Sunday, April 8, 2018

Cirrus SR-22, C-GMDQ, owned and operated by the private pilot: Accident occurred April 08, 2018 in Lowville, Lewis County, New York

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Latham, New York
Cirrus Design Corporation; Duluth, Minnesota
Continental Motors Inc; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://wwwapps.tc.gc.ca

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Lowville, NY
Accident Number: ERA18LA124
Date & Time: 04/08/2018, 1653 EDT
Registration: C-GMDQ
Aircraft: CIRRUS SR22
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On April 8, 2018, about 1653 eastern daylight time, a Cirrus SR22, Canadian registration C-GMDQ, owned and operated by the private pilot, was substantially damaged during a hard landing, following a Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS) deployment near Lowville, New York. The Canadian-certificated private pilot and two passengers were not injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Bedford County Airport (HMZ), Bedford, Pennsylvania. The intended destination for the flight was Montreal Mirabel International Airport (CYMX), Mirabel, Quebec, Canada.

The private pilot reported that the airplane was in cruise flight at 9,000 ft mean sea level, which was 1,000 feet above clouds. At that time, the autopilot was engaged and in navigation mode to proceed direct to the next waypoint, which was Massena International Airport (MSS), Massena, New York. Air traffic control (ATC) requested that the pilot turn right 20° or more, which the pilot complied with by switching the autopilot to heading mode and selecting the desired heading. Subsequently, ATC advised the pilot that he could proceed back on course. The pilot selected the autopilot back to navigation mode, but did not select direct MSS on the GPS. He realized immediately that he was returning to his previous navigation course and then selected direct MSS in the GPS and again selected navigation mode on the autopilot. By the time he returned his vision and attention to the primary flight display, the airplane was descending out of control through clouds. Additionally, the depicted horizon on the primary flight display (PFD) did not appear correct and the pilot activated the CAPS.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the airplane descended via parachute and landed upright in a field. Subsequently, after all occupants egressed, wind gusts blew the parachute, which inverted the airplane. Further examination of the damage by a National Transportation Safety Board structural engineer revealed that during upright landing on firm ground, the nose landing gear collapsed and both main landing gear spread outward, which resulted in substantial damage to the primary structure of the airplane.

The PFD and multifunction display were retained for data download. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CIRRUS
Registration: C-GMDQ
Model/Series: SR22
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGTB, 690 ft msl
Observation Time: 2049 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -3°C / -6°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 200 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots, 310°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 1000 ft agl
Visibility:  1.37 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.92 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Bedford, PA (HMZ)
Destination: Mirabel, QC (CYMX) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None
Latitude, Longitude: 43.821389, -75.571389 (est)

Cirrus SR-22, C-GMDQ, just after landing, still in an upright position.







Lowville, NY- A Canadian family escaped unscathed after their single-engine plane made an emergency landing late Sunday afternoon, near the intersection of Willow Grove and Number Three Roads in the Town of Lowville.


Lewis County Undersheriff Jason McIntosh said that Patrice Makinen, 47, of Quebec, was flying a 2003 Cirrus SR-22 aircraft, with a female passenger identified as Julie Charlebois, also of Quebec, and their five-month-old child, on their way to Massena for refueling. The couple had previously departed from Georgia, with the last refueling stop in Pennsylvania, and were en route back to Quebec.


Mr. Makinen had to divert his route to avoid restricted airspace around the Rome area, taking off the autopilot setting. At an altitude of around 9,000 feet, he encountered heavy clouds associated with a lake effect snow band over Lewis County. Mr. Makinen apparently became disoriented coming in and out of the clouds and noticed a change in pitch in the engine sound.


At that point he decided to make an emergency landing and deployed the aircraft's Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS). With no control over the location of the landing, the plane luckily ended up making an upright landing into a field off the Willow Grove Road.


The Sheriff's office received calls to the dispatch center alerting them to a plane with a parachute deployed making a landing in the field. Officials from Fort Drum's Wheeler Sack Airfield also contacted the Sheriff's Office to notify them that they had received a Mayday call, providing officers with the coordinates.


"It's a miracle they ended up landing where they did," Undersheriff McIntosh said.


All three occupants were transported to Lewis County General Hospital for a precautionary evaluation, with no injuries reported.


First responders were concerned that the plane would flip over given the windy conditions and the parachute still being attached to the plane. A tracked UTV was requested to the scene so responders could cut the parachute.


Unfortunately, prior to the UTV's arrival, a gust of wind caught the parachute, flipping the plane end-over-end onto its top. No one was in the plane at that time, and no injuries were reported. The plane is now thought to be totaled after the damage caused from flipping over.


Fuel is slowly leaking from the plane, with approximately 50 gallons still in each wing. The NYS DEC was notified and are on scene.


Mr. Makinen is the owner of the plane, which was insured. Undersheriff McIntosh said investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration will be on scene on Tuesday. After they clear the scene, the aircraft will be transported to a hangar in Watertown for the insurance company to evaluate.


The family spent last evening in Lowville, and obtained a rental car this morning to return home to Quebec.


Undersheriff McIntosh said four officers from the Sheriff's Office responded to the scene, along with Copenhagen Fire, Lewis County Search & Rescue and Director of Lewis County Emergency Management Robert MacKenzie.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://linkinglewiscounty.com



The various photos below show the plane after it flipped over and the parachute was removed:













We have the names of the people aboard the small plane which needed a parachute to avoid a crash landing in Lewis County.

They're identified as 47 year old Patrice Makinen, who was the pilot, and Julie Charlebois, both of Quebec, Canada.

Sheriff Mike Carpinelli said the couple was flying home to Canada from Georgia with their five month old baby.

The sheriff said the plane experienced engine problems prior to coming down Sunday afternoon at the corner of Willow Grove and Number Three roads just outside Lowville

Carpinelli said Makinen pulled an emergency parachute and called in a distress signal.

"We're gonna go back to the parachute. It was a great option that they obviously purchased when they bought plane, so thank God it was there," said Carpinelli.

The wind caught the parachute and flipped the plane over after the passengers left the scene.

He landed on John O'Brien's owns the land and went down to see what happened.

"The plane was sitting upright. For the most part, there really wasn't any damage to speak of to it," he said.

Makinen, Charlebois and the baby were taken to Lewis County General Hospital, where they were treated and released. Makinen returned to his airplane Monday morning to gather his belongings.

The Federal Aviation Administration is expected to investigate the incident on Tuesday.

The plane with a parachute is called a Cirrus SR-22 and there's one just like it at the Watertown International Airport. Mike Williams, a flight instructor, showed us how the parachute feature works.

"If the airplane is in peril for any reason whatsoever, one can reach up and grab the handle and just pull it and a big parachute will come out. The straps will rip out the side of this airplane and a parachute will manifest itself and the airplane will settle itself down to the ground," he said.

Williams believes the Cirrus is the safest small engine airplane out there. He says the parachute feature has saved hundreds of lives in engine failures.

"I think it's probably one of the best ones that is built today because of the safety features," he said.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wwnytv.com



LOWVILLE — A small plane carrying a husband, wife and child crashed near the corner of Willow Grove and Number Three roads Sunday afternoon.

“They realized something was wrong with their flight when they came out of a patch of clouds,” said John O’Brien, owner of the land where the plane came down. “My understanding is that the husband pulled for the parachute and cut the engine.”

“My neighbor actually saw it and called us,” he added. “We drove out to it in our tractor.”

The plane was empty when the O’Briens reached it. He learned later that after the plane parachuted to the ground, the three individuals walked to the nearest road.

A passerby driving down Willow Grove Road stopped to help them, he said. Emergency services arrived and though no one was injured, the family was taken to Lewis County General Hospital for evaluation.

Due to strong winds, the parachute, still attached to the plane, turned the wreckage over, Mr. O’Brien said. Lewis County Sheriff Michael P. Carpinelli said that clearing of the site will begin as soon as the Federal Aviation Administration and insurance companies finish with the case.

Sheriff Carpinelli said more information will be forthcoming. 

Original article ➤ http://www.watertowndailytimes.com

Probes Point to Northrop Grumman Errors in January Spy-Satellite Failure: Experts blame contractor’s mistakes for loss of top-secret U.S. spacecraft



The Wall Street Journal
By Andy Pasztor
April 8, 2018 4:48 p.m. ET


Government and industry experts have tentatively concluded that engineering and testing errors by Northrop Grumman Corp. caused a U.S. spy satellite to plummet into the ocean shortly after a January launch, according to people familiar with the details.

Initial indications were that the satellite, believed to cost as much as $3.5 billion to develop and known by the code name Zuma, didn’t separate in time from the spent second stage of a Space Exploration Technologies Corp. rocket. But now, these people said, two separate teams of federal and industry investigators have pinpointed reasons for the high-profile loss to problems with a Northrop-modified part -- called a payload adapter -- that failed to operate properly in space.

The device, purchased from a subcontractor, was significantly modified and then successfully tested three different times on the ground by Northrop Grumman, according to one person familiar with the process. But upon reaching orbit, this person said, the adapter didn’t uncouple the satellite from the rocket in zero gravity conditions.

Sensors on board failed to immediately report what happened, this person said, so officials tracking the launch weren’t aware of the major malfunction until the satellite was dragged back into the atmosphere by the returning second stage. The satellite ultimately broke free, but by then had dropped to an altitude that was too low for a rescue.

Northrop Grumman built the satellite, which was so highly classified that its purpose still hasn’t been disclosed. Likewise, no particular agency has been publicly identified as the customer. Industry officials and military-space analysts have said it likely was an advanced type of space radar or missile-warning satellite.

Specifics of the Zuma adapter still aren’t known, and Northrop Grumman spokesmen didn’t respond to requests for comment over the weekend. The Pentagon has repeatedly declined to comment on Zuma’s fate, and on Friday the Pentagon’s missile defense agency didn’t respond to an email seeking comment.

Investigators have focused on the satellite’s unique design, which was particularly vulnerable to shock and vibration, according to people familiar with its characteristics. That prompted Northrop Grumman to specially modify the adapter to cushion separation of the satellite in orbit, according to one of these people. Adapters typically use explosive bolts or other powerful systems to break satellites free of their attachments to rockets.

Shortly after the failed mission, leaders of several congressional committees and their top staffers were briefed about the bungled launch. They were told the satellite was a total loss and no salvage attempts were anticipated, according to industry officials informed about the sessions. The satellite is believed to have splashed down in the Indian Ocean.

SpaceX, as the rocket provider is commonly called, moved quickly to defend its Falcon 9 booster, saying it performed exactly as expected. Other industry officials backed up the company. SpaceX’s initial public statements reassuring customers about the rocket’s performance were made without the explicit approval of U.S. intelligence officials, according to people familiar with the sequence of events.

But since then, defense officials have publicly and privately signaled the rocket wasn’t at fault. Pentagon brass are continuing to pursue plans aimed at making SpaceX eligible to compete for the largest, most expensive spy satellites in coming years.

It isn’t clear when, or even if, a summary of the Zuma findings will be released. But the investigations are wrapping up while Northrop Grumman’s management is reeling from a series of embarrassing design and production snafus affecting the premiere space telescope the company is building for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Two weeks ago, NASA disclosed that production and testing slip-ups forced another delay in development of the James Webb Space Telescope. In blunt language, the agency blamed some of the factory setbacks, including damage to satellite thrusters and a sun shield, on “avoidable errors” by prime contractor Northrop Grumman.

NASA officials also laid out an unusually stringent oversight plan, mandating personnel changes and twice monthly updates by senior Northrop Grumman management to agency headquarters. Northrop Grumman has revamped production procedures for James Webb and other projects, from stepped-up quality control checks to enhanced training in an effort to lock in tighter testing requirements and prevent employee burnout.

Original article can be found here ➤   https://www.wsj.com

Hand Saw Found In Carry-On Bag At Atlantic City International Airport. (KACY)

TSA:  If you see something, say something. But don’t saw something. If you saw something you see at the airport, there’s a good chance you won’t make your flight. We know it’s a cutting edge tool, but it’ll have to go in your checked bag if you need to fly with it. It was discovered in a carry-on bag at the Atlantic City International Airport (KACY).




PHILADELPHIA (CBS) – One traveler apparently tried to take a hand saw on the plane at Atlantic City International Airport.

The Transportation Security Administration shared a photo of the item in question on their Instagram page.

“If you see something, say something. But don’t saw something,” the TSA joked.

Officials say the saw was recently discovered in a carry-on bag at ACY.

The TSA reminds travelers to always report suspicious activity and that some items must be in your “checked baggage” before flying.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com

Aerospatiale AS 350B2, N561AM, operated by Air Methods Corporation: Accident occurred April 15, 2016 in Jasper, Pickens County, Georgia

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia
Air Methods Corporation; Englewood, Colorado

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N561AM




Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Jasper, GA
Accident Number: ERA16LA159
Date & Time: 04/15/2016, 1955 EDT
Registration: N561AM
Aircraft: EUROCOPTER FRANCE AS350
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Settling with power/vortex ring state
Injuries: 4 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled - Air Medical (Medical Emergency) 

On April 15, 2016, about 1955 eastern daylight time, a Eurocopter France AS350B2, N561AM, operated by Air Methods Corporation, was substantially damaged during collision with terrain near Jasper, Georgia. The commercial pilot and three medical flight crewmembers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The helicopter was operating on a company visual flight rules flight plan from Lanier Park Hospital Heliport (38GA), Gainesville, Georgia, to a helipad at Piedmont Mountainside Hospital, Jasper, Georgia. The helicopter emergency medical service flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135.

According to a witness, the helicopter performed a circuit over the hospital prior to approaching the helipad to land. The helicopter began to descend, then about 110 ft above ground level (agl), the helicopter "bobbled up and down" and then it started to "fall quickly toward the ground."

According to the operator and the pilot, the helicopter completed an orbit over the hospital helipad about 800 ft agl prior to beginning a descent for landing. The pilot initiated a downwind approach to the helipad over high tension power lines, about 250 ft agl, and then turned onto the final leg of the approach, which was on a 300° heading. He said the tail rotor became "difficult to control," and the helicopter pitched forward uncommanded, and then began a "rapid descent with forward airspeed."

Believing he "might be in a vortex ring state condition," the pilot reduced the power and initiated a go-around but lacked sufficient altitude to complete the maneuver. The pilot maintained forward airspeed and raised the nose but landed hard, bounced three times, and came to rest upright. The pilot and three medical crew members then exited the helicopter without injury or assistance.

The weather reported at Pickens County Airport (JZP), Jasper, Georgia, about a half-mile northwest of the accident location included wind from 120°at 11 knots, gusting to 16 knots, with 10 miles visibility. The temperature was 18° C, the dew point was -8° C, and the altimeter setting was 30.24 inches of mercury.

Examination of the helicopter revealed substantial damage due to a partial separation of the taiboom. The operator reported, and examination confirmed, that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures prior to the accident.

According to representatives from Airbus Helicopters, the maximum allowable engine torque setting was for the helicopter was 100 percent continuous. The Vehicle Engine Multifunction Display (VEMD) was reviewed under federal supervision and the data indicated overtorque events at 107 percent for 2 seconds and 113 percent for 1 second.

According to the FAA Rotorcraft Flying Handbook, "vortex ring state" (or "settling with power") describes an aerodynamic condition where a helicopter may be in a vertical (with regard to the air mass) descent with up to maximum engine power applied, and little or no cyclic authority. The term "settling with power" comes from the fact that a helicopter keeps settling, even though full engine power is applied. However, when the helicopter begins to descend vertically, it settles into its own downwash, which greatly enlarges the main rotor blade tip vortices. In this vortex ring state, most of the power developed by the engine is wasted in accelerating the air in a doughnut pattern around the rotor.

A vortex ring state may be entered during any maneuver that places the main rotor in a condition of high upflow and low forward airspeed, including near-vertical descents of at least 300 ft per minute, and a horizontal velocity slower than that for effective translational lift. A fully developed vortex ring state can be "characterized by an unstable condition in which the helicopter experiences uncommanded pitch and roll oscillations."

The handbook also noted that "when recovering from a settling with power condition, the tendency on the part of the pilot is to first try to stop the descent by increasing collective pitch. However, this only results in increasing the stalled area of the rotor, thus increasing the rate of descent. Recovery is accomplished by increasing forward speed, and/or partially lowering collective pitch." With sufficient altitude, temporary entrance into an autorotation will also enable safe exit from the vortex ring state.




Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 52, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used:  4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam:  06/16/2015
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/07/2015
Flight Time:  4214 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1620 hours (Total, this make and model), 4214 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 30 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: EUROCOPTER FRANCE
Registration: N561AM
Model/Series: AS350 B2
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2007
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 4381
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  04/07/2016, Continuous Airworthiness
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 4630 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 57 Hours
Engines: 1 Turbo Shaft
Airframe Total Time: 3386 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Turbomeca
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: Arriel 1D1
Registered Owner:  TD AVIATION FINANCE LLC
Rated Power:  681 hp
Operator:  Air Methods Corporation
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135)
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code:  QMLA

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Dusk
Observation Facility, Elevation: JZP, 1535 ft msl
Observation Time: 1955 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / -8°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots/ 16 knots, 120°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.24 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: GAINESVILLE, GA (38GA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Destination: Jasper, GA (NONE)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1938 EDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Hospital Helipad (NONE)
Runway Surface Type:
Airport Elevation: 1535 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 4 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 None
Latitude, Longitude:  34.445556, -84.445833 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA159
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Friday, April 15, 2016 in Jasper, GA
Aircraft: EUROCOPTER FRANCE AS350, registration: N561AM
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 15, 2016, about 1955 eastern daylight time, a Eurocopter France AS350B2, N561AM, operated by Air Methods Corporation, was substantially damaged after it impacted terrain near Jasper, Georgia. The commercial pilot and three medical flight crewmembers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The helicopter was operating on a company visual flight rules flight plan from Lanier Park Hospital Heliport (38GA), Gainesville, Georgia, to a helipad at Piedmont Mountainside Hospital, Jasper, Georgia. The helicopter emergency medical service flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135.

According to the pilot, he made a downwind approach to the helipad over high tension power lines and then turned onto the final leg of the approach. Then, he noted that the tail rotor became "difficult to control" and the helicopter began a "rapid descent with forward airspeed." The pilot reduced the power and unsuccessfully attempted to perform a go-around maneuver. He configured the helicopter for landing by maintaining forward airspeed, raised the nose of the helicopter, however it impacted the ground and "bounced" three times prior to coming to rest. The pilot and three medical crew members then exited the helicopter without anomaly.

A post-accident examination of the helicopter revealed that the tailboom had partially separated from the airframe, which resulted in substantial damage. In addition, there were no anomalies noted with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation prior to the accident.

Representatives from Airbus Helicopters examined the data from the Vehicle Engine Multifunction Display (VEMD) under federal oversight on April 18, 2016. The data indicated an overtorque event at 107 percent for 2 seconds and 113 percent for 1 second.

Rutan Long-EZ, N754T: Accident occurred November 11, 2017 at Weedon Field (KEUF), Eufaula, Barbour County, Alabama


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Vestavia Hills, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N754T



Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: EUFAULA, AL 
Accident Number: ANC18LA008
Date & Time: 11/11/2017, 0935 CST
Registration: N754T
Aircraft:  CLOUD JEFFREY FERRELL LONG EZ
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Part(s) separation from AC
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On November 11, 2017, about 0935 central standard time (CST), a Cloud Jeffery Ferrell Long EZ airplane, N754T, landed short of the runway during a forced landing at Wheedon Field (KEUF), Eufaula, Alabama. The private pilot and passenger were not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The flight was being operated as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 visual flight rules personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed Marianna Municipal Airport (KMAI), Marianna, Florida, about 1000 eastern standard time, and was destined for Falcon Field (KFFC), Atlanta, Georgia. However, due to deteriorating weather conditions en route, the destination was changed to KEUF. No flight plan had been filed.

According to a statement from the pilot, while flying about 7,500 ft msl, about 9 miles northeast of KEUF, "suddenly and without warning the aircraft violently began shuddering." The pilot immediately shut down the engine and turned the airplane towards KEUF. During the turn, he noticed the right rudder control surface was damaged. Due to winds and orientation to the runway when the engine was shut down, the airplane was unable to reach the runway and landed about 200 ft prior to the runway edge in a rough, grassy area. Upon exiting the airplane, the pilot discovered a portion of the trailing edge of the propeller had separated and penetrated the lower half of the right rudder control surface, which resulted in substantial damage. The separated portion of the propeller was not located.

The wood propeller, manufactured by Ed Sterba Propellers, was removed from the aircraft and sent to the US Department of Agriculture's Forest Products Laboratory in Madison, Wisconsin, for examination under the NTSB supervision. The examination determined that the propeller was manufactured from laminations of defect-free hard maple lumber that was absent of any decay. An inspection of the separation surface, using a low magnification hand lens, indicated that the individual layers of the propeller were laminated together using an adhesive that resulted in a light-colored bond line. The failure surface included an exposed portion of the bond line between two wood laminae that had failed. Examination of this bond line showed minimal wood failure about eight inches in length and between 1/8" and 1/4" wide. It was noted that the amount of cured adhesive observed varied considerably along the length of the failure surface's bond line, with an area of the bond line having minimal adhesive coverage.

According to the propeller manufacturer, the propeller was carved by hand using hard maple lumber. The adhesive used was Weldwood® Plastic Resin Glue. Weldwood is a ureaformaldehyde product that is advertised as "ideal for interior wood application." In a letter to the NTSB from DAP Products Inc., the adhesive manufacturer, it was stated "DAP has not qualified this product for use on any aircraft component such as hand-carven wooden propeller, nor has it been tested for applications where extreme temperature fluctuations, pressure and vibration would be expected."

The closest official weather observation station is Columbus Airport (KCSG), Columbus, Georgia, which is located about 35 miles northeast of the accident site. At 0851, a METAR was reporting, in part, wind 090° at 11 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; clouds and ceiling clear; temperature 50° F; dew point 39° F; altimeter 30.35 inches of Mercury.



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 47, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed Unknown
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/06/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/06/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 248 hours (Total, all aircraft), 177 hours (Total, this make and model), 210 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 21 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 8 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CLOUD JEFFREY FERRELL
Registration: N754T
Model/Series: LONG EZ
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2015
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental Light Sport
Serial Number: 1763-L
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/05/2017, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1425 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 177.4 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-235-L2C
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 118 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCSG, 392 ft msl
Observation Time: 0851 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 35 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 16°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 10°C / 4°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots, 90°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.35 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: MARIANNA, FL (MAI)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: ATLANTA, GA (FFC)
Type of Clearance: VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 1000 EST
Type of Airspace: Class E



Airport Information

Airport: WEEDON FIELD (EUF)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 285 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry; Rough
Runway Used: 18
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5000 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing:  Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  31.958611, -85.128333 (est)

Cessna U206G, N16GP: Accident occurred September 04, 2017 at Trident Basin Seaplane Base (T44), Kodiak, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Juneau, Alaska

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N16GP

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Kodiak, AK
Accident Number: ANC17LA053
Date & Time: 09/04/2017, 1430 AKD
Registration: N16GP
Aircraft: CESSNA U206G
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 4 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

Analysis 

The airline transport pilot reported that, while attempting to takeoff in an amphibious, float-equipped airplane in choppy ocean waters, the airplane began to lose speed while simultaneously pitching forward. He subsequently aborted the takeoff, and the airplane struck a large swell, the right forward float strut fractured, the airplane rolled to the right, and the right wing's lift strut was substantially damaged. The pilot's initial examination of the airplane revealed that the left nosewheel was partially deployed even though the landing gear handle was in the "up" position.

Multiple witnesses observed the airplane depart to the east toward an area of unprotected water. One witness reported about 8-ft ocean swells in the unprotected area of the takeoff run, and another witness reported a strong wind from the east. Photos of the accident airplane taken during the rescue indicate rough water near the accident site with large ocean swells. Further, the forecast that day called for 9-ft seas and 25 knot winds. Guidance for takeoffs in float-equipped airplanes states that severe damage can occur when taking off in sea conditions with large swells. Although the pilot was aware of the ocean conditions he still attempted to takeoff in a protected area; however, the airplane did not lift off before reaching the ocean and encountered the large swells.

A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the left and right mechanical portion of the landing gear retraction system was improperly rigged, and the amphibious float cable loops were set to an inappropriately low tension load. No evidence of a hydraulic leak was present inside the amphibious floats or the fuselage.

Due to the improperly rigged landing gear, it is likely that the landing gear up-locks disengaged during the impact with the ocean swells. However, neither the pilot nor any of the witnesses reported the airplane yawing about its vertical axis during the takeoff run; thus, it is unlikely that the left nosewheel deployed during the accident airplane's water run. Furthermore, it is likely that the hydraulic lines were breached when the rear float struts were impact damaged, which then released hydraulic pressure and allowed the previously unlocked nosewheel to partially deploy after the accident. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be: 
The pilot's improper decision to takeoff in an area of rough water and ocean swells, which resulted in a failure of the right wing lift strut. 

Findings

Personnel issues
Decision making/judgment - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Choppy surface - Decision related to condition (Cause)

On September 4, 2017 about 1430 Alaska daylight time, an amphibious float-equipped Cessna U206 airplane, N16GP, sustained substantial damage while attempting to depart the water at Trident Basin Seaplane Base (T44), Kodiak, Alaska. The airplane was registered to and being operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 visual flight rules flight. The airline transport pilot and three passengers were not injured. Marginal visual meteorological conditions existed and no flight plan had been filed.

According to the pilot during the takeoff run, the airplane encountered small swells and began to lose speed, while simultaneously pitching forward. In an effort to correct for the forward pitching moment, the pilot applied full aft elevator. Shortly thereafter, he aborted the takeoff, but the airplane continued to pitch forward when it was struck by a larger swell. The right forward float strut fractured and the airplane rolled to the right, which resulted in substantial damage to the right wing's lift strut. An initial examination of the airplane by the pilot revealed that the left nose wheel was partially deployed with the landing gear handle in the up position.

A pilot rated witness reported that the accident pilot was talking to several pilots, prior to boarding the airplane, the morning of the accident and specifically asked him "what do you think?" and "which way to go?". He went on to state that one of the options, rather than the typical north departure, was to use "The Cut", which is an easterly departure through a break between the islands. He said this worked as long as the aircraft was airborne before exiting the protected area, as ocean swells were encountered on the other side of the islands.

Another pilot rated witness reported that he leaned out his office door and watched as the accident pilot started his water run. He said his initial thought was that the airplane "must be really heavy" because it took a very long time for the airplane to accelerate onto the step. As the airplane disappeared through "The Cut", he saw the wings start rocking up and down, as the airplane, still on step, encountered the ocean swells on the other side.

A third pilot rated witness reported that he observed the accident airplane begin its water run. He stated that the airplane was in the plow for an estimated 1,100 ft, prior to accelerating onto the step. The airplane then went through the "The Cut" where it encountered about 8-foot-tall ocean swells, and disappeared. He continued to hear the airplane's engine operating at full power for about 15 seconds before it abruptly stopped. He then jumped in his skiff and motored through "The Cut" to the accident site to assist with the rescue of the airplane and its occupants.

A fourth pilot rated witness who aided in the recovery of the airplane the day of the accident reported wind from the east at 15 to 20 knots, 1 to 1 ½ ft seas, with 6 to 8-inch swells. He also stated that there was no evidence of a hydraulic oil leak on the water as the airplane was towed back to the docks at T44.

Neither the pilot, nor any of the multiple witnesses reported the airplane yawing about its vertical axis during the takeoff run.

Photos of the accident airplane taken during the rescue indicate rough water near the accident site with large ocean swells.

The coastal waters forecast for Chiniak Bay on September 4, called for seas of 9 ft, with wind out of the southeast at 25 knots and rain, and a Small Craft Advisory had been issued.

The closest weather reporting facility was Kodiak Airport (PADQ), Kodiak, Alaska, about 4.5 miles southwest of the accident site. At 1428, a METAR from PADQ was reporting, in part: wind 100° at 15 knots; visibility, 4 statute miles, mist; clouds and ceiling, scattered clouds at 1,000 ft, overcast clouds at 3,100 ft; temperature, 54° F; dew point 54° F; altimeter, 29.59 inches of Mercury.

The airplane was equipped with EDO 696-3500 amphibious floats. The hydraulic lines that service the landing gear are routed through the hollow float struts to their attach points on the deck of the floats.

The mechanic who removed the airplane from the water the day after the accident reported that all three of the right float struts were separated completely from their attach points and the hydraulic lines servicing the landing wheels were severed.

A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the left and right mechanical portion of the landing gear retraction system was not rigged correctly, and the amphibious float cable loops were set to about a 17-pound tension load. No evidence of a hydraulic leak was present inside the amphibious floats or the fuselage.

The EDO Model 696-3500 Service and Maintenance Manual states in part: "Rig the cable loop to a 75 – 125-pound tension load."

The book, How To Fly Floats, published by EDO Corporation, Rough Water Take-offs states in-part: "When possible, take-offs in rough water should be avoided. Before attempting a rough water take-off, do some reconnaissance of the area first. You may happen to find more favorable surface conditions nearby. Pay special attention to any severe swell conditions that may exist and keep an eye out for swells produced by moving boat traffic. There is a very good possibility that severe damage can be done to either the floats, the attachment gear or the aircraft in big swell conditions." 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 41, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied:  Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present:
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification:  Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/18/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/31/2017
Flight Time:  16000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 200 hours (Total, this make and model), 16000 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 180 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 90 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N16GP
Model/Series: U206G
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1978
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: U20604467
Landing Gear Type: Amphibian;
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/01/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines:
Airframe Total Time: 1576.1 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer:
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series:
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power:
Operator:  On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PADQ
Observation Time: 2228 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 230°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 1000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 12°C / 12°C
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 3100 ft agl
Visibility:  4 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 15 knots, 100°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting:  29.59 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: Moderate - Mist
Departure Point: Kodiak, AK (T44)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Kodiak, AK
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1430 AKD
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: TRIDENT BASIN (T44)
Runway Surface Type: Water
Airport Elevation: 0 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Water--choppy
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 3 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 None
Latitude, Longitude:  57.780833, -152.391389

NTSB Identification: ANC17LA053
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, September 04, 2017 in Kodiak, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA U206G, registration: N16GP
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 4, 2017 about 1430 Alaska daylight time, an amphibious float-equipped Cessna U206 airplane, N16GP, sustained substantial damage while attempting to depart the water at Trident Basin Seaplane Base, Kodiak, Alaska. The airplane was registered to and being operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 visual flight rules flight. The certificated airline transport pilot and three passengers were not injured. Marginal visual meteorological conditions existed and no flight plan had been filed. 

In a written statement to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), the pilot stated that during the takeoff run the airplane encountered small swells, and began to lose speed while simultaneously pitching forward. In an effort to correct for the forward pitching moment, the pilot applied full aft elevator. Shortly thereafter, he aborted the takeoff, but the airplane continued to pitch forward when it was struck by a larger swell. The right forward float strut fractured and the airplane rolled to the right, which resulted in substantial damage to the right wing's lift strut. An initial examination of the airplane by the pilot revealed that the left nose wheel was partially deployed with the landing gear handle in the up position. 

The airplane was equipped with EDO 3500 amphibious floats. 

A detailed wreckage examination is pending.