Sunday, July 9, 2017

Vans RV-9A, N527LB: Incident occurred July 09, 2017 at Monroe County Airport (KMNV), Madisonville, Tennessee

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville, Tennessee

http://registry.faa.gov/N527LB

Aircraft landed and sustained gear damage.

Date: 09-JUL-17
Time: 21:17:00Z
Regis#: N527LB
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV9
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MADISONVILLE
State: TENNESSEE




MONROE COUNTY - An RV-9 plane that took off from Kentucky made an emergency landing at Monroe County Airport Sunday afternoon.

No injuries were reported.

According to Tom McCosh, the director of the Monroe County Airport, the pilot noticed the plane had damaged nose gear mid-flight and had to land at the airport.

Only the pilot, Tim Roush, and his wife were on board. McCosh said Roush is from Monroe County, but this was not the intended destination for the plane. 

Airport officials say the plane made a smooth landing. 

The Monroe County Fire Department, county mayor, rescue squad, and emergency medical services were all at the scene. 

McCosh said, "I can truly say that our county cares."

http://www.wbir.com




MONROE COUNTY, Tenn.(WVLT)-- Emergency crews responded to the Monroe County Airport when a pilot called needing to make an emergency landing Sunday afternoon.

The airport's director, Tom McCosh, said the plane's pilot was able to make it safely to the ground after having technical issues with the plane's nose gear.

The pilot called the airport before landing to let them know he was having technical issues.

Emergency crews and rescue were called to the scene. Among them was county mayor, Tim Yates, Sheriff Tommy Jones, and Director of development, Bryan Hall.

The pilot was able to make it to the ground safely in an emergency landing after being coached by the airport's command central, Bob Mundle.

In response to the large amount of help at the scene, McCosh said, "I can truly say that our county cares." 

http://www.local8now.com

85-year-old pilot enjoys birthday flight with her son

Former pilot Marguerite Moncrieff-Buck celebrated her 85th birthday on Friday by taking a flight with her son and pilot, Glyn Buck, at Windsor airport.



Marguerite Moncrieff-Buck thought she should do something memorable to mark her 85th birthday.

Dinner out with family and friends or maybe a second piece of cake just wasn’t going to cut it.

“It’s a significant year,” Moncrieff-Buck reasoned. “A lot of people don’t make it to 85. I did and I thought I have to do something special.”

So Moncrieff-Buck decided to dust off the pilot’s licence she earned back in 1960 and made plans to take a birthday flight with her son, Glyn Buck, on July 7.

Seeing how more than 50 years had passed since she last climbed into a cockpit, Moncrieff-Buck scheduled a session at Windsor Airport earlier in the week with flight instructor Dayne Morrison.

“I hated every second of it,” Moncrieff-Buck said, adding it had nothing to do with Morrison.

Rather, the instrument panel was totally foreign to her as was the technique used for landing. And the arm strength required to pull on the yoke used to steer the plane was simply too much.

“Everything was foreign, it was like you’re used to driving a Model T and they’re putting you in a 747,” she said.

“Give me a tail dragger,” she said referring to an older style of plane and how you landed it.

With the birthday flight already scheduled and looming just two days away, like any good pilot, Moncrieff-Buck charted another course of action.

“I had a brilliant notion,” she said of asking Morrison if he could give her son Glyn the controls and let him fly while she took it all in from the back seat.

“I loved every second of it,” she said. “I enjoyed watching my son fly. I can’t think of anything more important than flying in the back seat for his first flight.”

Of course, the new flight plan caught Glyn off guard.

“I’ve logged a lot of commercial miles as a passenger and I’ve been in a small plane a couple of times but at the back,” the 52-year-old said. “It’s very different in the front. It was thrilling but slightly terrifying at the same time.”

With Morrison at his side, Glyn steered the plane along the riverfront, through LaSalle, Amherstburg and out to Leamington before heading back to Windsor.

His wife, Tracie, and son, Carter, took pictures and video from the tarmac.

“It was quite a day,” Glyn said.

Mother and son walked arm-in-arm out to the airplane signing a 1959 tune written about the atomic bomb titled “We will all go together when we go.”

It was another war song that inspired Moncrieff-Buck’s life-long love of flight.

She was a child when the 1942 film Captains of the Clouds came out, chronicling the story of two Canadian pilots in the Second World War. Moncrieff-Buck loved the title song of the same name.

She knew all the lyrics and their wonderful tale of flying made her wish she was old enough to join the air force.

Later, as an adult, a friend suggested she take flying lessons.

She flew for several years until she started raising children.

Moncrieff-Buck tells a hair-raising story about her solo flight which entailed flying from Windsor to London to St. Thomas and back. Having missed her first checkpoint she had to guestimate her way to the London airport. Then on the next leg, she misread the windsock in St. Thomas and wound up executing a tricky manoeuvre in order to land the plane down wind instead of the preferable method of into the wind.

A group of men watched in amazement outside the St. Thomas hangar.

“When I climbed out of the plane they were lined up with their hands on their hips and said ‘Do you know you just landed your plane downwind?’ I said yes, can you please sign my logbook I’ve got to get back home.”

Fortunately, last Friday’s flight was much more routine.

“He did well,” she said of Glyn. “I was very proud of him.”

http://windsorstar.com

Cory Erwin Moore

Cory Moore

Cory Moore designed this flamboyant Suburban and added a decal of his Cessna 182. He stood out around town for the vehicle, family said.

Cory Moore's sister holds this photo of him and relatives, including Robin Selleck, back, Lucas Lemere, 2, Heidi Moore, 12 and, Danielle Moore.



CANTON—CLARE - Cory Erwin Moore, 50, of 4482 CR 27, died tragically on July 5th as a result of a motor vehicle crash in the town of Sandy Creek. 

The funeral will be Tuesday, July 11th at 3:30PM at Moore’s Field Airport, CR 27 in the town of Clare, NY, with Rev. Thomas Nichols officiating. 

Burial will follow at Moore Family Cemetery on the airport property. 

Those wishing to honor by arriving by airplane are asked to please have your plane landed and parked on the field between 2-2:30PM. 

As the committal service is ending, in a symbol of lifting his spirit to heaven, the planes will be asked to follow Wayne Lincoln who will be flying Cory’s Cessna 182 to lift off the runway.

Calling hours will be held Monday, July 10th from 4-7PM at O’Leary Funeral Services, a short distance from where Cory worked. 

If friends so desire, contributions will be made to the Heidi Moore Memorial Fund, c/o St. Lawrence Federal Credit Union, 33 Court St., Canton, NY 13617. Condolences, food, photos and flowers can be sent online to www.islandviewfs.com.

Born on September 30, 1966 in Gouverneur, NY, the son of Lloyd Edward Moore and Kathryn May Wallace, Cory graduated from Knox Memorial Central School in 1985. 

Cory worked in Florida before returning to his roots in Northern New York. Upon his return, he worked at Jefford Steel in Potsdam. 

In 2005 he went to work with R.B. Lawrence Ambulance as a vehicle maintenance manager until the time of his death.

A skilled mechanic with a knack for detail, Cory treated the ambulances as his own baby. He knew the “ins and outs” of each vehicle like the back of his hand. Nothing got by him.

Cory is survived by his fiancé`, Robin Lynn Selleck; four daughters, Heidi Moore, Taylor Dunbar, Darian Moore, Jazmin Lopez and one son, Cory Moore; his mother, Kathryn of Clare; three step-daughters, Mackenzie Banks, Hayley Lamere, Betsey Banks; three step-grandchildren, Mason and Lucas Lamere and Ethan Gollinger; two brothers and one sister-in-law, Wallace (Cynthia), Edwards and Giles (Tammy Mantor), Clare; three sisters, Carlene (Cheyenne Kerr) Dowling, Oswegatchie, Ronda (Jerry) teReile of Canton, Brendalee (Chad) Emerson of Potsdam; grandchildren Chandler, Baila, Cory Robert, and Eliza, and several cousins. He was predeceased by his father, Lloyd Moore of Clare, a St Lawrence County Legislator.

An avid NASCAR fan and hunter, Cory was a true” jack of all trades”.

Cory was a member of AOPA (Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association) and the co-owner and operator of Moore’s Field Airport, airport Identifier 1E8, affectionately known as “Clare International Airport”. 

Cory had passed his written exam and was preparing for his check ride proficiency exam to complete his private pilot’s license. He proudly owned his dad's 1968 Cessna 182.

You could not have found a harder worker, or someone who was more passionate about his life and family, than Cory. 

http://www.watertowndailytimes.com

Cessna 180 Skywagon, N2429C: Accident occurred July 09, 2017 near Lake Hood Seaplane Base (PALH), Anchorage, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Anchorage, Alaska
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N2429C

NTSB Identification: ANC17LA034
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 09, 2017 in Anchorage, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 180, registration: N2429C
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 9, 2017, about 1220 Alaska daylight time, a float-equipped Cessna 180 airplane, N2429C, sustained substantial damage during an emergency landing in a residential neighborhood shortly after takeoff from the Lake Hood Seaplane Base, Anchorage, Alaska. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot, as a visual flight rules (VFR) personal flight, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The airline transport pilot, the sole occupant, sustained minor injuries, and there were no injuries to those on the ground. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The local area flight departed the Lake Hood Seaplane Base, at about 1210, destined to return within the hour.

During an on-scene interview on July 9 with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), the pilot stated that after a takeoff from the north water lane, and during climb out, he was unable to retract the airplane's wing flaps. He then requested to return for landing, and the Lake Hood Air Traffic Control Tower (ATCT) specialist on duty granted his request. He said that he then turned right and entered a right downwind leg to return to Lake Hood Seaplane Base. The pilot reported that while on the downwind leg, at an altitude of 600 feet, all engine power was lost. He then selected an open field that was surrounded by a residential neighborhood as a forced landing site. Unable to reach the field, the airplane subsequently landed in the adjacent neighborhood, and just short of his intended forced landing site. During the forced landing, the airplane collided with a tree, various structures, a light pole, and a vehicle before coming to rest in a residential street. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings, fuselage, engine firewall and empennage. 

The Anchorage Airport Police and Fire Rescue, Anchorage Fire Department and the Anchorage Police Department responded. Multiple witnesses reported to first responders that they heard the airplane's engine lose power just before descending into the neighborhood. 

Shortly after the accident, the NTSB IIC, accompanied by a Federal Aviation Administration airworthiness aviation safety inspector from the Anchorage Flight Standards District Office (FSDO), examined the wreckage at the accident site. 

The associated debris path was oriented on a heading of 320°. (All headings/bearings noted in this report are magnetic). The wreckage debris path measured about 200-feet long, and a 40-foot tall spruce is believed to be the initial impact point, which was marked by a broken treetop. The debris path between the spruce tree, and the main wreckage site consisted of a downed street light pole, damage to a residential structure (duplex), a storage shed, and a pickup truck that was parked in the street. The airplane eventually came to rest, upright, and within a residential street. 

The airplane was equipped with an Continental Motors IO-520 engine. 

The airplane wreckage was then recovered to the Lake Hood Seaplane Base, and a detailed NTSB engine and airframe examination is pending. 

At 1153, an aviation routine weather report from the Lake Hood Seaplane Base (the closest weather reporting facility) reported, in part: wind 340 at 5 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition, few 2,700 feet, few 4,700 feet, broken at 6,000 feet; temperature 55° F, dewpoint 46° F; altimeter, 29.95 inHg.




No one was injured when a float plane crashed into a house near Lake Hood in Anchorage Sunday afternoon, Anchorage Airport Police said.

The floatplane took off from Lake Hood before communicating by radio that it was having engine problems, said Airport Police officer Douglas Holler. 

It appeared to have crashed into a duplex at the corner of Orion Circle and Cosmic Circle before coming to rest in the street a block away from Balto Seppala Park, busy on a sunny summer afternoon.

The pilot and sole occupant of the plane walked away without serious injuries, Holler said.

No one was in the home the plane crashed into at the time of the incident early Sunday afternoon.

At 1 p.m. fire department and police personnel were on the scene along with dozens of curious onlookers viewing the wrecking of the mangled plane.

https://www.adn.com








ANCHORAGE (KTUU) UPDATE:

The Anchorage Fire Department says the pilot was already out of the plane when they arrived.

AFD says the pilot was the only occupant of the plane and was uninjured.

They say the plane clipped a nearby house in the process of the crash.

The scene of the crash is blocked off between Milky Way drive and Cosmic Circle along Orion drive while the NTSB investigates.

ORIGINAL STORY:

Emergency personnel are responding to a plane crash on 35th and Wisconsin.

Anchorage police said the plane hit a structure and in their Nixle sent out at 12:47 P.M.

The National Transportation Safety Board said they are sending an investigator to the scene.

Anchorage Police have confirmed that no one was injured in the crash.

http://www.ktuu.com

GLO Airlines' fate is up in the air after the end of July



More than a year and a half after launching nonstop regional service from New Orleans, charter operator GLO Airlines has attracted a clientele of business travelers who long sought a way to get to major Mid-South cities without spending days in the car or wasting hours at hub airports during layovers.

Last year, in its first full year of operation, GLO transported about 32,300 passengers through Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport, where the startup airline is based, and it was on track to surpass that figure this year, court records show.

But now that's up in the air. It filed for bankruptcy in April and is accepting reservations only through the end of this month, leaving its fate uncertain. 

As a so-called "paper airline," GLO has a fleet of three leased 30-passenger Saab 340B commuter plans, but they are staffed by another company, Tennessee-based Corporate Flight Management.

That business relationship has soured. The two sides have sued each other in court, and GLO was nearly grounded in April after Corporate Flight Management tried to cut short their agreement, which is due to expire July 31.

In March, GLO sued CFM, alleging that one of its pilots negligently damaged a plane, causing "significant damages, including engine repairs, rental costs, maintenance fees and lost revenues."

In response, CFM claimed that its deal with GLO insulated it from liability for repair costs; it also denied the pilot was at fault.

CFM then notified GLO in April that the airline had breached its contract by falling behind on its payments, which CFM described in court records as part of a pattern of "cumulative and ongoing defaults."

As a result, the firm notified GLO and the U.S. Department of Transportation that its contract would be terminated after a 10-day grace period.

GLO, which disputed it was in default, filed for bankruptcy protection and asked a federal bankruptcy judge, Jerry Brown, to allow it to continue flying until July 31 so it would not lose "its principal source of revenue." Brown agreed.

FlyGLO LLC's bankruptcy petition listed assets and liabilities of between $10 million and $50 million each, with up to 49 creditors.

Now, GLO faces a deadline at the end of the month by which it has essentially to reach a new deal with Corporate Flight Management, which hires, trains and oversees the airline's pilots, or bring on another operator that's certified to fly its planes.

"It's obviously been quite a bit of a whirlwind," said GLO founder and CEO Trey Fayard, who manages about a dozen employees.

Another option would be acquiring a company that's already certified by the Federal Aviation Administration to fly the Swedish-built commuter planes. Perhaps a couple dozen companies would qualify, according to some estimates.

"There's no magic bullet," Fayard said. "You have to find a good, strong business, put your plan together and take over that business, while you are modifying the certificate to fit what your needs may be."

In the long term, GLO also could work toward earning its own certificate to operate its planes, but Fayard acknowledged it's a costly, time-consuming process that could take more than a year.

Since it started in late 2015, GLO has offered nonstop service from New Orleans to Shreveport; Little Rock, Arkansas; and Memphis, Tennessee. It later added flights to Huntsville, Alabama, and briefly to Fort Walton Beach, Florida.

At the time it began, some local business executives said GLO's entry into the market highlighted an area where the New Orleans airport had room to grow: targeting underserved regional cities that would attract business people and others eager for an alternative to driving or multiple-stop flights.

After six years of planning, Fayard chose GLO's initial three destinations after extensive research, including driving to dozens of cities and airports in the South to gauge the potential demand for the service.

Fayard is the son of a prominent, well-connected attorney and longtime Democratic Party supporter Calvin Fayard; his sister, Caroline Fayard, was a Democratic U.S. Senate candidate in 2016.

Despite his company's uncertain fate, Fayard said GLO was moving ahead with scheduling beyond this month and has plans to add at least one new destination.

But first, he'll need someone to fly the planes.

Some aviation industry experts note the risks of relying on a third-party operator, saying it can make financial sense in the beginning but can hamper an airline's long-term growth.

"Anytime you're relying on outside services to provide your product, you are at the whim of their level of reliability and, ultimately, their costs," said Robert Mann, an airline consultant in New York.

http://www.theadvocate.com

Morse Rebel, N914FM, KJ Enterprises: Fatal accident occurred June 05, 2015 at Eagle County Regional Airport (KEGE), Colorado

Karl Hipp


Lavonne and Amanda Hipp


Grandpa Karl flew to Minnesota from his home in Colorado at the beginning of summer this year. It was the first time he had been back to the state in about 20 years.

Karl Hipp was a small plane pilot with vast experience. On June 4, he pinned his granddaughter Amanda as staff sergeant through the national Civil Air Patrol program.

“It was my dream [to be a pilot] since I was 9 years old,” Amanda said. “It was a big day.”

“I was glad he was there and proud she was doing what she was doing,” Scott Hipp said.

The next day, Karl and Amanda flew back to Karl’s home in Colorado, where Amanda would be staying for a week. They were the only two aboard the small plane.

Throughout the trip down, they made multiple stops for fuel and rest, and Amanda texted her parents updates each time. When Lavonne and Scott didn’t receive an update on any final landing, they knew something was wrong.

Amanda’s memory cuts out from there, but it’s believed the crash was caused by difficult conditions at the Eagle, Colorado, airport, where they intended to land. They originally planned to land at a different airport, but a storm cell over the mountains forced Karl to go to Eagle, which Scott said is considered one of the more difficult landing spots in the country.

As they attempted to land, a burst of wind near the ground vaulted the plane into a different direction, and sent it heading toward the airport hangar. Karl managed to avoid multiple obstacles, but the plane was unable to lift over the hangar and crashed into it.

The family believes, and the wreckage seemed to indicate, that Karl veered the plane at the last moment to ensure the direct impact came on his side, rather than Amanda’s.

“He saved my life,” Amanda said.

Amanda had multiple broken bones in her face, lost three teeth, had punctures in her elbow, scarring above her left eye, internal bleeders and a 6-millimeter blood clot pushing against her brain. Following the crash, Lavonne, Scott and Alisha traveled to Colorado by car as fast as they could.

“It was devastating,” Lavonne remembers of first seeing Amanda in the hospital.

Amanda bounced back quickly, though, coming out of a medically induced coma after four days She progressed by leaps and bounds and returned to their Henderson home at the end of June. The family held Karl’s memorial service Aug. 15, and Amanda went back in a plane that same day.

“When we took off, I stopped breathing,” she said. “But then I took a couple of deep breaths and I just flew. After that, I was fine.”

Read more here: http://www.southernminn.com

This was Karl Hipp's plane. 


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Final Report- National Transportation Safety Board:http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Aviation Accident Factual Report  -   National Transportation Safety Board:  http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket -  National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

KJ Enterprises: http://registry.faa.gov/aN914FM  





NTSB Identification: CEN15FA257
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 05, 2015 in Eagle, CO, CO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/15/2016
Aircraft: MORSE FRANK L REBEL, registration: N914FM
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was landing the experimental, amateur-built airplane in gusty, crosswind conditions. Witnesses observed the airplane enter a sharp left turn away from the runway at a very low altitude, overfly the airport taxiway and ramp area, then impact a hangar on the airport property. A witness stated that “the wind caught [the airplane]” as it was landing. The airplane had a stated crosswind limitation of 15 knots. Based on recorded wind data, the calculated crosswind component was between 13.7 knots and 16.8 knots. Examination of the airplane wreckage did not reveal any anomalies that would have prevented normal operation. The accident sequence is consistent with the pilot losing control of the airplane while landing in gusty, crosswind conditions that likely exceeded the recommended crosswind limitation of the airplane.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain control of the airplane while landing in gusty, crosswind conditions that likely exceeded the recommended limitation of the airplane.



HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 5, 2015, at 1647 mountain daylight time, a Morse Rebel experimental amateur-built airplane, N914FM, impacted a hangar and parking ramp at the Eagle Regional Airport (EGE), Eagle, Colorado. The commercial pilot was fatally injured and the passenger was seriously injured. There were no ground injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal, cross-country flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was being operated without a flight plan. 

GPS data recovered from an avionic device found in the wreckage recorded three flights on the day of the accident. The first flight data began at 08:11:12 in south-central Minnesota. Enroute stops were recorded from 09:25-09:50 at Martin Field Airport (7K8), Iowa, and from 12:57-13:40 at Holyoke Airport (HEQ), Colorado. The flightpath tracked from HEQ to the West-Northwest before turning southwest near Walden, Colorado, towards EGE.

The airplane flew a visual approach to land on runway 25 at EGE. During the approach the tower controller provided the pilot the current wind direction and velocity of 220 degrees at 21 knots, gusting to 26 knots. A witness observed the airplane very near to the runway during landing when "the wind caught [the airplane]". The airplane climbed away from the runway and completed an approximately 180 degree, rapid left turn. The airplane's flight path overflew the airport parking ramp on an easterly heading, mostly wings level, and in a slightly nose high attitude until just before it impacted the west face of hanger number four on the airport property. Before impact, the airplane began a left descending roll and hit the hanger in a left bank of about 75 degrees and approximately thirty-five feet above the ground. The airplane subsequently fell to the parking ramp and came to rest inverted. First responders told investigators it was not raining when they first reached the airplane, but it started raining within a few minutes of their arrival. 

Security camera footage captured portions of the accident flight, and the footage confirmed the witness reports. 

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 68, held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multi-engine land, airplane single-engine sea, and instrument airplane. The pilot also held a mechanic – airframe and powerplant certificate. The pilot's current pilot log book was not located; however, a pilot log book was located with the last entries dated September 2, 2011. As of that date, the pilot had logged a total of 2,536.5 hours. The pilot's last 3rd class airman's medical certificate was dated February 4, 2013. The pilot claimed 3,000 total flight hours and 50 flight hours in the past 6 months on that application.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The single engine, high wing, two-seat, fixed gear airplane, serial number 0147R, was assembled in 1996. It was powered by a Lycoming D-320 engine, serial number 3556-27, that drove a composite, two-bladed Props, INC. 74x746 propeller. The airplane's last condition inspection was accomplished on February 15, 2015, at a recorded tachometer time of 215.9 hours. The airplane was equipped with a flaperon system.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1650 MDT, KEGE reported a wind from 200° at 18 knots with gusts to 22 knots, visibility ten statute miles or greater, light rain, overcast cloud base at 7,000 feet above ground level (agl), temperature of 20° Celsius (C) and dew point temperature of 16°C, altimeter setting 30.16 inches of mercury.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

Eagle Regional Airport (EGE) is a public airport located at measured altitude of 6,547 feet mean sea level. It has one runway; runway 7/25, 9,000 feet by 150 feet, of asphalt construction.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane impacted the west facing front of a metal-sided hangar about thirty-five feet above the ground and subsequently fell to the parking ramp. The airplane came to rest inverted. The wreckage was removed to a secure location and examined. Flight control continuity was verified to all flight controls, and no pre-impact anomalies were noted with any airplane systems or the engine. The position of the airplane's flaperon handle could not be determined due to impact damage.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was authorized and conducted on the pilot by the Rocky Mountain Forensic Services, PLLC, Loma, Colorado. The cause of death was the result of multiple injuries sustained in an airplane accident. 

Forensic toxicology was performed on specimens from the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Results were negative for all substances tested for.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The following devices containing non-volatile memory (NVM) were recovered from the wreckage and sent to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Vehicle Recorder Division for examination: 

Device Manufacturer/Model: iFly GPS 720

Serial Number: Unknown.

The iFly GPS 720 exhibited damage due to impact forces. No accident related data was recorded on the device's internal memory.

Device Manufacturer/Model: AvMap Ultra 

Serial Number: 4120423 

The AvMap Ultra exhibited major damage due to impact forces. No accident related data was recorded on the device's internal memory. 

Device Manufacturer/Model: SD Memory Card 

Serial Number: BI1401222811D 

The SD memory card exhibited minimal damage due to impact forces, but no accident related data was recorded on the device.

Device Manufacturer/Model: HTC One M8 Phone 

Serial Number: 310003202964795

The HTC One M8 phone exhibited minimal damage due to impact forces. Nine photographs from the accident flight were recovered from the phone. Timing of each of the photos was established using the metadata embedded in the image files, and the timing ranged from 1635 to 1638 MDT. 

Device Manufacturer/Model: Samsung Galaxy Tab (Black) 

Serial Number: R52G10SC1WB 

The Samsung Galaxy Tab (Black) exhibited minimal damage due to impact forces. The internal memory was recovered using laboratory hardware and software. GPS data was recovered that captured each leg of the cross-country flight that occurred on the day of the accident, beginning at 08:11:12 and ending at 16:49:53.

Device Manufacturer/Model: Samsung Galaxy Tab (White) 

Serial Number: R52FB0DLAZH 

The Samsung Galaxy Tab (White) exhibited major damage due to impact forces. Due to the damage, no data could be recovered from the device.

Device Manufacturer/Model: Apple iPad 

Serial Number: DMPJ75EEDNQT 

The Apple iPad exhibited minimal damage due to impact forces. No accident related data was recorded on the device.

Performance Study:

A Performance Study was conducted utilizing GPS data obtained from the Samsung Galaxy Tab (black) and weather data recorded at EGE at 1650 MDT. The GPS data reflected the accident flight, which originated at Holyoke Airport in Holyoke, Colorado at about 13:43 MDT. The flight duration was three hours and five minutes. The weather at EGE at 1650 was reported as 10 statute miles visibility, overcast skies at 7,000 feet, light rain, and winds from 200 degrees at 18 knots, gusting to 22 knots.

The aircraft approached runway 25 at an equivalent airspeed of 75 knots (kts) and slowed to 65 kts as it crossed the runway threshold. The equivalent airspeed calculation relied on the 18 kts wind report; the reported gusting winds up to 22 kts would change the equivalent airspeed. The final 400 ft of descent was done along a glide slope of 4.7 degrees. Runway 25 has a four light precision approach path indicator (PAPI) with a 3.0 degree glide path. The aircraft's rate of climb (descent) during this final portion of the flight was between -600 and -800 ft/min.

About 18 seconds after crossing the threshold, about 1,200 feet down the runway, the aircraft turned sharply to the left. The aircraft departed the runway, crossed over a taxiway, and continued over the ramp before impacting the hanger. During the final 40 seconds of flight the aircraft crossed the threshold at an equivalent airspeed of 64 kts (groundspeed was 54 kts) and slowed to just above 40 kts (30 kts groundspeed) when it began to turn to the left. As the aircraft left the runway, its airspeed increased until it was about 67 kts (64 kts groundspeed) as it crossed over the taxiway.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

The Pilot's Operating Manual stated the maximum recommended crosswind as 15 knots at 90 degrees. Based on recorded wind data, the calculated crosswind component was 13.7 knots, 16.8 knots with gusts.







NTSB Identification: CEN15FA257
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 05, 2015 in Eagle, CO, CO
Aircraft: MORSE FRANK L REBEL, registration: N914FM
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 5, 2015, at 1647 mountain daylight time, a Morse Rebel experimental amateur-built airplane, N914FM, impacted a hangar and parking ramp at the Eagle Regional Airport (EGE), Eagle, Colorado. The commercial pilot was fatally injured and the passenger was seriously injured. There were no ground injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal, cross-country flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was being operated without a flight plan. 

The airplane flew a visual approach to land on runway 25 at EGE. During the approach the tower controller provided the pilot wind direction and velocity of 220 degrees at 21 knots, gusting to 26 knots. A witness observed the airplane very near to the runway during landing when "the wind caught [the airplane]". The airplane climbed away from the runway and an approximately 180 degree left turn occurred. The airplane overflew the airport parking ramp on an easterly heading, mostly wings level, and in a slightly nose high attitude until just prior to impacting the west face of hanger number four on the airport property. Prior to impact, the airplane began a left descending roll and hit the hanger in about 75 degrees left bank about thirty-five feet above the ground. The airplane subsequently fell to the parking ramp and came to rest inverted. First responders told investigators it was not raining when they first reached the airplane, but it started raining within a few minutes of their arrival. 

The weather at EGE at 1650 was reported as 10 statute miles visibility, overcast skies at 7,000 feet, light rain, and winds from 200 degrees at 18 knots, gusting to 22 knots.

North American Harvard Mk IV, C-FWLH, Canadian Harvard Aircraft Association: Incident occurred July 09, 2017 at Owen Sound Billy Bishop Regional Airport, Ontario, Canada

http://wwwapps.tc.gc.ca



The pilot and his passenger were not seriously hurt after a Canadian Harvard flipped upside down during landing at the Wings and Wheels show on Sunday.

The 1952 North American Harvard Mk IV was landing around 2:30 or 2:45 p.m. when it left the runway at the Owen Sound Billy Bishop Regional Airport, hit a small earth berm and flipped over onto its roof.

"I can't say what happened because we don't know ourselves," Pat Hanna, past-president of the Canadian Harvard Aircraft Association, said later in the afternoon. 
"Crosswinds were present at the time."

The transportation Safety Board of Canada was contacted and was expected to further investigate today.

Hanna said there were minor injuries in the incident. The pilot needed stitches to a cut on his head.

In a news release, Grey County OPP said the 46-year-old pilot from Toronto was taken to hospital where he was treated and released. The 21-year-old woman from West Grey who was the passenger in the plane was treated at the scene and released.

An off-duty physician and a nurse visiting the event came to the assistance of the victims. Grey County paramedics and the Inter Township Fire Department also assisted at the scene, the news release said.

While Hanna didn't see the plane flip over himself, he said several people who witnessed the incident said it went over very slowly.

Hanna said there was substantial damage to the aircraft.

Based in Tillsonburg, the CHAA's mission is to acquire, preserve, restore, maintain, display and demonstrate the Harvard and other training aircraft associated with the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan and the Royal Canadian Air Force. The CHAA has been a regular participant at the Wings and Wheels event since it began 10 years ago.

On Sunday they were taking off and landing at the airport, where they were providing sightseeing tours to the public.

Hanna said in 32 years, Sunday was the first time the CHAA had experienced such an incident.

"It is not a good day," he said.

The runway at the airport had to be closed Sunday afternoon after emergency personnel responded, but it was reopened later in the afternoon to allow aircraft to leave.

By 5 p.m. most of the aircraft, including the other two Canadian Harvards that were brought in, had left. The plane that flipped sat far enough off the runway that it wasn't interfering with runway traffic.

Wings and Wheels coordinator Steve Meades said the incident was an accident, and he was sorry it happened.

He said Wings and Wheels organizers would be meeting today to further discuss the incident.

http://www.owensoundsuntimes.com



Ontario Provincial Police say two people have been hurt in an incident at Owen Sound Billy Bishop Regional Airport.

Investigators are trying to determine how a vintage plane overturned during a fundraising event at the airport around 2:30 Sunday afternoon. A photo sent to the Blackburn Radio newsroom showed a plane lying on its top side on a grassy area at the airport.

The plane is a North American Harvard Mk IV> Police say the plane was attempting a landing when it somehow went off the runway and flipped onto the grass.

Two people, a 46-year-old man from Toronto who was the pilot, and his 21-year-old female passenger, from West Grey, suffered minor injuries. The pilot was taken to hospital where he was treated and released. The passenger was treated at the scene. An off-duty doctor and a nurse attending the event came to the victims’ aid, police say.

The airfield was hosting the Wings and Wheels fundraiser, where over 300 vehicles and 60 planes were on display.

The Transportation Safety Board (TSB) has been notified and will continue the investigation.

http://blackburnnews.com

Incident occurred July 09, 2017 at Windsor International Airport, Ontario, Canada




Fire and ambulance emergency crews rushed to Windsor International Airport Sunday morning in response to a report of a jet in trouble and coming in for an emergency landing.

The crew of a Gulfstream jet reported the aircraft was having battery or electrical problems, and a Windsor Fire & Rescue dispatcher advised responders it was unknown if there was smoke present but to prepare for the possibility of an onboard fire.

But minutes later, with the jet safely on the tarmac, the dispatcher gave an “everything 10-4” — no fire and no injuries. All seven people on board disembarked safely. The incident is being investigated.

http://windsorstar.com

Spurwink Farm Airfield: Cape Elizabeth, Cumberland County, Maine



CAPE ELIZABETH — Buzzing like a mosquitoes overhead, the experimental planes dropped from the sky one by one onto the landing strip at Spurwink Farm on Sunday morning.

Their pilots were headed to the Spurwink Farm International Fly-In and pancake breakfast, hosted by the Limington chapter of the Experimental Aircraft Association. The chapter has hosted the popular event for 21 years at the grassy landing strip owned by Phin and Mary Lou Sprague.

All heads turned to watch the landing techniques of each of the roughly 40 pilots from across New England as they touched down in the field.




“We are the worst critics, but we all make the same mistakes,” said Guy Boudreau of South Portland, a member of the Biddeford EAA chapter.

The EAA was founded in 1953 by a group interested in building their own airplanes and has expanded to include antiques, classics, warbirds, aerobatic aircraft, ultralights, helicopters and contemporary manufactured aircraft. Based in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, the association has 200,000 members. There are seven chapters in Maine.

Like many of the EAA members Boudreau started flying before he could drive. He said growing up on a farm in Caribou, owning a plane was not a big deal.




“We had them for hunting and fishing. It wasn’t expensive, ” Boudreau said.

But today owning a plane is much more expensive. The price of starts at $20,000 and can easily reach several million dollars, said Jonathan Goode of South Portland, a member of the Biddeford chapter. Goode said that the cost is driving away the younger generations from taking up the sport. He said not only has this caused a shortage of commercial pilots, but has resulted in the closing of flight schools in Portland, Bar Harbor and Rochester, N.H.

A retired commercial airline pilot, Goode owns a what he calls a “flying boat,” which can land and take off in water and on land.

Helen Warner of Wiscasset flew in with her husband, Mark, pilot of their 71-year-old Cesna 140.

“We like to fly low and slow,” Warner said.




Many of the planes landing at Spurwink Farm Sunday were built in the 1940s and 1950s, at the tail end of what is known as the Golden Age of Flight between World I and World War II when airplane racing and record setting made front page news. Almost all of the planes at the Sunday fly-in featured tail wheels, which are designed for landing in hay fields.

“They keep the propeller away from the ground,” said Goode.

As the pilots approached the landing strip, they slowed their engines and sometimes banked into the wind to decelerate the aircraft further.

“They almost look like birds,” said Lucas Wintersteen, 9, of Brookline, Massachusetts.

Lucas said he was fairly certain a career in aviation was not in his future. He was with a large family group, including Ella Shepherd, 6, of Boston, who ventured by car from their summer home on Prout’s Neck in Scarborough to see the airplanes up close.

“They look black in the sky but when they come down they are yellow and other colors,” said Ella.

http://www.pressherald.com