Friday, December 30, 2016

Diamond Star DA40 NG, N605SJ: Accident occurred December 29, 2016 in Kingman, Arizona

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: SCOTTSDALE


Aviation Accident Preliminary Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

CTC AVIATION LEASING (US) INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N605SJ

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA050
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, December 29, 2016 in Kingman, AZ
Aircraft: DIAMOND AIRCRAFT IND GMBH DA 40 NG, registration: N605SJ
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 29, 2016, about 1120 mountain standard time, a Diamond Aircraft DA40 NG, N605SJ experienced a partial loss of engine power near Kingman, Arizona. The airplane was registered to and operated by CTC Aviation, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot was not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings during the subsequent forced landing. The flight departed Kingman Airport about 1100 with a planned destination of Lake Havasu City Airport, Lake Havasu City, Arizona. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a company flight plan was filed.

The pilot was flying with the intention of gaining flight time experience in preparation for his commercial pilot's license test.

He reported that during level cruise at an elevation of about 9,500 ft msl, he felt the airframe shaking, and a few minutes later, he received an ECU (Engine Control Unit) A and B failure annunciation. He began to follow the emergency checklist, and while doing so he noticed that the engine oil temperature was rising. He reduced engine power and initiated a descent, and the oil temperature began to drop, however a short time later, the oil pressure dropped to zero. Having now descend to 3,500 ft, he decided to perform a forced landing into a field. During the landing roll, both wings struck vegetation, resulting in delamination of the upper and lower skins at the leading edge.

Subsequent examination revealed that the belly of the airplane was soaked in black-colored oil from the engine cowling through to the tailskid, with the source appearing to be from the engine oil breather hose.

The airplane was equipped with a four-cylinder, turbocharged, Austro AE300 (E4-series) diesel-fuel engine.




KINGMAN – Mohave County Sheriff’s deputies and Search and Rescue crews were hot on their toes this holiday weekend.


Winter weather got the best of a local photographer’s New Year’s celebrations as SAR units were deployed early Sunday morning to find Akio Matsuo, 41, of Kingman stranded on Bull Mountain.

According to Mohave County Sheriff’s office spokeswoman Trish Carter, Matsuo hiked up the mountain on New Year’s Eve to take pictures of the evening lights. The weather changed, and rain and fog started moving in on the mountains. Matsuo called 911 and SAR units responded and found him at about 5 a.m. New Year’s Day. The report said other than being cold and hungry, he was okay.

Search and rescue crews were at it again, this time near Sara Park in Lake Havasu City.

They assisted Lake Havasu Fire Department personnel Monday night to find a missing hiker when she was separated from her husband in the Sara Park area.

A man said that he and his wife, Nylene Haseman, 71, both of Lake Havasu City, were hiking through the mountain trail known as Sara’s Crack when they became separated around 5 p.m. The man said he called 911 after an hour of unsuccessful attempts to find Haseman.

SAR units responded to the Sara Park area at about 6 p.m. and worked jointly with the LHCFD personnel. Haseman was located stuck in the canyon at about 9:30 p.m. when a SAR member heard someone in the far distance repeatedly say “Woohoo” in what sounded like a soft voice.

Haseman had fallen about 12 feet down the canyon and into water, breaking her ankle, injuring her shoulder and damaging her cellphone. Crews from SAR and LHCFD jointly evacuated her out of the canyon. The area was too rugged and narrow for a helicopter rescue, so she was placed in a basket and moved along like a conveyor belt with a line of crews passing her out of the canyon.

She was transported to a suitable landing zone and airlifted to Havasu Regional Medical Center by Native Air. Haseman also suffered from hypothermia. The joint rescue operation by SAR and LHCFD significantly increased Haseman’s recovery.

Mohave County Sheriff’s deputies responded to an emergency landing of an airplane approximately 20 miles north of Lake Havasu City Dec. 29.

At about 12:50 p.m., deputies responded to a pipeline road parallel to Interstate 40 near milepost 12 where a pilot performed an emergency landing of a Diamond fixed-wing single engine airplane. The pilot and single occupant, Keita Kojima, 20, of Goodyear, was flying when the aircraft lost oil pressure. Kojima spotted the pipeline road and landed the plane, where it sustained minimal damage. The pilot is a flight student and was not injured.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board have been notified.

Source:  http://kdminer.com

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N781JA: Incident occurred December 29, 2016 in Winslow, Navajo County, Arizona

NORTH AIRE AVIATION LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N781JA

FAA Flight Standards District Office: SCOTTSDALE

AIRCRAFT HAD MECHANICAL (TRIM) MALFUNCTION CAUSING PILOT TO MAKE AN OFF-AIRPORT LANDING ONTO ROAD.

Date: 29-DEC-16
Time: 17:45:00Z
Regis#: N781JA
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: WINSLOW
State: ARIZONA

Diamond DA40 NG, N528MH: Incident occurred December 28, 2016 in Goodyear, Maricopa County, Arizona

CTC AVIATION LEASING (US) INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N528MH

FAA Flight Standards District Office: SCOTTSDALE

AIRCRAFT STRUCK BIRD WHILE ON SHORT FINAL FOR RUNWAY 21.

Date: 28-DEC-16
Time: 14:57:00Z
Regis#: N528MH
Aircraft Make: DIAMOND
Aircraft Model: DA40
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: GOODYEAR
State: ARIZONA

American Airlines, Boeing 737-800, N878NN: Incident occurred December 29, 2016 at San Francisco International Airport (KSFO), California

http://registry.faa.gov/N878NN

FAA Flight Standards District Office: OAKLAND

AIRCRAFT STRUCK NUMEROUS SMALL BIRDS WHILE ON APPROACH/DEPARTURE RWY 1R

Date: 29-DEC-16
Time: 17:34:00Z
Regis#: N
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 737-800
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: AMERICAN
Flight Number: AAL2594
City: SAN FRANCISCO
State: CALIFORNIA

Cessna 182RG, N397MR: Incident occurred December 29, 2016 in San Diego, California

FAA Flight Standards District Office: SAN DIEGO

AIRCRAFT EXPERIENCE DIFFICULTY EXTENDING LANDING GEAR. AIRCRAFT LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT.

Date: 30-DEC-16
Time: 00:10:00Z
Regis#: N397MR
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182RG
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 91
City: SAN DIEGO
State: CALIFORNIA

Southwest Boeing 737: Incident occurred December 28, 2016 in Denver, Colorado

FAA Flight Standards District Office: DENVER

AIRCRAFT STRUCK BIRD CLIMBING OUT OF 9000FT. PILOT STATED NO OBSERVABLE DAMAGE AND CONTINUED FLIGHT TO DESTINATION.

Date: 28-DEC-16
Time: 19:22:00Z
Regis#: N
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 737
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: INITIAL CLIMB (ICL)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: SOUTHWEST
Flight Number: SWA4320
City: DENVER
State: COLORADO

Piper PA-28-151, Skywagon 382 Inc., N41883: Incident occurred December 29, 2016 in Punta Gorda, Charlotte County, Florida

SKYWAGON 382 INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N41883

FAA Flight Standards District Office: TAMPA

AIRCRAFT STRUCK BIRD

Date: 29-DEC-16
Time: 16:15:00Z
Regis#: N41883
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: PUNTA GORDA
State: FLORIDA

Cessna 152, Altitude Airways Corp., N67324: Incident occurred December 29, 2016 in Miami, Miami-Dade County, Florida

ALTITUDE AIRWAYS CORP:   http://registry.faa.gov/N67324

FAA Flight Standards District Office: S FLORIDA

AIRCRAFT STRUCK BIRD WHILE ON APPROACH.

Date: 29-DEC-16
Time: 19:42:00Z
Regis#: N67324
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 152
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 91
City: MIAMI
State: FLORIDA

Virgin America, Airbus A320-200, Performing Flight VX-501, N635VA: Incident occurred December 28, 2016 in Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, Florida

http://registry.faa.gov/N635VA

FAA Flight Standards District Office: S FLORIDA

AIRCRAFT SUFFERED BIRD STRIKE DAMAGING #1 ENGINE

Date: 28-DEC-16
Time: 15:42:00Z
Regis#: N635VA
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A320
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: VIRGIN AMERICA
Flight Number: VRD501
City: FT LAUDERDALE
State: FLORIDA

Maule M-7-235C, Richardson Companies Inc., N66E: Incident occurred December 28, 2016 -and- Accident occurred January 29, 2016 at Macon-Fower Municipal Airport (K89), Macon, Macon County, Missouri

RICHARDSON COMPANIES INC: http://registry.faa.govN66E

FAA Flight Standards District Office: KANSAS CITY 

AIRCRAFT ENCOUNTERED CROSSWIND ON LANDING AND PUSHED AIRCRAFT OFF THE SIDE OF THE RUNWAY.

Date: 28-DEC-16
Time: 19:30:00Z
Regis#: N66E
Aircraft Make: MAULE
Aircraft Model: M7
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MACON
State: MISSOURI
============

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Final Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA100
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, January 29, 2016 in Macon, MO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/28/2016
Aircraft: MAULE M 7-235C, registration: N66E
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

During the landing roll following a normal touchdown after a personal flight, the pilot felt a vibration in the airframe, and the right main landing gear collapsed. The pilot was unable to maintain directional control, and the airplane departed the side of the runway. A pilot-rated witness confirmed that the landing approach, flare, and touchdown were normal, and the surface wind was about a 20-degree left crosswind at 8 to 10 knots and not gusting at the time of landing. An examination of the airplane revealed the right main landing gear strut assembly failed, and all associated fracture surfaces were consistent with overload. The reason for the overload failure could not be determined.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of the right main landing gear assembly for reasons that could not be determined based on the available information.

On January 29, 2016, about 1130 central standard time, a Maule M 7-235C single-engine airplane, N66E, experienced a right main landing gear collapse during landing at the Macon-Fower Municipal Airport (K89), Macon, Missouri. The private pilot was not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and right wing. The airplane was registered to Richardson Companies, Inc., and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight departed at an unknown time.

After a normal touchdown on runway 20 and during the landing roll, the pilot felt a vibration in the airframe. Shortly thereafter, the right wing dropped and the pilot lost yaw control. The pilot was unable to maintain directional control, and the airplane departed the left side of the runway. The airplane came to rest upright off the side of the runway. 

A pilot-rated witness stated the landing approach, flare, and touchdown were normal. He reported the wind at 8 to 10 knots, not gusting, and a 20 degree left crosswind for the landing.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector showed the right main landing gear collapsed and remained partially attached to the fuselage. The right wing strut and right wing were bent. The inspector located the upper half of one bolt that attaches the right main gear strut to the fuselage, and the bolt was sheared. The bolt fracture surface was consistent with an overload failure. The inspector noted the fuselage to main landing gear frame structure was fractured, and the inspector did not see any evidence of corrosion or a preexisting condition that contributed to the failure. The right main landing wheel hub assembly was fractured, and a portion of the hub was not located. The remaining portion of the hub did not display any evidence of corrosion or a preexisting condition that contributed to the failure. The reason for the right main landing gear collapse could not be determined.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA100
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, January 29, 2016 in Macon, MO
Aircraft: MAULE M 7-235C, registration: N66E
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 29, 2016, at 1145 central standard time, a Maule M 7-235C, N66E, experienced a landing gear collapse during landing at the Macon-Fower Municipal Airport (K89), Macon, Missouri. The private pilot was not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and right wing. The airplane was registered to Richardson Companies, Inc., and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight departed at an unknown time.

According to the pilot, after touchdown and during the landing roll, he felt a vibration in the airframe. Shortly thereafter, the right wing dropped and the pilot lost yaw control. The pilot applied engine power to attempt to keep the airplane on the runway centerline. The pilot was unable to maintain directional control, and the airplane departed the left side of the runway. The airplane came to rest upright off the side of the runway.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector showed the right main landing gear collapsed and remained partially attached to the fuselage. The right wing strut and right wing were bent.

Maule M-7-235C Orion, Earsom Consulting,, N969AW: Incident occurred December 30, 2016 in San Antonio, Texas

EARSOM CONSULTING LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N969AW

FAA Flight Standards District Office: SAN ANTONIO

AIRCRAFT LANDED IN WIND GUST CAUSING IT TO ROLL TO THE RIGHT AND STRIKING RIGHT WINGTIP ON RUNWAY.

Date: 30-DEC-16
Time: 00:17:00Z
Regis#: N969AW
Aircraft Make: MAULE
Aircraft Model: NA
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SAN ANTONIO
State: TEXAS

Great Lakes 2T-1A-2, N3604L: Incident occurred December 28, 2016 in Waxahachie, Ellis County, Texas

http://registry.faa.gov/N3604L

FAA Flight Standards District Office: NORTH TEXAS

AIRCRAFT NOSED OVER UPON LANDING.

Date: 28-DEC-16
Time: 21:00:00Z
Regis#: N3604L
Aircraft Make: GREAT LAKES
Aircraft Model: 2T1A
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: WAXAHACHIE
State: TEXAS

Howard County, Maryland, weighs bill to authorize legal action over air traffic noise




The County Council will weigh whether to take the first step toward legal action against the federal government over flight patterns that are bringing noisy airplanes closer to homes.

County officials say they've been frustrated for months in their attempts to get the Federal Aviation Administration to rethink its NextGen air traffic update.

"They just seem to be kicking the ball around," said Council Chairman Jon Weinstein, a Democrat who says airplane noise has gotten louder around his Ellicott City home.

Weinstein and Councilman Calvin Ball, also a Democrat, plan to introduce a bill Tuesday that will give the county government's law office the authority to "institute any civil action or other proceedings" over NextGen.

As part of the $35 billion nationwide air-traffic overhaul, BWI Marshall Airport in Linthicum has changed flight patterns, resulting in increased noise in some communities surrounding the airport.

The FAA estimates the increased efficiency of the NextGen air traffic update will save $160 billion on fuel, maintenance and other costs through 2030.

But people who live around the airport say the improvements come at a cost to them.

In some cases, residents who are used to hearing some airplane noise say the planes are closer and louder than before. Others who haven't heard airplane noise now have planes flying near their homes.

Complaints also have been lodged by homeowners in Anne Arundel County communities such as Severn, Hanover and Millersville. BWI sits in Anne Arundel, just about a mile from the border with Howard, so residents in both counties are affected by the airport's operations.

If Howard County takes legal action against the FAA, it wouldn't be the first local government to do so. Lawsuits have been filed by local officials in cities, including Phoenix, Ariz.; Newport Beach, Calif.; and Culver City, Calif., according to news reports. In some other areas, homeowners have filed lawsuits.

Howard County officials say they've tried to work with the FAA on the issue, but that the federal agency has not been responsive.

Weinstein and Ball say legal action is a necessary step to consider after getting little help from the FAA.

They and other Howard officials have held meetings with the FAA and written letters, but that effort is "not resonating to the extent we hoped," Weinstein said.

"Frankly, I'm troubled that our FAA folks have been unresponsive and have not addressed the issues for our constituents," said Ball, who has fielded complaints from constituents in Hanover, Elkridge and Columbia. "It's unfortunate that it's come to this."

Weinstein plans to talk with other local counties to see if they're interested in pursuing a joint action against the FAA.

But he also said there are other possibilities for resolving the concerns.

He's asked Maryland's representatives in Congress to hold hearings on the issue. And with a new presidential administration arriving in late January, there will be new leadership at the U.S. Department of Transportation and the FAA that could address the issue, he said.

County Executive Allan H. Kittleman, a Republican, also has worked on the issue and has said he's frustrated by the problem. He was not immediately available to comment on the proposed legislation, said spokesman Andy Barth.

Read more here:   http://www.baltimoresun.com

Pilot accused of being drunk after video shows him staggering through airport









An Indonesian budget airline has fired a pilot suspected of trying to fly a plane while he was drunk, and two of its executives are resigning.

Citilink president director Albert Burhan announced on Friday that he and the airline’s production director would resign over the incident. Citilink is a subsidiary of national flag carrier Garuda Indonesia.

Passengers became suspicious when they heard slurred words and unclear announcements from the cockpit. Some of them left the plane and asked for a replacement of the pilot they believed to be either drunk or under drug influence.

Citilink assigned a new pilot to fly the Airbus A320 about an hour behind schedule. The flight had 154 passengers but a number reportedly decided to cancel.

The flight on Wednesday was heading from Surabaya, Indonesia’s second-largest city, to the capital, Jakarta. Aviation is a main mode of travel in the sprawling nation of 17,000 islands, and the incident has raised safety concerns.

YouTube footage showed the pilot appeared to stagger through a metal detector at a security checkpoint and security guards picked up his belongings that were falling on the floor as he seemed out of control.

“The pilot had committed serious violation of standard operation procedure that endangered passengers,” Burhan said. “We apologise for the discomfort. I have to be responsible for that and therefore I and my production director resign.”

The airline previously had dismissed reports that the 32-year-old pilot Tekad Purna was drunk, saying initial tests of drug and alcohol were negative.

Director general of Air Transportation Suprasetyo has asked Citilink to make sure the pilot underwent a medical check.

Purna is under investigation for possible drunkenness or drug use. Minister of Transportation Budi Karya has banned him from flying pending the outcome of the investigation. If proven, his license would be revoked.

In December last year, three crew members, a pilot and two flight attendants were arrested for allegedly consuming crystal methamphetamine, known locally as shabu-shabu, at a hotel. 

Story and video: https://www.theguardian.com


Citilink president director Albert Burhan (right) speaks to state-owned airport operator Angkasa Pura II general manager for Supadio Airport in Pontianak, West Kalimantan, on December 1st, in front of a Citilink aircraft prepared to serve the airline's maiden flight from the city to Batam, Riau Islands.



Less than 72 hours after reports of an allegedly drunk Citilink pilot showing up for work circulated in the public, two top executives of the low-cost carrier announced on Friday their resignation as a gesture of responsibility for the incident.

Speaking to The Jakarta Post on Friday, Citilink vice president of corporate communications Benny S. Butarbutar said that president director Albert Burhan and operational director Hadinoto Soedigno had decided to resign from the company following the incident.

"Pak Albert expressed his intention to resign all of a sudden at the end of a press conference [on Friday] as a form of his responsibility [regarding the case]," he said, adding that the resignation must first get approval by the company’s board of commissioners and its parent company.

Citilink, the low-cost subsidiary of national flag carrier Garuda Indonesia, has been under media spotlight following reports that one of its pilots was possibly under the influence of alcohol while on duty.

The pilot, identified as Capt. Tekad Purna, was relieved on Wednesday after passengers claimed he spoke incoherently during a flight announcement made before takeoff. Many passengers decided to disembark from the plane soon after as they were suspicious that the pilot was drunk.

The incident occurred on Wednesday morning as a Citilink flight prepared to depart from Juanda International Airport in Surabaya, East Java, to Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Jakarta.

Also on Friday, the airline announced that it had fired Tekad for breaching the procedures, a violation that can endanger the lives of passengers.

The pilot was reported to have undergone a medical test at a clinic in Surabaya, East Java, as well as a second medical test in Jakarta by the Flight Health Agency. The final results of the medical check will be issued in a week.

Source:  http://www.thejakartapost.com

Greater Rochester International Airport searched, roads closed after threats made



Roads to the Greater Rochester International Airport were shut down and the airport searched after officials say threats were made Thursday afternoon.

County officials say the investigation has been cleared. We're told the airport received "specific threats" combined with two unattended bags being found.

Sheriff Patrick O'Flynn says it all started just after noon. According to O'Flynn, the airport received the threats and -- shortly after -- the unattended bags were found. This prompted an emergency response from the county's hazardous device team.

"Our hazardous device team responded and were able to secure and evaluate the two suspicious articles," the sheriff said Thursday afternoon."[Investigators] determined they were not a threat. It took a little time doing X-ray to determine they were safe."

Investigators used robots to check the unattended "articles," which Sheriff O'Flynn said was baggage.

"The bomb team responded with their equipment, included in that was a portable X-ray, that allowed us to investigate," said the sheriff.

While the investigation was underway, roads to the airport were closed, but passengers were still being loaded and unloaded inside the airport.

Deputies say the investigation into the threats made to the airport are underway.

"It's definitely ridiculous for someone to do that because not only -- they're trying to make a statement but they're inconveniencing a bunch of people," says Rob Knickerbocker, passenger. "And they're wasting a lot of people's time."

Knickerbocker's flight to LAX was delayed by four hours because of the investigation at the airport. It looks like he won't make it to his connecting flight either.

"It's pretty inconvenient because I have a ride back with the only key to my apartment at midnight tonight," says Knickerbocker. "And my ride is probably at work when I get in tomorrow so I might not be able to get home for an extra eight hours after I get to LA."

While this incident may have inconvenienced hundreds of passengers during one of the busiest travel times of the year, they are just glad that everyone is safe.

"It's definitely good that the airport and security takes precaution," says Knickerbocker.

Story and video:  http://www.whec.com



Officials at the Greater Rochester International Airport Thursday received bomb threats which, after two unattended bags were found, led to a shutdown of the facility for about two hours.

Access roads into and out of the airport were closed, as passengers and airport workers were huddled into the waiting area and not allowed to move through the airport.

The Sheriff's Office and law enforcement agencies used canines to search the airport and robots to check the bags; which were determined to be safe.

Shortly before 4 p.m., activity resumed at the airport and the roads reopened.




During a news conference, Monroe County Sheriff Patrick O'Flynn said the threats came around the same time officials found the unattended bags, one outside the airport and another inside the airport terminal.

"We were able to determine they were not a threat, it took a little bit of time doing X-ray to make sure they were safe," he said. The packages turned out to be abandoned luggage.

O'Flynn would not give specifics about the nature of the bomb threats, and the overall investigation will continue.

Airport director Michael Giardino said the airport remained open for flights throughout the investigation, and there were minimal flight delays. "Those passengers that were pre-screened and in the sterile area, the secure area, were allowed to board. Some delays were because of what was happening with law enforcement but for the majority of time, planes were coming and going."




Mike Allen, who flew from Tampa to Rochester to visit family, said he and other passengers had left their planes around 2 p.m. and were walking toward the main terminal when told to wait or turn back.

"There was a guy blocking the way toward the main terminal," Allen said in a telephone conversation. "He said, 'Guys, we have a security situation and we need you to stay in this part of the airport.' "




Shortly thereafter, law enforcement officials moved them all into the area where passengers wait to board.

Allen estimated 200 people were there, including passengers and airport employees.

Lisa Zimmerman arrived on a flight from Orlando with her husband and daughter as the incident was beginning. She said passengers on her plane were taken to Concourse A to wait.

She said the room was filled with an "eerie quiet" as passengers waited to hear when they could retrieve their baggage and leave.

"Social media has been keeping people updated, though," she said in a telephone conversation. "It's just a quiet calm here."

During the news conference, Monroe County Executive Cheryl Dinolfo said she was pleased the situation concluded without a serious incident. She thanked airport staff for taking care of passengers and law enforcement for their quick work. "I also want to thank our passengers for their great patience today."




While roads to the airport were blocked off, travelers were directed to wait for the incident to end in two shuttle lots on Buell Road. Dozens of others waited in cars idling along Buell Road and pulled to the side of Brooks Avenue near the airport entrances.

Benjamin and Roselyn Rudney said they were hopeful they could still catch their 5:30 p.m. flight to New York City. They drove to the airport from Mount Morris, Livingston County a couple hours early, expecting a wait at the security screening as they headed out on vacation, but not a wait to get into the airport. But, they maintained a positive outlook.

"It is what it is, and we'll deal with it," said Benjamin Rudney.

Story and video:   http://www.democratandchronicle.com

Cessna 525C Citation CJ4, N614SB, Superior Beverage Group: Fatal accident occurred December 29, 2016 near Cleveland Burke Lakefront Airport (KBKL), Cleveland, Ohio

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards; North Olmsted, Ohio 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: Cleveland

Maverick Air LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N614SB

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN17FA072
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, December 29, 2016 in Cleveland, OH
Aircraft: CESSNA 525, registration: N614SB
Injuries: 6 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 29, 2016, at 2257 eastern standard time, a Cessna model 525C (Citation CJ4) airplane, N614SB, was destroyed during an in-flight collision with Lake Erie shortly after takeoff from runway 24R (6,604 feet by 15o feet, asphalt) at the Burke Lakefront Airport (BKL), Cleveland, Ohio. The pilot and five passengers are missing and presumed fatal. The airplane was registered to Maverick Air LLC and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was operated on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan. The intended destination was the Ohio State University Airport (OSU), Columbus, Ohio.

The pilot and passengers initially departed OSU about 1730 and arrived at BKL about 1800. The pilot checked in at the fixed base operator (FBO) at 1812. The pilot and passengers reportedly attended a local sporting event before returning to the airport about 2230.

An initial review of Air Traffic Control (ATC) transmissions between the pilot and the Midwest ATC Federal Contract Tower at BKL revealed that the pilot requested the IFR clearance at 2247, followed by the taxi clearance at 2251. At 2256, the pilot informed the BKL tower controller that he was holding short of the runway and ready for takeoff. The controller subsequently cleared the pilot for takeoff and instructed him to turn right to a heading of 330 degrees and maintain 2,000 feet msl after departure. The pilot acknowledged the clearance. After takeoff, the controller instructed the pilot to contact departure control; however, no further communications were received from the pilot. After multiple attempts to contact the pilot were unsuccessful, the controller initiated search and rescue procedures.

Automated Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) position data indicated that the takeoff began about 2256:47 (hhmm:ss). The data depicted the airplane entering a right turn shortly after crossing the runway departure threshold. The airplane became established on a magnetic course of 310 degrees at about 2257:28. During this time, the airplane reached an altitude of approximately 2,925 feet msl. About 5 seconds later, the airplane entered a descending right turn that continued until the final data point. The final data point was recorded at 2257:52 and was located 1.83 miles northwest of BKL. The associated altitude was 775 feet msl.

The resulting search and recovery effort was hampered by weather and lake conditions. Airplane debris, including the cockpit voice recorder, was ultimately located about 0.10 mile northeast of the final data point. The cockpit voice recorder was transferred to the NTSB Recorders Laboratory for readout. A detailed wreckage examination will be conducted once recovery operations have concluded.

The Cessna 525C Citation CJ4 airplane has a low-wing, T-tail airframe arrangement, with a retractable tricycle landing gear configuration. The cabin is pressurized and the airplane is capable of operating at a maximum pressure altitude of 45,000 feet. It is configured for up to 10 occupants including the pilot(s). The airplane is approved for single pilot operations provided the pilot-in-command holds a CE525S (single pilot) type rating, the airplane is configured for single pilot operations in accordance with the operating limitations, and the pilot occupies the left pilot seat.

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records indicated that the accident airplane was a 2012 model year Cessna 525C, serial number 525C-0072. It was powered by two Williams International FJ44-4A turbofan engines, serial numbers 211155 and 211156. The airplane was initially issued a commuter category standard airworthiness certificate in January 2012. It was subsequently exported to Brazil. The airframe and engines had accumulated about 10 hours total time when exported. The airplane was imported to the United States and purchased by the accident owner in October 2016. The airframe and engines had accumulated about 812 hours total time when the airplane was returned to the United States. Available records indicated that the most recent maintenance activity occurred on December 17, 2016. At that time the airplane had accumulated 860 hours total time.

FAA records revealed that the accident pilot held a private pilot certificate with airplane single and multi-engine land, rotorcraft helicopter, and instrument airplane category/class ratings. In addition, the pilot held CE-510S and CE-525S type ratings. He was issued a third class airman medical certificate without limitations on October 15, 2015. The pilot's CE-525S type rating was added December 8, 2016, after he successfully completed the prescribed FAA practical test (checkride). His initial Cessna 525 training was completed in the accident airplane. The pilot subsequently completed a simulator-based recurrent training course at FlightSafety International on December 17, 2016.

Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport officials OK bond issue

HIGHFILL -- Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport staff members closed on a deal to issue bonds for a new parking deck Wednesday.

Perry Franklin, finance director at the regional airport, said the deal with Regions Capital Advantage calls for the issue of just more than $25 million of revenue bonds for the parking deck and $44 million to refinance existing airport debt.

The airport board has a contract with Nabholz Construction to build the deck at a guaranteed maximum cost of $35 million.

In addition to the $25 million bond issue, the airport board expects to put in $10 million from $25 million it has in reserve.

The order to proceed with construction is expected to be issued by Saturday. The project should take about 18 months to complete, making it ready to open about August 2018.

The board earlier this year approved plans for a 1,400 space, four-level deck with a roof.

The board agreed in March to pay Nabholz Construction $1.5 million for design work and related services for the garage, which will be built in front of the terminal.

The structure is expected to house car rental companies initially. A second deck likely will be added for car rental companies in three to five years, airport officials have said.

Construction of the deck is expected to reduce short term spaces from 491 to 274 spaces next year.

Source:  http://www.nwaonline.com

Robinson R44 Raven, Hangar 21 Helicopters / November Alpha LLC, N324RS: Accident occurred December 29, 2016 in Mt. Baldy, San Bernardino County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

NOVEMBER ALPHA LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N324RS

FAA Flight Standards District Office: RIVERSIDE


NTSB Identification: WPR17LA043
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, December 29, 2016 in Mt. Baldy, CA
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R44 II, registration: N324RS
Injuries: 1 Serious, 3 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 29, 2016, at 1131 Pacific standard time, a Robinson Helicopter Company R44 II, N324RS, landed hard near the peak of Mount Baldy, in San Bernardino County, California. The helicopter was registered to November Alpha LLC., and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The commercial pilot sustained serious injuries, and the three passengers were not injured. The helicopter sustained substantial damage during the accident sequence. The personal flight departed Fullerton Municipal Airport, Fullerton, California at 1100 with a planned destination of Mount Baldy. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot reported that prior to flight, he performed a weight and balance check, and based on the results, he filled the main fuel tank to half of its capacity, and the auxiliary tank to one quarter.

The departure and flight were uneventful, and he approached the peak of Mount Baldy from the south with the intention of performing an orbit to survey a site for landing. He estimated the wind to be about 5 knots out of the south as he approached, and during the orbit, he could see hikers at the intended landing spot. As he continued to survey the area, the helicopters low rotor RPM warning horn sounded. He lowered the collective and rolled on the throttle, and the warning stopped. He then checked the manifold pressure, which was between 18 and 19 inches of mercury, and decided that he had enough power available to proceed. He continued with a low pass over a ridge, to signal his intent to the hikers that he wished to land at their location.

He returned to the landing site, and in order to avoid the hikers, he positioned the helicopter to approach from the south-southeast. He could feel a tailwind as they approached the landing site, and the low RPM horn sounded again. He lowered the collective, but the helicopter rapidly descended towards the mountain face directly ahead. He warned everyone that a crash was imminent, and just before colliding with the ground, he applied full left foot pedal in an effort to land sideways rather than nose-down. After impact, everyone was able to exit unimpeded, and he set the transponder to 7700, and turned the fuel valve to the "off" position.


The helicopter came to rest on a ridge, 1/3 of a mile west of the summit of Mount Baldy, at an elevation of 9,860 ft. The aft fuselage was partially submerged in the snow, and had sustained buckling damage through to the tailboom.





GLENDORA (FOX 11 / CNS) - A helicopter made a hard landing Thursday on Mt. Baldy, just west of the San Bernardino County line, causing minor injuries to three of the four people aboard.

The helicopter went down about 11:40 a.m. atop a mountain ridge in the snow, according to the San Bernardino County Fire Department, which sent an air rescue unit to evacuate the four people who were on board.

The occupants had gotten out of the downed rotorcraft by the time rescuers arrived.

Three were taken to a hospital and one refused transport, officials said.

The Federal Aviation Administration was investigating the crash along with the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Aero Bureau.

Story and video:  http://www.foxla.com




MOUNT BALDY, Calif. (KABC) -- A helicopter crashed Thursday morning in the snow-covered Mount Baldy area, prompting a rescue operation by the San Bernardino County Fire Department, officials said.

The incident occurred west of and 1,000 feet below the Mount Baldy summit, the fire department said on Twitter shortly before noon. According to the agency, hikers at the scene initially reported the helicopter's occupants were "awake and talking."

Four people were in the Robinson R44 when it made a "hard landing," leaving its tail boom significantly damaged, said Ian Gregor, spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration's Pacific Division.

A fire department helicopter was dispatched to the crash site, which was inaccessible to ground units, officials said.

That chopper landed "offsite" and rescuers made contact with the crashed helicopter's four occupants, the fire department said. Three people were taken to the hospital to be treated for minor injuries, according to officials with the sheriff's department.

After being escorted onto the agency's Air Rescue 7 helicopter, the individuals were flown to a landing zone at Cow Canyon Saddle.

Source:  http://abc7.com




A rescue effort on snow-covered Mount Baldy airlifted all four who had been aboard to safety after their helicopter crippled in a hard landing.  

Two were hospitalized.  

"I'm just glad everyone walked out and no one's gushing blood right now," said passenger William Francis. "Just out of nowhere, we lost altitude."

The Robinson R-44 helicopter went down Thursday morning shortly before noon. 

A responding Sheriff's rescue helicopter carried the pilot and three passengers to a lower elevation. 

From there, one of the injured was flown to a trauma center.  

A second was transported by ground ambulance.  

Their injuries did not appear life-threatening, according to the San Bernardino County Fire Department. 

The helicopter, based in Fullerton, had been chartered by a group with cameras and plans to record video.  

One brought a drone.

What led to the hard landing is under investigation.

There were indications it was a planned landing that went awry.

It appeared to one passenger that the pilot did not recognize a problem until moments before touchdown. 

"We were just going fast and I heard him say 'oh, (expletive),'" said one passenger, who asked not to be identified.  

Extensive damage was visible to the helicopter's tail section and rotor, and a cockpit window popped out.

"From what I understand it was a pretty hard landing," said Doug Nelson, a Battalion Chief with the San Bernardino County Fire Department. "They're very lucky it was on top of the ridge and not to the side of the ridge."

The helicopter went down just west of the summit of Mount San Antonio, commonly known as Mount Baldy, elevation 10,064 feet, the highest point in Los Angeles County.

The peak is in the San Gabriel Mountains National Monument and Angeles National Forest. 

The summit is reachable by a hiking trail from the east side, and the initial emergency call came from a hiker who saw the helicopter go down, Nelson said.

That call went to San Bernardino county, and one of its Sheriff rescue airships was first to respond, as did a helicopter from the Los Angeles County Sheriff's department.  

Within hours of the rescue, a representative of the Federal Aviation Administration was airlifted to the scene to investigate before the expected arrival Friday of a weather front. 

The National Transportation Safety Board was also notified.

The helicopter has previously been used for aerial tours offered by Hangar 21 at Fullerton Airport. 

The incident did not occur during a company tour, according to Rob Sims, who said the helicopter had been rented by the pilot for a charter flight. 

Plans to remove the damaged helicopter from the ridge have yet to be made.

Story and video: http://www.nbclosangeles.com