Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Boone County Regional Airport selects airline

Matt Chaifetz (front, center), CEO of Contour Airlines, walks with Boone County Airport manager Judy McCutcheon (left) after arriving at the airport on October 19, 2016 to make his  proposal for his company becoming the Boone County Airport’s essential air service (EAS) provider. Visitors had an opportunity to look over one company’s twin engine aircraft after the presentation.


Contour Airlines has been chosen to provide scheduled air service at the Boone County Regional Airport in Harrison.

Judy McCutcheon, the airport manager, said its board voted 4-1 on Monday, picking Contour out of seven companies that submitted proposals.

The final decision will be up to the U.S. Department of Transportation, but they have always approved the provider that was recommended by the airport board, said McCutcheon, who has been the airport manager for 25 years.

The Harrison airport is one of three in Arkansas that lost its air service provider when Oregon-based SeaPort Airlines abruptly ceased operations on Sept. 20. The other two Arkansas airports that were served by SeaPort are in Hot Springs and El Dorado.

All three Arkansas airports qualify for the federal government's Essential Air Service program, which provides subsidies to ensure that small communities have scheduled air service. SeaPort received $5.9 million in annual subsidies to serve the three Arkansas airports.

On Sept. 21, the Department of Transportation issued an emergency request for proposals to provide air service for El Dorado, Harrison and Hot Springs. The department asked for proposals to provide three round-trip flights per weekday (18 flights per week) to a large or medium hub on aircraft that seat nine passengers.

Historically a charter service, Contour recently began providing Essential Air Service flights to airports in Tupelo, Miss., and Bowling Green, Ky., said McCutcheon. The company is based in Smyrna, Tenn.

One thing that made Contour stand out was its twin-engine Jetstream 31 turboprop aircraft, said McCutcheon. They're made for 19 seats, but Contour will remove 10 seats from each plane so the company can qualify for the federal subsidy. That will mean five feet of legroom for passengers and plenty of room for luggage, she said.

"You can carry all the luggage you want," said McCutcheon. "I'm thinking these business travelers are going to love being able to stretch out in that thing."

Contour's planes can fly at an altitude of 30,000 feet, said McCutcheon. The single-engine Cessna Caravan planes that SeaPort used on the Arkansas routes could only fly at 10,000 feet, she said.

Harrison is home to FedEx Freight, a subsidiary of FedEx Corp., which is based in Memphis. So it's important to have flights between those cities, said McCutcheon.

Contour will provide two round-trip weekday flights to Dallas and one round-trip weekday flight to Memphis. On Saturdays and Sundays, Contour will provide one round-trip flight from Harrison to Dallas. The company will also provide one round-trip flight to Memphis on weekends.

To serve the Harrison airport, Contour is asking for a $4.7 million annual subsidy through the Essential Air Service program. McCutcheon said Contour wants to be able to keep ticket prices low and offer flights from Harrison to Dallas for $49 each way.

Contour could have everything in place to begin serving Harrison in two to three months, said McCutcheon.

Glen Barentine, director of the airport at Hot Springs Memorial Field, said he will meet with the Hot Springs Board of Directors today and a decision will likely be made at that meeting.

Barentine said he has received six proposals, and all six companies had also offered to provide air service to Harrison and El Dorado.

Barentine said passengers in Hot Springs are more interested in going to Dallas than Memphis. While all three Arkansas Essential Air Service program airports historically have chosen the same air service provider, this year they could chose three different ones, said Barentine.

"Each airport has some different wants and desires," he said.

El Dorado is home to Murphy Oil Corp. and Lion Oil Co. Executives with those companies often travel to Houston, so that has been a destination for business flights from the South Arkansas Regional Airport in El Dorado.

But Dallas is a popular destination for consumers in south Arkansas, said Tim Johnson, manager of the El Dorado airport.

"We're getting feedback from a lot of folks in town that Dallas would be a more popular destination," he said.

Johnson said they'll probably make a decision at a meeting on Monday.

"Over half of my commissioners are out of town," he said.

SeaPort had two daily round-trip flights from Memphis to Houston on weekdays. Hot Springs and El Dorado were stops along each of those routes. So El Dorado had direct flights to Houston and Hot Springs, and a flight to Memphis that stopped in Hot Springs on the way.

Source:   http://www.nwaonline.com

Embraer to Pay $205 Million to Settle Bribery Allegations: Brazilian aircraft maker reaches agreement with U.S. and Brazilian authorities



The Wall Street Journal
By ROGERIO JELMAYER
Updated Oct. 24, 2016 2:23 p.m. ET


SÃO PAULO—Brazilian aircraft maker Embraer SA reached an agreement with U.S. and Brazilian authorities to settle an investigation into alleged bribes paid to foreign officials, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission said Monday.

Under the settlement, Embraer agreed to pay a total of $205 million in compensation to end the investigation into whether the company violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, or FCPA, regarding the sale of planes to various countries.

The SEC’s complaint alleges that Embraer made more than $83 million in profit as a result of bribe payments.

Embraer said in a separate statement that the sales of a total of 16 aircraft between 2007 and 2011 to Saudi Arabia, India, Mozambique and the Dominican Republic were investigated.

“The company acknowledges responsibility for the conduct of its employees and agents according to the facts ascertained in the investigation. Embraer deeply regrets this conduct,” the company said.

After being subpoenaed by U.S. authorities in 2010, the company carried out an internal investigation of the sales in question. In May 2015, Embraer started discussions with the U.S. Department of Justice for a possible resolution of the allegations.

Under the settlement, Embraer agreed to pay $107 million to the Justice Department as part of a deferred prosecution agreement, and another $98 million to the SEC.

In a separate statement, the U.S. Department of Justice provided some details about the investigation.

The Justice Department said the company paid $3.52 million to an “influential government official” in the Dominican Republic in 2008 to win a contract to sell eight military aircraft to the country’s air force .

The aircraft maker paid $1.65 million to win a Saudi Arabian contract for the purchase of three aircraft, paid $800,000 to win a contract to supply planes to a Mozambican airline, and paid $5.76 million to secure a contract to sell planes to the Indian Air Force, the Justice Department said.

The company in July reported a net loss of 337.3 million Brazilian reais ($102 million) in the second quarter, reversing a net profit of 399.6 million reais in the year-ago period.

During Monday’s trading session, Embraer shares were up 0.1% at 15.67 reais, while the main local stock market index, the Ibovespa, was unchanged from Friday.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.wsj.com

Raytheon (Beech) A36 Bonanza, Kenmore Crew Leasing Inc Trustee, N1099A: Incident occurred October 23, 2016 at Titusville Airport (6G1), Crawford County, Pennsylvania

KENMORE CREW LEASING INC TRUSTEE: http://registry.faa.gov/N1099A

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Allegheny PFSDO-03

AIRCRAFT LANDED SHORT OF THE RUNWAY AND THE GEAR COLLAPSED, TITUSVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 

Date: 23-OCT-16
Time: 21:10:00Z
Regis#: N1099A
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 36
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: TITUSVILLE
State: Pennsylvania


CHERRYTREE TOWNSHIP — A local pilot most likely had extremely little time to think as he was coming in for a landing Sunday evening at Titusville Airport and lost power, but he managed to bring the aircraft down without so much as a scratch on his five passengers.

On Monday, Jim Kuhn, Titusville Airport manager, told the newspaper that he did not know exactly how high up the plane was when it lost power, but he estimated it to be only several hundred feet. This left 68-year-old pilot William Fritz, of Franklin, barely any time to think, Kuhn explained.

If the plane had been at cruising altitude, the pilot would typically have time to declare an emergency and seek out the safest possible landing spot, or perhaps even get power going again.

But that wasn’t the case on Sunday, around 5 p.m., when the aircraft piloted by Fritz lost power for an unknown reason.

Fritz, who has a hangar at the local airport, was aware of his surroundings, said Kuhn, and managed to clear the airport fence along state Route 27 by about 10 feet. The plane came down “pretty hard” before reaching the runway, in mowed but muddy grass, Kuhn said.

Had the ground been hard, the plane would have most likely rolled onto the runway, he said.

Even though the plane sustained damage, Fritz kept everyone aboard safe. “Everybody walked away without a cut,” said Kuhn.

On Sunday evening, a woman who was on the plane, but declined to give her name, told a Herald reporter that Fritz was a “great pilot,” and credited him with keeping everyone safe.

The newspaper was unsuccessful in its attempts to reach Mr. Fritz on Monday.

On Monday morning, two Federal Aviation Administration investigators from Pittsburgh were at the airport, which is located at 2572 Meadville Road (Route 27), just outside Titusville, Kuhn said. No information about the crash was released by the agency on Monday.

The plane had departed from an airport in Michigan, according to Titusville Fire Department personnel on the scene Sunday, and its destination was Titusville Airport.

Source:  http://www.titusvilleherald.com

Arion Lightning, N235SC: Accident occurred October 21, 2016 in Mesa, Maricopa County, Arizona

http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N235SC

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07


NTSB Identification: WPR17LA015
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 21, 2016 in Mesa, AZ
Aircraft: RYAN W Gross Arion Lighting, registration: N235SC
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 21, 2016, about 1730 mountain standard time, a Ryan W. Gross Arion Lighting, N235SC, was substantially damaged following a reported loss of engine power during initial climb, loss of control, and subsequent impact with terrain at Falcon Field (FFZ), Mesa, Arizona. The pilot, who has recently purchased the airplane, was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the proposed cross-country flight, which was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations part 91, and a flight plan was not filed. The flight was originating at the time of the accident, with a planned destination of Henderson Executive Airport (HND), Henderson, Nevada.


In a telephone interview with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, the pilot reported that just after taking off and about 50 feet above ground level, "…the engine seemed to lose power, and the airplane rocked back and forth, like there was a problem with the controls." The pilot added that he remembered impacting the left side of the runway in a nose down attitude. The airplane, which was recovered for further examination, was substantially damaged due to impact forces.

Enstrom 280C, N9285: Incident occurred October 21, 2016 Long Beach, Los Angeles County, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N9285

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Long Beach FSDO-05

N9285 ENSTROM 280C ROTORCRAFT DURING AUTO ROTATION, STRUCK THE TAIL, LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA.  

Date: 21-OCT-16
Time: 21:55:00Z
Regis#: N9285
Aircraft Make: ENSTROM
Aircraft Model: 280
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: MANEUVERING (MNV)
City: LONG BEACH
State: California

Mooney M20J 201, N201EU: Accident occurred October 22, 2016 near Harris Ranch Airport (3O8), Fresno County, Coalinga, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N201EU

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Fresno FSDO-17


NTSB Identification: WPR17LA011
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 22, 2016 in Coalinga, CA
Aircraft: MOONEY M20J, registration: N201EU
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 22, 2016, about 1800 Pacific daylight time, a Mooney M20J, N201EU, was substantially damaged following a forced landing due to a loss of engine power near Coalinga, California. The private pilot/registered owner of the airplane, and his sole passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The personal flight, which was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, departed Hanford Municipal Airport (HJO), Hanford, California, about 1740, with Harris Ranch (3O8), Coalinga, the reported destination.

In a telephone interview with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, the pilot reported that about 10 miles out and while descending toward the destination airport, he experienced a loss of engine power; attempts to regain full power were not successful. Not being able to make it to the destination airport, the pilot elected to make a forced landing. The airplane landed and remained upright in an almond orchard, which resulted in substantial damage to both wings. The airplane will be recovered to a secured salvage facility for further examination.

Beech V35A Bonanza, Arcade Flying Club, N33AB: Incident occurred October 22, 2016 in Sacramento, California

ARCADE FLYING CLUB INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N33AB

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Sacramento FSDO-25

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, GEAR COLLAPSED, SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA.  
Date: 22-OCT-16
Time: 02:15:00Z
Regis#: N33AB
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 35
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SACRAMENTO
State: California

Yakovlev Yak-55M, N38YK: Accident occurred October 23, 2016 in Tracy, San Joaquin County, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N38YK

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Oakland, California


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA034
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 23, 2016 in Tracy, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/13/2017
Aircraft: YAKOVLEV YAK, registration: N38YK
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the high-performance airplane reported that, on his third simulated forced landing, while turning left base to final in a slip, he realized that the airplane was too low and not aligned with the runway. He applied full throttle to go around. The airplane responded suddenly by changing attitude but continued to descend and impacted terrain and the airport perimeter fence. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage. 

The pilot further reported that the slow airspeed coupled with the unexpected high torque from advancing the throttle during an uncoordinated left turn were factors in the accident. 

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s unstabilized approach and delayed application of full throttle for a go-around, which resulted in an uncontrolled descent.

The pilot of the high performance airplane reported that on his third simulated forced landing, while turning left base to final in a slip, he realized that the airplane was too low, and not aligned with the runway. He applied full throttle to go-around. The airplane responded suddenly by changing attitude, but continued to descend and impacted terrain and the airport perimeter fence. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage.

The pilot further reported that the slow airspeed coupled with the unexpected high torque from advancing the throttle during an uncoordinated left turn were factors in the accident. 

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Quad City Challenger II, N3830B: Incident occurred October 22, 2016 in Erie, Colorado

http://registry.faa.gov/N3830B

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Denver FSDO-03

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING WENT OFF THE RUNWAY INTO A DITCH, ERIE, COLORADO.  

Date: 22-OCT-16
Time: 16:24:00Z
Regis#: N3830B
Aircraft Model: CHALLENGER
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ERIE
State: Colorado

Lancair IV-P, N11AW: Incident occurred October 23, 2016 in Eagle, Colorado

http://registry.faa.gov/N11AW

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Denver FSDO-03

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, GEAR COLLAPSED, EAGLE, COLORADO.  

Date: 23-OCT-16
Time: 19:28:00Z
Regis#: N11AW
Aircraft Make: LANCAIR
Aircraft Model: IV
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: EAGLE
State: Colorado

Aeronca, 11AC, N9410E: Accident occurred October 22, 2016 in Winter Haven, Polk County, Florida

Aviation Accident Final Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items   -   National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary  -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N9410E

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Orlando FSDO-15


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA043
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 22, 2016 in Winter Haven, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: AERONCA 11AC, registration: N9410E
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of a tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that during the landing roll in crosswind conditions, the airplane encountered a wind gust, the tail swung to the right, and the airplane veered off the runway to the left. During the runway excursion, the right main landing gear impacted an airport sign and collapsed.

The right wing lift strut sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observing system at the airport near the time of the accident reported the wind direction at 330 degrees true at 7 knots. The pilot reported that he landed on runway 5.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll in gusty crosswind conditions, which resulted in a runway excursion.

Piper PA-28R-201 Cherokee Arrow III, FlightSafety International Inc., N44838: Incident occurred October 22, 2016 in Vero Beach, Indian River County, Florida

FLIGHTSAFETY INTERNATIONAL INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N44838

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Orlando FSDO-15

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, WENT OFF THE RUNWAY INTO THE GRASS, VERO BEACH, FLORIDA

Date: 22-OCT-16
Time: 14:08:00Z
Regis#: N44838
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: VERO BEACH
State: Florida.

Southwest Airlines, Boeing 737-7H4, N930WN: Incident occurred October 21, 2016 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

http://registry.faa.gov/N930WN

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19

N930WN SOUTHWEST AIRLINES FLIGHT SWA364 BOEING 737 AIRCRAFT ON TAKEOFF, STRUCK A BIRD, TAXIED BACK TO THE GATE, NO INJURIES, INSPECTION REVEALED DAMAGE TO ENGINE, FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA.  

Date: 21-OCT-16
Time: 14:37:00Z
Regis#: N930WN
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 737
Event Type: Incident
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Aircraft Operator: SWA-Southwest Airlines
Flight Number: SWA364
City: FORT LAUDERDALE
State: Florida

Six Chuter Legend XL, N149SC: Accident occurred September 24, 2016 in Arcadia, DeSoto County, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -   National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N149SC

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA526
14 CFR Part 103: Ultralight
Accident occurred Saturday, September 24, 2016 in ARCADIA, FL
Aircraft: SIX CHUTER INC LEGEND XL, registration: N149SC
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the powered parachute reported that the flight got started later in the day than he had planned and that the temperature and relative humidity had risen. He further reported that during the initial climb the powered parachute was unable to gain sufficient lift to maintain a climb rate required to clear nearby power lines. Subsequently, the powered parachute stuck the power lines.

The powered parachute sustained substantial damage to its tubular frame.

The pilot reported that the air temperature at the time of the accident was 94 degrees Fahrenheit, with a density altitude of 1,800 feet.

The pilot reported that there were no pre impact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

Cessna 172M Skyhawk, N21699: Incident occurred October 21, 2016 in Boise, Ada County, Idaho

http://registry.faa.gov/N21699

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Boise FSDO-11

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING BOUNCED AND STRUCK SIGNS, BOISE, IDAHO

Date: 21-OCT-16
Time: 23:10:00Z
Regis#: N21699
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: BOISE
State: Idaho

Cirrus SR22, Cirrus Design Corp, N528HB: Accident occurred October 23, 2016 at Kirksville Regional Airport (KIRK), Adair County, Missouri

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Kansas City, Missouri

Aviation Accident Factual Report / National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 


http://registry.faa.gov/N528HB

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA046
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 23, 2016 in Kirksville, MO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/10/2017
Aircraft: CIRRUS SR22, registration: N528HB
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The recently certificated pilot reported that, during the initial climb, he heard a whistling noise and noticed that the passenger door was not secured. Subsequently, he returned to the departure airport to secure the door. 

He added that, during the landing flare, he believed that the wind decreased significantly, which resulted in him having “too much right rudder engaged.” The airplane touched down 30° relative to the runway centerline, veered off the runway to the right, and the nose gear collapsed. 
The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall. 

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot’s improper compensation for changing wind during the landing flare, which resulted in an off-centered landing and a subsequent loss of directional control. 

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA046
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 23, 2016 in Kirksville, MO
Aircraft: CIRRUS SR22, registration: N528HB
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The recently certificated pilot reported that during the initial climb he heard a whistling noise and noticed that the passenger door was not secured. Subsequently, he returned to the departure airport to secure the door.

He added that during the landing flare, he believed that the wind decreased significantly, which resulted in him having "too much right rudder engaged". The airplane touched down 30° relative to center line, veered off the runway to the right, and the nose gear collapsed. 

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall. 

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.
=============

A pilot and a passenger walked away injury free after their plane lost control while landing at the Kirksville Regional Airport on Sunday.

Local emergency services responded to the incident around 3 p.m. on Sunday at the airport. 

According to Kirksville Regional Airport Director Glenn Balliew, the plane lost control while trying to land and slid into the grass area about 200 feet from the runway.

The pilot and passenger, Harry Bates, 61, and Leah Davis-Bates, 52, both of San Antonio, Texas, were not injured during the accident.

Balliew said the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating the incident.

Source:   http://www.kirksvilledailyexpress.com

Agusta AW139, Peak Enterprises LLC, N41CP: Incident occurred October 20, 2016 in Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey

PEAK ENTERPRISES LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N41CP

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Philadelphia FSDO-17

N41CP AGUSTA AW139 ROTORCRAFT WINDOW SEPARATED FROM THE AIRCRAFT, LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, TRENTON, NEW JERSEY.  

Date: 20-OCT-16
Time: 17:45:00Z
Regis#: N41CP
Aircraft Make: AGUSTA
Aircraft Model: AW139
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: TRENTON
State: New Jersey

Beech D18S, N644B: Accident occurred October 23, 2016 in Deming, Luna County, New Mexico

Aviation Accident Final Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N644B

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Albuquerque FSDO-01


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA044
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 23, 2016 in Deming, NM
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: BEECH D18S, registration: N644B
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the multi-engine tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that during the landing roll, after the tailwheel had touched down, the airplane veered sharply to the left. The pilot further reported that the airplane was close to the left runway edge, so he allowed the airplane to continue off the runway, in effort not to overcorrect to the right. During the runway excursion, the right main landing gear collapsed in soft terrain.

The right wing sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll, which resulted in a runway excursion.

North American T-28B, D J T Inc., N5440W: Incident occurred October 22, 2016 in Indiahoma, Comanche County, Oklahoma

D J T INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N5440W

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oklahoma City FSDO-15

AIRCRAFT MADE A FORCED LANDING IN A FIELD, NEAR INDIANOMA, OKLAHOMA.  

Date: 22-OCT-16
Time: 17:20:00Z
Regis#: N5440W
Aircraft Make: NORTH AMERICAN
Aircraft Model: T28
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: None
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: INDIANOMA
State: Oklahoma

Vans RV-7A, N735RV: Incident occurred October 21, 2016 in Kingsbury, Guadalupe County, Texas

http://registry.faa.gov/N735RV

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Antonio FSDO-17

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING WENT OFF THE RUNWAY INTO A HOLE, KINGSBURY, TEXAS 

Date: 21-OCT-16
Time: 16:50:00Z
Regis#: N735RV
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV7
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: None
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: KINGSBURY
State: Texas

Cessna R182, N9178C: Incident occurred October 22, 2016 in Lone Rock, Richland County, Wisconsin

http://registry.faa.gov/N9178C

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Milwaukee FSDO-13

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, LONE ROCK, WISCONSIN.  

Date: 22-OCT-16
Time: 18:00:00Z
Regis#: N9178C
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: LONE ROCK
State: Wisconsin

Cessna 182Q Skylane, Garland Air LLC, N97878: Accident occurred October 23, 2016 in Buffalo, Johnson County, Wyoming

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Casper, Wyoming
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors, Inc.; Mobile, Alabama 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Docket And Docket Items -   National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


GARLAND AIR LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N97878

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA025 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 23, 2016 in Buffalo, WY
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 182Q, registration: N97878
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot reported that, before taking off from the 1,200-ft-long grass/gravel private airstrip, he performed an engine run-up and set the flaps to 20 degrees. He applied full engine throttle and accelerated to 45 knots airspeed for rotation/takeoff. After applying back pressure to the yoke for takeoff, the airplane would not lift off the runway. The airplane "passed the point of no return," and the pilot continued the takeoff. The airplane impacted a metal post near the end of the runway, traveled down an embankment, impacted terrain, cartwheeled, and came to rest inverted. The pilot reported that all engine instruments were in the "green" during the takeoff roll. An engine test run revealed no anomalies that would have precluded the engine's ability to produce rated horsepower. Examination of the airframe revealed the flaps were in the fully retracted or 0° position. According to the supplemental type certificate pilot's checklist, the flaps should be set at 20° for a short field takeoff. The improper flap setting reduced the airplane’s lift and resulted in a longer takeoff roll.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to set the proper flap position before the short field takeoff, which resulted in a runway excursion and impact with terrain.

On October 23, 2016, at 1010 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 182Q single-engine airplane, N97878, impacted terrain following a loss of control during takeoff from a private airstrip near Buffalo, Wyoming. The private pilot, who was the sole occupant, sustained serious injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage. The airplane was registered to Garland Air LLC, Buffalo, Wyoming, and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan was not filed. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

Prior to takeoff from the 1,200-foot grass/gravel private airstrip, the pilot reported that he performed an engine run-up and set the flaps to 20 degrees. He applied full engine throttle and advanced to 45 knots airspeed for rotation/takeoff. After applying back pressure to the yoke for takeoff, the airplane would not lift off the runway. The airplane "passed the point of no return" and the pilot kept waiting for the airplane to lift off the runway. Near the end of the left side of the runway, the airplane impacted a metal post, went down an embankment, impacted terrain, cartwheeled, and came to rest inverted. Witnesses to the accident assisted the pilot in exiting the airplane.

According to local authorities, the pilot stated that all engine instruments were in the "green" during the takeoff roll.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed the fuselage, both wings, and empennage were buckled and bent. The propeller assembly separated from the engine crankshaft and came to rest in the debris field. The engine remained partially attached to the airframe and was crushed aft into the fuselage. The airplane was recovered for further examination.

On November 8, 2016, at the facilities of Beegles Aircraft Services, Greeley, Colorado, the airplane was examined under the supervision of the NTSB investigator-in-charge (IIC). Examination of the airframe revealed the flaps were in the fully retracted or 0-degree position, as confirmed by the flap actuator position. Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit flight controls to the flight control surfaces. Damage, consistent with the impact sequence, was noted on the following engine components: right rear wye pipe separated and missing, front induction balance tube, no. 2 cylinder rocker box cover, propeller governor, right front and rear engine mounts, muffler, lower alternator mount, and exhaust risers/collectors. The engine was manually rotated and thumb compression was confirmed on all six cylinders. Spark was produced at all upper sparkplug ignition leads. The propeller spinner displayed rotational type marks. One propeller blade exhibited rearward twisting and bent about 18 inches outboard of blade root, one blade exhibited rearward twisting and bent about 12 inches outboard of blade root, and one blade was twisted about 180 degrees and was loose in the propeller hub. The blade displayed leading edge and cambered surface gouging. The engine was removed and shipped to the manufacturer for a functional test.

A review of the maintenance records showed the most recent annual inspection was completed on February 15, 2016. On July 9, 2016, a high-left canard was installed in accordance with supplemental type certificate (STC) SA485SW. The STC SA485SW pilot checklist indicated the flaps should be set to 20 degrees extended for short field takeoffs. In addition, a Continental Motors, Inc. (CMI) IO-550D-13B engine, and a McCauley propeller were installed in accordance with STC SA3825SW. At the time of the accident, the engine had accumulated 44.7 hours since factory remanufacture. 

The airplane was equipped with a JPI engine data monitoring (EDM-700) unit. The unit was downloaded at a local Greeley, Colorado, avionics facility. The EDM-700 unit data contained several "flights" of data. The accident flight data was captured on the unit. The accident flight data parameters were consistent with other previous flight data parameters. 


On January 10 and 11, 2017, at the facilities of CMI, Mobile, Alabama, the engine was examined and a functional test of the engine was performed under the supervision of the NTSB IIC. After replacing some components that were damaged in the accident, the engine was placed in a test cell for a functional test. The engine was test run for 30 minutes at various power settings with no anomalies noted that would have precluded the engine's ability to produce rated horsepower. 

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA025
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 23, 2016 in Buffalo, WY
Aircraft: CESSNA 182Q, registration: N97878
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 23, 2016, at 1010 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 182Q single-engine airplane, N97878, impacted terrain following a loss of control during takeoff from a private airstrip near Buffalo, Wyoming. The private pilot, who was the sole occupant, sustained serious injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage. The airplane was registered to Garland Air LLC, Buffalo, Wyoming, and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan was not filed. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

According to local authorities who spoke with the pilot, the pilot reported that during takeoff from the private grass/turf airstrip, which was about 1,200 feet in length, the airplane veered to the left at the departure end of the runway. The pilot attempted to correct to the right, but the airplane impacted a metal post, went down an embankment, and impacted terrain. The airplane came to rest inverted and the pilot exited the airplane. The pilot stated that all engine instruments were in the "green" during the takeoff roll.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed the fuselage, both wings, and empennage were buckled and bent. The engine crankshaft fractured near the propeller hub, and the propeller assembly came to rest in the debris field. The engine remained partially attached to the airframe and was crushed aft into the fuselage.

Swearingen SA227-AT Expediter, CAE Aviation, N577MX: Fatal accident occurred October 24, 2016 at Malta-Luqa Airport

WORLDWIDE AIRCRAFT SERVICES INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N577MX

N577MX FAIRCHILD SA227AT CRASHED SHORTLY AFTER TAKEOFF AND BURNED, THE 5 PERSONS ON BOARD WERE FATALLY INJURED, MALTA LUQA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, MALTA

Date: 24-OCT-16
Time: 00:00:00Z
Regis#: N577MX
Aircraft Make: SWEARINGEN
Aircraft Model: SA227
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: Fatal
Damage: Destroyed
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: MALTA
Country: Malta