Sunday, November 20, 2016

Ryan Navion A, N4976K: Fatal accident occurred November 19, 2016 in New Gretna, Bass River Township, Burlington County, New Jersey

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama 

William C. Lindley, Sr: http://registry.faa.gov/N4976K 

NTSB Identification: ERA17FA052
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, November 19, 2016 in New Gretna, NJ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/16/2017
Aircraft: RYAN NAVION, registration: N4976K
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot was conducting a personal cross-country flight. The pilot's friend reported that he provided weather information to the pilot about 1 hour before the flight; no record was found indicating that the pilot or the friend obtained a formal weather briefing before he departed for the night cross-country flight. A review of weather information revealed that, about 1 hour 20 minutes into the flight, as the airplane was nearing the destination airport, it encountered a strong cold front boundary with associated severe wind shear and turbulence. Review of radar data revealed that, during the following 13 minutes, the flight completed numerous course deviations, including three complete left circuits and two right circuits, before impacting wooded terrain. Review of the last 3 minutes of radar data revealed that the airplane's altitude oscillated between 2,100 and 200 ft mean sea level (msl) as it completed the two right circuits and one of the left circuits before it impacted terrain. The last target was recorded about 2,000 ft southeast of the accident site at an altitude of 525 ft msl. Examination of the wreckage did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. Based on the evidence, it is likely that the airplane encountered wind shear and turbulent conditions upon encountering the strong cold front boundary and that the pilot subsequently lost airplane control.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's inadequate preflight weather planning and in-flight weather evaluation, which resulted in an encounter with a strong cold front and the pilot's subsequent loss of airplane control.



HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On November 19, 2016, about 1902 eastern standard time, a Ryan Navion A, N4976K, impacted wooded terrain while maneuvering near New Gretna, New Jersey. The private pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by the private pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Hummel Field (W75), Saluda, Virginia, about 1730, destined for Ocean County Airport (MJX), Toms River, New Jersey.

The day before the accident, the pilot flew uneventfully from MJX to Accomack County Airport (MFV), Melfa, Virginia for an overnight visit with a friend who was also a pilot. On the day of the accident, both pilots flew their airplanes to W75 for dinner. After dinner, they both fueled their airplanes and about 1730, they departed for home (the pilot to MJX and the friend to MFV). While en route, they communicated with each other on their radios. During approach to MFV, about 1805, the friend experienced wind shear and performed a missed approach. He advised the pilot of the strong wind conditions, which he acknowledged. The friend radioed the pilot again about 1830 to check on him, and he replied that he was okay and had reached the Delaware Bay. No further communications were received from the pilot.

Review of weather information and radar data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that, after departure, the accident flight proceeded on a relatively direct course until about 1849, when it encountered the leading edge of a cold front boundary. During the following 13 minutes, the flight completed numerous course deviations, including three complete left circuits and two right circuits, before impacting wooded terrain. Review of the last 3 minutes of radar data revealed that the airplane's altitude oscillated between 2,100 and 200 ft mean sea level (msl) as it completed the two right circuits and one of the left circuits before impacting terrain. The last target was recorded at 1902:36, when the airplane was about 2,000 ft southeast of the accident site at an altitude of 525 ft msl.

PILOT INFORMATION

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. He did not have an instrument rating. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on May 7, 2015. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 800 hours. The pilot's logbook was not recovered.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The four-seat, low-wing, retractable tricycle-gear airplane was manufactured in 1949. It was powered by a 205-horsepower Continental E-185 engine and was equipped with a constant-speed Hartzell propeller. The pilot purchased the airplane in 1993. Review of maintenance records revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on July 12, 2016. At that time, the airframe had accumulated about 3,501 total flight hours, and the engine had accumulated about 548 hours since major overhaul. According to the tachometer, the airplane had flown about 23 hours from the time of the annual inspection until the accident.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The pilot's friend reported that he had obtained a weather briefing about 1630 via flight service for both his and the pilot's flights. The friend added that he told the pilot that the weather was forecast to deteriorate near his destination airport between 1900 and 1930; however, a search of flight service records did not reveal any contact from either pilot's airplane registration numbers on the day of the accident. Additionally, the friend reported that he plotted a route on the pilot's iPad using a Garmin Pilot app, which overlaid weather information; however, a search of ForeFlight and Garmin did not reveal any current subscriptions for the pilot.

MJX was located about 16 miles northeast of the accident site. At 1856, the recorded weather at MJX was wind from 150° at 5 knots, visibility 3 statute miles in mist, sky clear, temperature 12°C, dew point 12°C, and altimeter setting 29.64 inches of mercury.

Atlantic City International Airport (ACY), Atlantic City, New Jersey, located about 14 miles southwest of the accident site. At 1730, the recorded wind at ACY was from 290° at 24 knots, gusting to 31 knots.

Further review of weather data revealed multiple area forecasts for a strong cold front moving through the area with associated severe wind shear and turbulence (for more information, see the Weather Study in the public docket for this accident).

WRECKAGE INFORMATION

A debris path, beginning with freshly cut tree branches and a section of right stabilizer tip and right elevator, extended about 420 ft on a magnetic heading north of the main wreckage. The right and left flaps, left wing tip, left aileron, and cabin roof were located about 340 ft along the debris path. The right aileron and left stabilizer tip were located about 390 ft along the debris path.

The main wreckage was inverted at the end of the debris path with both wings separated. The right main landing gear and nose landing gear remained attached to the airframe and were observed in the extended positon. The left main landing gear had separated, and the landing gear tire was located next to the main wreckage. The empennage and rudder remained attached to the airframe.

The wreckage was transported to a recovery facility for further examination. Aileron control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit area to the wing roots, where the left and right aileron cable ends exhibited broomstraw separation, consistent with overload. Continuity was also confirmed from the cockpit area to the empennage area, where the elevator and elevator trim cables exhibited broomstraw separation, consistent with overload. The rudder cables exhibited cuts consistent with recovery of the wreckage.

The propeller remained attached to the engine. Both propeller blades exhibited S-bending, chordwise scratching, leading edge gouging, and tip curling. Due to an impact fracture at the front of the engine crankcase, the propeller could only be rotated about 90°. Using a lighted borescope during rotation, crankshaft continuity was confirmed to the pistons, and camshaft continuity was confirmed to the cylinder valves. Both magnetos sparked at all leads when rotated by hand. Throttle control continuity was confirmed to the throttle lever at the carburetor. Mixture control continuity was confirmed to the mixture lever at the carburetor, where the mixture lever was impact separated.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Burlington County Medical Examiner, Mount Holly, New Jersey, conducted an autopsy on the pilot. The autopsy report noted the cause of death as "multiple injuries."

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Science Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, conducted toxicological testing on specimens from the pilot. The results were negative for alcohol and drugs.



NTSB Identification: ERA17FA052
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, November 19, 2016 in New Gretna, NJ
Aircraft: RYAN NAVION A, registration: N4976K
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 19, 2016, about 1902 eastern standard time, a Ryan Navion A, N4976K, was substantially damaged when it impacted wooded terrain, while maneuvering near New Gretna, New Jersey. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the private pilot as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned flight to Ocean County Airport (MJX), Toms River, New Jersey. The flight originated from Hummel Field (W75), Saluda, Virginia, about 1730.

A friend of the accident pilot, who was also a pilot, owned a second home near Accomack County Airport (MFV), Melfa, Virginia. The accident pilot flew uneventfully from MJX to MFV during the day prior to the accident, for an overnight visit. On the day of the accident, both pilots flew their respective airplanes to W75 for dinner. After dinner, they both fueled their airplanes before departing for home (the accident pilot to MJX and the friend to MFV) about 1730. While enroute, they communicated with each other on frequency 123.45 MHz. During approach to MFV, about 1805, the friend experienced windshear and performed a missed approach. He advised the accident pilot of the strong wind conditions, which the accident pilot acknowledged. The friend radioed the accident pilot again about 1830 to check on him. The accident pilot replied that he was okay and had reached the Delaware Bay. No further communications were received from the accident airplane.

Review of preliminary radar data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the accident flight proceeded on a relatively direct course until approximately 1849, when it encountered the leading edge of a cold front boundary. During the following 13 minutes, the flight completed numerous course deviations, including three complete left circuits and two right circuits, before impacting wooded terrain.

A debris path was observed; beginning with freshly cut tree branches and a section of right stabilizer tip and right elevator, and extended approximately 420 feet on a magnetic heading of north to the main wreckage. The right and left flaps, left wingtip, left aileron, and cabin roof were located about 340 feet along the debris path. The right aileron and left stabilizer tip were located about 390 feet along the debris path.

The main wreckage was inverted at the end of the debris path, with both wings separated. The right main landing gear and nose landing gear remained attached to the airframe and were observed in the extended positon. The left main landing gear had separated and the landing gear tire was located next to the main wreckage. The empennage and rudder remained attached to the airframe. The wreckage was retained for further examination.

The pilot, age 75, held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. He did not possess an instrument rating. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on May 7, 2015. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 800 hours.

The four-seat, low-wing, retractable tricycle-gear airplane, serial number NAV-4-1976, was manufactured in 1949. It was powered by a Continental E-185, 205-horsepower engine, equipped with a constant-speed Hartzell propeller. The pilot purchased the airplane in 1993. Its most recent annual inspection was completed on July 12, 2016. At that time, the airframe had accumulated approximately 3,501 total hours of operation and the engine had accumulated about 548 hours since major overhaul.

The MJX airport was located about 16 miles northeast of the accident site. The recorded weather at MJX, at 1856, was: wind from 150 degrees at 5 knots, visibility 3 miles in mist; sky clear; temperature 12 degrees C; dew point 12 degrees C, altimeter 29.64 inches Hg.

Atlantic City International Airport (ACY), Atlantic City, New Jersey, was located about 14 miles southwest of the accident site. The recorded wind at ACY, at 1730, was from 290 degrees at 24 knots, gusting to 31 knots.

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP — A Beachwood man was identified late Sunday as the person killed in a small plane crash Saturday night in Bass River State Forest.

State Police said William Lindley, 75, was in the plane. Police gave no other details.

Lindley's small plane went missing Saturday night and was found Sunday afternoon by a U.S. Coast Guard helicopter.

At about 10:55 a.m. Sunday, State Police received calls for the possible downed aircraft, police said in a news release. Troopers from the Tuckerton barracks responded to search.

Lindley's aircraft departed Salisbury, Maryland, on Saturday en route to the Ocean County Airport, police said. It did not arrive as scheduled Saturday night and attempts to communicate with the pilot were unsuccessful, police said. The pilot's cellphone was tracked and police were told the possible location of the plane, police said.

According to the National Transportation Safety Board's Twitter account, the plane was a Ryan Navion A, a single-engine, four-seat plane built by North American Aviation in the 1940s.

State Police spokesman Trooper Alejandro Goez said the plane was located in a heavily wooded area with difficult terrain, requiring the State Police Aviation and Urban Search and Rescue Units to respond.

Goez did not say earlier Sunday evening whether anyone else had been in the plane.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the NTSB were on scene investigating.

Source:   http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com

BEACHWOOD — The pilot killed when his WW II-era plane crashed in a marsh in Burlington County on Saturday was identified as a 75-year-old Beachwood man, State Police said.

Trooper Alejandro Goez, a State Police spokesman, identified the pilot as William Lindley. Goez declined to comment further, and said the Federal Aviation Administration was leading the investigation of the crash.

FAA spokeswoman Arlene Salac said Sunday that the two-seater Navion A aircraft was found Sunday at approximately 1:30 p.m., adding that the FAA continues to investigate and that the National Transportation Safety Board will work to figure out what caused the crash.

FAA records indicate Lindley was issued a license on April 1, 2010, as a private pilot for single-engine aircraft. 

The Ocean County Airport-bound aircraft failed to arrive Saturday.

The records indicate he was required to wear corrective lenses for near and distant vision.

State police said authorities received a call just before 11 a.m. regarding a possible downed aircraft within the Bass River State Forest, a 29,000-acre site that covers Burlington and Ocean counties.

Authorities said the plane left Salisbury, Maryland on Saturday. Following failed attempts to contact the pilot, state police tracked the pilot's cell phone to determine the plane's possible location.

A U.S. Coast Guard helicopter later located the wreckage.

Source:   http://www.nj.com

A 75-year-old man was killed when an airplane he was piloting crashed in a marshy area of New Jersey on Sunday, New Jersey State Police officials said. 

William Lindley, of Beachwood, was the only person on the plane when it crashed. 

State police officers received a call about a possibly downed aircraft in the Bass River State Forest just before 11 a.m., authorities said. 

The two-passenger aircraft crashed in a marshy area of the forest at around 1:30 p.m. Sunday, the FAA said. 

The aircraft departed Salisbury, Maryland yesterday and was en route to the Ocean County airport. Authorities said the plane didn't arrive as scheduled last night.

After unsuccessful attempts to communicate with Lindley, police were able to track his cellphone and notify Tuckerton troopers of the plane's location.

A multiagency search began Sunday morning and a Coast Guard helicopter crew spotted the plane a few hours later.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash.


Source:  http://www.nbcnewyork.com


A small plane bound Saturday for Ocean County Airport was found Sunday afternoon, crashed in Bass River State Forest, according to the New Jersey State Police.


The pilot, William Lindley, 75, of Beachwood, N.J., was killed in the crash, state police said.


An investigation is being conducted by the National Transportation Safety Board.


Authorities began searching for the plane, which could hold two people, around 11 a.m. Sunday after they could not make contact with Lindley, who had been scheduled to land in Ocean County on Saturday, state police said in a statement.


The plane had departed from an airport in Salisbury, Md., police said. After it did not arrive in Ocean County, authorities tracked the pilot's cellphone signal to the Bass River State Forest, where the New Jersey State Police Aviation and Urban Search and Rescue Units began looking for the aircraft.


New Jersey State Police said around midafternoon Sunday on Twitter that a U.S. Coast Guard helicopter had located the plane and that police were heading to the crash site.


Police said Lindley was the only person aboard when the plane went down for reasons that were not immediately clear.


Source:   http://www.philly.com

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP, N.J. --  State police have identified a pilot killed after a small plane crashed in the Bass River State Forest in Burlington County.


The pilot has been identified as William Lindley, 75, of Beachwood, New Jersey.


Authorities say the Ryan Navion plane had departed from Salisbury, Maryland, on Saturday, but failed to arrive at Ocean County Airport in New Jersey on Saturday night as scheduled.


After attempts to communicate with Lindley were unsuccessful, the pilot's cellphone was tracked to the area where the plane was found. A multi-agency search began Sunday morning, and a Coast Guard helicopter crew spotted the plane a few hours later.


Officials say the pilot was alone in the plane.


The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash.


Source:   http://6abc.com

A pilot died from his injuries after a small plane crashed in the Bass River State Forest in Burlington County, according to the NTSB.

Authorities say the plane had departed from Salisbury, Maryland on Saturday but failed to arrive at Ocean County Airport in New Jersey on Saturday night as scheduled.

After attempts to communicate with the pilot were unsuccessful, the pilot's cellphone was tracked to the area where the plane was found. A multiagency search began Sunday morning and a Coast Guard helicopter crew spotted the plane a few hours later. Officials later confirmed the pilot, identified as William Lindley, 75, of Beachwood, New Jersey, died in the crash. He was the only person on the plane.

Source: http://www.nbcphiladelphia.com 

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP, N.J. (WTXF) - A Coast Guard helicopter found the downed plane from Maryland was supposed to land at New Jersey's Ocean County Airport, Saturday night, but never arrived.

That Coast Guard chopper found the wreckage in the Bass River State Forest, and New Jersey State Police ground personnel got there and secured the scene.

New Jersey State Police have identified the pilot as William Lindley, 75, of Beachwood, New Jersey.

The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration have also arrived, and they'll take over the investigation.

New Jersey State Police reported getting a call just before 11am Sunday about a possible downed aircraft at the Bass River State Forest. Troopers from Tuckerton Station immediately responded to search.

They say two passenger aircraft departed Salisbury, Maryland on Saturday. Unfortunately, the plane did not arrive as scheduled.

Then, attempts to communicate with the pilot were unsuccessful. The pilot's cellphone was tracked and Tuckerton Station personnel were advised of the possible location of the plane.

Source:   http://www.fox29.com

WASHINGTON TWP., N.J. (CBS) — Authorities say one person is dead after a Navion-A aircraft has crashed in a New Jersey state park.

The plane went down around 11 a.m. The United States Coast Guard helicopter located the downed plane in a marshy area in the Bass River State Forest after a search.

State Police have identified the victim as 75-year-old William Lindley from Beachwood, New Jersey.

Officials say the two passenger aircraft departed Salisbury, Maryland on Saturday en route to Ocean County Airport. The plane did not arrive as scheduled Saturday night and attempts to communicate with the pilot had been unsuccessful. The pilot’s cellphone was tracked and Tuckerton Station personnel were advised of the possible location of the plane.

The FAA and NTSB are now investigating what caused the crash.

Source:   http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP, NJ —A two-passenger plane bound for New Jersey from Maryland has been found in Bass River State Forest, New Jersey State Police said Sunday afternoon.

State Police reported at 1:30 p.m. that authorities were searching for the plane in the state forest, on the border of southern Ocean and northern Burlington counties. A U.S. Coast Guard helicopter located the plane, which had been tracked via the pilot's cellphone, state police said.

State police did not release any information on the pilot or say whether the pilot was alone or had a passenger.

The plane departed from Salisbury, MD, to Ocean County Airport, also known as Robert J. Miller Airpark in Berkeley Township, on Saturday, but did not arrive as scheduled, state police said.

State Police were notified shortly before 11 a.m. Sunday after attempts to communicate with the pilot were unsuccessful, they said.

The pilot's cellphone then was tracked to Bass River State Forest and the New Jersey State Police Tuckerton Station were advised of the possible location of the plane, state police said.

The New Jersey State Police Aviation and Urban Search and Rescue Units also participated in the search.

The weather on Saturday changed from warm and sunny in the early afternoon to cold and extremely windy as a cold front moved across New Jersey Saturday night.

The National Weather Service issued a high winds advisory Saturday, warning of winds gusting to 40 to 50 mph, and the winds were strong enough that authorities lower the speed limit to 45 mph for bridges crossing the Delaware River between New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

Gusts of more than 40 mph were recorded in Fortescue, a town on the Delaware Bay between Salisbury and Berkeley Township, on Saturday evening between 6 and 9 p.m., according to state climatology data reported online through Rutgers University.

The front also brought rain, hail and even some snow to southern New Jersey.

Source:   http://patch.com

Saturday, November 19, 2016

Neighbors upset over low-flying helicopter hovering near homes



AUBURN, Wash. -- Auburn residents are upset after a low-flying helicopter hovered near their homes Saturday morning.

Several people took to social media, saying that the helicopter was flying too close to the ground and calling the pilot's actions reckless and dangerous.

Some users have since deleted the videos.

Without a tail number, the Federal Aviation Administration says there's little they can do.

In a statement to KOMO News, Allen Kenitzer with the FAA Office of Communications says the agency is investigating the incident.

Original article can be found here: http://komonews.com

Air Tractor AT-502, Spray Tech Aviation Pty Ltd, VH-LIK: Fatal accident occurred November 05, 2016 in Cryon, 50km east of Walgett, NSW, Australia

NTSB Identification: WPR17WA028
Accident occurred Saturday, November 05, 2016 in Walgett, Australia
Aircraft: AIR TRACTOR AT502, registration:
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On November 5, 2016, approximately 1000 Australian Eastern Daylight Time (ESuT), an Air Tractor AT-502, Australian registration VH-LIK, collided with terrain about 33 nautical miles south of Walgett, Australia. The pilot, the sole occupant, sustained fatal injuries.

The investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Australian government. This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau. Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Australian Transport Safety Bureau
P.O. Box 967, Civic Square ACT 2608
15 Mort St., Canberra City, Australian Capital Territory
Telephone: +61 2 6274 6471
Fax: +61 2 6274 6434
Internet: www.atsb.gov.au 

A report will be prepared for the Coroner following the death of a man in the state’s north, just near Walgett, NSW Police say.

Just after 10am today, emergency services were called to a property on Cryon Road, Cryon, after reports a plane had crashed.

Upon arrival, officers attached to Castlereagh Local Area Command located a plane well alight, with Fire & Rescue NSW extinguishing the blaze.

A 46-year-old man, the single occupant of the plane, died at the scene.


Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) will commence an investigation in the circumstances surrounding the incident.

What the Navy says about the 'mystery' plane over Denver

DENVER - Many people contacted 9NEWS on Thursday asking about a “mystery” plane they saw flying over Denver.

Navy spokesperson Lt. Leslie Hubbell says the plane was a E-6B Mercury that was traveling from Travis Air Force Base in California to Tinker Air Force Base in Oklahoma.

She says it did spend some time over Denver, but didn’t say why.

Hubbell says it’s “normal” for these planes to fly like this, and directed questions about the pattern to the Federal Aviation Administration.

When 9NEWS contacted the FAA, a spokesperson said they don’t comment on military operations.

So part of the mystery plane remains a mystery.

As for the E-6B Mercury, the Navy’s website says it’s a communications relay and strategic airborne command post aircraft that costs a cool $141.7 million.

Its primary function, according to the website, is to relay fleet ballistic missile submarines and serve as a command post for U.S. Strategic Forces.

You can read more about the plane here: http://www.navair.navy.mil

Source:   http://www.wtsp.com

Piper PA-46-350P Malibu, N757NY: Fatal accident occurred May 01, 2019 in Rigolet, NL, Canada -and- Incident occurred November 19, 2016 at Norfolk International Airport (KORF), Virginia

NTSB Identification: GAA19WA248
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Wednesday, May 01, 2019 in Rigolet, NL, Canada
Aircraft: PIPER PA46, registration: N757NY
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

The government of Canada has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a PIPER PA46 airplane that occurred on May 01, 2019. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the government of Canada's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Richmond, Virginia

November 19, 2016: Aircraft landed gear up.

http://registry.faa.gov/N757NY

Date: 19-NOV-16
Time: 15:55:00Z
Regis#: N757NY
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA46
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: NORFOLK
State: Virginia


Alan Simpson survived the crash, but succumbed to his injuries.

 
Sam Rutherford survived the aircraft crash.


A British pilot has described how he regained consciousness after a crash in the northern Canadian wilderness and then texted his wife in Europe to alert rescuers.

Sam Rutherford, 47, was trapped in the aircraft as it teetered on a mountainside in a blizzard, with his flying companion fatally injured beside him.

A nine-man team climbed from Makkovik on the north coast of Labrador to search for the men after their Piper PA-46-350P Malibu struck the mountain. Alan Simpson, 73, a Shropshire farmer who owned the aircraft, survived the initial impact but died during the rescue attempt.

“When I recovered, I saw that Alan was not moving, but still breathing,” Mr Rutherford said. “I immediately put an emergency blanket over him to keep him warm.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.thetimes.co.uk



NORFOLK, Va. (WVEC) -- All incoming and outgoing flights were on hold for about three hours at Norfolk International Airport due to a disabled aircraft on the runway.

Steve Sterling, Deputy Executive Director at ORF, said the airport received an emergency field alert from the FAA Norfolk Tower at around 10:45 a.m. reporting that a Piper PA-46-350P Malibu that had just taken off had lost power. It was forced to return to the airport, where it ended up having to land on its belly on the main runway.

"The aircraft sustained structural damage and is being removed by crane. Upon removal of the crane, crews will remove the debris and inspect the runway before reopening the runway," Sterling said in his initial statement.

Sterling reported that the plane had been removed and the runway reopened at around 1:40 pm. 

According to the online flight tracking website, FlightView, dozens of incoming and outgoing flights have either been diverted or delayed.

Source: http://www.13newsnow.com



NORFOLK, Va. – Several flights at the Norfolk International Airport have been delayed due to a disabled plane on the runway.

On Saturday at 10:46 a.m., the airport authority received an emergency alert from the FAA Norfolk Tower about a Piper PA-46-350P Malibu aircraft that had just taken off and lost power.

The aircraft returned and landed on its belly on Runway 23.

Two people were on board, but no one was injured.

The aircraft was damaged and is being removed by crane.

Once it is removed, crews will remove the debris and inspect the runway before reopening the runway.

Until the aircraft is removed, the runway is closed.

Source:   http://wtkr.com




NORFOLK, Va. (WAVY) – A disabled aircraft at the Norfolk International Airport runway caused flight delays coming in and going out of the airport on Saturday.

Officials say that around 10:46 a.m., Authority received an emergency field alert from the FAA Norfolk Tower of a Piper PA-46-350P Malibu that had just taken off and lost power. The aircraft returned and landed on its belly on Runway 23.

The aircraft sustained structural damage but the two people in the aircraft were not injured. The aircraft was removed by a crane. and crews removed the debris. Officials say the runway has been reopened. 

Source: http://wavy.com

Tuscola Area Airport doubles as taxpayer-funded, private hunting preserve

A sign marking the perimeter of the Tuscola Area Airport with a truck in the distance at dusk on Wednesday. The taxpayer-funded airport is open to hunting for a select few.


Using a telephoto lens from M-81, this truck was one of several seen parked near the woods at the Tuscola Area Airport this week.



Most people know it as the Tuscola Area Airport, but for a select special few throughout the year – it’s a taxpayer-funded private hunting preserve, conveniently located just outside of Caro.

And during this first week of Michigan’s 2016 firearm deer season it’s been busy.

That’s because at least six hunters have taken advantage of the opportunity to get prime, private hunting real estate set within the airport’s 130 acres in exchange for volunteering with chores like clearing snow, painting or cutting the grass.

Chris McCollum, manager, Tuscola Area Airport – which is in Indianfields Township, three miles west of Caro – said he thought “it was kinda public knowledge” that anyone could take advantage of the program that rewards volunteers with an opportunity to submit a hunting application at the Tuscola Area Airport. “I always thought it was kinda public knowledge because a few other people had asked about it in the past,” McCollum told The Advertiser. “It was never published or anything like that…it was a kind of word of mouth deal.”

McCollum explained how it’s decided who gets to hunt at the airport.

“Airport property it technically considered private land… the way we do it is people are allowed to hunt based off of volunteering.

“If you volunteer for us, then you have a right to submit a hunting application,” he said. “You choose whatever season – bow, gun, muzzleloader – whatever you want to do and then that would get approved by the board members and then you would have the right to hunt out there.

“So that’s how we operate with our hunting licenses,” McCollum said.

But before anyone starts hooking up their snowplow and heading to the Tuscola Area Airport at 1750 Speirs Drive in Indianfields Township, McCollum said it’s important to note only a very few get the privilege to hunt at the site.

Currently, only six people are approved by the board to hunt at the site, including two of the airport’s four board members – former Caro Mayor Dick Pouliot and current Caro Mayor Joe Greene.

Though McCollum said the other four special hunters were approved by the airport board – which also includes Cass City Village Manager Pete Cristiano and Cass City Village President Carl Palmateer – he said he “wouldn’t feel comfortable” disclosing “the names of the private citizens that hunt back there.”

The Tuscola Area Airport is publicly owned and partially funded by taxes.

For the current fiscal year, Caro contributed about $14,000 and Cass City, about $7,300. The rest of the revenue for the airport comes from the state of Michigan and sales of fuel and hangar rentals, among other things.

The airport is the only general aviation airport located in Tuscola County and is owned and operated by the Tuscola Area Airport Authority.

The authority was incorporated in 1993 and originally included Caro, Cass City, Kingston, Almer Township, and Elkland Township.

Today, only Caro and Cass City are in the authority, which is why they are the only communities represented on the board.

According to a statement in its audit, the “Tuscola Area Airport Authority’s goal is to improve services to the flying public by increasing the economic development of the local communities in Tuscola County. The Authority is working toward increasing traffic into the airport and making improvement to its infrastructure as ways to reach this goal.”

There are 35 aircraft based at the airport. Activities that take place at the airport include corporate transportation, delivery of goods, emergency service and hospital activities, business and agricultural use by local companies, flight training, aircraft maintenance and repair, and recreational uses. The airport is used by representatives of Poet Biorefining in Caro, Walbro Engine Management in Cass City and others, including UPS, Michigan State Police and the University of Michigan Hospital.

It consists of about 260 acres and McCollum said “any part of the airport land could be used for (hunting) really.”

“It’s not like we have just designated acreage,” he said. “As long as it’s in a safe place, in a safe direction. You could probably pop a blind anywhere on the property as long as it isn’t on the runway, of course.”

In general, he said, hunters take an access road at the western part of the property where there isn’t a gate and drive straight back to the wooded area. Some hunters, however, access property on the other side of the airport.

Deer blinds are set up on airport property, he said, though McCollum said none are permanent and didn’t say exactly where they were located.

“Anyone that wants to help out, volunteer time at the airport, it’s based off of that obviously,” McCollum said. “It’s kinda first-come, first-serve.”

However, McCollum said “priority” is given to “a couple of guys that have been helping all along and are kinda always on call for us.”

McCollum said anyone interested must visit the airport office and sign a volunteer form.

“Then if we need help with something, you know, getting rid of snow, painting, maybe there’s just some general upkeep stuff,” he said. “Then if they help with that stuff, come hunting season, they can submit a hunting application which is separate from the volunteer form.”

The airport appears to be in need of more volunteers, too.

As The Advertiser reported in July, the Michigan Department of Transportation has downgraded the license of the Tuscola Area Airport, effectively cutting it off from state and federal funding and potentially costing taxpayers.

A representative from the Michigan Department of Transportation told The Advertiser the airport’s license has changed from “General Utility License” to “Basic Utility License,” following an April inspection.

The type of license generally refers to the aircraft landing zone, though the bigger impact to the public is that airports that carry a basic utility license are ineligible to receive state and federal funds.

The airport depends on such funds for much of its revenue and its five-year plan includes many much-needed upgrades.

Eric Engler — former airport manager who still rents hangar space there — said without government support, taxpayers would likely be asked to fund improvements at the airport or risk losing the local economic impact of the airport.

The Advertiser asked McCollum if he encourages others to take advantage of the opportunity to volunteer at the airport.

“I mean yeah, if they want to,” he said, adding that six is “probably the maximum we would want out there at any given time.”

“We don’t want 15 people out there hunting at the same time because that’s when we could start having issues with safety,” he said.

However, McCollum also said “there’s not a ton of work to be done at the airport.”

“So, you know, we couldn’t have 30 people volunteering because there just wouldn’t be enough stuff for everyone to do,” he said.

McCollum said the decision on granting permission for volunteers to hunt at the airport is “based on how many people already have been approved.”

“We normally give them designated spots,” McCollum said. “So that way everyone’s not stepping on top of one another.”

McCollum said it’s just one of the steps taken to avoid any hunting accidents.

“We’ve got four guys out there right now and they all know where each other hunt so they kinda make sure they face opposite direction of one another,” he said.  “We’ve never had any real problem.”

He also said that the aircraft flying in and out of the airport is too far to affect or be effected by hunters.

Further, hunters must sign a waiver in case something happens at the airport while hunting.

Not everyone is convinced the hunting program is an appropriate use of the limited funds the airport to which it has access.

Engler – who still uses the airport regularly – said he sees grass being cut with equipment and fuel paid for by taxpayers to clear a path for deer.

“The airport’s not mowed but it is out there so they can see the deer – it has nothing to do with the airport itself, it’s just property they have,” he said. “Basically, they’re just cutting it for their own purposes.

“Just basically what everyone uses it for is their own hunting area,” Engler said.

Engler said when he was running the airport, he kept all of the grass completely cut.

With longer grass, he said, deer are actually attracted to the area – something he said he feels is done purposely to improve hunting.

“Somebody’s gonna get hurt out here,” he said.

Sgt. Joe Molnar, acting lieutenant of the Bay City Operations Service Center of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, said “Airports are issued special permits to hunt or take deer that pose a safety risk to airplanes. Those would be year-round permits to take out deer that threaten aircraft.”

Molnar said he didn’t know if Tuscola Area Airport had such a permit and that it couldn’t be determined before press time, due to the DNR being in the midst of one of its busiest seasons. McCollum did not mention if Tuscola Area Airport has such a permit.

Molnar said permitted hunting like the kind at Tuscola Area Airport would be akin to crop damage permits issued to farmers whose crops are threatened by animals (though during an interview with The Advertiser, McCollum did not mention hunting is permitted to control population).

“What the DNR Wildlife Division would do is issue a permit stating they are allowed to take deer – sometimes they’ll establish time periods, they’ll establish what can be harvested, when it can be harvested to mitigate risks,” he said.

Molnar added that when such permits are issued, the governing entity must list all potential shooters.

“The airport supervisor would be the one to select who would them be listed under the permit,” he said.

Molnar urged anyone who suspects poaching or other illegal activity to call the state DNR’s poaching hotline at 800-292-7800.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.tuscolatoday.com

No deal for Adirondack Regional Airport: Harrietstown board questions potential buyer

Marshall Schecter, right, of Montreal, talks to the Harrietstown town board Thursday about his plan to buy the Adirondack Regional Airport as his real estate agent, Allen Olmstead, listens. 



SARANAC LAKE — A Canadian man’s offer to buy the Adirondack Regional Airport from the town of Harrietstown appears to have crashed shortly after takeoff.

Marshall Schecter has been talking to town officials for the last few weeks. He told the town board Thursday that he wants to turn the airport into a private aircraft maintenance hub that would employ 150 to 200 people, one of several such facilities he’s planning to build around the world.

Town officials were leery, however, as Schecter’s proposal would mean the end of commercial and private plane service at the Lake Clear facility.

They also questioned whether Schecter’s plan was legitimate, as he was unwilling to provide the town with more information, including financial statements and even the name of his company.

Allen Olmstead of Syracuse-based Canaan Realty speaks on behalf of Marshall Schecter at Thursday night's Harrietstown town board meeting. 


Complicated

At the start of Thursday’s meeting, Supervisor Mike Kilroy noted that Schecter had given the town a series of non-disclosure agreements and said he wanted to meet with the board in a closed-door executive session. Kilroy said the town couldn’t do that under the Freedom of Information Act and Open Meetings Law.

Allen Olmsted of Syracuse-based Canaan Realty initially spoke on behalf of Schecter. He said his client is interested in purchasing the airport and its adjacent business park, but he acknowledged that it would be a complicated deal that would take several years to complete.

“There’s a lot of moving parts that would have to come into play,” Olmstead said. “There’s leases there. There’s tenants that are there. There’s the (Federal Aviation Administration). There’s money that has been borrowed or granted from the FAA. All of that would have to be taken into consideration from the town’s standpoint.”

Another issue is that Paul Smith’s College, which gave the land to the town for the airport, would have to approve the deal, per a covenant in its decades-old agreement with the town.


Two private jets sit on the tarmac at the Adirondack Regional Airport in Lake Clear in September.


Vision

Asked by Councilman Howard Riley what his vision is for the airport, Schecter said the plan is to build roughly 500,000 square feet of aircraft maintenance, repair and overhaul facilities, plus hangar space and an FBO, or fixed base operator, which provides aviation services.

“It would act as a hub for us in North America,” Schecter said. “We would fly our planes and helicopters in and out and take care of them. We’d have the same alternate in Europe, probably in Germany, and eventually one in Asia as well.”

Riley asked if Schecter already owns a fleet of planes and helicopters. Schecter said he would be “procuring them” over the next few years, but he couldn’t provide details. He said he was under non-disclosure agreements with 35 people around the world.

The operation would be private, not open to the public, but would create 150 to 200 jobs with salaries of $75,000 to $100,000, Schecter said.

Riley asked how Schecter’s operation would make any money.

“We’re not bottom line driven,” Schecter said. “It’s involved in our business operations and we fund it. It’s not a situation where someone will come in and you’ll make money on fuel and labor. It’s a central hub, strictly for our aviation.”

Schecter said the Lake Clear airport is one of two sites being considered for his North American hub. The other is in Colorado, he claimed.

Skeptical

Riley noted the airport would lose its commercial service, currently provided by Cape Air. Private plane owners who fly into Lake Clear, including those who have seasonal camps in the area, would also no longer be able to use the airport.

“But you have to look at the impact of what 150 to 200 jobs is going to do for the airport,” Schecter said. He also noted that the airport typically operates at a loss for the town.

Councilman Ron Keough said he knows some taxpayers would be happy to see the airport be sold off.

“But I have some deep reservations about losing a service to the region,” Keough said. “I know the value and need for people who fly out of Adirondack Regional Airport. There are jobs and businesses in this area that utilize that service to get all around the world.”

“I’d love to see a nice big fat check,” Kilroy said, “but if it’s going to put our people at a disadvantage, I’m with Ron. It would be nice to have that off the tax rolls; however, now we’ve got people who’ve bought (homes) here, have their planes here or use it to get to Boston. I’m a little reluctant at this stage.”

Back and forth

Kilroy also said he hadn’t seen enough detail from Schecter to make him comfortable with a potential deal.

“I know your name. I know where you’re from, but I haven’t seen any financial statements,” Kilroy said.

“You never will,” Schecter said.

“Then I think this conversation is over,” Kilroy said.

Schecter thanked the board and headed toward the door, but not before pointing at Kilroy and saying, “And never hang up on me again.”

“Good night,” Kilroy said. “Good-bye.”

“You’re arrogant,” Schecter responded.

After Schecter left, town officials said they didn’t think the proposal should go any further.

“My opinion is that ought to be the last meeting we have,” said Riley. “That airport is too important to the region.”

Airport Manager Corey Hurwitch, who didn’t speak during the meeting, said later that he gave Schecter a tour of the airport, “but as things went on, it seemed less and less likely to be legitimate.

“He didn’t seem to be concerned with the stuff that’s normal obstacles for other people. Cost never seemed to be a concern, and that’s a concern for everybody.”

Dead deal?

After the meeting, Schecter declined to provide the Enterprise with any more information about his company, even its name.

“I have many names. I don’t even want to get into it,” he said. “I’ve been vetted all around the world. (Kilroy) wants financial statements. Let me tell you something: The new president of the United States (Donald Trump) doesn’t give his financials. I don’t have to give my financials out.”

However, Schecter said he would provide necessary financial information to the FAA.

“But not the people you’re buying the airport from?” he was asked.

“Well, what do they have to know as long as they get the check?” Schecter responded.

Asked if an agreement is still possible, Schecter said not as long as Kilroy is involved.

“I’m not interested in dealing with a person like this,” he said. “So as far as I’m concerned, the deal is dead.”

Original article can be found here:   http://www.adirondackdailyenterprise.com