of the wreckage did not reveal evidence of any preimpact mechanical malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation. The pilot's (left front seat's) shoulder harness was torn in half at its midpoint. The distal 24 inches (the portion that did not normally retract into the inertia reel) of the webbing showed significant discoloration, fading, and stiffness. A significant section of abrasive wear was noted on the edges of the webbing about 15 to 21 inches from the distal end fitting; the shoulder harness separated in this worn section. The passenger's (right front seat's) shoulder harness was also discolored, faded, and stiff.

The manufacturer's maintenance manual for the airplane stated that an inspection of the seat belts is required during the annual and/or 100-hour inspection. The manual indicated that the belts are to be replaced if deteriorated or worn. Review of the airplane's maintenance logbooks found no records indicating that the seat belts were ever inspected or replaced. If the pilot's shoulder harness had been replaced, it would likely have secured him in his seat and minimized the severity of the injuries that he incurred.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's improper decision to allow the passenger to attempt a landing, which resulted in a loss of control during landing with a quartering tailwind. Contributing to the severity of the pilot's injuries was the separation of the deteriorated shoulder harness.




The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miami, Florida
Lycoming; Atlanta, Georgia
Piper; Vero Beach, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N7031R




NTSB Identification: ERA16FA186
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 16, 2016 in Homestead, FL
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N7031R
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On May 16, 2016, about 1646 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-140, N7031R, impacted terrain during landing at Homestead General Aviation Airport (X51), Homestead, Florida. The airplane sustained substantial damage; the private pilot was seriously injured, and the passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Miami Executive Airport (TMB) en route to X51.

The pilot's wife reported that he does not have any recollection of the accident. The passenger stated that the pilot was a friend of his, and the accident flight was their first flight together. The passenger also stated that he was previously a student pilot but never completed his training and let his medical certificate expire. Soon after departing TMB, the pilot transferred control to passenger and let him fly around and make a couple of turns before he transferred control back to the pilot. They flew to X51, and the pilot made one touch-and-go landing. During departure, the pilot transferred control to the passenger and stated, "you make the next landing and I will watch you."

According to the passenger, the pilot then asked him if he wanted "one notch" of flaps, which equated to 10° flap extension, and the passenger responded that he did. The passenger reported that he was trying to fly the airplane straight to the runway, but it kept drifting left due to the quartering tailwind. The passenger tried to correct the flight path but could not get the airplane aligned with the centerline of runway 36. The passenger further stated that he was having difficulty controlling the airplane and did not remember if the pilot tried to help or not. The passenger recalled the airplane veering to the left of the runway centerline and the ground coming up on them quickly. He then braced for impact.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating, which was issued on May 4, 2012. He also held an FAA third-class medical certificate, issued September 23, 2015. At the time of the medical examination, the pilot reported 2,100 total hours of flight experience. The pilot's logbook could not be located.

According to FAA records, the passenger held a student pilot certificate. He also held an FAA first-class medical certificate, issued December 4, 2014. At the time of the medical examination, the passenger reported no hours of flight experience. The student pilot's logbook could not be located.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The four-seat, low-wing, fixed-tricycle-gear airplane was manufactured in 1966. It was powered by a 150-horsepower Lycoming O-320-E2A engine and equipped with a two-bladed, fixed-pitch Sensenich propeller.

A review of maintenance records revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on September 20, 2015. At that time, the airframe had accumulated 3,630 total flight hours, and the engine had accumulated 1,453.7 flight hours since major overhaul.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 1645 recorded weather at X51 was wind from 120° true at 14 knots, gusting to 22 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, temperature 29°C, dew point 23°C, and altimeter setting 30.07 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Examination of the accident site revealed that the wreckage was located near midfield and about 340 ft off the left side of runway 36. Ground scars that corresponded with damage to the airplane's left-wing tip were between the runway and a canal. Another ground scar that corresponded to damage to the propeller was located on the far bank of the canal. The ground scars were orientated on a heading of 295°. The airplane came to rest on a heading of 200° about 40 ft from the canal bank. The nose gear was bent aft, and both main landing gear were sheared off.

Cable continuity was established to all flight controls. The left-wing tank was full of fuel, and the right wing tank was half-full of fuel. The fuel was consistent in color and odor to 100LL aviation type gasoline and had no visible signs of water contamination. The nose section of the airplane was crushed down and aft, and the engine was tilted up about 30°. The left wing main spar was fractured at the fuselage, and the rear attachment point bolt separated and was not located within the wreckage area. The left wing pulled away from the fuselage about 6 inches but remained attached to the flap torque tube assembly. The flaps were in the 10° position. The ailerons, fuselage, and right wing were intact. The fuel selector was selected to the left tank. Both control yokes were bent to the right and downward.

The left front seat's (pilot's) shoulder harness was torn in half at its midpoint. The aft attachment points of the pilot's seat remained attached to the seat rails; however, the forward attach points were separated from the seat rails, consistent with impact forces. The right front seat's (passenger's) shoulder harness was intact, and the seat was attached at all four corners to the seat rails.

Additional Information

The left and right front seatbelts and shoulder harnesses were retained for further examination by an NTSB survival factors specialist. The shoulder harnesses were manufactured by Pacific Scientific, and the lap belts were manufactured by Davis Aircraft Products, Inc. Both shoulder harnesses were equipped with an inertia reel and an end fitting designed to secure to a standoff button on the separate lapbelt, and the belt webbing's total extended length was about 53 inches.

The left shoulder harness webbing retracted normally into the inertia reel. The distal 24 inches (the portion that did not normally retract into the inertia reel) of the webbing showed significant discoloration and fading. The yellowed material in the discolored area was noticeably stiffer and less pliable than the material that retracted into the inertia reel, which appeared to be black in color. Some minor wear was noted on the edges of the webbing that retracted into the inertia reel, and there was a 6-inch section of significant abrasive wear about 15 to21 inches from the distal end fitting. In this section, about 6 longitudinally woven threads (or 1/8 inch) were compromised at the wear's deepest intrusion into the webbing. A complete transverse, frayed separation of the webbing was present at the point of deepest intrusion, about 20 inches from the distal end fitting.

The webbing of the right shoulder harness did not retract normally into the inertia reel and about 48 inches of webbing remained exposed. The distal 44 inches of the webbing showed discoloration and fading and appeared an orangish color. The discolored material was slightly stiffer and less pliable than the webbing of both lapbelts, but less so than the webbing of the left shoulder harness. The most significant area of discoloration appeared between 14 and 42 inches from the distal end fitting. There was very minor abrasive wear on the edges of a small portion of the webbing that would normally have retracted into the inertia reel, but no thread integrity was compromised. There was no noted wear to the edges of the remainder of the webbing.

Both the lapbelts were in good condition, and the buckles functioned as designed. The webbing was appropriately supple and showed no evidence of fading or damage. The adjustable, insert tab portions of the belts were in similarly good condition. They were adjusted to a length of about 34 inches.

The manufacturer's maintenance manual for the airplane stated that an inspection of the seat belts is required during the annual and/or 100-hour inspection. The manual indicated that the belts are to be replaced if deteriorated or worn. Review of the airplane's maintenance logbooks found no records indicating that the seat belts were ever inspected or replaced.

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA186
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 16, 2016 in Homestead, FL
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N7031R
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 16, 2016 about 1646 eastern daylight time, a Piper, PA-28-140, N7031R was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain during landing at Homestead General Aviation Airport (X51), Homestead, Florida. The private pilot was seriously injured and the passenger received minor injuries. The airplane departed from Miami Executive Airport (TMB), Miami, Florida. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned flight to X51. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The passenger stated that the pilot was a personal friend and this was their first flight together. The passenger also stated he was a student pilot, but never obtained his pilot certificate and he currently did not have a medical certificate. He added that soon after departing TMB, the pilot transferred control to the passenger and let him fly around, making a couple turns and then the passenger gave controls back to the pilot. The passenger stated they flew to X51 and the pilot made one touch-and-go landing and during departure, the pilot transferred control over to the passenger and stated "you make the next landing and I will watch you." The pilot then asked the passenger if he wanted "one notch" of flaps which equated to 10 degrees of flap extension, in which the passenger stated he did want "one notch" of flaps. The passenger was trying to fly the airplane straight to the runway, but kept getting blown to the left side. The passenger tried to correct the flight path, but could not get the airplane back on the centerline of the approach to runway 36. The passenger further stated he was having difficulty controlling the airplane and did not remember if the pilot tried to help or not. The passenger did not know how they got so far off the centerline of the runway and heading 90 degrees from the centerline of the runway. He remembered the ground coming up on them quickly and he braced for impact.

Examination of the airplane at the accident site revealed that the wreckage was located to the left side of runway 36, approximately 340 feet away and midfield. The direction of flight was 295 degrees magnetic and the airplane came to rest oriented about 200 degrees magnetic. There were ground scars between the runway and a canal that corresponded with damage to the left wing tip. Orange paint chips were located in the grass and ground scars. The airplane had proceeded across the water and impacted the bank on the edge of the water. The propeller contacted the bank first, which bent one blade aft and stopped the engine from rotating further. During the impact, the nose gear bent aft and both main landing gear were sheared off. The airplane then slid approximately 40 feet to its final resting spot.

The left wing tank was full of fuel and the right wing tank was half full of fuel. The fuel was clean and no water was present. The nose section of the airplane was crushed and the engine was tilted up about 30 degrees. The left wing main spar was fractured at the fuselage and the rear attachment point bolt separated and was missing. The left wing pulled away from the fuselage approximately 6 inches, but still remained attached to the flap torque tube assembly. The flaps were in the neutral position, but the flap handle was in the first detent, which equated to 10 degrees of flap extension. The ailerons, fuselage and right wing were intact. The fuel selector was selected to the left tank. Both control yolks were bent to the right side and downward. The pilot's shoulder harness was torn in half at the mid-point of the belt. The pilot's seat was separated from the seat rails, consistent with impact forces. The passenger's shoulder harness was intact and his seat was attached at all four corners of the seat rails.  

Fleet 16B Finch II, N666J, owned and operated by Rhinebeck Aerodrome Museum: Accident occurred July 02, 2016 at Old Rhinebeck Airport (NY94), Dutchess County, New York

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Teterboro, New Jersey

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Rhinebeck Aerodrome Museum: http://registry.faa.gov/N666J

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA255

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 02, 2016 in Rhinebeck, NY
Aircraft: FLEET FLEET 16B, registration: N666J
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 2, 2016, about 1220 eastern daylight time, a Fleet 16B biplane, N666J, owned and operated by Rhinebeck Aerodrome Museum, was substantially damaged during landing at Old Rhinebeck Airport (NY94), Rhinebeck, New York. The commercial pilot and passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot stated that during takeoff from a turf runway, the left main landing gear collapsed but did not separate from the airplane. The pilot was aware of the damaged landing gear, and circled the airport. During the subsequent landing on the departure runway, the airplane touched down, flipped over, and came to rest to rest inverted, which damaged the right upper wing and vertical stabilizer.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single engine land, multi engine land, and a flight instructor certificate. The pilot held a first class medical certificate and reported 643 total hours of flying experience. He reported 25 hours of flying time in the accident airplane make and model.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the left main landing gear strut mount nut that secured the landing gear strut was stripped, and the bolt was missing. Damage consistent with wear was observed on the strut base and the housing. There was no inspection required for the gear strut mount for the Fleet 16B, which was manufactured in 1942. The most recent annual was completed about 38 hours before the accident flight.

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA255
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 02, 2016 in Rhinebeck, NY
Aircraft: FLEET FLEET 16B, registration: N666J
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 2, 2016, about 1220 eastern daylight time, a Fleet 16B biplane, N666J, owned and operated by Rhinebeck Aerodrome Museum, was substantially damaged during landing at Old Rhinebeck Airport (NY94), Rhinebeck, New York. The commercial pilot and passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

During the takeoff roll from the turf runway, the left main landing gear collapsed but did not separate from the airplane. The pilot was aware of the damaged landing gear, and circled the airport. During the subsequent landing on the departure runway, the airplane touched down, flipped over, and came to rest to rest inverted, which damaged the right upper wing and vertical stabilizer.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the left main landing gear strut mount nut that secured the landing gear strut was stripped, and the bolt was missing. Damage consistent with wear was observed on the strut base and the housing.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.