Saturday, November 10, 2018

Mooney M20C Mark 21, N78870: Accident occurred November 10, 2018 at Cape May County Airport (KWWD), Lower Township, New Jersey

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N78870

Location: Wildwood, NJ
Accident Number: ERA19TA042
Date & Time: 11/10/2018, 1530 EST
Registration: N78870
Aircraft: Mooney M20C
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On November 10, 2018, about 1530 eastern standard time, a Mooney M20C, N78870, was substantially damaged during a forced landing immediately after takeoff from the Cape May County Airport (WWD), Wildwood, New Jersey. The private pilot was seriously injured. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight destined for Columbus County Municipal Airport (CPC), Whiteville, North Carolina. The airplane was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, the left fuel tank contained about 21 gallons of fuel, and the right fuel tank contained about 3 gallons. The fuel selector was positioned for the right tank and remained there for the startup, taxi, run up, and takeoff.

A video recorded by a witness captured most of the flight. The airplane took off from runway 28, which was 4,998 feet long. About 7 seconds after liftoff, the landing gear were in the fully retracted position. About 8 seconds later, at an altitude of about 150 ft, the engine began to sputter and then ceased. About 6 seconds later, while still over the runway with about 1,700 feet of runway remaining, the airplane began a descending 180° turn to the right, impacting a drainage ditch to the left of runway 10.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed substantial damage to the outboard 3 feet of the right wing, as well as the left horizontal stabilizer and the left elevator. No fuel was observed in the right wing fuel tank, and an undetermined quantity of fuel was present in the left wing fuel tank.

According to FAA airmen records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate. His most recent FAA third class medical examination was performed on June 3, 2016, at which time he reported 900 hours of total flight experience.

At 1555, the reported weather at WWD included wind from 290° at 16 knots with gusts to 25 knots, with a peak wind reported at 1545 of 280° at 26 knots. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Mooney
Registration: N78870
Model/Series: M20C
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KWWD, 23 ft msl
Observation Time: 1555 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 7°C / -6°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 6000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 16 knots / 25 knots, 290°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.14 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Wildwood, NJ (WWD)
Destination: Whiteville, NC (CPC)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 39.007778, -74.914167 (est)



LOWER TOWNSHIP, N.J. (WPVI) -- Authorities are investigating a plane crash at the Cape May Airport in Lower Township, New Jersey Saturday afternoon.

Officials say it was just before 3:30 p.m. when a small aircraft landed in a ditch at the airport.

The pilot of the Mooney M20C Mark 21 lost control on takeoff and landed in the ditch.

The pilot, who was the lone occupant, was taken to the hospital to be treated for facial cuts and bruises.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://6abc.com






The Lower Township Police received a report of a plane crash at approximately 3:31 PM on 11/10/18 within the Cape May County Airport. 

Upon police arrival the pilot was out of the single engine aircraft with very minor injuries.


 The plane crashed shortly after takeoff from the Cape May County Airport.


Erma Fire, Villas Fire, and Lower Township Rescue also responded.


The Federal Aviation Administration was notified and responded to the scene and will be conducting the investigation. 



A small plane crashed into a ditch Saturday afternoon, shortly after taking off from a Jersey Shore airport, the Federal Aviation Administration said. 

The pilot was the only person on board, the Federal Aviation Administration said. When police arrived, the pilot was out of the aircraft and had very minor injuries, the Lower Township Police Department said. 

The Mooney M20C Mark 21 departed from Cape May County Airport at 3:30 p.m., the Federal Aviation Administration said. It then crashed into a ditch. 

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board were investigating.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.nbcnewyork.com

Cessna 310R, registered to and operated by KBUF Air LLC, N5044J: Fatal accident occurred November 09, 2018 in Walton, Delaware County, New York

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; ALbany, New York
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N5044J


Location: Walton, NY
Accident Number: ERA19FA039
Date & Time: 11/09/2018, 1502 EST
Registration: N5044J
Aircraft: Cessna 310
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On November 9, 2018, at 1502 eastern standard time, a Cessna 310R, N5044J, was destroyed when it impacted terrain near Walton, New York. The airline transport pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by KBUF Air LLC under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed for the flight, which originated from Niagara Falls International Airport (IAG), Niagara Falls, New York, about 1405, and was destined for Teterboro Airport (TEB), Teterboro, New Jersey.

According to Leidos Flight Service, the pilot filed an IFR flight plan from IAG to TEB, with a cruising altitude of 7,000 ft and an estimated time en route of 1 hour and 47 minutes. A fueling receipt from a fixed-based operator at IAG showed that the airplane received 103.6 gallons of 100 low lead fuel on the day of the accident.

Review of preliminary air traffic control communications provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that while en route, the airplane was handed off to the Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) located in Binghamton (BGM), New York, and about 1442, the pilot contacted BGM approach and reported flying at 7,000 ft mean sea level (msl). BGM approach provided the altimeter setting, which was read back by the pilot. About 1459, the pilot stated, "I need to get on the ground immediately." BGM approach responded by stating, "the closest airport to you is Sidney Airport, approximately 360° heading from your current position." There were no further intelligible radio transmissions from the pilot.

Review of preliminary radar track data provided by the FAA revealed that for about 55 minutes the airplane flew southeast on-course toward TEB at 7,000 ft msl, about 200 knots ground speed. At 1500:21, the airplane descended to 6,550 ft, slowed to 151 knots, and began a turn to the northeast. At 1500:36, the airplane continued flying northeast, descended to 5,100 ft, and was at 196 knots groundspeed. The last track data point recorded at 1500:50 was about 1.8 nautical miles from the initial impact point with terrain, and showed the airplane at 7,350 ft, on a heading of 308°, at 151 knots groundspeed.

A witness, who was located about 1/2 mile from the initial impact point reported that she was outside in her driveway and heard engines revving up and down for about 1 minute. She subsequently realized the noise was coming from the air, and then saw an airplane "overhead." She stated, "it was so loud" and it flew in a straight-line over a pond near her. She reported that she could see a "gray round column of smoke" trailing the airplane and observed a "red orange glow" originating from under the right wing. The airplane then flew out of view; she then heard a loud explosion and subsequently observed a plume of smoke originate from where the airplane had just flown.

The airplane sustained extensive impact damage, and evidence of a post-impact fire was observed. The wreckage path was oriented on a 320° heading, and the initial impact point (IIP) coincided with two 50 ft tall trees, which were atop a ridgeline that was about 2,000 ft msl. Two additional trees atop the ridgeline that were about 40 ft tall and located about 20 ft forward of the IIP in the wreckage path, displayed impact damage. The wreckage path continued through a heavily wooded down-sloping ravine about 620 ft, consistent with the airplane impacting trees atop the ridgeline in a steep nose down attitude.

All major flight control components of the airplane were accounted for at the accident site. Flight control continuity could not be established due to the fragmented wreckage. Both wings were fragmented and were located in the wreckage path. The vertical stabilizer remained intact, the rudder remained attached, and the elevator trim tab hardware was installed. The elevator and rudder trim actuators were impact damaged and observed outside of their normal operating range.

The left and right upper engine cowlings were located in the debris field and were fragmented. Neither cowling displayed thermal damage or sooting. All three landing gear struts were located in the wreckage path. The landing gear actuators were located, but were fragmented, and their position could not be determined. Several seat frames were observed along the wreckage path and exhibited thermal damage.

The cockpit, main cabin area, and instrument panel were fragmented, scattered throughout the debris field and displayed varying degrees of thermal damage and sooting. Both fuel selector handles were impact damaged, separated from the fuel selector valves, and neither valves were not located.

Both engines separated from their respective engine mounts are were found in the debris field. They displayed impact damage and numerous engine accessories had separated from their attach points. A vacuum pump was located in the debris field and remained intact. Both three-bladed propeller assemblies separated from their respective engines and were located in the debris field. The three respective blades for both propellers remained secured to their propeller hubs. Every blade displayed varying levels of leading-edge gouging, blade polishing, and s-bending. Both spinners displayed impact damage.

According to FAA airmen records, the pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate. He was issued an FAA special issuance first-class medical certificate on June 4, 2018. At that time, the pilot reported civil flight experience that included 19,800 total hours, and 300 hours in the past six months.

The multi-engine low-wing airplane was powered by two six-cylinder, Continental Motors model IO-550-A3B engines, that drove three-bladed McCauley constant-speed propellers. According to airplane logbook entries, an annual inspection was completed on August 21, 2018. The airplane accumulated 5,416.6 hours of total flight time at the time of that inspection.

The weather conditions reported at 1453, at the Greater Binghamton Airport (BGM), Binghamton, New York, about 34 miles west of the accident site, included visibility 1 3/4 statute miles, light snow, mist, ceiling broken at 400 ft above ground level (agl), overcast at 1,300 ft agl, wind 130° at 10 knots, temperature 0°C, dew point -1°C, barometric pressure 30.01 inches of mercury.

A witness located about 1/4 mile from the initial impact point, who heard the impact, reported that at the time of the accident, he observed that it was snowing and sleeting "very heavy." He further stated that it was "very windy," and you "couldn't see anything."

The wreckage was retained for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N5044J
Model/Series: 310 R
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: KBUF Air LLC.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBGM, 1638 ft msl
Observation Time: 1453 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 34 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 0°C / -1°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:  / 400 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / , 130°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 1300 ft agl
Visibility:   1.75 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Niagara Falls, NY (IAG)
Destination: Teterboro, NJ (TEB)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  42.076944, -75.214444 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Daniel Prince Drew
June 25, 1953 - November 9, 2018
Born in Buffalo, New York
Resided in Buffalo, New York 

Suddenly, November 9, 2018, at age 65. Beloved husband of Donna “Dee” Drew; dearest son of Dean A. Drew and the late Florence “Loney” Drew; brother of Dean M. (Karen) and Dale A. (Colleen) Drew; also survived by several nieces, nephews and many, many friends. Dan was a 1971 graduate of St. Francis High School.

After a first flight lesson at age 16, Dan pursued a flying career and attended flight school in Florida. He held an airline transport pilot license and was an FAA-certified aircraft mechanic. Over a 40-year career as a professional pilot Dan flew scores of different makes and models of airplanes, earned a dozen jet type-ratings and operated aircraft on all the continents except Antarctica, often in very demanding circumstances. Dan supplemented his flying with a number of business ventures, including hardware stores, auto repair shops and other businesses. 

In his spare time Dan kept busy repairing and remodeling a series of homes in Buffalo and the family summer homes in Ft. Erie and Dorset, Ontario. He was an avid boater and a member of the Buffalo Maritime Center. 

A celebration of Dan’s life, and his storied sense of humor, will be held on a date to be announced in the near future. A private burial in Forest Lawn Cemetery will be held at the convenience of the family. In lieu of flowers, donations are welcomed to the Friends of the City of Buffalo Animal Shelter and the Buffalo Maritime Center. Arrangements by AMIGONE FUNERAL HOME, INC. Share condolences at www.AMIGONE.com

Daniel Prince Drew

A seasoned pilot from Buffalo flying a small plane from Niagara Falls to New Jersey on Friday was killed when the plane crashed in Delaware County, according to authorities.

Daniel P. Drew, 65, was the only person aboard a twin-engine Cessna that crashed shortly before 3:30 p.m. off Readburn Road in the Town of Tompkins, about 40 miles east of Binghamton, according to a spokesman for the New York City Department of Environmental Protection Police.

Drew, a lifelong pilot, was flying to Teterboro Airport, commuting to his job with a New Jersey-based charter company, said his brother, Dean M. Drew.

Daniel Drew’s love of flying began when his father bought him a 1-hour flight as a present for his 16th birthday, according to his brother.

He had probably had more than 30,000 hours of flying time in his life, Dean Drew said.

“Flying was his passion,” he said.

Daniel and Dean’s 93-year-old father, Dean A. Drew, was a pilot in World War II.

On Friday afternoon in Delaware County, a person called 911 to report seeing a low-flying plane and then hearing an explosion, said Adam Bosch, public affairs director for the DEP Police.

Firefighters extinguished a small fire at the scene of the crash.

It was snowing and sleeting around the time of the crash, but authorities are still investigating the cause of the crash, Bosch said. Representatives of the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board arrived at the scene Saturday, he said.

The crash happened in a wooded area and the plane was found at the bottom of a 600-foot drop. The land is owned by New York City, which operates the nearby Cannonsville Reservoir that supplies drinking water to the city.

Daniel Drew, who was born and raised in Buffalo, is survived by his wife of more than 30 years, Donna, known to family and friends as “Dee.”

In addition to working as a pilot, Daniel Drew used to run Drew’s Hardware on Delaware Avenue in Buffalo. The store was later run by another brother, Dale, who later moved the store to Wyoming County.

Daniel Drew went to flight school in Florida, where he was certified as an aircraft mechanic and a pilot. He also worked as a test pilot for a company that made flight inspection systems and over his lifetime flew roughly 10 different types of aircraft, his brother said.

“He had flown all over the world,” Dean Drew said.

Aside from flying, Daniel Drew loved boating and was a talented mechanic and handy around the house.

“He couldn’t do enough for other people,” his brother said.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://buffalonews.com


There was one confirmed death in a small plane crash that occurred in Delaware County around 3 p.m. Friday.

Delaware County Sheriff Craig DuMond told The Daily Star that he could confirm that the pilot was deceased, but couldn't say whether there were passengers.

Authorities were alerted after a caller reported that a small plane was seen trailing smoke from its wing above Readburn Road in the town of Tompkins, according to scanner reports.

Trout Creek firefighters were the first responders on the scene. Emergency services found the aircraft on a hill near Rainbow Lodge Road in Tompkins.

Officials from the Federal Aviation Administration said the craft was a Cessna 310 aircraft but did not have information about the pilot, the plane's destination or its origin.

According to state police, the New York City Department of Environmental Protection are leading the investigation. Officials at the DEP could not be reached for comment by press time Friday. 

Federal Aviation Administration officials said the department will be a part of the investigation and the National Transportation Safety Board will attempt to determine the cause of the accident.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.thedailystar.com

TOMPKINS (WBNG) — Police have identified the one person who died in the small plane crash in Tompkins on November 9th.

According to the New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), 65-year-old Daniel Drew of Buffalo New York was killed when his 1975 Twin-Engine Cessna plane crashed in the north side of the Cannonsville Reservoir in the town of Tompkins.

The DEP say just before 3:30 p.m., they received a call from a local resident who said they saw a low flying plane then heard an explosion, which led them to the crash site.

Authorities arrived at the scene to find Drew, the only person on board, deceased and a fire that was a result of the crash.

The DEP says the plane was on route from an airport in Niagara Falls to Teterboro Airport in New Jersey.

At this time, the DEP says they are marking and cataloging the main parts of the plane they recovered.  They say they do not know what caused the plane to crash, but say the National Transportation Safety Board is investigating.

Director of Public Affairs for the DEP, Adam Bosch, credits multiple local agencies for helping.  Bosch says, “We are thankful for their assistance.”

The DEP says at this time, the Federal Aviation Administration is at the scene and the National Transportation Safety Board will arrive shortly to conduct their investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://wbng.com

TOWN OF TOMPKINS, NY (WKBW) - A Buffalo man is dead following a plane crash in the Town of Tompkins Friday afternoon, according to the New York City Department of Environmental Protection Police.

According to a spokesperson for the NYC DEP, a resident of in the Town of Tompkins reported they saw a small plane flying low and then heard an explosion around 3:30 p.m.

65-year-old Daniel P. Drew was the only occupant of the 1975 twin-engine Cessna, which crashed on Readburn Road just north of the Cannonsville Reservoir which supplies drinking water to New York City.

The NYC DEP was involved in responding to the crash due to the location.

Officials say the flight was traveling from Niagara Falls to Teterboro airport in New Jersey.

The investigation has been handed over to the National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration who will determine the cause of the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wkbw.com

Piper PA-28-236 Dakota, registered to C&D Farms II LLC and operated by the pilots, N91770: Fatal accident occurred November 09, 2018 near Guthrie County Regional Airport (KGCT), Iowa

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines, Iowa
Piper Aircraft Company; Phoenix, Arizona
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N91770

Location: Guthrie Center, IA
Accident Number: WPR19FA022
Date & Time: 11/09/2018, 1715 CST
Registration: N91770
Aircraft: Piper PA28
Injuries: 4 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On November 9, 2018, about 1715 central standard time, a Piper PA28-236, N91770, collided with terrain about 2 miles south of Guthrie County Regional Airport (GCT), Guthrie Center, Iowa. The private pilot, student pilot, and two passengers sustained fatal injuries, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to C&D Farms II LLC., and operated by the pilots under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The cross-country flight departed Le Mars Municipal Airport (LRJ), Le Mars, Iowa, at 1618 with a planned destination of Osceola Municipal Airport (I75), Osceola, Iowa.

The purpose of the flight was for the private pilot to fly the other 3 persons to Osceola for a hunting trip. The private pilot then planned to fly the airplane back to LRJ on his own that night.

The student pilot co-owned the airplane with another person (not the accident pilot) and had purchased it in July 2018. According to the other co-owner, the airplane had accumulated about 150 hours of total flight time during the period between purchase and the accident, and the student pilot had flown the airplane solo on multiple occasions. The private pilot's flight logbook indicated he had also accumulated about 8.3 hours flight time in the airplane during that period.

According to preliminary data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), an air traffic controller at the Des Moines International Airport (DSM) departure radar position observed a radar target squawking on the 7700 emergency transponder beacon code, about 40 miles west of DSM. Controllers were then able to establish contact with the pilot of an airplane using a call sign of "Dakota 770" on the GCT common traffic advisory frequency. That pilot reported that he was a student, and that he was diverting to Perry Municipal Airport (PRO) because the pilot who was flying the airplane was having a "heart attack." No other communication from that airplane was received directly by the DSM controllers. However, the pilots of two aircraft that had just departed DSM advised the controllers that they were able to communicate with the pilot, who reported that he was now going to attempt a landing at GCT.

By 1730, about 30 minutes after the communications with the DSM controllers, the airplane had not landed at either GCT or PRO, and an Alert Notice (ALNOT) was issued.

The wreckage was located the following morning in an area composed of rolling hills and pastures, at an elevation of 1,200 ft, 6 miles southwest GCT. The main wreckage, which included the cabin, both wings and the empennage, had come to rest facing uphill on a heading of about 270° magnetic. The first identified point of impact was located about 25 ft southeast of the main wreckage, and was composed of three 18-inch-long by 8-inch-wide divots, the relative positions of which matched the main landing and nose gear. The nose gear-scissor leg was found impaled in the soil just beyond the center divot, and a few feet further the soil had cratered leaving a 15-inch-deep by 4-ft-wide hole. Two matching linear impact marks, the total length of which corresponded to the airplane's wingspan, emanated from either side of the crater. Red navigation lens fragments were present at the tip of the northwest mark, and a complete green navigation lens was located just beyond the tip of the southeast mark. Soft dirt, along with shards of composite material, sections of seat rails, the battery, and propeller covered the area between the main cabin and initial impact point.

The fuselage sustained crush damage from the nose aft to the leading edge of the vertical stabilizer. The cabin flight controls, instrument panel, and avionics were heavily fragmented and compressed. The firewall had folded underneath the instrument panel, which was obscuring the engine. The right side of the cabin walls, along with the cabin roof, had peeled back, exposing the aft seats and baggage area.

The airplane was equipped with a portable Garmin Aera 660 GPS receiver. Preliminary review of flight track data recorded by the unit indicated that after departing I75, the airplane followed an almost direct southeast track for about 40 minutes at an altitude of about 4,000 ft msl, before reaching the Guthrie Center area. At 1701, the airplane made a 90° left turn towards the general direction of GCT, followed by an anti-clockwise 3-mile-wide orbit around the GCT runway at an altitude of about 3,500 ft msl (1,300 ft agl). The airplane then proceeded to fly southwest towards the town of Guthrie Center, and after passing east of the town, it initiated a descending right turn, reaching an altitude of 1,513 ft (400 ft agl), about 2 miles to the south. It then proceeded to fly north and make a clockwise orbit around the town climbing, descending, and then climbing again until it reached 2,800 ft at 1713. The airplane then turned to a southwest track, and descended to the last recorded location. That location was at an altitude of 2,560 ft, about 2 1/2 miles northeast of the accident site.

Examination of the wreckage at the accident site revealed a 2-inch-long crack in the engines aft exhaust muffler. The inner surface of the muffler heat shroud was coated in sooty tan and grey colored deposits. Similar deposits were also present on the inner surface of the cabin heat hose that ducted air from the shroud to the cabin heat distributor box assembly.

Toxicology testing performed by the Iowa State Medical Examiner's office revealed elevated levels of carbon monoxide in the blood of all occupants.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N91770
Model/Series: PA28 236
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Dusk
Observation Facility, Elevation: KADU, 1287 ft msl
Observation Time: 2315 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 18 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -7°C / -12°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / 18 knots, 310°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 4400 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.41 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Le Mars, IA (LRJ)
Destination: Osceola, IA (I75)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 41.620278, -94.521944

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Ed Anderson

Samantha Clark

Patrick Kellen

Tyler Douvia




GUTHRIE CENTER — Plymouth County is mourning the loss of four residents after a single-engine aircraft crashed outside Guthrie Center, Friday, November 9th.

Aircraft tail number N91770, a Piper PA-28-236 Dakota, was traveling from Le Mars toward Osceola when Guthrie County Sheriff’s Office received a call at 5:08 p.m. from Des Moines Air Traffic Control, requesting an emergency landing at the Guthrie Center Airport.


“Des Moines Traffic Control advised the pilot had suffered a heart attack and a student pilot would be attempting an emergency landing,” Guthrie County Sheriff Marty Arganbright said in the press release.


The pilot, Edward Ralph Anderson, 49, of Le Mars, had flown for roughly 20 years, safely delivering people to their destination.


“He loved flying,” Le Mars Airport Manager Tom Mullally said of his longtime friend and colleague. “It hits (the aviation community) the hardest, but we have a strong community bond and we support each other in times like this and our hearts go out to the family.”


Traveling with Anderson was Patrick Kellen, 36, Samantha Clark, 15, both of Le Mars, and Tyler Douvia, 28, of Merrill.


“We’re all related,” explained Patrick’s father Del Kellen. “Tyler was Pat’s first cousin, Sam was Pat’s daughter. Three from the same family.”


“I know Tyler, Pat and Sammy will never be forgotten and always remembered and missed,” added Deanna Douvia, Tyler’s mother, in a post on Facebook. “They were all too young and taken before their time.”


The Douvia and Kellen families also mourn Anderson’s loss.


“I also had the pleasure to know Ed Anderson and what a wonderful man he was,” Deanna said. “My heart goes out to his family also but know his heart of gold will never be forgotten.”


Mullally shared how Anderson inspired him to go after his instrument license, which would allow him to fly up in the clouds and through bad weather.


“Recently, he got his instrument license and him doing so inspired me to get my instrument license,” Mullally said. “He was my safety pilot. We were both going to get our instrument licenses, our commercials, then go on to take some charter flights.”


According to authorities, Guthrie Fire and Rescue and Panora Rescue were dispatched to Guthrie Center Airport, but the aircraft never arrived, dropping off radar approximately four miles southwest of the airport.


“The Guthrie County Sheriff’s Office launched an extensive search and rescue mission to locate the aircraft,” Arganbright stated. “The sheriff’s office utilized the assistance of the Iowa State Patrol, Iowa Department of Natural Resources, Adair County Sheriff’s Office, Dallas County Sheriff’s Office, Carroll County Sheriff’s Office, Panora Police Department, Stuart Police Department, Guthrie County Emergency Management, Guthrie Center Fire and Rescue, Panora Fire and Rescue, and numerous other law enforcement, fire, and rescue agencies.”


After being notified of the distress call, family members raced to aid in the search for the missing plane. Hundreds of volunteers also assisted in the search effort, from adding boots on the ground to businesses donating food and other supplies.


“We had a couple hundred volunteers out there looking until 3:30 in the morning,” Del said. “First thing in the morning, another couple hundred showed up again and we found them right away.”


With the search effort broadcasted on local media, area families opened their doors to volunteers doing the long hours of the search in the bitter cold.


“They helped us a lot,” shared Lori Kellen, Patrick’s mother, of an interaction she had with a family in Guthrie County during the search. “They had no clue who we were, but they opened their home to us, they knew why we were there.”


During the search, Guthrie County law enforcement kept in constant contact with the family.


“I’d like to thank the Guthrie Center police,” said Deanna. “They were very good to us, very informative. They told us what they could while they were out there searching.”


At approximately 6:31 a.m., Saturday, someone reported the crashed aircraft, authorities said.


“A Guthrie County citizen reported a small plane crash in a cow pasture southwest of the intersection of 265th and Maple Avenue,” the sheriff’s office release stated. “The plane was identified as tail #91770. The plane impacted very hard and all occupants were deceased at the scene.”


While family and friends gathered at the Kellen Ponderosa, outside of Le Mars on County Road K-49, to offer moral support over the weekend, the Le Mars community rallied to show support, via phone calls and social media posts.


“Our families were out here for us when we got home, had stuff ready for everything,” Del explained.


“I’ve received a lot of phone calls of support and condolences,” Deanna added.


Le Mars Community High School also opened their doors Saturday morning until 3 p.m., offering counseling services to students impacted by the loss of their classmate.


Guthrie County authorities revealed the deceased were transported to the Iowa Medical Examiner’s Office while the crash site was secured pending an investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration.


Funeral services for the deceased are being organized through Mauer-Johnson Funeral Home in Le Mars.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.lemarssentinel.com




Edward R. “Ed” Anderson, 49, of Le Mars, Iowa passed away on Friday, November 9, 2018 passed away while piloting a friend's plane. The accident occurred near Guthrie Center, Iowa due to an unexpected medical situation. Funeral services will be at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, November 17, 2018 at the United Methodist Church of Le Mars in Le Mars. Rev. Merrill Muller will officiate. Burial will follow at Memorial Cemetery in Le Mars. Visitation will begin at 2:00 p.m. Friday, November 16, 2018 with the family present from 5-7 p.m. and a prayer service at 7 p.m. at the Mauer-Johnson Funeral Home in Le Mars. 

Edward Ralph Anderson was born March 5, 1969, in Des Moines, Iowa to Jim and Roxie (White) Anderson. He was named after both of his grandfathers. He lived most of his life in Le Mars. 

Following the completion of high school at Le Mars Community, he attended WITCC in Sioux City, IA. He graduated from WITCC completing training in two careers. Following graduation he was employed by Interstates Electric & Engineering, Langel's Electric for almost 25 years, and the last five years for Thompson's Electric in Sioux City. Most of his work was covering the Le Mars and surrounding area. He made every effort to do his upmost work satisfaction for his customers. Customers enjoyed the fact that they could call him directly.

Ed has been a member of the First United Methodist Church of Le Mars and in recent years with the Merrill First United Methodist Church of Merrill, IA. Ed was a member of the IBEW Local 231 of Sioux City Electrical Workers. He was also a long time member of the Experimental Aircraft Association. As an EAA member he was also certified in the Young Eagles Program providing first flight for many youth. 

Ed enjoyed many hobbies. Motorcycling included many family trips to the Black Hills. He did considerable design and customizing of his cycles. One of his favorites was a 1989 Harley Soft Tail. His customized bike was photographed for the front cover of Popular Mechanics Magazine, issued in November 1998. 

In 1993 he became a licensed airplane pilot. At first he partnered in a plane ownership. In recent years he was the owner of a Challenger Light Sport. He was recognized by many as they would see him flying nightly above Le Mars with his flashing LED lights. He would rent other planes for the very long trips. He had acquired over 2300 hours flight time on more than 26 different aircraft. This past summer he passed all the exams for certification as an Aircraft Instrument Pilot. He was currently working on further certification for a Commercial License.

Ed was known as a very busy man but never hesitated to help others. No one would be left stranded along the road. He greeted everyone with a friendly smile. He had a kind heart caring for animals. Ed passed away November 9 while piloting a friend's plane in Iowa. The accident occurred due to an unexpected medical situation.

He is survived by his parents, Jim and Roxie Anderson; significant other, Christine Rasmussen; sister, Marlene Sale (Devin) and their children Bradley James, Austin Ryan and Nicole Amber from Carmel, IN.; two aunts, Arlene Engh and Norma Anderson as well as many cousins. 

Ed was preceded in death by his grandparents Matilda and Ralph White and Nellie and Ed Anderson.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorials be directed to the Siouxland Humane Society, Sioux City, IA.

https://mauerjohnsonfh.com



Samantha “Sami” M. Clark, 15, of Le Mars, Iowa, passed away Friday, November 9, 2018 from injuries sustained in an airplane accident near Guthrie Center, Iowa. Mass of Christian Burial will be at 10:30 a.m. on Friday, November 16, 2018 at All Saints Catholic Parish-St. Joseph Church in Le Mars. Father Bruce Lawler will officiate. Burial will follow at Calvary Cemetery in Le Mars. Visitation will begin at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, November 15, 2018 at the church with a Scriptural Prayer service at 7 p.m. There will be also be one hour of visitation before the funeral at the church on Friday. 

Samantha Marie Clark was born on February 14, 2003 in Cherokee, Iowa to David Paul Clark and Tonia Elizabeth Hinspeter. She attended Kluckhohn Elementary School. Sami was currently a sophomore at Le Mars Community High School. 

At school, Sami participated in volleyball, track, softball and was an A student on the Honor Roll. Away from school, Sami was adventurous and loved to hunt with her dad, Patrick. She loved her siblings and cared for each one. Sami was a best friend to everyone she knew. Sami was a happy go-lucky goofball who had to make everyone laugh. She was selfless and would do anything for friends and family. Sami was a 15 year old who had maturity beyond her age but still knew how to enjoy life as a teenager. 

Sami will be dearly missed by her mother, Tonia Kellen of Le Mars, IA; father, David Clark of Holstein, IA; a sister, Tessa; brothers, Konnor and Kassel Kellen at home and Devin (Destiny) O’Tool of Sac City, IA; grandparents, Lyle Jr. and Patti Hinspeter of Cleghorn, IA, Cindy Barry of Holstein, IA and Del and Lori Kellen of Le Mars, IA; great-grandparents, Donald and Mary Jane Kellen of Le Mars, IA; and numerous aunts, uncles and cousins. 

She was preceded in death by her dad, Patrick John Kellen; great-grandparents, Darrel and Cloette Schroeder, John and Viola Barry, Arthur and Doris Clark, Glenn and Arliss Todd, Elmer Tharpe, Florence Tharpe, Lyle Sr. and Margaret Hinspeter; grandfathers, Douglas Barry and Paul Clark; cousin, Tyler Douvia; and a close friend, Daisy Pippett.

A memorial fund has been established at American Bank in Le Mars. 

https://mauerjohnsonfh.com


Patrick Kellen, 36, of Le Mars, Iowa, passed away Friday, November 9, 2018 from injuries sustained in an airplane accident near Guthrie Center, Iowa. Mass of Christian Burial will be at 10:30 a.m. on Friday, November 16, 2018 at All Saints Catholic Parish-St. Joseph Church in Le Mars. Father Bruce Lawler will officiate. Burial will follow at Calvary Cemetery in Le Mars. Visitation will begin at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, November 15, 2018 at the church with a Scriptural Prayer service at 7 p.m. There will be also be one hour of visitation before the funeral at the church on Friday. 

Patrick John Kellen was born on September 26, 1982 in Le Mars, Iowa, the son of Del and Lori (Schroeder) Kellen. He graduated from Le Mars Community High School in Le Mars in 2001. He later attended Northwest Iowa Community College in Sheldon and graduated with an associate’s degree in Applied Science in Truck and Diesel Technology. 

On January 4, 2009, Patrick and Tonia Hinspeter were united in marriage in Tampa Bay, Florida aboard the Carnival Legend. They made their home in Le Mars. Patrick worked as a contractor for his parents at Kellen Excavating. He operated multiple pieces of heavy equipment. Pat also helped his father obtain work for the company. 

Patrick was a member of All Saints Catholic Parish in Le Mars. He was a member of the Le Mars Sportsman’s Club, Powder Players Snowmobile Club and participated in a men’s basketball league. He also rode in RAGBRAI (Registers’ Annual Great Bike Ride Across Iowa). 

Patrick worked hard but played harder. He had an adventurous spirit that led him to all kinds of hunting along with taking pilot lessons. He was always on the move doing something with his family and friends. Patrick was a wonderful father and always included his children in his adventures. Cracking jokes and playing pranks were his specialties. No matter where Pat traveled, he left a lasting impression. Everyone that knew him has some crazy story to tell. Pat knew no fear. 

Grateful to have shared his life is his wife, Tonia; his children, Tessa, Konnor and Kassel all of Le Mars, IA; parents, Del and Lori Kellen of Le Mars, IA; grandparents, Donald and Mary Jane Kellen of Le Mars, IA; sisters, Cassie (Seth) Delutri of Granger, IA and MacKenzie (Dalton) Brady of Ankeny, IA; brothers, Justin (Erica) Kellen of Merrill, IA and Derek (Chelsea) Kellen of Le Mars, IA; and numerous aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins.

He was preceded in death by his daughter, Samantha Clark; grandparents, Darrel and Cloette Schroeder; cousins, Tyler Douvia and Jashua Clark. 

https://mauerjohnsonfh.com



Tyler Douvia, 28, of Le Mars, Iowa passed away Friday, November 9, 2018 from injuries sustained in an airplane accident near Guthrie Center, Iowa. Mass of Christian Burial will be at 10:30 a.m. on Friday, November 16, 2018 at All Saints Catholic Parish-St. Joseph Church in Le Mars. Father Bruce Lawler will officiate. Burial will follow at Calvary Cemetery in Le Mars. Visitation will begin at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, November 15, 2018 at the church with a Scriptural Prayer service at 7 p.m. There will be also be one hour of visitation before the funeral at the church on Friday. 

Tyler Lee Douvia was born on April 20, 1990 in Le Mars, Iowa, the son of Darrell and Deanna (Kellen) Douvia. He grew up in Remsen, Iowa and attended grade school at Remsen Union Schools and later graduated from Remsen Union High School in 2009.

Following his education, Tyler went to work for his uncle Del Kellen at Kellen Excavation in Le Mars. His work focused mainly in the shop and in the iron yard. Most recently, Tyler and his fiancé, Rachel Kinney were going to manage the Koch Apple Orchard which they renamed the Le Mars Apple Orchard in Le Mars.

Tyler was a member of the Northwest Iowa Demo Derby Party and the Powder Players Snowmobile Club. Along with derby cars and snowmobiling, Tyler enjoyed deer hunting and boating at Storm Lake, Iowa. He also liked to work on restoring cars. To his family and friends, Tyler was a prankster. He loved to pull practical jokes on everyone he loved. He was an amazing brother and son and a loving and caring father. 

He will be dearly missed by his mother, Deanna Douvia of Le Mars, IA; father, Darrell Douvia of Remsen, IA; fiancĂ©, Rachel Kinney of Le Mars, IA; his daughter, Addelyn Douvia of Le Mars, IA; step-children, Kaiden and Mercedeez Hurley of Rockwell, IA; grandparents, Donald and Mary Jane Kellen of Le Mars, IA and Dwayne Douvia of Remsen, IA; sisters, Trisha (Nick) Harms, Anna Douvia and Katie Douvia; a brother, Travis (Lexi) Douvia; Godson’s, Kohen Douvia and Karter Harms all of Le Mars, IA; and numerous aunts, uncles and cousins. 

He was preceded in death by his grandmother, Darlene Douvia; uncle, Loren Clark; cousins, Samantha Clark, Patrick Kellen, Jashua Clark and Madison Fuller. 

A memorial fund in Tyler’s name has been set up at Iowa State Bank in Le Mars. 

https://mauerjohnsonfh.com



The Rev. Merrill Muller was shocked by the news. 

Edward Anderson, a fellow pilot who attended the pastor's church in Merrill, suffered a heart attack while in flight from Le Mars in northwest Iowa to Osceola in southern Iowa, authorities said. When wreckage of the plane was found Saturday in rural Guthrie County, deputies recovered the bodies of Anderson and three passengers. 

"He loved flying so much," Muller, who will officiate Anderson's funeral services, said Monday, recalling the Le Mars resident's smile. "He always seemed to be smiling."

Anderson, 49, was flying three passengers — Samantha Clark, 15, and her stepfather, Patrick Kellen, 36, both of Le Mars; and Kellen's cousin, Tyler Douvia, 28, of Merrill — to a hunting trip, friends said. 

When Anderson suffered a heart attack, Des Moines air-traffic control requested an emergency landing for the 1979 Piper Dakota, a single-engine aircraft, authorities said. A student pilot was to attempt an emergency landing at an airport east of Guthrie Center.

In a message on Facebook, Patrick Kellen's younger brother, Derek Kellen, described learning of the crash as unbelievable. His brother was the student pilot, he said. 

Samantha Clark was Patrick Kellen's stepdaughter, but he "treated her like his own," his brother said. The Kellen brothers and Tyler Douvia, their cousin, worked at Kellen Excavation, which is owned by the brothers' father, he said. 

Tom Mullally, manager of Le Mars Municipal Airport, has said it was a coincidence a student pilot on board. A close friend of Anderson, he called the crash heartbreaking.

In a brief interview, the pilot's father, James Anderson, said his son was a pilot for more than 15 years. Shocked by the news, he said Saturday his son loved to be in the air.

Some family members on Monday could not be reached by the Des Moines Register; others declined to comment. Condolences began filling social media when the news broke, with family and friends sharing photographs of the four killed. 

"I have no words," one person wrote on Facebook. "We are saddened by this tragedy."

"God decided that he needed four new angels," another said.

A woman who wrote a condolence for Anderson told him to "fly high where you are!"

Muller expected at least a couple hundred people to attend Anderson’s funeral services. Having grown up in Le Mars, Anderson was well-known in the community, he said.

Through his pastor, James Anderson thanked the 150 or so people who helped in the extensive search for the aircraft after it disappeared from radar about four miles southwest of the Guthrie County airport. The county sheriff’s office was assisted by more than a dozen police, fire and rescue agencies.

The plane was found more than 13 hours later when a resident reported a small-plane crash Saturday morning in a cattle pasture southwest of 265th Street and Maple Avenue. Authorities there found the plane, which the sheriff's office said “impacted very hard” and scattered in pieces.
A single-engine plane crashed in rural Guthrie County on Friday, claiming four lives.

The official cause of the crash may not be known for a year, a spokesman with the National Transportation Safety Board, which investigates aviation accidents that result in injury or death, told the Register. A preliminary report was expected to be completed within a week.

The aircraft was manufactured in 1979 and was based in El Salvador until 1991, according to Aircraft Ownership Solutions' online advertisement for the $114,900 plane.

The Friday plane crash was the deadliest in Iowa since Feb. 16, 2007, when a Cessna 240A carrying a pilot and three passengers crashed on approach to Council Bluffs Municipal Airport during adverse winter weather, killing all four on board, according to data kept by the NTSB.

Before that, the last time four people died in an aviation incident in Iowa was Dec. 17, 2003, when a Piper PA-32 crashed into a cornfield in Brooklyn. The NTSB determined the pilot's inadequate planning and lack of an instrument rating contributed.

Muller, the Merrill pastor, said Anderson received his instrument rating about four weeks ago, flying a minimum of 200 hours and passing a variety of tests. Muller, a pilot himself, called it "quite an achievement." Anderson was proud of his efforts.

"It was really special to him," he said.

Original article ➤ https://www.desmoinesregister.com



Four people were killed in a plane crash Friday in Guthrie County after the pilot had a heart attack, the deadliest aviation incident in Iowa since 2007, authorities said. 

The Guthrie County Sheriff's Office was called at about 5 p.m. from Des Moines air-traffic control requesting an emergency landing for a single-engine aircraft at the airport east of Guthrie Center. The plane, a 1979 Piper Dakota, never arrived.

Air-traffic control told local authorities the pilot, Edward Ralph Anderson, 49, of Le Mars, suffered a heart attack and that a student pilot would attempt an emergency landing of the plane, which had two additional passengers.

The plane left Le Mars in northwest Iowa at 4:15 p.m. and was traveling to Osceola, Guthrie County Sheriff Marty Arganbright said. Traffic control reported the aircraft disappearing from radar about 4 miles southwest of the Guthrie County airport.

The sheriff's office launched an extensive search for the aircraft, using the assistance of more than a dozen police, fire and rescue agencies. More than 13 hours later, on Saturday morning, a resident reported a small-plane crash in a cow pasture southwest of the intersection of 265th Street and Maple Avenue in Guthrie County. 

There, authorities found the wreckage of the plane, which the sheriff's office said "impacted very hard." Pieces of the aircraft were scattered nearby. 

The others killed were identified Saturday as 36-year-old Patrick Kellen and 15-year-old Samantha Clark, both of Le Mars, and Tyler Douvia, 28, of Merrill. 

The plane crash is the deadliest in Iowa since Feb. 16, 2007, when a Cessna 240A carrying a pilot and three passengers crashed on approach to Council Bluffs Municipal Airport during adverse winter weather, killing all four on board, according to data kept by the National Transportation Safety Board.

In a brief interview, the Le Mars pilot's father, James Anderson, said his son was a pilot for more than 15 years. His son was flying the three people to a hunting trip, he said. 

"My son really enjoyed flying," James Anderson, shocked by the news, said Saturday. 

Tom Mullally, manager of Le Mars Municipal Airport for 18 years, said Edward Anderson was a good friend of his. He said he watched the plane take off Friday and that it was a coincidence there was a student pilot on board.

"What happened is just heartbreaking," said Mullally, who joined the search efforts when news spread of the missing aircraft. 

The bodies of the four were transported to the Iowa Medical Examiner’s Office. The crash site was secured pending an NTSB investigation.

Original article ➤ https://www.desmoinesregister.com





GUTHRIE COUNTY, Iowa (KCCI) — Four people died in a small-plane crash in west-central Iowa after a student pilot attempted an emergency landing, Guthrie County authorities said.

Guthrie County Sheriff Marty Arganbright said in a news release that Des Moines Air Traffic Control requested an emergency landing around 5 p.m. Friday for a single-engine aircraft at the Guthrie Center Airport.

The pilot had suffered a heart attack and a student pilot would be attempting the emergency landing, officials said. There were four people in the aircraft.

Emergency response personnel from Guthrie Center and Panora were sent to the airport, but the plane never arrived. Des Moines Traffic Control reported that the aircraft dropped off radar approximately 4 miles southwest of the Guthrie Center Airport.

The aircraft left Le Mars at 4:15 p.m. Friday, traveling to Osceola, Arganbright said.

The Le Mars Municipal Airport director confirmed that there were three men and a 15-year-old girl on board on their way to a hunting trip.

The victims have been identified as Edward Ralph Anderson, 49, who was the pilot, Patrick Kellen, 36, Samantha Clark, 15, all of Le Mars, and Tyler Douvia, 28, of Merrill.

The Guthrie County Sheriff’s Office launched an extensive search and rescue mission to find the aircraft.

A Guthrie County resident reported the small-plane crash at approximately 6:30 a.m. Saturday in a cow pasture southwest of the intersection of 265th Street and Maple Avenue.

All occupants of the plane died at the scene, authorities said.

The bodies have been taken to the state medical examiner’s office. The crash site is being secured pending an investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration.

Emergency response personnel said the search was difficult because the plane went missing as the sun went down. Pitch-black conditions limited their visibility, especially in forested areas of the rural county.

The Iowa State Patrol, the Iowa Department of Natural Resources, the Adair County Sheriff’s Office, the Dallas County Sheriff’s Office, the Carroll County Sheriff’s Office, the Panora Police Department, the Stuart Police Department, Guthrie County Emergency Management, Guthrie Center Fire and Rescue, Panora Fire and Rescue and numerous other law enforcement, fire and rescue agencies assisted in the search.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.kcci.com