Monday, November 14, 2016

Langley AFB exercise to cause increased air traffic

Langley's 1st Fighter Wing and the Virginia Air National Guard's 192nd Fighter Wing will conduct exercises out of Langley Air Force Base from Monday to Saturday, according to a news release.

There will be increased airfield activity outside of normal hours and round-the-clock flying operations throughout the exercise, the release stated.

The exercise will involve F-22 Raptors and test the 1st Fighter Wing's ability to conduct simulated combat flying in national-level assignments, the release stated.

Traffic at Langley may experience slight delays, according to the release.

Source:  http://www.dailypress.com

Cessna A185F Skywagon, N4918Q: Accident occurred November 12, 2016 at Ninilchik Airport (NIN), Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Juneau, Alaska

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N4918Q

NTSB Identification: ANC17LA005
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, November 12, 2016 in Ninilchik, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA A185, registration: N4918Q
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 12, 2016, about 1215 Alaska standard time, a tailwheel-equipped Cessna A185F airplane, N4918Q, sustained substantial damage during the landing roll at the Ninilchik Airport, Ninilchik, Alaska. The certificated airline transport pilot and the pilot-rated passenger sustained no injuries. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot as a visual flight rules (VFR) flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a VFR flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from the Soldotna Airport, Soldotna, Alaska, about 1200.

During a telephone interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge on November 13, the flying pilot, who was seated in the right seat at the time of the accident, stated that after an uneventful touchdown on the slightly wet and gravel surface of runway 10, the right-side brake system did not function as designed, which resulted in an asymmetrical braking condition. As the airplane continued the landing roll, the airplane ground looped to the left and the right wing and right horizontal stabilizer impacted the runway surface. The airplane came to rest on the runway without further incident. 

The accident pilot stated that the previous landing was accomplished by the pilot-rated passenger and she reported no issues with the brake system during that landing sequence. The pilot further stated at the time of the accident, the wind condition originated from the north, about 10 to 15 knots. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing and the right horizontal stabilizer. 

In a written statement from a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aviation safety inspector (ASI) on November 16, he reported that he conducted an onsite examination of the airplane's brake system. He reported that he attempted to actuate the right brake, but the brake just went to the full travel stop. The right brake master cylinder filler plug was removed and a small tie wrap was utilized as a dip stick, and no fluid was observed on the tie wrap. The bottom of the fuselage and the right brake caliper were visually examined, and no signs of fluid leaks were observed. The accident pilot was asked if he previously observed the ground under the brake calipers at his parking space for evidence of any fluid leaks and the pilot reported he did look and did not observe any signs of fluid. The ASI additionally reported that the runway utilized by the accident pilot was in a useable condition, and that ice patches on the side of the runway were not a factor with the accident sequence. 

In the recommendation section of the NTSB Accident/Incident Reporting Form 6120.1, the pilot stated that the accident may have been avoided if he depressed the brakes prior to landing to confirm both were functioning.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION 

The closest weather reporting facility was the Homer Airport, Homer, Alaska. At 1153, an Aviation Routine Weather Report (METAR) was reporting in part: wind from 080 degrees at 17 knots, gusting 24 knots; visibility 6 statute miles; sky condition broken 3,600 feet; temperature 45 degrees F; dew point 37 degrees F; altimeter 29.11 inHg.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

In a written statement from the accident pilot on December 20, he reported that the entire brake system was tested. The testing revealed that the right brake had an "extremely small leak (one drop)" from both o-rings at 500 pounds per square inch. The rest of the brake system appeared normal and no signs of brake fluid were found on the underside of the fuselage. He reported he assumed the leak was small and that only under pressure would it show signs of leaking, that is why no evidence of leaking was observed on any preflight activity prior to the accident. He further reported the o-rings on both calipers were replaced, the brake system was pressurized, and no further leaks were found. 

In a written statement from the pilot on April 4, he reported that after replacing the brake lines, the right brake did not readily take fluid when pumped from the caliper. The right brake master cylinder was disassembled, and the spring was observed to be deformed. He reported that in certain positions, the spring would block the flow of fluid in or out. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The FAA has published the Aviation Maintenance Technician Handbook – Airframe FAA-H-8083-31 (2012). This document discusses airplane brake systems and states in part:


Brake seals are very important. Without properly functioning seals, brake operation will be compromised or the brakes will fail. Over time, heat and pressure mold a seal into the seal groove and harden the material. Eventually, resilience is reduced and the seal leaks. New seals should be used to replace all seals in the brake assembly. Acquire seals by part number in a sealed package from a reputable supplier to avoid bogus seals and ensure the correct seals for the brake assembly in question. Check to ensure the new seals have not exceeded their shelf life, which is typically three years from the cure date.

NTSB Identification: ANC17LA005
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, November 12, 2016 in Ninilchik, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 185, registration: N4918Q
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 12, 2016, about 1230 Alaska standard time, a tailwheel-equipped Cessna 185 airplane, N4918Q, sustained substantial damage during the landing roll at the Ninilchik Airport, Ninilchik, Alaska. The certificated airline transport pilot and the pilot-rated passenger sustained no injuries. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot as a visual flight rules (VFR) flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a VFR flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from the Soldotna Airport, Soldotna, Alaska, about 1200. 

During a telephone interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge on November 13, the flying pilot, who was seated in the right seat at the time of the accident, stated that after an uneventful touchdown on the slightly wet and gravel surface of runway 10, the right side brake system did not function as designed, which resulted in an asymmetrical braking condition. As the airplane continued the landing roll, the airplane ground looped to the left and the right wing and right horizontal stabilizer impacted the runway surface. The airplane came to rest on the runway without further incident. 

The accident pilot stated that the previous landing was accomplished by the pilot-rated passenger and she reported no issues with the brake system during that landing sequence. The pilot further stated at the time of the accident, the wind condition originated from the north, about 10 to 15 knots.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing and the right horizontal stabilizer. 

The closest weather reporting facility was the Homer Airport, Homer, Alaska. At 1153, an Aviation Routine Weather Report (METAR) was reporting in part: wind from 080 degrees at 17 knots, gusting 24 knots; visibility 6 statute miles; sky condition broken 3,600 feet; temperature 45 degrees F; dew point 37 degrees F; altimeter 29.11 inHg.

Luscombe 8E, N2604K: Accident occurred November 12, 2016 at Poe's Airport (AR88), Conway, Faulkner County, Arkansas

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Little Rock, Arkansas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N2604K

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA066
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, November 12, 2016 in Conway, AR
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/05/2017
Aircraft: LUSCOMBE 8, registration: N2604K
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot in the tailwheel-equipped airplane, he landed on the turf runway, and the airplane began to drift left. He made a right rudder pedal input that did not counter the left drift, and he adjusted his foot on the right rudder pedal so that he could apply differential braking. However, he reported that “my shoe was caught between the rudder pedal and the sheet metal fairing on the floorboard that covers the rudder pedal bell cranks,” which prevented him from applying differential braking. The airplane exited the runway to the left and ground looped, the right main landing gear collapsed, and the right wing struck the ground. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right-wing spar and right aileron.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot’s failure to maintain directional control of the airplane during the landing roll, which resulted in a runway excursion and ground loop. 

China Southern, Airbus A388: Incident occurred November 11, 2016 in Los Angeles, California

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA El Segundo (Los Angeles) FSDO-23

CHINA SOUTHERN FLIGHT 328, B6139 AIRBUS A388 AIRCRAFT, ON PUSHBACK FROM THE GATE, STRUCK A TUG, 1 PERSON ON THE TUG SUSTAINED UNKNOWN INJURIES, DAMAGE TO THE AIRCRAFT IS MINOR, PERSONS ON BOARD WERE DEPLANED AND BUSSED TO THE TERMINAL, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA. 

Date: 11-NOV-16
Time: 07:15:00Z
Regis#: B6139
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A380
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: Unknown
Damage: Minor
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: PUSHBACK/TOWING (PBT)
Flight Number: CSN328
City: LOS ANGELES
State: California

Van's RV-8, N564AB: Incident occurred November 11, 2016 in Corona, Riverside County, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N564AB

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Riverside FSDO-21

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING NOSED OVER, CORONA, CALIFORNIA.  

Date: 11-NOV-16
Time: 19:40:00Z
Regis#: N564AB
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV8
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: CORONA
State: California

Bell 206B, N206SA: Accident occurred April 06, 2017 in La Verne, Los Angeles County, California (and) Incident occurred November 12, 2016 near Camp Pendleton, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;   Los Angeles, California

Coastal Helicopters LLC 
c/o Paracorp Inc.
http://registry.faa.gov/N206SA

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA218
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, April 06, 2017 in La Verne, CA
Aircraft: BELL 206, registration: N206SA

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Rotorcraft damaged tail boom upon landing.

Date: 06-APR-17
Time: 17:35:00Z
Regis#: N206SA
Aircraft Make: BELL
Aircraft Model: 206
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: ON DEMAND
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: LA VERNE
State: CALIFORNIA

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Diego FSDO-09

N206SA BELL 206 Rotorcraft during aerial operation, struck wire.  Landed without incident.  Near Camp Pendleton, California

Date: 12-NOV-16
Time: 23:30:00Z
Regis#: N206SA
Aircraft Make: BELL
Aircraft Model: 206
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Other
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: CAMP PENDLETON
State: California

Bellanca 14-19 Cruisemaster, N6582N: Incident occurred November 12, 2016 at Front Range Airport (KFTG), Denver, Colorado

http://registry.faa.gov/N6582N

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Denver FSDO-03

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING WENT OFF THE RUNWAY AND STRUCK RUNWAY LIGHTS, FRONT RANGE AIRPORT, DENVER, COLORADO.  

Date: 12-NOV-16
Time: 17:18:00Z
Regis#: N6582N
Aircraft Make: BELLANCA
Aircraft Model: 1419
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: DENVER
State: Colorado

Sky Lease Cargo, Boeing 747, N902AN: Incident occurred November 11, 2016 in Miami, Florida

AMERICAN AIRLINES INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N902AN

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19

N902AN SKYLEASE CARGO FLIGHT KYE4852 BOEING 747 AIRCRAFT ON DEPARTURE, AN ENGINE COWLING SEPARATED FROM ENGINE AND FELL ONTO THE RUNWAY, NO INJURIES, AIRCRAFT LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, MIAMI, FLORIDA.  

Date: 11-NOV-16
Time: 22:48:00Z
Regis#: N902AN
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 747
Event Type: Incident
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Cargo
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Aircraft Operator: SKYLEASE CARGO
Flight Number: KYE4852
City: MIAMI
State: Florida

Cessna 560XL, NextEra Energy Inc., N868XL: Incident occurred November 13, 2016 in West Palm Beach, Palm Beach County, Florida

NEXTERA ENERGY INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N868XL

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19

AIRCRAFT ENCOUNTERED A BIRDSTRIKE, LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, SUSTAINED UNKNOWN HORIZONTAL STABILIZER DAMAGE, WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA.  

Date: 13-NOV-16
Time: 18:56:00Z
Regis#: N868XL
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 560
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: WEST PALM BEACH
State: Florida

Piper PA-28R-180 Cherokee Arrow, Royal Majesty Aviation LLC, N599M: Incident occurred November 12, 2016 in Atlanta, Georgia

ROYAL MAJESTY AVIATION LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N599M

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Atlanta FSDO-11

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, ATLANTA, GEORGIA 

Date: 12-NOV-16
Time: 22:47:00Z
Regis#: N599M
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28R
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ATLANTA
State: Georgia

Mini-Max: Incident occurred November 12, 2016 in New Haven, Allen County, Indiana

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA South Bend FSDO-17

UNREGISTERED ULTRALIGHT, MINI-MAX, FORCE LANDED IN A FIELD NEAR NEW HAVEN, INDIANA. 

Date: 12-NOV-16
Time: 16:31:00Z
Regis#: UNREGISTERED
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: NEW HAVEN
State: Indiana.

Cessna 172, N739WC: Incident occurred November 11, 2016 in Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky

http://registry.faa.gov/N739WC

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Louisville FSDO-17

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING STRUCK THE PROPELLER AND WENT OFF THE RUNWAY INTO THE GRASS, LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY. 

Date: 11-NOV-16
Time: 17:00:00Z
Regis#: N739WC
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: LEXINGTON
State: Kentucky

Flight Design CTSW, N329CT: Accident occurred November 13, 2016 near Omni Airport (LA46), Port Allen, Louisiana

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N329CT

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Baton Rouge FSDO-03


NTSB Identification: CEN17LA041
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, November 13, 2016 in Port Allen, LA
Aircraft: FLIGHT DESIGN GMBH CTSW, registration: N329CT
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 13, 2016, about 1608 central standard time, a Flight Design CTSW, single-engine airplane, N329CT, was substantially damaged after impacting terrain during an off-airport forced landing near Port Allen, Louisiana. The student pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed and a visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan had not been filed. At the time of the accident the airplane was departing Omni Airport (LA46), Port Allen, Louisiana for a local flight.

The student pilot reported that he had climbed to about 850 feet above ground level when he had a sudden and complete loss of engine power. He went through the emergency checklist for engine restart, but was not successful. During the forced landing the airplane impacted terrain in a recently harvested sugar cane field and came to rest partially inverted. There was substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage. The student pilot also reported that he was able to exit the wreckage without assistance. There was adequate fuel on-board, but no fuel spill, and no postimpact fire.

At 1553 the KBTR Automated Surface Observation System at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, about 9 miles east from the accident location, reported wind from 330 degrees at 4 knots, visibility 10 miles, temperature 17 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 8 degrees C, with an altimeter setting of 30.15 inches of mercury.

Cessna 172P Skyhawk, Anvab Inc. dba, N53402: Accident occurred November 10, 2016 in Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

ANVAB INC DBA:   http://registry.faa.gov/N53402

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Portland FSDO-65


Docket And Docket Items -   National Transportation Safety Board:   
https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA067
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, November 10, 2016 in Concord, NH
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/06/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N53402
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during the second landing of a closed traffic pattern flight, the airplane “ballooned” in the landing flare and touched down “hard.” The pilot further reported that she aborted the landing and landed without further incident. 

The firewall sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's improper landing flare, which resulted in a hard landing.

Weatherly 620B, Burkett Aerial Spraying, N2035J: Accident occurred November 12, 2016 in Coleman County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Lubbock, Texas 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Burkett Aerial Spraying: http://registry.faa.gov/N2035J

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA038
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Saturday, November 12, 2016 in Coleman, TX
Aircraft: WEATHERLY AVIATION CO INC 620B, registration: N2035J
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 12, 2016, about 1300 central standard time, a Weatherly Aviation Company 620B airplane, N2035J, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Coleman, Texas. The pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Burkett Aviation under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial spraying practice flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, with no flight plan filed. The local flight departed a private strip about 1200.

Flying his initial flight in the model of the accident airplane, the pilot stated that a total loss of engine power occurred during climb following a practice spray pass. The pilot executed a forced landing into an adjacent wheat field. Due to trees and a fence in the path of his rollout, he aggressively applied brake pressure, which resulted in a nose over and damage to the vertical stabilizer.

The owner had informed the pilot prior to takeoff that he needed to switch from left to right tank after flying for about 40 minutes. His advice was based on the engine's typical fuel burn of about 33 gallons per hour and fuel tank capacity of 35 gallons of each wing. The owner estimated the airplane was airborne for about one hour.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector and local mechanic revealed fuel leaking from a breached left tank, with the right tank intact and empty. The fuel selector was in the right tank position. After flipping the airplane upright, the propeller was rotated, with normal engine continuity. Fuel was added to the right tank and the engine was started. The engine ran for about 10 seconds and then stopped. Additional engine starts attempts were not successful, due to unavailability of a powered electrical source.

The right fuel tank low level warning light was tested and initially found to inoperable. After adjusting the sensor in the right fuel tank, the warning light operated normally. The owner stated the low fuel warning system had been intermittent during previous flights.

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA038
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Saturday, November 12, 2016 in Coleman, TX
Aircraft: WEATHERLY AVIATION CO INC 620B, registration: N2035J
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 12, 2016, about 1300 central standard time, a Weatherly Aviation Company 620B airplane, N2035J, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Coleman, Texas. The pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Burkett Aviation under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial spraying flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, with no flight plan filed. The local flight departed a private airport about 1200. 


The pilot stated that a total loss of engine power occurred during climb and he executed a forced landing into an adjacent wheat field. Due to trees and a fence in the path of his rollout, the pilot aggressively applied brake pressure, which resulted in a nose over and damage to the vertical stabilizer.





COLEMAN COUNTY, TX -   The pilot of a crop duster airplane was able to walk away from the scene of a crash early Saturday afternoon in eastern Coleman County.

The pilot, whose name has not been released, refused treatment from EMS at the scene. The plane is registered to Burkett Aerial Spraying of Coleman County.

The plane went down in a field on a ranch. As of 2:00 pm Saturday, a Texas Department of Public Safety trooper and Coleman County Sheriff's Deputy had returned to the scene to investigate. 

The official cause of the crash is not known at this time.

Source:   http://www.everythinglubbock.com

Sun Country Airlines, Boeing 737-700, N710SY: Incident occurred November 11, 2016 at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport (KAUS), Austin, Texas

http://registry.faa.gov/N710SY

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Antonio FSDO-17

SUN COUNTRY FLIGHT SCX8160 BOEING 737 AIRCRAFT, REGISTRATION NOT REPORTED, ON LANDING, SUSTAINED BIRDSTRIKE DAMAGE TO THE RIGHT ENGINE, NO INJURIES, LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, AUSTIN, TEXAS.  

Date: 12-NOV-16
Time: 00:45:00Z
Regis#: SCX8160
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 737
Event Type: Incident
Damage: Minor
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Aircraft Operator: SCX-Sun Country Airlines
Flight Number: SCX8160
City: AUSTIN
State: Texas

Cessna 170B, N170DP: Incident occurred November 13, 2016 in Yakima County, Washington

http://registry.faa.gov/N170DP

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Spokane FSDO-13

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING ROLLOUT, TAIL WHEEL COLLAPSED, YAKIMA, WASHINGTON.
  
Date: 13-NOV-16
Time: 21:16:00Z
Regis#: N170DP
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 170
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: YAKIMA
State: Washington

Cessna 172RG Cutlass, Ameriflyers of Florida LLC, N751DW: Incident occurred November 13, 2016 in Addison, Dallas County, Texas (and) Incident occurred November 10, 2014 at David Wayne Hooks Memorial Airport (KDWH), Spring, Texas

AMERIFLYERS OF FLORIDA LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N751DW 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Dallas FSDO-05

AIRCRAFT LANDED SHORT OF THE RUNWAY IN THE GRASS AND TAXIED OVER RUNWAY LIGHTS, ADDISON, TEXAS 

Date: 13-NOV-16
Time: 21:00:00Z
Regis#: N751DW
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ADDISON
State: Texas

Ameriflyers of Florida LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N751DW

Incident occurred November 10, 2014 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Houston FSDO-09

Description: AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, SPRING, TEXAS

Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)


  

HARRIS COUNTY, Texas -  A plane circling around Hooks Airport in Spring made a safe forced landing around 5 p.m. Monday.

The plane landed on its main gear, then fell forward onto its nose and skidded to a stop. Sky 2 captured two people stepping out of the plane after the landing.

The aircraft touched the ground twice, apparently trying to free up the nose gear, but both attempts were unsuccessful. After the plane burned off fuel and flew around the airport, it made its third attempt at a landing.

The plane is a Cessna and is a fixed-wing, single engine aircraft. The registered owner of the plane is Ameriflyers of Florida in Addison, Texas, according to the Federal Aviation Administration's registry.

Source:   http://www.click2houston.com





A small plane that circled above David Wayne Hooks Memorial Airport in Spring for more than 30 minutes landed safely. 

According to NBC affiliate KPRC, the pilot was having trouble with the nose gear.

The Cessna single-engine aircraft landed just after 5 p.m. Monday, first touching down on its back wheels, then tipping forward, where it skidded on its nose before coming to a complete stop.

There were two people on board. No one was injured.

The aircraft is registered in Addison.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.


Story and video: http://www.nbcdfw.com

Robinson R44 Raven II, S M Hentges & Sons Inc., N744JS: Accident occurred in Stone Lake, Washburn County, Wisconsin (and) Accident occurred June 09, 2012 in Santa Teresa, Doña Ana County, New Mexico

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA070
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, November 12, 2016 in Stone Lake, WI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/15/2017
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R44, registration: N744JS
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The helicopter pilot reported that, during a hover taxi for takeoff, about 3 ft above the ground, he thought that he saw a person at the corner of his driveway. He added that he stopped and that the helicopter drifted to the left. Subsequently, the main rotor blade impacted a tree, which resulted in substantial damage to the fuselage. 
The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain lateral control while in a hover and the helicopter’s subsequent impact with a tree.



Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

S M Hentges & Sons Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N744JS



NTSB Identification: GAA17CA070
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, November 12, 2016 in Stone Lake, WI
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R44, registration: N744JS
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The helicopter pilot reported that during a hover taxi for takeoff, about three ft above the ground, he thought that he saw a person at the corner of his drive way. He added that he stopped and the helicopter drifted to the left. Subsequently the main rotor blade impacted a tree, which resulted in substantial damage to the fuselage.

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation. Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

S M HENTGES & SONS INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N744JS

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Milwaukee FSDO-13


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA070
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, November 12, 2016 in Stone Lake, WI
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R44, registration: N744JS
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The helicopter pilot reported that during a hover taxi for takeoff, about three ft above the ground, he thought that he saw a person at the corner of his drive way. He added that he stopped and the helicopter drifted to the left. Subsequently the main rotor blade impacted a tree, which resulted in substantial damage to the fuselage.

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation.






Washburn County Sheriff's Office Press Release


At approximately 11 AM this morning Washburn County Sheriff's Dispatch received a 911 call of a helicopter crash in Birchwood Township, on County B and Bobby Schmidt's Drive.


The operator of the helicopter, and the only occupant, tried to take off from his home on Long Lake. For reasons unknown to this office at this time, the helicopter hit a pine tree and the crashed on the owners property.


The pilot was taken to Spooner Hospital where he was treated and released. Stone Lake Fire and Ambulance were called to the scene.


The NTSB was notified and will have the responsibility for the investigation.


We are very thankful the pilot only suffered minor injuries and that the helicopter did not catch on fire.


Sheriff Dryden


Source:   http://www.drydenwire.com 


National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

National Transportation Safety Board -  Docket And Docket Items:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

National Transportation Safety Board  -  Aviation Accident Data Summary:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN12LA359
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 09, 2012 in Santa Teresa, NM
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/06/2013
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R44 II, registration: N744JS
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The helicopter was about 76 pounds under its maximum gross weight for the takeoff at a density altitude of about 6,800 feet. The pilot lifted the helicopter into a hover 2 feet above ground level (agl) and departed into the wind, which was variable from 210-260 degrees at 10 knots, gusting to 18 knots. After the helicopter entered translational lift, the pilot accelerated the helicopter to 30-35 knots and climbed to about 10-20 feet agl. The helicopter suddenly started to settle, the low rotor rpm warning light illuminated, and the warning horn sounded. The left seat passenger, who was a flight instructor, took control of the helicopter and attempted to recover rotor rpm. Unable to regain enough rotor rpm to maintain flight, he decided to land under control rather than continue to an uncontrolled crash. He was only able to slow the helicopter to about 15-20 knots before leveling the helicopter to land. The helicopter touched down in rough, uneven terrain, and substantial damage was incurred to the fuselage and tailboom. Examination of the helicopter did not show any evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have resulted in the loss of main rotor rpm and settling. 

The pilot and the left seat passenger stated that they could have operated the helicopter at a lighter takeoff weight for greater performance or waited until early morning to depart when the cooler temperatures would have reduced the density altitude. Further, they stated that the wind gusts resulted in the loss of some of the headwind component. Additionally, the left seat passenger reported that at the time the helicopter began to settle, a freight train was crossing about 30 to 50 yards in front of the takeoff flight path of the helicopter. He stated that he believed the train probably blocked some of the headwind component as it passed. A reduction in the headwind component would have resulted in the helicopter settling at a critical point during the takeoff. The pilot and the left seat passenger stated that the collective was probably raised slightly to compensate for the settling, which caused the decay of main rotor rpm, and once that happened, the helicopter was in a position that was not recoverable.

Given that the settling was sudden during an otherwise routine takeoff, it is likely that a wind gust, the blocking of the wind by the passing train, or a combination of the two resulted in an abrupt decrease in headwind, which caused the helicopter to lose lift and descend. Because the helicopter was already operating near its maximum performance capability (high gross weight at high density altitude), there was not enough reserve power available to stop the descent and maintain rotor rpm.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The sudden decrease in headwind during takeoff in a gusty wind and near a passing train, which resulted in a loss of lift and main rotor rpm. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's decision to operate the helicopter near its maximum performance capability (near gross weight at high density altitude), which resulted in a lack of reserve power available to compensate for the wind change.

On June 9, 2012, approximately 1900 mountain daylight time, a Robinson R44 II helicopter, N744JS, registered to S M Hentges & Sons of Jordan, Minnesota, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain after a loss of lift during takeoff/initial climb from the Dona Ana County Airport (5T6), Santa Teresa, New Mexico. All 3 occupants, the private helicopter pilot and his 2 passengers (who both held helicopter pilot certificates), were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area and a flight plan was not filed. The cross country flight was being conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight's intended destination for this leg of the trip was Roswell, New Mexico. 

The helicopter had just been refueled at Santa Teresa after an uneventful flight leg from Chino, California. One of the passengers, who was a certified flight instructor (CFI) and seated in the left seat for the flight, stated that the helicopter was about 76 pounds under its maximum gross weight after the refueling. He stated that the density altitude was about 6,800 feet, with wind of 210 to 260 degrees at 10 to 18 knots at the time of takeoff. 

The pilot, who was also the owner of the helicopter, lifted the helicopter into a 2-foot hover and departed into the wind. The helicopter entered translational lift, accelerated to about 30 to 35 knots, and 10 to 20 feet of altitude. Unexpectedly, the helicopter suddenly started to settle and the low rotor RPM warning light illuminated and warning horn sounded. The CFI came onto the controls and announced that he had control of the helicopter. In an attempt to recover main rotor RPM, he slightly lowered the collective, increased throttle, and added slight aft cyclic. He was not able to increase the main rotor RPM enough to maintain flight, so attempted to land under control rather than continue to an uncontrolled crash. He made a cyclic flare to reduce the airspeed as much as possible. Due to the low main rotor RPM, low altitude, and low airspeed, he was only able to slow the helicopter to about 15 to 20 knots, before leveling the helicopter to land. 

The helicopter touched down in rough terrain, (gravel, sand, sage brush, and small mounds of dirt). The skids broke off when they hit a mound of dirt and the helicopter pitched forward. The main rotor struck the ground and broke off and the tail boom was severed. The helicopter spun slightly right, struck a mound of dirt and rolled onto its left side. Initial touchdown to the final point of rest was about 75-80 feet. The helicopter was secured and the 3 occupants evacuated.

NOTE: The flight was not instructional. The CFI was a friend of the pilot/owner and was along as a passenger on the flight.

After the accident, the CFI provided statements to the NTSB describing the event and offered more details. He stated that he had never experienced a helicopter lift off, enter translational lift almost immediately, accelerate through 30 knots, appear to be making a normal takeoff, and then suddenly begin to settle so abruptly. 

He stated that the pilot/owner and his wife were fairly new helicopter pilots, but had attended a very reputable training facility to get their licenses. During the various flights that he had flown with them prior to this trip, he thought that they were very competent helicopter pilots. The owner/pilot had asked the CFI to go on the trip with them due to the length of the trip and they wanted the CFI to teach them more about the operation of the Garmin 430 in their helicopter. The pilot/owner and his wife alternated legs as PIC on the trip, with the CFI in the left seat. 

The CFI stated that when he returned to the accident site after the accident, he discussed the accident with the owner of the fuel service where the helicopter refueled. During that discussion, the owner of the fuel service asked the CFI if the "whirlwinds (dust devils) had gotten us." The CFI stated that he had observed many whirlwinds that day during the flight across the southwest desert areas, and had turned to avoid several. He stated that he did not observe whirlwinds in the takeoff path during the accident flight, but that's not to say that one was't starting, or ending. He said that the helicopter could have passed near an unseen whirlwind, which could have contributed to the rapid decay in rotor RPM and settling that was experienced at a critical time during takeoff.

Initially, the accident was reported by a freight train engineer. The train was crossing in front of the takeoff flight path of the helicopter, about 30 to 50 yards away. The CFI had noticed the train in his peripheral vision during the takeoff attempt. The CFI stated that perhaps the freight train crossing in front of the takeoff path could have blocked enough of the relative headwind component to affect the takeoff. The train was basically traveling from west to east, and passed in front of the takeoff path about the time that the helicopter began to settle. The CFI stated that he believes that the train probably blocked some of the headwind component as it passed, causing the air flow to burble and settle into a downdraft. He believes that this could be what caused the loss of rotor RPM and started the helicopter to settle.

Examination of the helicopter (engine, airframe, and flight controls) after the accident did not show any evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunction or abnormalities that may have contributed to the loss of main rotor RPM and settling. The refueling source was tested and found to be within specifications and clear of contaminants. The fuel filter screens on the helicopter were clean.

On the submitted NTSB Form 6120, Recommendation Section, the CFI and pilot offered how this accident could have been prevented. They offered that they could have operated the helicopter at a lighter takeoff weight for greater performance (less fuel), or waited until early morning to depart in cooler temperatures and lower density altitude. They stated that the helicopter was within operating and gross weight limits for takeoff, but close to the maximum. They stated that the wind gusts were definitely a factor, and that the loss of some of the headwind component, caused the helicopter to settle at a critical time during takeoff. They stated that the collective was probably raised slightly to compensate for the settling, which caused the loss of main rotor RPM and the corresponding loss of power. They said that, once that happened, the helicopter was in a position that was not recoverable.