Friday, September 21, 2018

Cessna 150H, N7152S: Fatal accident occurred September 20, 2018 near Festus Memorial Airport (KFES), Jefferson County, Missouri

https://registry.faa.gov/N7152S

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

   

FESTUS, Mo. (KMOV.com) -- An airline pilot and his son were killed Thursday night when their small plane crashed near the Festus Memorial Airport after a mechanical failure.

Authorities haven’t released the names of the father, who was in his mid-50s, and his son, who was in his early 20s.

Festus Memorial Airport Vice President Mike Bippen told News 4 the pilot was very experienced.

"With him being an American Airlines pilot, I mean he's probably got more hours than all of us put together," said Bippen.

According to the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department, the father and son were returning with a Cessna 150 they had purchased in New York which the son planned to use as he pursued a pilot’s license. At some point in the flight, the plane lost all electrical power.

"If he had lost his whole electrical system he wouldn't be able to see inside the cockpit at night. He wouldn't be able to see what his airspeed is, his elevation, you know the heading,” said Bippen.

Like most small airports, Festus Memorial Airport isn’t staffed 24 hours a day and the lights are turned off at night. Pilots can remotely turn them on by clicking the microphone of their radio six times. But the pilot of the Cessna couldn’t do that because of the mechanical problems.

"He texted his fiancé to respond out here to assist in either getting the lights on for the runway or to use a flashlight to indicate the end of the runway,” said Corporal John Kozel with the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department.

Kozel said the fiancé went to the airport but couldn’t get the lights on, so she stood at the end of the runway with a flashlight. He said the plane attempted to land but was offline, then crashed as it tried to circle back around for a second attempt.

The plane went down around 10:30 p.m. in a heavily wooded area. During the night, a search was suspended because of the weather but the plane was discovered Friday morning around 7:40 a.m. by a helicopter from Mercy Hospital, which was aiding in the search.

"It's just sad, tragic deal for a nice person and his son to pass this way," said Bippen.

Investigators with the Federal Aviation Administration arrived Friday morning and an investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board was expected to arrive Friday night or Saturday morning.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.kmov.com







JEFFERSON COUNTY • A father and his adult son were killed in a plane crash near Festus after electrical problems made it hard for him to see the runway, authorities said Friday morning.

Before trying to land, the pilot even texted his fiancée and asked her to stand with flashlights on the runway so he could see where he was going, police say.

The single-engine Cessna 150 crashed about 200 to 300 yards from the runway, said Mike Bippen, vice president of CAEE, which runs the airport.

There were no survivors, he said.

The names of the dead haven’t been released. The father was in his 50s and an American Airlines pilot from the Jefferson County area. His son was in his 20s, Bippen said.

The father and son were bringing a plane back from New York. They planned to refurbish it in Festus, where they had a hangar.

Jefferson County Sheriff Dave Marshak said the pilot had reported electrical issues Thursday night. Authorities had been searching for the plane for several hours when they found the wreckage before 8 a.m. Friday.

Marshak said the pilot’s fiancée called police at 2 a.m. Friday. The pilot had contacted her from the plane when he was having electrical problems. Marshak said lights at the airport are not on throughout the evening, but pilots can activate something on their radios to turn the lights on once they get close. Without power, the pilot could not activate the lights.

He asked the woman to stand at the end of the runway with a flashlight so he could try to see where to go, the sheriff said. The man and woman were texting back and forth, Marshak said.

Police tried to get a helicopter in the air for a search but rain hampered that effort. They began a ground search Friday morning. On the south end of the airport, they found the plane in woods near Joachim Creek.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash.

Bippen, the airport executive, said the father was an experienced pilot for American Airlines. “So he had plenty of hours of flying,” Bippen said.

Bippen said most small airports like the one in Festus have a system where the pilots activate the runway lights by clicking their mic six times. “His plane was having electrical issues, which would mean he probably had no lights on his plane and couldn’t see his instruments,” Bippen said. “We don’t know if he tried to land.”

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.stltoday.com

Delta Seeks Partner for Its Jet-Fuel Refinery: No. 2 airline’s goal of mitigating energy costs by making its own jet fuel has had mixed results



The Wall Street Journal
By Alison Sider
Sept. 21, 2018 9:00 a.m. ET

Delta Air Lines Inc. is looking for a partner to share the burden of its six-year experiment in running a refinery to supply its planes with jet fuel.

The carrier paid $150 million for the refinery near Philadelphia in 2012, betting that making its jet fuel could help offset rising prices. In total, the refinery has added $281 million to Delta’s operating income through the first half of this year.

It is on track to make money in 2018, but high regulatory costs and shifting market dynamics that put East Coast refineries at a disadvantage have made the plant more of a hassle than Delta anticipated, analysts say, even if fuel prices are on the rise.

Delta, currently the No. 2 U.S. carrier by traffic, was the first U.S. airline to make its own fuel. The refinery, which is run by a subsidiary, generated $5 billion of Delta’s $41 billion in revenue last year. Margins have been slim.

Delta still wants the refinery’s jet-fuel output but doesn’t need the diesel or gasoline it produces. Chief Financial Officer Paul Jacobson said in a statement earlier this month that Delta wants to see if there are other arrangements that would “maximize the value of other aspects of the refinery for a potential joint venture partner.”

Some analysts saw that as a concession that operating the refinery had become a distraction.

Helane Becker, an analyst at Cowen & Co., said the refinery was a worthy experiment, but “I don’t think it was as big a benefit as they thought it was going to be,”

Delta declined to say whether it has talked with potential buyers, but it has hired investment banks Barclays PLC and Jefferies Group to help with the process.

Though it isn’t clear whether Delta will find a partner, some energy trading firms could be interested, said Garfield Miller, president of Aegis Energy Advisors Corp., an adviser on refinery deals that isn’t working with Delta on the potential partnership. But he estimated the plant is worth well below $100 million and said it could be hard for a partner to make money.

Refineries on the East Coast lack a pipeline link to the crude being produced in the U.S. shale fields around North Dakota and Texas. Trains once carried deeply discounted oil eastward, but that has slowed as new pipelines have been built to the Gulf. That leaves Eastern refineries reliant on pricier crude from regions like West Africa. Philadelphia Energy Solutions, a big refinery operator not far from Delta’s facility, went through bankruptcy earlier this year.

Delta executives have said over the years they were happy with the purchase. The difference between the price of fuel and price of crude oil, known as the “crack spread,” was Delta’s fastest-growing expense in 2012. Every penny per gallon that the price of jet fuel rises boosts Delta’s costs $40 million a year.

Because of the refinery, Delta says it pays several cents less per gallon for fuel than its competitors, totaling about $300 million a year in savings. As a result, the carrier has no plans to close the plant—even though its profits have lagged behind expectations—if a partner doesn’t emerge.

Delta also has said the refinery’s output has helped lower fuel prices generally by putting more fuel on the market on the East Coast, where several refineries have closed. But other airlines also reap those benefits, while Delta alone pays the mounting costs of running the facility.

“It actually is beneficial for Southwest Airlines , selfishly, for Delta to be bringing that supply to the East Coast,” Southwest Airlines Chief Executive Gary Kelly told analysts after Delta bought the plant in 2012. “If that’s what they want to do, we’ll cheer them on.”

But what began as a modest investment has become costly. Delta has invested about $837 million so far. It plans to close the plant for most of the fourth quarter to make an additional $120 million in upgrades.

Credits that refiners must buy to comply with a more-than-decade-old law requiring plant-based ethanol be blended into fuel have also cut into the refinery’s bottom line. In 2016 and 2017, Delta’s refining unit spent a total $330 million on those credits.

“Delta probably didn’t realize all the capital and market volatility burdens that come with owning a refinery,” said John Auers, executive vice president of Turner, Mason & Co., a refinery consultancy.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wsj.com

de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver, N121AK: Accident occurred September 20, 2018 in Igiugig, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Crashed into trees.

Rainbow River Lodge LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N121AK

Date: 21-SEP-18
Time: 02:15:00Z
Regis#: N121AK
Aircraft Make: DEHAVILLAND
Aircraft Model: DHC 2
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: IGIUGIG
State: ALASKA

Piper PA-28-180, N703TK: Incident occurred September 20, 2018 in Agua Caliente Springs, San Diego County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California

Made emergency landing on a dirt road.

Lorimar Group Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N703TK

Date: 20-SEP-18
Time: 22:12:00Z
Regis#: N703TK
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 28 180
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS
State: CALIFORNIA

Mooney M20J, N66201: Incident occurred September 20, 2018 at Kalaeloa Airport (PHJR), Hawaii

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii

Landed gear up.

Perly Aviation Inc Trustee

https://registry.faa.gov/N66201

Date: 20-SEP-18
Time: 02:20:00Z
Regis#: N66201
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20J
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: KAPOLEI
State: HAWAII

Boeing PT-17 Kaydet, N34KS: Accident occurred September 15, 2018 at Morris Municipal Airport (C09), Grundy County, Illinois

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; DuPage, Illinois

While on landing roll, aircraft suffered damaged to upper and lower wing tip due to drifting into Bellanca 7ECA, N8503.

https://registry.faa.gov/N34KS

Date: 15-SEP-18
Time: 15:15:00Z
Regis#: N34KS
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: PT 17
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MORRIS
State: ILLINOIS

Hiller UH-12E, N1349A: Accident occurred September 20, 2018 in Frankfort, Marshall County, Kansas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wichita, Kansas

Rotor blade impacted equipment.

Sky Copters Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N1349A

Date: 20-SEP-18
Time: 14:45:00Z
Regis#: N1349A
Aircraft Make: HILLER
Aircraft Model: UH 12E
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: CORPORATE
Flight Phase: MANEUVERING (MNV)
Operation: 91
City: FRANKFORT
State: KANSAS

Piper PA-22-135 Tri-Pacer, N3544A: Accident occurred September 18, 2018 at Hillsdale Municipal Airport (KJYM), Michigan

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; East Michigan

Flipped over on landing.

https://registry.faa.gov/N3544A

Date: 18-SEP-18
Time: 22:15:00Z
Regis#: N3544A
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 22 135
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: HILLSDALE
State: MICHIGAN

Schleicher ASK 13, N545TT: Incident occurred September 13, 2018 at Richmond Field Airport (69G), Gregory, Livingston County, Michigan

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; North Michigan

Hard landing.

Sandhill Soaring Club

https://registry.faa.gov/N545TT

Date: 13-SEP-18
Time: 21:40:00Z
Regis#: N545TT
Aircraft Make: SCHLEICHER
Aircraft Model: AS K13
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: GREGORY
State: MICHIGAN

Beech V35B Bonanza, N1120M: Incident occurred September 20, 2018 at Minden-Tahoe Airport (KMEV), Douglas County, Nevada

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada

Gear up landing.

https://registry.faa.gov/N1120M

Date: 20-SEP-18
Time: 21:00:00Z
Regis#: N1120M
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: V35B
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MINDEN
State: NEVADA

Piper PA-24-260, N9292P: Incident occurred September 20, 2018 at Pearland Regional Airport (KLVJ), Brazoria County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

Gear up landing.

https://registry.faa.gov/N9292P

Date: 21-SEP-18
Time: 04:28:00Z
Regis#: N9292P
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 24 260
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: HOUSTON
State: TEXAS

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N56LU: Incident occurred September 20, 2018 in Longview, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; North Texas

Made off airport landing.

LeTourneau University

https://registry.faa.gov/N56LU

Date: 20-SEP-18
Time: 21:42:00Z
Regis#: N56LU
Aircraft Make: TEXTRON
Aircraft Model: 172S
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LONGVIEW
State: TEXAS

Cessna TU206G Turbo Stationair, N756NN: Incident occurred September 20, 2018 in Brenham, Washington County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

Landed in a field.

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

https://registry.faa.gov/N756NN

Date: 20-SEP-18
Time: 20:57:00Z
Regis#: N756NN
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: TU206G
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PUBLIC USE
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Aircraft Operator: US DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
City: BRENHAM
State: TEXAS

SkyWest Airlines, Canadair CRJ-900, N679CA: Incident occurred September 20, 2018 at Salt Lake City International Airport (KSLC), Utah

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah

Flight DL-4813: Lost wheel on takeoff, landed without incident.

Delta Air Lines Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N679CA

Date: 21-SEP-18
Time: 02:50:00Z
Regis#: N679CA
Aircraft Make: BOMBARDIER
Aircraft Model: CL 600 2D24
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: SKYWEST
Flight Number: UNK
City: SALT LAKE CITY
State: UTAH

Beechcraft 300 Super King Air, registered to and operated by KAAZ LLC, N385KA: Fatal accident occurred January 23, 2017 at Tucson International Airport (KTUS), Pima County, Arizona

Daniel Rodriguez (passenger)



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona
Textron; Wichita, Kansas
Desert Jet; Palm Springs, California
Hartzell Propeller Inc

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N385KA

 
Location: Tucson, AZ
Accident Number: WPR17FA057
Date & Time: 01/23/2017, 1233 MST
Registration: N385KA
Aircraft: BEECH 300
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On January 23, 2017, about 1233 mountain standard time, a Beech 300 airplane, N385KA, was destroyed when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from runway 11L at Tucson International Airport (TUS), Tucson, Arizona. The airline transport pilot and the passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by KAAZ, LLC under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed for the cross-country personal flight to Hermosillo (MMHO), Sonora, Mexico.

A witness, who was located about 0.7 mile southwest of the midfield of runway 11L observed the airplane take off and rapidly pitch up during the initial climb. He stated that after reaching an altitude of between 100 to 150 ft above the runway, the airplane suddenly yawed to the left while maintaining a nose-up pitch attitude. The airplane then appeared to slow down that the witness believed it was about to stall. The left wing dropped, the airplane rolled left to the inverted position as the nose dropped, and the airplane struck the ground inverted.

Another witness, who was located near the approach end of runway 11L, described the airplane yawing from left to right while climbing. The airplane then rolled left and eventually became inverted, in a manner he described as similar to a barrel roll. The airplane then exited his field of view.

A surveillance camera, located on the roof of the terminal building 0.2 mile northwest of the impact point, captured the airplane entering its field of view in a level attitude. About 1 second later, the nose dropped, and the airplane rolled to the left and descended. The wings became nearly vertical, and the airplane impacted terrain. The video footage was of a poor quality and airplane's airspeed or altitude could not be determined.

Another surveillance camera, located on a building about 0.7 mile southwest of runway 11L with a northeast-facing field of view that encompassed the control tower and the terminal building, captured the airplane passing in front of the tower in a slight nose-up attitude while gradually climbing before it went out of view. No smoke or vapors were observed coming from the airplane before impact. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 56, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/05/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 15100 hours (Total, all aircraft), 13000 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft) 

The pilot, age 56, held an airline transport pilot certificate with an airplane multi-engine land rating and type ratings in DA-200, SA-227, BE300, CL604-605, and CASA 212 airplanes. He held commercial privileges in airplane single-engine land and sea airplanes. The pilot was issued a first-class Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) medical certificate on April 5, 2016, with no limitations.

The pilot did not report his flight experience on his most recent FAA medical certificate application. On the application from July 7, 2014, he reported a total of 12,000 hours flight experience with 400 hours in the last 6 months. On the July 22, 2013, application, he did not report his flight time, and on the October 12, 2012, application, he reported 12,000 hours total with 400 hours in the last 6 months. On the March 15, 2012, application, he reported 9,000 hours total with 500 hours in the last 6 months. The pilot's personal flight logbooks were not available for examination during the investigation.

In a resume submitted to his last employer, dated October 2016, the pilot reported a total flight experience of 15,100 hours, including 13,000 hours as pilot-in-command. He reported 9,500 hours in multi-engine airplanes, over 9,000 hours in turboprop airplanes, 3,500 hours in jet airplanes, and 3,900 hours in amphibious/float airplanes. Between 1979 and 1988, he served on active duty in the United States Air Force. Throughout his aviation career, he flew as a line and corporate pilot for various companies. He also flew in Afghanistan and Iraq as a contracted pilot through the Air Force and as a captain for various companies in Africa and Saudi Arabia. 



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BEECH
Registration: N385KA
Model/Series: 300 300
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1985
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: FA42
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  01/19/2017,
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 14000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 9962.7 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: P&W CANADA
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-60A
Registered Owner: KAAZ LLC
Rated Power: 1127 hp
Operator: KAAZ LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

The eight-seat, twin-engine, low-wing, retractable-landing-gear airplane, serial number FA-42, was manufactured in 1985. It was powered by two Pratt & Whitney PT-6A-60, 1,050-horsepower turboprop engines. Each engine drove a Hartzell HC-B4MP-3B four-bladed constant-speed propeller with feathering and reversing capabilities. Review of maintenance records showed that the most recent airframe, engine, and propeller inspections were completed on January 19, 2017, at a total airframe time of 9,962.7 hours.

On January 22, 2017, the airplane was flown from Long Beach, California, to Tucson, Arizona as a pre-buy and post-maintenance test flight in order for KAAZ, LLC to purchase the airplane. During that flight, the airplane was still under the ownership of the seller. The flight was conducted by the seller's contracted pilot, with the accident pilot and a pilot- rated passenger on board. The seller's contracted pilot reported that during the flight, the accident pilot did not fly the airplane. After completion of the flight, sale's transactions were finished, and the airplane's ownership was transferred to KAAZ, LLC. In a post-flight conversation with the KAAZ, LLC's representative, the accident pilot reported no issues with the airplane, and the representative had the impression that the accident pilot had flown the airplane. The representative further stated that she had been told that the pilot-rated passenger would be the pilot -in -command and that the accident pilot would be allowed to fly the airplane during the flight; the representative was not aware that the accident pilot did not fly the airplane during this flight and was unaware of the seller's contracted pilot's presence in the airplane.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTUS, 2555 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1153 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 322°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 5500 ft agl
Visibility (RVR): 
Wind Speed/Gusts:  15 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 180°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 29.93 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 4°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Tucson, AZ (TUS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Hermosillo, FN (MMHO)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1232 MST
Type of Airspace: 

The TUS special weather observation at 1240 reported wind from 240° at 12 knots gusting to 22 knots, visibility 10 miles, ceiling overcast at 6,000 ft above ground level, temperature 19°C, dew point 6°C, and altimeter 29.89 inches of mercury.

The 2-minute average wind in the 5-minute period surrounding the time of the accident was from 230° magnetic at 13 to 15 knots with gusts to 22 knots. Runway 11L had a magnetic heading of 123°, which resulted in a 12- to 14-knot crosswind and a 4-knot tailwind based on the sustained wind and a 21-knot crosswind and a 6-knot tailwind based on the peak wind gust. For further weather information, see the meteorological factual report in the public docket for this investigation. 

Airport Information

Airport: TUCSON INTL (TUS)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 2643 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 11L
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 10996 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

TUS is a tower-controlled airport located at an elevation of 2,643 ft mean sea level (msl). The airport is equipped with three asphalt runways: 11L/29R, which is 10,996 ft long, 11R/29L, which is 8,408 ft long, and 3/21, which is 7,000 ft long. 


Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries:  1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 32.116111, -110.941111 (est) 

The accident site was located on the ramp adjacent to the south terminal. The initial impact point was about 4,000 ft from the departure end of runway 11L. A debris path led north from the impact point about 650 ft across the ramp to the main wreckage, which was resting against an 8-ft-tall concrete wall. A postimpact fire damaged the wreckage. All major structural components of the airplane were located within the wreckage debris path.

The first identified point of contact (FIPC) was a slash mark from the left propeller on the ground located about 250 ft from the terminal building. Four propeller strike marks created by the left propeller and three propeller strike marks created by the right propeller were observed with 25 to 27 inches distance between each mark. According to the representative from Hartzell Propeller Inc., those distances suggested rotation at or near the rated speed of 1,700 rpm at the estimated impact velocity.

The debris path from the FIPC to the main wreckage was marked by charred, black burned stains and smudges. A portion of the right wing spar was separated and found 52 ft from the FIPC. The right wing tip separated from the wing and came to rest 223 ft from the FIPC. The left propeller assembly was found 470 ft east of the FIPC. Three out of four propeller blades were still attached to the hub. The fourth blade was found near the main wreckage.

The main wreckage consisted of the cabin, fuselage, portions of both wings, a compression section of the right engine, a compression section and accessory gearbox of the left engine, the right propeller, and the empennage. These components were damaged by the impact and burned by the postimpact fire.

The right propeller assembly was located under the wreckage. Three blades were attached to the hub; the fourth blade was located 460 ft north of the main wreckage. The cockpit area was displaced rearwards into the cabin. The instrument panel was mostly consumed by fire.

The left wing was separated from the fuselage; both aileron cables were separated at the root. The aileron bellcrank was attached to the spar, and the cable was attached from the bellcrank to the root. The inboard portion of the right wing was held on to the fuselage by flight control cables only.

The left and right flaps were in their retracted positions on the flap tracks. The left flap actuators were separated from their drive cables. The left inboard flap actuator measured at 4 inches, which corresponded to a 10° extended position. The left outboard flap actuator was partially melted, and its position could not be determined. The right inboard and outboard flap actuators measured at 2.2 inches, which corresponded to a retracted position.

The empennage separated from the fuselage on the left side and was bent to the right. The right side of the empennage was still attached to the fuselage by its skin. The emergency locator transmitter was located in the empennage area, and it was intact.

The elevator cable was connected to bellcrank, and both pushrods were connected to the elevator. The right and left elevator trim actuators measured at 1.5 inches and 1.4 inches, respectively, which corresponded to a 10° tab-down position. Both cables were connected to the rudder trim servo actuator. The rudder boost switch was found in the "RUDDER BOOST" position.

The main and nose landing gear were found in the up (retracted) position. Flight control cable continuity was established from each cockpit control to the associated flight control.

The left engine power section and the propeller were impact-separated from the engine. The power turbine shaft was fractured, and the exhaust duct was severely compressed. Circumferential rubbing and machining were displayed on the compressor turbine, the power turbine guide vane, the interstage baffle, and the power turbines from contact with their adjacent components under impact loads and housing deformation.

The right engine power section, the propeller, the propeller shaft section of the front reduction gearbox, the accessory gear box, and three stages of the compressor were impact-separated from the engine. The power turbine shaft was fractured, and the exhaust duct was severely compressed. Circumferential rubbing and machining were displayed on the compressor turbine, the power turbine guide vane, the interstage baffle, and the 2nd stage power turbine from contact with their adjacent components under impact loads and housing deformation.

Both engines exhibited rotational scoring signatures that indicated they were producing symmetrical power and, according the Pratt and Whitney specialist, were most likely operating in the mid- to upper-power range at impact. The engines did not display any preimpact anomalies that would have precluded normal engine operation.

The blades of both propellers had deep chordwise/rotational scoring on their camber sides. There were no discrepancies noted that would have prevented or degraded normal operation before impact. All damage was consistent with high impact forces. According to the Hartzell Propeller specialist, both propellers were rotating under power and in the normal blade angle range of operation at impact; neither propeller appeared feathered or near the reverse stop. In comparing damage between the propellers, the right propeller had damage suggesting it was operating at a higher blade angle and power than the left propeller.

The pilot occupied the front left seat and was using the 4-point restraint system. The passenger occupied the front right seat, and the restraint system was found unbuckled. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner, Tucson, Arizona, performed an autopsy of the pilot and determined the cause of death to be the result of blunt force and thermal injuries. No significant natural disease was identified.

Toxicology testing performed by AXIS Forensic Toxicology at the request of the medical examiner found tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, the primary psychoactive substance in marijuana) at 6.4 ng/ml and its inactive metabolite, 11-carboxytetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH), at 22.8 ng/ml in cavity blood. In addition, amphetamine at 238 ng/ml and pseudoephedrine at 452 ng/ml were found in cavity blood. Amphetamine and 7-aminoclonazepam were detected in urine.

Toxicology testing performed by the FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, identified venlafaxine and its metabolite O-desmethylvenlafaxine, alfuzosin, and pseudoephedrine in liver and cavity blood. In addition, amphetamine was found at 265 ng/ml, THC at 10.9 ng/ml, and THC-COOH at 15.1 ng/ml in cavity blood. Amphetamine and pheniramine were detected in liver; THC was detected in lung; and THC-COOH was detected in liver and urine.

Marijuana has mood altering effects, including inducing euphoria and relaxation. Specific performance effects include decreased ability to concentrate and maintain attention, and impairment of hand-eye coordination. Impairment in retention time and tracking, subjective sleepiness, distortion of time and distance, vigilance, and loss of coordination in divided attention tasks have been reported.

Postmortem test results for marijuana may not indicate antemortem levels. Marijuana has been demonstrated to have clinical effects at levels as low as 0.001 µg/ml. While significant performance impairments are usually observed for at least 1 to 2 hours following marijuana use, residual effects have been reported up to 24 hours, even when the blood level is undetectable.

Amphetamine is a Schedule II controlled substance that stimulates the central nervous system and is available by prescription for the treatment of attention deficit disorder and narcolepsy; commonly marketed names include Adderall, Dexedrine, and Vyvanse. It carries a warning about its potential for abuse and has warnings about an increased risk of sudden death and the potential for mental health and behavioral changes. After a single 30 mg oral dose, early blood levels averaged 0.111 µg/ml, and average blood levels in adults using the long acting prescription orally for a week were about 0.065 µg/ml. However, amphetamine is also prepared and used as a street drug, often by snorting, inhaling, or injecting. Generally, levels above 0.2 µg/ml (200 ng/ml) are the result of misusing amphetamine to maximize its psychoactive effects.

In the early phase, amphetamine misusers may experience a combination of euphoria, excitation, exhilaration, rapid flight of ideas, increased libido, rapid speech, motor restlessness, hallucinations, delusions, psychosis, insomnia, reduced fatigue or drowsiness, increased alertness, a heightened sense of well-being, stereotypes behavior, feelings of increased physical strength, and poor impulse control. As the initial effects wear off, users commonly experience dysphoria, restlessness, agitation, and nervousness; they may experience paranoia, violence, aggression, a lack of coordination, delusions, psychosis, and drug craving.

Pseudoephedrine available from behind-the-counter without a prescription in multiple products used to treat nasal congestion. It is commonly marketed with the name Sudafed. It may cause sleeplessness and excitability and exacerbate the effects of other stimulants.

7-aminoclonazapam is a metabolite of clonazepam that is excreted into the urine. Clonazepam is a sedating benzodiazepine used to treat some types of seizures and to calm patients with anxiety and panic disorders. It is commonly marketed with the name Klonopin and carries this warning, "Since clonazepam produces CNS [central nervous system] depression, patients receiving this drug should be cautioned against engaging in hazardous occupations requiring mental alertness, such as operating machinery or driving a motor vehicle. They should also be warned about the concomitant use of alcohol or other CNS-depressant drugs during clonazepam therapy."

Venlafaxine is a prescription antidepressant commonly marketed with the name Effexor that is used in the treatment of major depression. O-desmethylvenlafaxine is its major active metabolite. Major depression itself is associated with significant cognitive degradation, particularly in executive functioning. The cognitive degradation may not improve even with remission of the depressed episode, and patients with severe disease are more significantly affected than those with fewer symptoms or episodes. This is the reason depression is a disqualifying condition for pilot medical certification. The FAA will consider a special issuance of a medical certificate for depression after 6 months of treatment if the applicant is clinically stable on one of four approved medications; venlafaxine is not one of them.

Alfuzosin is a prescription medication used to treat the symptoms of an enlarged prostate that may also decrease blood pressure. It is not generally considered impairing.

Pheniramine is a sedating antihistamine used primarily in over-the-counter allergy products and eye drops in the United States.

The investigation was unable to obtain medical records regarding any underlying neuropsychiatric disease(s); as a result, whether these were adequately controlled



NTSB Identification: WPR17FA057
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, January 23, 2017 in Tucson, AZ
Aircraft: BEECH 300, registration: N385KA
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 23, 2017, about 1233 mountain standard time, a Beechcraft 300, N385KA, was destroyed when it impacted terrain during takeoff from Tucson International Airport (TUS), Tucson, Arizona. The pilot and the passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to KAAZ, LLC, and operated as a personal flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight to Hermosillo (MMHO), Sonora, Mexico. The flight originated from TUS at 1232.

A witness observed the airplane takeoff from runway 11L and rapidly pitch up in the initial climb. At an altitude between 100-150 feet above the runway, the airplane suddenly yawed to the left while maintaining a nose-up pitch attitude. The airplane then appeared to slow down such that he believed it was about to stall. The left wing dropped, and the airplane rolled left and continued as the nose dropped and the airplane struck the ground inverted. 

Another witness described the airplane yawing from left to right while climbing. The airplane then rolled left and eventually became inverted, in a manner he described as similar to a barrel roll. The airplane then exited his field of view.

After impact, the airplane slid about 650 feet across the ramp on a 060-degree magnetic heading before it collided with an 8-feet tall concrete wall.

The wreckage has been recovered for further examination.

Bellanca 7GCAA, N88373: Fatal accident occurred November 25, 2016 in Glamis, Imperial County, California


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 
  
http://registry.faa.gov/N88373



Location: Glamis, CA
Accident Number: WPR17FA029
Date & Time: 11/25/2016, 1145 PST
Registration: N88373
Aircraft: BELLANCA 7GCAA
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal - Air Medical (Unspecified) 

On November 25, 2016, about 1145 Pacific standard time, a Bellanca 7GCAA airplane, N88373, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain while on approach to landing at a private airstrip near Glamis, California. The private pilot sustained fatal injuries, and the passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The flight originated from an open desert area near the airstrip about 5 minutes before the accident.

A friend of the pilot reported that the pilot had been giving 10- to 15-minute rides to people they were camping with and that he was taking off and landing from a long area of packed sand near their campsite. He further reported that the accident occurred as the pilot was conducting his sixth ride flight of the day with the intention of landing at the private airstrip to park the airplane overnight. The friend stated that during the previous ride flights, the pilot had flown over his intended landing area about 50 ft above ground level (agl) and then continued in a traffic pattern for the landing area about 50 ft agl. He added that the pilot had also flown low in the sand dune bowls in the area during the previous flights.

Two witnesses located near the dirt airstrip reported that they observed the airplane touch down about halfway down the runway on a westerly heading while traveling at a high speed. The witnesses said that the airplane's engine powered up, and the airplane pitched upward about 30° before it banked steeply to the right as the pilot executed a 180° turn to parallel the runway. The airplane leveled off at an altitude of about 100 to 150 ft above ground level (agl). Shortly thereafter, the witnesses observed the airplane make a steep right turn toward the runway before it descended out of their line of sight. The witnesses reported that at the time of the accident, the wind was from the east-northeast at 15 to 20 miles per hour.

During a telephone interview, the passenger reported that she recalled the pilot conducting a touch-and-go landing and stating that he "didn't like the way that felt" before "pulling out and banking hard to the right." The passenger stated that the last thing she remembered was the airplane "going straight down."

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 59, held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. He held a third-class airman medical certificate issued on September 26, 2016, with the limitation, "must wear corrective lenses for near and distant vision." On the application for this medical certificate, the pilot reported a total flight experience of 430 hours of which 15 hours were in the previous 6 months. 

Review of the pilot's logbooks revealed that between July 14, 1987, and April 10, 2011, he had logged 265.3 hours of flight experience. Between October 19, 2013, and November 9, 2016, he had logged 178.9 hours. According to his logbooks, the pilot had a total of 442.2 hours of flight experience. The pilot had logged 205.5 hours in the accident make/model airplane of which 8.1 hours and 2.7 hours were in the 90 days and 30 days, respectively, before the accident.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The two-seat, tailwheel-equipped airplane, serial number 304-74, was powered by a 150-horsepower Lycoming O-320-A2D engine, serial number L-39348-27A, driving a Sensenich fixed-pitch propeller. The front and rear seats were equipped with shoulder restraints.

Review of the airframe and engine logbooks revealed that the most recent annual inspection was completed on May 9, 2016, at an airframe total time and tachometer time of 4,380 hours. The engine was last overhauled on June 21, 1996, at a tachometer time of 1,650.49 hours. At the time of the accident, the airframe had accumulated 17.2 hours since the most recent annual inspection, and the engine had accumulated 2,746.71 hours since major overhaul.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The private airstrip was located in an area of open desert terrain. The reported field elevation was 440 ft mean sea level. The dirt runway was oriented about 230°/050° and was about 3,000 ft in length. No flags or windsocks were located near the runway nor was there any weather reporting equipment located at the private airstrip.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1153, the automated weather observation station at Imperial Airport (IPL), Imperial, California, located about 30 miles west of the accident site, reported wind from 350° at 4 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear sky, temperature 23°C, dew point -5°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.10 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane impacted open desert terrain about 565 ft short (northeast) of the approach end of the southwest (230°) runway at the private airstrip. The debris path was about 34 ft in length oriented on a magnetic heading of about 206°. The first identified point of impact (FIPC) was a 1-ft by 2-ft area of disturbed dirt. The propeller, starter ring gear, plexiglass, and a portion of engine cowling were located within a 5-ft by 4-ft area of disturbed dirt about 24 ft from the FIPC. The main wreckage, which included the fuselage and both wings, was located about 34 ft from the FIPC. The fuselage came to rest upright on a magnetic heading of about 009°. Adjacent to the left wing and propeller were portions of the strobe light housing and red navigation light lens from the left wing tip. 

The left wing was separated from the airframe and displaced forward. The leading edge of the wing was compressed aft to the main spar from about mid-span outboard to the wing tip. The lift struts remained attached to the wing, and the aft strut was bent. The aileron remained attached via all three mounts. The control linkage from the aileron to the bell crank was intact. Both control cables remained attached to the bell crank and extended inboard to the wing root where they were separated. The separated ends of both control cables exhibited splayed signatures that were consistent with tension overload separation.

The right wing was separated from the fuselage. The entire wing was buckled throughout, and both wing spars were fractured in multiple locations. The lift struts remained attached to the wing. The forward lift strut was bent with leading edge scratches, and the aft strut was bowed. The wingtip exhibited a 7-inch-wide circular impression on the leading edge that was consistent with an impact with the right main landing gear tire. The right-wing tip lights remained attached to the wing tip. The aileron, which remained attached to the outboard and middle attach points, was buckled upward at mid span. The control linkage from the aileron to the bell crank remained attached. The control cables extended from the bell crank to the wing root where they were separated. The separated ends of both cables exhibited splayed signatures that were consistent with overload separation.

The fuselage was intact from the rear door post aft to the empennage. The fuselage structure forward of the rear doorpost was bent and compressed upward with aft compression. The right main landing gear was separated. The left main landing gear remained attached and was bent upward. The airframe fuel strainer screen was free of debris. The front and rear seat lap belts were unbuckled. The forward shoulder restraint was cut. The rear shoulder restraint remained attached to the lap belt buckle.

The empennage was intact and undamaged. The left and right elevators remained attached to their respective attach points on the horizontal stabilizers. The rudder remained attached to the vertical stabilizer.

Flight control continuity for the ailerons was established from the wing roots to the forward and aft control torque tubes. Rudder control continuity was established from the rudder forward to the rear rudder pedals. Elevator control continuity was established from the elevators forward to the control stick torque tube.

The engine remained attached to the fuselage. The vacuum pump, alternator, and carburetor were displaced from their respective mounts. The top spark plugs, rocker arm covers, and both magnetos were removed from the engine. The crankshaft was rotated by hand using a hand tool attached to an accessory mount pad. Thumb compression and suction were obtained on all four cylinders. Continuity was established throughout the engine and valve train. When the magneto drive shafts were rotated, the left and right magnetos produced spark at all ignition terminal posts. The top spark plugs exhibited normal operational signatures; light gray deposits were observed within the electrode areas.

The propeller was separated from the crankshaft propeller flange. The spinner assembly was crushed aft around the propeller. One propeller blade exhibited leading edge gouges and was bent and twisted opposite the direction of rotation. In addition, chordwise striations were observed on the forward side of the blade. The other propeller blade appeared relatively straight with chordwise striations and leading-edge gouges.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Imperial County California Coroner, El Centro, California, performed an autopsy of the pilot and determined that the cause of death was multiple traumatic injuries. The heart was enlarged with left ventricular hypertrophy and coronary artery disease with 75% narrowing of the right, 90% narrowing of the left anterior descending, and 25% narrowing of the left circumflex coronary arteries. The autopsy did not find evidence of ischemic heart muscle damage. No other significant natural disease was identified.

The Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing on samples from the pilot and identified acetaminophen at 28.86 µg/ml in urine, sertraline in urine and at 0.063 µg/ml in cavity blood, sertraline's metabolite desmethylsertraline in urine and blood, and trazodone in urine and at 0.101 µg/ml in cavity blood.

Acetaminophen is a non-sedating pain and fever-reducing medication sold alone or in combination with cough and cold treatments and marketed under many names including Tylenol. 

Sertraline is a prescription antidepressant with an accepted therapeutic range from 0.010 to 0.200 ug/ml. While sertraline is not specifically known to directly cause impairment, the underlying depression that it is prescribed to treat is associated with significant cognitive degradation, particularly in executive functioning. As a result, the FAA has a specific process to certify pilots with depression who require antidepressant treatment. The FAA's Guide for Aviation Medical Examiners states that "the use of a psychotropic drug is disqualifying for aeromedical certification purposes – this includes all antidepressant drugs, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). However, the FAA has determined that airmen requesting first, second, or third-class medical certificates while being treated with one of four specific SSRIs may be considered." Sertraline is one of these four specific SSRIs.

Trazodone is a prescription antidepressant that is significantly sedating; it is often used as a sleep aid. The accepted therapeutic range is from 0.5 to 3.0 ug/ml. It carries the precaution: "Antidepressants may impair the mental and/or physical ability required for the performance of potentially hazardous tasks, such as operating an automobile or machinery; the patient should be cautioned accordingly. Trazodone hydrochloride may enhance the response to alcohol, barbiturates, and other [central nervous system] CNS depressants."

Review of the pilot's personal medical records revealed that his medical conditions included colon cancer that was successfully treated with surgical removal and radiation in 2008, chronic pain resulting from the cancer therapy treated with oxycodone until June 2016, and depression and anxiety treated with a number of different psychotropic medications.

In a note dated November 2, 2016, the pilot's psychiatrist stated that the pilot had a 5-year history of anxiety and depression and had been treated with sertraline for the preceding 2 years. The psychiatrist wrote that the pilot "recently tried to decrease sertraline from 50 to 25 mg/day and had increased irritability and anxiety and increased dose back to 50 mg/day after 4 days with improvement in symptoms. Reports residual symptoms of marked frustration when things aren't going well [once a week] and [is] always feeling rushed or 'in a hurry' and anhedonia (not enjoying flying and other activities as much as he used to) …Sleeping well with trazodone."

The psychiatrist's mental status examination found that the pilot did not express ideations of harm to himself or others. However, the patient's mood was anxious and depressed with a Beck depression inventory score of 18 (consistent with mild or borderline clinical depression). The psychiatrist's diagnostic impression was major depressive disorder (moderate severity). He prescribed sertraline 75 mg daily, hydroxyzine 50 mg as needed for anxiety, and trazodone 100 to 200 mg at bedtime for sleep. Hydroxyzine is a prescription sedating antihistamine for treatment of anxiety and itching.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

A handheld GPS that was located within the wreckage was shipped to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory for further examination. The GPS data that were downloaded from the unit did not contain any information regarding the accident flight. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 59, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/26/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 09/30/2016
Flight Time:   442.2 hours (Total, all aircraft), 205.5 hours (Total, this make and model), 8.1 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 2.7 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BELLANCA
Registration: N88373
Model/Series: 7GCAA NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1974
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 304-74
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/09/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection: 17 Hours
Engines:  Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4380 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91A installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-320-A2D
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:  Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MMML, 74 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 24 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1953 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 207°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 350°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.1 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / -5°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Glamis, CA
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Glamis, CA
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1140 PST
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  32.993611, -115.021944

NTSB Identification: WPR17FA029
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, November 25, 2016 in Glamis, CA
Aircraft: BELLANCA 7GCAA, registration: N88373
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 25, 2016 about 1145 Pacific standard time, a Bellanca 7GCAA, N88373, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain following a loss of control while on approach to landing at a private airstrip near Glamis, California. The private pilot sustained fatal injuries and his passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The flight originated from an open desert landing area about 5 minutes prior to the accident.

Witnesses located adjacent to the accident site reported that they observed the accident airplane land about midfield to the southwest while traveling at a high speed. The witnesses said that the airplane powered up and it pitched upward about 30 degrees before it banked steeply to the right. The witnesses continued to watch the airplane as it executed a 180-degree turn, paralleling the runway, and leveling off at an altitude of about 100 to 150 feet above ground level (agl). Shortly after, the airplane was observed making a steep right turn towards the runway before it descended out of their line of sight. Witnesses further added that at the time of the accident, the wind was from the north-northeast at 15 to 20 miles per hour, and later calmed down within an hour following the accident.

A friend of the pilot reported that the pilot was giving 10 to 15 minute rides to people in their campsite, and was initially taking off and landing on a long area of packed sand nearby. The friend of the pilot further stated that the pilot was conducting his 6th ride with the intention of landing at the nearby private airstrip in order to park the airplane overnight.

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane impacted open desert terrain about 565 feet northeast of the approach end of the southwesterly oriented dirt runway. The debris path was about 34 feet in length oriented on a heading of about 206 degrees magnetic. All major components of the airplane were located within the wreckage debris path.