Wednesday, October 12, 2016

Mooney M20J 201, N201RD: Incident occurred August 26, 2018 at Herlong Recreational Airport (KHEG), Jacksonville, Florida • Incident occurred March 04, 2018 at Myrtle Beach International Airport (KMYR), Horry County, South Carolina • Incident occurred October 10, 2016 at Person County Airport (KTDF), Roxboro, Person County, North Carolina





http://registry.faa.gov/N201RD

A pilot and passenger are safe Sunday after their plane lost power while 300 feet in the air, according to the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office. 

It all started when the pilot took off from runway 7 at Herlong Airport at 9300 Normandy Boulevard but lost all power at about 300 feet in the air, says JSO. He attempted to land the plane in a grassy field east of the runway, but JSO says the plane skidded to a stop. The pilot and his one passenger sustained very minor injuries.

Federal Aviation Administration is leading an investigation into the incident with assistance from JSO.

JSO says the plane is a 1977, 4-passenger Mooney M20J aircraft.

Original article ➤  https://www.firstcoastnews.com

March 04, 2018: Tire blew on landing, aircraft then went off the runway into the grass.  

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Carolina

Date: 04-MAR-18
Time: 16:13:00Z
Regis#: N201RD
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20J
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MYRTLE BEACH
State: SOUTH CAROLINA























Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Greensboro

October 10, 2016:  Aircraft landed gear up.

Damage:  Prop strike, engine stoppage, belly damage, some sheet metal damage to wings

Date: 10-OCT-16
Time: 18:00:00Z
Regis#: N201RD
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20J
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ROXBORO
State: North Carolina AIRCRAFT:   Mooney M20J N201RD

ENGINE - M&M, S/N:  IO-360-A3B6D            S/N L-16709-81A

PROPELLER – M&M, S/N:       McCauley MDB2D34C212 S/N 765625

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE:   1237.5 TS NEW

PROPELLER:    1237.5 TS NEW          

AIRFRAME:    1237.5 TS NEW                   

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  Gear up landing

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES: Prop strike, engine stoppage, belly damage, some sheet metal damage to wings.          

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:  KTDF (Person County Airport, Roxboro, NC)           

REMARKS: Aircraft is being hangared in private hangar at KTDF.

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com/N201RD.htm

Beech G58, Bear State Financial Inc., N458G: Incident occurred October 09, 2016 in Fayetteville, Washington County, Arkansas

BEAR STATE FINANCIAL INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N458G

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Little Rock FSDO-11

AIRCRAFT WENT OFF THE TAXIWAY INTO THE GRASS, FAYETTEVILLE, ARKANSAS.  

Date: 09-OCT-16
Time: 04:00:00Z
Regis#: N458G
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 58
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: FAYETTEVILLE
State: Arkansas

Cessna 172, N523ND: Incidents occurred October 09, 2016 and July 19, 2012 in Grand Forks, North Dakota

University of North Dakota
John D. Odegard School of Aerospace 

http://registry.faa.gov/N523ND

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Fargo FSDO-21

AIRCRAFT SUSTAINED A BIRDSTRIKE, LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, GRAND FORKS, NORTH DAKOTA.  

Date: 09-OCT-16
Time: 01:50:00Z
Regis#: N523ND
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: GRAND FORKS
State: North Dakota

AIRCRAFT WENT OFF THE RUNWAY AND STRUCK A SIGN, GRAND FORKS, NORTH DAKOTA.

Date: 07/19/2012
Time: 0140
Regis#: 523ND 
Make/Model: C172    
Description: 172 Skyhawk
Event Type: Incident 
Highest Injury: None     
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Unknown  
Phase: Unknown
City: GRAND FORKS  
 State: ND

Cessna 170B, N8170Q: Incident occurred October 09, 2016 in Sterling, Alaska

http://registry.faa.gov/N8170Q

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Anchorage FSDO-03

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED 5 MILES FROM STERLING, ALASKA

Date: 09-OCT-16
Time: 23:55:00Z
Regis#: N8170Q
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 170
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: STERLING
State: Alaska

Bellanca 14-13 Cruisair Senior, N86889: Accident occurred October 10, 2016 in Ravenna, Portage County, Ohio

http://registry.faa.gov/N86889

AIRCRAFT DURING TAXI, WENT OFF THE RWY INTO A DITCH, RAVENNA, OHIO

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Cleveland FSDO-25

Date: 10-OCT-16
Time: 21:39:00Z
Regis#: N86889
Aircraft Make: BELLANCA
Aircraft Model: 1413
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Substantial
Activity: Other
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: RAVENNA
State: Ohio

Cessna 150M, N704LE: Accident occurred October 08, 2016 in Beasley, Fort Bend County, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA014
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 08, 2016 in Beasley, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/06/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 150M, registration: N704LE
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot reported that he was returning from a solo flight when the engine "started failing." The engine speed decreased to about 1,500 rpm with a "significant" vibration. The pilot's efforts to restore engine power were unsuccessful, and the engine ultimately lost total power. He subsequently conducted a forced landing to a plowed field, during which the airplane nosed over. 

A postaccident examination of the engine revealed that the No. 2 cylinder exhaust valve was stuck in the “full open” position. Disassembly of the cylinder revealed that the exhaust valve stem exhibited carbon deposits consistent with the stuck valve condition. No other engine anomalies were noted.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The No. 2 cylinder exhaust valve being stuck in the “full open” position due to carbon deposits, which resulted in a total loss of engine power.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas
Continental Motors Inc.; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N704LE

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA014 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 08, 2016 in Beasley, TX
Aircraft: CESSNA 150M, registration: N704LE
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 8, 2016, about 1840 central daylight time, a Cessna 150M airplane, N704LE, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Beasley, Texas. The student pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by private individuals under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a solo instructional flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Wharton Regional Airport (ARM), Wharton, Texas, about 1610. The intended destination was the Sugar Land Regional Airport (SGR), Sugar Land, Texas.

The pilot stated that he departed SGR about 1530 and flew to Eagle Lake Airport (ELA) where he conducted some practice takeoffs and landings. He then flew to ARM, conducted some additional takeoffs and landings, and refueled the airplane. He reported conducting a preflight inspection at that time and observed no anomalies. After takeoff, he conducted practice maneuvers in the local area for about 30 minutes before deciding to return to SGR. The pilot stated that while cruising at 2,500 ft mean sea level en route to SGR, the engine "started failing." The engine speed decreased to about 1,500 rpm, with a "significant" vibration. His efforts to restore engine power were unsuccessful and the engine ultimately lost power completely. He executed a forced landing to a plowed agricultural field. During the landing, the airplane nosed over, resulting in damage to the vertical stabilizer, rudder, and left wing.

A postaccident examination of the engine revealed that the no. 2 cylinder exhaust valve was stuck in the full open position. Disassembly of the cylinder determined that the exhaust valve stem exhibited carbon deposits consistent with the stuck valve condition. No other anomalies with respect to the no. 2 cylinder or the remainder of the engine were observed.

Maintenance records indicated that the engine was overhauled in April 2002. At that time, the engine had accumulated 3,492 hours total time. The overhauled engine was installed on the accident airplane in May 2002, at a recording tachometer time of 3291.9 hours. According to the records, the most recent annual inspection was completed on December 18, 2015. A maintenance entry, dated February 26, 2016, noted that an exhaust valve leak on cylinder no. 4. The exhaust valve was subsequently replaced. The final entry was dated April 8, 2016, and noted that the no. 2 cylinder spark plugs were cleaned. The maintenance records did not contain any subsequent entries.

At the time of the examination, the airplane recording hour (Hobbs) meter and tachometer indicated 2373.4 hours and 4131.60 hours, respectively.

The engine manufacturer's recommended overhaul interval was 1,800 hours or 12 years. Although more than 14 years had elapsed since the overhaul, Federal Aviation Administration regulations do not require compliance with an engine manufacturer's recommended time-between-overhaul (TBO) interval.

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA014
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 08, 2016 in Beasley, TX
Aircraft: CESSNA 150M, registration: N704LE
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 8, 2016, about 1850 central daylight time, a Cessna 150M airplane, N704LE, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a loss of engine power near Beasley, Texas. The student pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by private individuals under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a solo instructional flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Wharton Regional Airport (ARM), Wharton, Texas, about 1600. The intended destination was the Sugar Land Regional Airport (SGR), Sugar Land, Texas.

The pilot informed Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors that the engine lost power during cruise flight. He executed a forced landing to a plowed field. The airplane subsequently nosed over, coming to rest inverted with damage to the vertical stabilizer, rudder, and left wing.

A postaccident examination of the engine is pending.

Cessna 182T Skylane, N65903: Accident occurred October 09, 2016 in Toone, Hardeman County, Tennessee

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Memphis, Tennessee 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N65903

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Toone, TN
Accident Number: ERA17LA019
Date & Time: 10/09/2016, 1050 CDT
Registration: N65903
Aircraft: CESSNA 182
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On October 9, 2016, about 1050 central daylight time, a Cessna 182T, N65903, was substantially damaged during a forced landing in a field, following a partial loss of engine power during cruise flight near Toone, Tennessee. The private pilot was not injured. The personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight that that originated from Destin Executive Airport (DTS), Destin, Florida, about 0730. The flight was destined to McKeller-Sipes Regional Airport (MKL), Jackson, Tennessee.

The pilot reported that while in cruise flight at 4,000 feet mean sea level, nearing the destination airport, an instrument panel warning sounded and the oil pressure indicator was in the red arc; however, the engine was running smoothly. The pilot began to look for airports or fields to divert to and notified air traffic control (ATC) of the abnormal engine indication. The pilot then requested, and ATC approved a direct course to the destination airport. A few minutes later, a light "clanging" noise was heard from the engine and the pilot alerted ATC that the airplane did indeed have an engine problem. The controller then advised the pilot that there was a private airstrip 5 miles west of his position and the pilot attempted to divert to that airstrip. The "clanging" noise grew louder and the engine did not have enough power to reach the private airstrip. The pilot then performed a forced landing in a field. During the landing, the airplane encountered uneven terrain, which collapsed the nose landing gear.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the firewall had sustained damage. The inspector also noted that the engine's No. 3 cylinder had suffered a catastrophic failure. Examination of photos provided by the inspector revealed evidence of oil on the exterior of the engine and exhaust system in the immediate vicinity of the No. 3 cylinder. The inspector added that the No. 3 cylinder exhaust valve was stuck in the closed position. The No. 3 cylinder was retained and forwarded to the NTSB Materials Laboratory, Washington, D.C. Examination of the No. 3 cylinder revealed that the rocker arm shaft bosses, bushings, and exhaust valve keeper were fractured. The rocker arm cover was fractured and bent outward. All of the fracture surfaces exhibited features consistent with overstress failure. No indications of pre-existing damage, such as corrosion or fatigue cracking, were observed. Dimensional review of the stuck exhaust valve revealed that it exhibited deposits on its surface up to 0.006-inch thick.

The four-seat, high-wing, fixed-tricycle gear airplane was manufactured in 2004. It was equipped with a Lycoming IO-540, 230-horsepower engine. The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on July 12, 2016. At that time, the engine had accumulated 2,188.6 hours since new. The airplane had flown 79.8 hours from the time of the inspection, until the accident, which resulted in 2,268.4 total engine hours since new at the time of the accident. The manufacturer recommended overhaul time for the make and model engine was 12 years or 2,000 hours, whichever occurred first.

Review of an engine data plot for the accident flight reveled that the engine monitor was indicating that the No. 3 cylinder was about two-thirds below the exhaust gas temperature and cylinder head temperature of the other five cylinders during the entire approximate 3-hours cruise portion of the accident flight. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 40, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/07/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/29/2016
Flight Time:  369 hours (Total, all aircraft), 236 hours (Total, this make and model), 251 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 73 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 26 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N65903
Model/Series: 182 T
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2004
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18281501
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/12/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3110 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 80 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2268 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C91A installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-540-AB1A5
Registered Owner: EASY AVIATION LLC
Rated Power: 230 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MKL, 434 ft msl
Observation Time: 1053 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 5°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 4°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 14 knots, 50°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.36 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Destin, FL (DTS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Jackson, TN (MKL)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 0730 CDT
Type of Airspace:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  35.320000, -88.950000 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA019
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 09, 2016 in Toone, TN
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration: N65903
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 9, 2016, about 1050 central daylight time, a Cessna 182T, N65903, was substantially damaged during a forced landing in a field, following a partial loss of engine power during cruise flight near Toone, Tennessee. The private pilot was not injured. The airplane was operated by the private pilot as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight that that originated from Destin Executive Airport (DTS), Destin, Florida, about 0730. The flight was destined to McKeller-Sipes Regional Airport (MKL), Jackson, Tennessee.

The pilot reported that while in cruise flight at 4,000 feet mean sea level, nearing the destination airport, an instrument panel warning sounded and the oil pressure indicator was in the red arc; however, the engine was running smoothly. The pilot began to look for airports or fields to divert to and notified air traffic control (ATC) of the abnormal engine indication. The pilot then requested, and ATC approved a direct course to the destination airport. A few minutes later, a light "clanging" noise was heard from the engine and the pilot alerted ATC that the airplane did indeed have an engine problem. The controller then advised the pilot that there was a private airstrip 5 miles west of his position and the pilot attempted to divert to that airstrip. The "clanging" noise grew louder and the engine did not have enough power to reach the private airstrip. The pilot then performed a forced landing in a field. During the landing, the airplane encountered uneven terrain, which collapsed the nosegear.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the firewall had sustained damage. The inspector also noted that the engine's No. 3 cylinder had suffered a catastrophic failure.

The engine was retained for further examination.

Cessna 150J, N61326: Accident occurred October 11, 2016 in Greenville, Hunt County, Texas

http://registry.faa.gov/N61326

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Dallas FSDO-05

AIRCRAFT DURING TAXI, STRUCK A SIGN, GREENVILLE, TEXAS  

Date: 11-OCT-16
Time: 02:00:00Z
Regis#: N61326
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 150
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Substantial
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: GREENVILLE
State: Texas

Milholland Kelly D, N522LM: Accident occurred October 07, 2016 near Livingston Municipal Airport (OOR), Polk County, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA015 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 07, 2016 in Livingston, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/06/2017
Aircraft: Milholland Kelly D, registration: N522LM
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot reported that, while on approach for landing in the experimental amateur-built airplane, the engine experienced a total loss of power. The pilot performed a forced landing to a field, during which the airplane sustained substantial damage. An examination of the engine revealed that the left magneto was not producing spark. Further examination of the left magneto revealed signatures consistent with failure of the magneto capacitor. Although the failure of a single magneto would likely result in a partial loss of engine power, the reason for the total loss of engine power experienced on the accident flight could not be determined based on the available information.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A total loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined based on the available information.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N522LM

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA015
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 07, 2016 in Livingston, TX
Aircraft: Milholland Kelly D, registration: N522LM
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 7, 2016, about 1315 central daylight time, a Milholland Kelly D airplane, N522LM, was substantially damaged during a forced landing 1/2 mile north of Livingston Municipal Airport (OOR), Livingston, Texas. The pilot was not injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The cross-country flight departed Sport Flyers Airport (27XS), Brookshire, Texas, about 1200, and was en route to OOR.

According to the pilot, while approaching OOR for landing, the engine rpms decreased and the engine stopped producing power. He added that there were no indications from the engine or the engine gauges prior to the sudden power loss. During the forced landing to the field, the landing gear collapsed and partially separated from the fuselage. The lower wings, fuselage, and firewall were substantially damaged.

An examination of the engine revealed that the left magneto was not producing spark. Further examination of the engine and related systems revealed no additional mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operations.


The left magneto was placed on a test machine and brought to operating speed. Each of the four ignition leads produced spark; however, at times the spark was intermittent. Further examination of the magneto revealed a greyish color on the points, consistent with failure of the capacitor. The technician remarked that a magneto could test within expected parameters but when it got hot during normal engine operations, it could fail.

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA015
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 07, 2016 in Livingston, TX
Aircraft: MILHOLLAND LEONARD E KELLY D, registration: N522LM
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 7, 2016, about 1320 central daylight time, an amateur-built Milholland Kelly D airplane, N522LM, was substantially damaged during a forced landing 1/2 mile north of Livingston Municipal Airport (OOR), Livingston, Texas. The pilot was not injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The cross-country flight departed Sport Flyers Airport (27XS), Brookshire, Texas, about 1200, and was en route to OOR. 

According to the pilot, while approaching OOR for landing, the engine RPMs decreased and the engine stopped producing power. There was no sputter or noise prior to or associated with the sudden power loss. During the forced landing to the field the landing gear collapsed and separated partially from the fuselage. The lower wings, fuselage, and firewall were substantially damaged.

Cessna A185F Skywagon 185, N4924E: Accident occurred October 07, 2016 in San Antonio, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N4924E

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Antonio FSDO-17


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA013
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 07, 2016 in San Antonio, TX
Aircraft: CESSNA A185, registration: N4924E
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of a tailwheel equipped airplane reported that, while landing at a tower controlled airport, he performed a wheel landing and as the tail settled to the runway, in a "fraction of a second" the airplane was "sideways on the runway." He further reported that the airplane skidded off the runway to the right, the right main landing gear collapsed, and the right wing impacted the terrain.

The right wing sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observing system at the accident airport, about two minutes before the accident, recorded the wind at 360 degrees true at 11 knots. In addition, a wind shift and frontal passage was recorded about 3 minutes before the accident. The pilot reported that he landed on runway 12 left.

The pilot submitted an additional statement, which in part stated: "1) Tower assigned a runway with a known quartering tail wind, up to 18 knots. 2) As pilot in command, I did not process the wind call out prior to landing." 

According to the Federal Aviation Administration Chart Supplement, within the final approach path, a wind sock was located to the left of the runway. The flight was flown under day visual meteorological conditions, the airplane entered the pattern on a left downwind, and would have likely been visible to the pilot. However, the pilot reported that he did not observe the wind sock.

According to an Air Traffic Control transcript of tower and ground communications, the accident occurred about 3 minutes and 8 seconds after the accident airplane's initial contact with the tower, when the accident airplane reported, 3 miles east inbound. The tower responded to the initial call with, wind 010 at 18, cleared to land 12 left. 

About 40 seconds later, a ground controller held a taxiing jet stating in part: "hold out right there, we're not sure what we're going to be doing with the airport right now, [wind] 360 at 16, that's a pretty strong tailwind for you guys."

About 30 seconds later, tower directed the accident airplane to enter left downwind for 12 left and provided the landing clearance a second time for runway 12 left. 

About 20 seconds later, a second airplane reported inbound and 8 seconds later was directed by tower to enter left downwind for 12 left. The airplane subsequently repeated the instruction and the tower reported wind 360 at 15. 

About 25 seconds later, the second airplane requested to land runway 30 right instead of runway 12 left. The tower subsequently directed this second airplane to enter a left downwind for runway 30 left, while the accident airplane continued and landed on runway 12 left.

According to 14 CFR Part 91.3 titled, "Responsibility and authority of the pilot in command," sub bullet (a) states, "The pilot in command of an aircraft is directly responsible for, and is the final authority as to, the operation of that aircraft."

Cessna 172RG Cutlass, Precise Flight LLC, N9387D: Incident occurred October 10, 2016 in Waukesha County, Wisconsin

Precise Flight LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N9387D

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Milwaukee FSDO-13

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, NOSE WHEEL SEPARATED, WAUKESHA, WISCONSIN. 

Date: 10-OCT-16
Time: 00:25:00Z
Regis#: N9387D
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: WAUKESHA
State: Wisconsin

Tuesday, October 11, 2016

Lodi pursuit ends with crash at Calaveras County Airport (KCPU), San Andreas, California

Lodi Police were busy this weekend with a long-distance pursuit and a drive-by shooting at a Downtown bar.

Lodi Police and the California Highway Patrol pursued a suspect in a stolen vehicle from Lodi all the way to San Andreas on Saturday evening. The pursuit ended when the driver, 36-year-old Jeffrey Bishop of Lodi, crashed into a plane at a municipal airport in San Andreas, according to the Lodi Police Department.

Officer Ryan LaRue located a reported stolen vehicle near the Downtown area at 11:15 p.m. When he attempted to begin a traffic stop of the vehicle, the driver fled at a high rate of speed, Lodi police said. The driver headed east on Lockeford Street and then headed out into the county area east down Victor Road and Highway 12.

When officers left the city limits they called in for backup from CHP, Lodi Police Lt. Fernando Martinez said. However CHP officers were already engaged in another pursuit. They arrived when Bishop had reached the Valley Springs area. Lodi police returned to the city, except for one K-9 officer.

After 26 minutes in the pursuit, the car, a 2012 Dodge Avenger, missed a turn and went off the shoulder, hitting several fences and flipping onto its roof after striking a plane, police said.

One of the passengers sustained life-threatening injuries and was airlifted to an area hospital, Lodi police said. On Monday, the passenger had been in surgery and was stable.

Bishop was arrested on suspicion of felony evasion with injury, driving under the influence of drugs and vehicle theft. He was booked into the Lodi City Jail.

Source:   http://www.lodinews.com

Monday, October 10, 2016

Cessna F150M Commuter, G-BDZC: Fatal accident occurred October 17, 2016 in Cambridge, United Kingdom







NTSB Identification: CEN17WA017
Accident occurred Monday, October 17, 2016 in Cambridge, United Kingdom
Aircraft: CESSNA F150, registration:
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Minor.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On October 17, 2016, at 1021 coordinated universal time, a Reims Cessna F150M airplane, G-BDZC, crashed after takeoff at the Bourn Airfield (EGSN), Cambridge, United Kingdom. The pilot was fatally injured.

The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the government of the United Kingdom. This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by or obtained from the United Kingdom. Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Farnborough House
Berkshire Copse Road
Aldershot, Hampshire
GU11 2HH, United Kingdom
Tel: +44 (0)1252 510300
Fax: +44 (0)1252 376999
https://www.aaib.gov.uk

Norwegian Air Shuttle to hire at least 24 U.S. pilots for its Fort Lauderdale crew base

To shore up growth in the United States in coming years, Norwegian Air Shuttle announced Monday it is recruiting and hiring American pilots for its crew base at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport.

The Scandinavian low-cost airline, which has drawn opposition from U.S. carriers and unions over its business practices, said its goal is to hire a "large pool" of American pilots to ensure adequate staffing for the dozens of new Boeing Dreamliner aircraft expected to join its fleet over the next few years.

"Hiring American pilots for our long-haul operation has been one of Norwegian's goals since launching our transatlantic service three years ago, and we are thrilled that we are finally able to do so," said Asgeir Nyseth, Norwegian Group chief operating officer, in a statement. "With the delivery of 31 additional Boeing Dreamliners over the next few years, Norwegian is excited to be adding American pilots to our ever-growing workforce."

Norwegian will be the only European airline to hire U.S.-based pilots, Nyseth said.

For its Fort Lauderdale pilots' base, the carrier is aiming to hire a minimum of 24 crew members to support operations of one Dreamliner aircraft, spokesman Anders Lindstrom said. That will include one base captain, nine captains, five relief captains and nine first officers, he said.

"We will start with a pilot's base in Fort Lauderdale, but the ambition, of course, is to grow and also have more pilot bases in the U.S.," Lindstrom said. "Recruitment is already in place, with job ads just out, and we aim to have them working during the first six months of 2017."

The airline has received nearly 100 applications for the pilots' jobs, which will offer competitive salaries, Lindstrom added.

Norwegian first began recruiting American flight attendants for its bases at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood and John F. Kennedy International Airport in October 2013. Three years later, it expects to have more than 500 American cabin crew members across the two bases by year's end, Norwegian said.

In August, Norwegian's U.S. base flight attendants voted for union representation through the Norwegian Cabin Crew Association, with assistance from the Association of Flight Attendants-CWA in Washington, D.C., which represents nearly 60,000 flight attendants at several major carriers.

Norwegian launched service between Fort Lauderdale and Scandinavia in late 2013, with flights to Oslo, Norway; Copenhagen, Denmark; and Stockholm, Sweden. It then added service to London's Gatwick Airport in July 2014 and, most recently, to Paris, France this August.

Since it began operations at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood in November 2013, Norwegian has carried 511,894 passengers on 1,977 flights to and from there, airport records show.

Next up, Norwegian plans to launch service from Fort Lauderdale to Guadeloupe in the French Caribbean on Dec. 17 and to Barcelona, Spain on Aug. 22.

Given the upcoming launch of several new routes from the United States, the hiring of American pilots over the next few years will allow it to adequately accommodate the growth of its long-haul network, airline officials have said.

Norwegian said it will cover the cost of converting the U.S. pilots' certification from a Federal Aviation Administration pilot certificate to a European pilot license based on European Aviation Safety Agency regulations.

"Continuing our U.S. expansion is one of the key factors to Norwegian's global strategy, and we want to be able to support the local market and stimulate those economies as much as we possibly can," Nyseth said. "We are still looking at opening more crew bases across the U.S., and depending on the success of the American pilots in Fort Lauderdale, we'll include pilots in each of those new bases as well."

Currently, two subsidiaries — Norwegian Air International (Ireland) and Norwegian UK (London) — are awaiting approval from the Department of Transportation for their foreign air carrier permit to operate flights between the United States and Europe.

Their approval would allow the airline to more effectively utilize its long-haul fleet and establish a seamless operation, including the use of the same aircraft on both U.S. and other long-haul routes to Asia and South America, Norwegian said.

Norwegian Air International's application, which has been pending for more than two years, has received opposition from industry groups including the AFA and Air Line Pilots Association International (ALPA).

AFA has said NAI's business model evades international labor laws and seeks to create unfair competition with U.S. carriers. ALPA, which represents more than 52,000 pilots at 30 airlines in North America, contends the airline's business plan threatens fair competition and U.S. jobs.

Both applications are still pending approval from the DOT.

For information on Norwegian's pilot jobs, click here.

Source:   http://www.sun-sentinel.com

Cirrus SR20, Cory Lidle, N929CD: 10 Years After Plane Crash, Lidle’s Widow Says ‘It’s Still Not Realistic’

Cory Lidle, a New York Yankees pitcher, flies over Clearwater, Florida, in February 2006. (credit: Randy Miller/Bucks County Courier Times) 


Cory Lidle, Tyler Stanger and their families pose for a photo on the Rockefeller Center observation deck on Oct. 10, 2006, a day before Lidle and Stanger were killed in a plane crash in Manhattan. (Photo courtesy of Melanie Lidle-Heyward)



There are still days Melanie doesn’t believe it really happened. But then she looks at her son. Christopher isn’t 6 years old anymore. He’s a teenager, doing teenage things like learning to drive. So it must be real.

Melanie’s husband and Christopher’s father — Cory Lidle — died in a plane crash on Oct. 11, 2006. Lidle pitched in the major leagues for a decade, including the last two months of his career with the Yankees.

When I met with Melanie and Christopher in New York City last month, it was easy to see Christopher’s resemblance to Cory. “His eyes have always been (Cory’s) from day one,” Melanie said with a smile.

Lidle’s death — 10 years ago Tuesday — was stunning, certainly for the manner in which it happened. His small plane crashed into a building on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, killing him at age 34, and his 26-year-old copilot/flight instructor, Tyler Stanger. Just five years after 9/11, news of a plane crash in Manhattan sent chills down New Yorkers’ spines.

There were a few things that struck me about Cory’s death. For one, I knew Cory, albeit for just two months.

For another, I spoke to him a few times about his relatively new hobby of flying airplanes, and we openly talked about famous plane crashes just three days before his tragic accident.

And what hit me maybe hardest of all was that I — along with the rest of the world — knew Cory died before Melanie and Christopher did.

“Cory went up in the plane and was in love,” Melanie said of the first time he had flown in a small aircraft. That was the fall of 2005, during an offseason vacation with friends in Arizona.

A month before the 10th anniversary of Cory’s death, Melanie Lidle-Heyward sat across from me — along with now-16-year-old Christopher and her second husband, Brandyn Heyward — in the restaurant of a Midtown hotel. We were about three miles from the Belaire Apartments, where Cory’s plane crashed barely a year after that first flight.

Obsessed With Hobbies

Melanie and Cory had known each other since they were kids in West Covina, California, about 20 miles east of Los Angeles. They dated in eighth grade, were best friends throughout their years at South Hills High School and got together again after graduating in 1990. They were married in 1997, the year Cory made his major league debut with the Mets.

By 2005, Cory had become one of the more durable pitchers in the majors, starting at least 30 games for the fourth straight season. He was also one of the most traveled, pitching for five teams in six years.

The time and devotion to compete in the major leagues is enough to consume some people. For Cory, there was always time for family and other diversions.

“Cory is one of those guys that has to always be doing something,” Melanie said. “And he has to be the best at it, and then he will move on.”

Once Cory felt the itch to fly planes, Melanie knew exactly what that meant because Cory’s hobbies would be all-consuming. In high school, he wanted to become a pool shark and flipped burgers in the kitchen of a local billiards hall just so he could play for free. Later, after taking up golf, he would be out on the course several times a day to perfect his swing.

“The joke in our house was that he was only allowed to have one hobby at a time, because I would never see him,” Melanie laughed. “We started poker so I could spend more time with him.”

Poker became such a serious endeavor that they befriended World Series of Poker champion Chris Moneymaker. Cory actually advanced to the fourth round of a WSOP qualifier in 2004, and Melanie made it to the second round.

Cory had a small window of time to obsess over his newest hobby — between October and February, which is the end of the regular season and the start of spring training. A minimum of 40 hours of solo flight time is required before earning a private pilot’s license, and that takes most people a year or longer.

Cory met and hired Stanger as his instructor in the fall of 2005. By September of 2006, Cory said in a New York Times article that he had amassed 95 solo hours.

Cory had also just purchased his own plane, a 2002 Cirrus SR-20, for $187,000, according to the Times article.

“Of course I was worried, but there was nothing I could do,” Melanie told me. She remembers going up in a plane twice with Cory in spring training. That was in planes they rented to fly, but she never went up in the Cirrus plane with him.

“I know Cory — I knew that he isn’t going to do something half-assed,” she said. “I knew that he went up there and knew what he was doing. But I knew the risks. He’s told me a million times, ‘I’m more likely to have a crash on the street than in the air.’”

Over the course of about 90 minutes, Melanie spoke about Cory in the present tense off and on — a reminder that, for some, 10 years can go by in an instant. And maybe another sign that she’s not sure it really happened.

Melanie knew that trying to keep her husband grounded would have been fruitless.

“I couldn’t tell Cory, ‘No you’re not going to get a plane,’” she said. “He’s a grown man. (I asked) ‘Why the plane?’ But I knew that he loved it and there was no talking him out of it.”

Last Moments With His Family 

Cory was traded from the Phillies to the Yankees at the end of July in 2006. He appeared in 10 games for the Yankees over the final two months of the season, going 4-3 with a 5.16 ERA. He made one appearance in the Yankees’ four-game loss to the Tigers in the ALDS — the final game in Detroit.

While Cory flew back to New York with the team on a Saturday night, Melanie and Christopher flew back from California — where Christopher had just started kindergarten — to meet him. Before they packed up and went home for the winter, they were going to spend a few days enjoying New York City.

When it was time to fly back to California, Melanie and Christopher planned to board a commercial flight while Cory would fly home in his Cirrus, a journey that would take three days with stops in between. Since Cory was going to be joined on his flight by his instructor, Stanger and his family also traveled to New York.

The Lidles and Stangers spent Monday and Tuesday walking around Manhattan and taking in what the city had to offer. They took their kids to see “Beauty and the Beast” on Broadway. And Tuesday, on their last full day in New York, they took pictures from the Top of the Rock at Rockefeller Center.

“That’s the last picture we have of all of us together,” Melanie said.

Well Aware Of What Could Go Wrong

I was among the group of reporters Cory spoke to as he cleaned out his locker the day after the Yankees had been eliminated from the playoffs. As the session broke up and we said goodbye for the winter, Cory told us about his plan to fly home in a few days on his new plane.

I joked with Cory that I started to sing “American Pie” every time I boarded a small commuter jet. No way would I ever go up in a plane like that, I told him.

We started talking about the safety issues, and he told me and a few other reporters that he was a student of flying now. He was well aware of the accidents that had claimed the lives of Thurman Munson and John F. Kennedy Jr.

Cory told us he had read the accident reports on both of those famous crashes and others on the National Transportation Safety Board website.

Munson, the former Yankees captain, died Aug. 2, 1979, in a small plane crash in Ohio. At old Yankee Stadium, the team kept his locker stall empty with his No. 15 hanging above. It was across the clubhouse about 40 feet away from where Cory was standing and telling us — just like he told Melanie so many times — he was more likely to get into an accident on the ground than in the air.

Cory was going to be a free agent, and it was unlikely he would have re-signed with the Yankees, so he made sure his family got to spend a couple days having fun in New York before they had to leave.

That Fateful Day

Then, on a gray Wednesday afternoon, Cory and Stanger took off from Teterboro Airport around 2:30 p.m. They flew past the Statue of Liberty and up the East River, a little aerial sight-seeing before turning west for home.

Less than 15 minutes after takeoff, the plane slammed into a 42-story apartment building on East 72nd Street.

News outlets quickly covered the story, with fears of a terrorist attack being an immediate reaction by most. That idea was soon dismissed, and in a short period of time, reporters learned that it was Cory’s plane that struck the building and that both men had perished in the fiery crash.

Media outlets began reporting the deaths Lidle and Stanger. But New York City and police officials were not officially making that announcement yet.

That’s because both men had wives and children who were on a plane heading to California. And they had no idea yet what had happened.

“I had like 15 people helping me at one time, and I thought, this is kind of weird, no one’s ever done this before,'” Melanie said.

Melanie had gotten used to flying alone with Christopher all over the country. A baseball wife married to an oft-traveled player figures out the routine pretty quickly.

“Him and I fly everywhere together, and I did everything by myself,” Melanie recalled. “No one would ever offer to help.”

Not that it’s easy, but Melanie had gotten used to taking care of Christopher and all the belongings — bags, car seat, stroller, etc. — by herself with little assistance.

This time it was different. The crew on the cross-country flight from New York to Los Angeles was being extra attentive to Melanie and Christopher.

“This time the flight attendants were coming up to us (during the flight) and asking him questions — ‘How old are you? Oh, you’re so cute.’”

Maybe if they were in first class, she wouldn’t have been as suspicious. But since she was travelling with Stephanie Stanger and her 9-month-old daughter, they were all seated in coach. The two families were separated by a few rows.

“And people are coming up to me,” Melanie said, “wanting to help me with the car seat, help me with my bag, and I’m thinking to myself this is the weirdest thing ever.”

One thing to remember is that in 2006, there were no iPhones. There was no Twitter, no Facebook and no on-board Wi-Fi to keep passengers constantly plugged in and up to date. On board a commercial airplane, you were still out of touch with the rest of the world until the plane landed. Unless you were a pilot.

It turns out that an old high school friend of Cory and Melanie heard news of the plane crash on TV while Melanie’s plane was still in the air. That friend had a family member who worked at American Airlines, allowing him to get a message to the pilots and crew and alerting them to what just happened to the husbands of two of their passengers.

Back in L.A., where the news spread in normal time, family members of both the Lidles and the Stangers were brought to the terminal so they could meet the plane at the gate. Melanie remembers hearing an announcement for passengers to not turn their phones on until after they got off the plane.

“I thought that’s weird, too,” Melanie said.

She realized later that “they didn’t want people to turn their phones on and see the breaking news.”

Waiting at the gate when Melanie and Christopher got off the plane were Melanie’s sister, Brandy Peters, and her husband, Miles.

“You couldn’t get past security without a ticket, so I thought, ‘What the hell are you guys doing here?'” Melanie said.

“My sister looked at me and said, ‘Melanie, Cory’s been in an accident.’

Melanie began to wonder about the magnitude of Cory’s plane crashing in New York City.

“I thought, ‘How many people could have died in this?’” Melanie said. “And she’s like, ‘It’s just Cory and Tyler.’

“And I was kind of trying to process that. ‘How can that happen? You hit a building in New York City, just the debris on the ground, how does that not hit anybody else?’”

There were, in fact, several injuries at the site and on the ground, but miraculously none life-threatening.

“So I think all these things are just going through my head, and at that point, I must have just, not blacked out, but just — shock hit me,” Melanie said. “My legs went from under me. They put me in a wheelchair, and they took me into a little room.”

Christopher was whisked away by a family friend, taken to Melanie’s truck, which had been brought out to the tarmac near the plane, and distracted with headphones and cartoons.

“As they are rolling me in, I’m thinking to myself: ‘Stephanie is on the plane. She’s four months pregnant, and she’s got a 9-month-old baby with her,'” Melanie said. “And they said: “Her family is here, too. They’re going to get her.”

Stephanie Stanger, just like Melanie, was then told her husband was dead.

“All of a sudden, I hear screaming,” Melanie recalled. “They had to take her out with the wheelchair. She was throwing up. And I was so worried about this baby.”

Stephanie’s baby would be OK. He just wouldn’t ever meet his father.

Melanie and Christopher went home, but had to sneak into their house in the middle of the night. That’s because the media had already gathered outside the Lidle house in West Covina. Remember, they knew what happened before she did, and they had blocked the entire street.

“There were reporters and newscasters and lights and everything,” Melanie recalled. “So we went to my sister’s house, and then in the middle of the night, we went back, and we were able to drive our truck into the garage.”

The crush of media on the tiny cul de sac caused a power outage on the street.

“We couldn’t leave the house. It was bombarded,” Melanie said.

Meanwhile, there was Christopher, shielded from the sobering reality as much as possible.

“Luckily Nickelodeon doesn’t show breaking news,” Melanie said.

Melanie was having a hard enough time coming to grips with Cory’s death. Trying to break the news to Christopher became impossible.

“I couldn’t do it,” Melanie said. “My mom and my sister, they told him for me. I didn’t want to know how he reacted. … I didn’t want to know.”

Telling a 6-year old his father is dead is one thing. Getting him to understand it is something else altogether.

“They told him, but I don’t think he believed it or really knew what they were talking about,” Melanie said. “I don’t think he really accepted it.

“He didn’t cry. And, truthfully, I didn’t cry for the first week. I think I was in so much shock I couldn’t have any feelings. Christopher and I are a lot alike in that sense, so I think he probably handled it the way I did. It didn’t really happen in our minds.”

The first time Melanie left her house after that was for Cory’s funeral, six days after the accident. Christopher was there, but was taken home halfway through by his older cousins.

Derek Jeter, Joe Torre, Brian Cashman and Reggie Jackson were among those representing the Yankees.

Kevin Lidle, Cory’s twin brother and a former minor league player, was — unintentionally — a spooky presence.

There was media coverage there as well. The USA Today account mentioned that, “Supported by another woman, Lidle’s wife, Melanie, walked up to the gray casket … .”

The other woman was Stephanie Stanger.

“For me, after getting past Cory actually being gone, the second hardest thing was that it was all about Cory,” Melanie said.

“That really hurt me. It was really hard to look at them in the face, knowing that (Tyler’s) life wasn’t as important (to the media) as Cory’s.”

The other thing Melanie kept coming back to was Christopher.

“If it wasn’t for him, I don’t know how different it would have been,” she said. “But I had to be strong for him.”

Picking Up The Pieces

The Yankees provided a great deal of assistance right away, from helping Melanie’s sister arrange the funeral to setting up grief counseling for both Melanie and Christopher.

“He was still so little, so he didn’t understand,” Melanie said. “He thought he was going there for playtime.”

In the first few months after losing his father, Christopher would oftentimes wake up crying in the middle of the night.

“It wasn’t that he was thinking about Cory,” Melanie said. “He was thinking about everybody else.”

Christopher would wake up thinking about his mom, his grandmother or his aunt and uncle not being there now. Melanie left a cellphone next to his bed with a handful of numbers programmed, and Christopher would awake in the middle of the night and call his grandmother, just to make sure she was still there.

Therapy only helped so much. Melanie took Christopher once a week, and then went by herself another day of the week. They went for about two years before Melanie decided to “give us a break.”

In 2008, 8-year-old Christopher was playing baseball in the same West Covina little league his dad had decades earlier. That’s when Melanie met Brandyn Heyward.

It turned out that Brandyn had lived in the same neighborhood as Melanie when they were kids, but they didn’t know each other then. Brandyn also had played college baseball against Cory’s twin brother, Kevin.

Doug Lidle — Cory’s dad and Christopher’s grandfather — introduced Brandyn and Melanie. There was also a little help from Brandyn’s teenage son, R.J., who was strategically deployed by Brandyn to strike up conversation with Melanie.

Brandyn was divorced. As he and Melanie became close, so did R.J. and Christopher. Melanie saw Christopher looking up to R.J. like an older brother.

On March 22, 2009, R.J died in a drowning accident caused by a heart issue. He was 14 years old. And it happened on what would have been Cory’s 37th birthday.

With another traumatic event to deal with in such a short time, Melanie decided to get Christopher back into therapy.

“It kind of pushed everything backwards for a little bit,” Melanie said. However, “It didn’t take so long to get everything back to normal this time.”

In April 2010, Melanie and Brandyn were married. After living for a short time in Glendora, they moved to West Covina, down the street from the home Melanie and Cory were planning to build in 2006.

The Aftermath

The final NTSB accident report on Cory’s crash was released in May 2007. It states the cause of the fatal accident was “the pilots’ inadequate planning, judgment, and airmanship in the performance of a 180-degree turn maneuver inside of a limited turning space.”

The report placed blame solely on the pilots, but the board could not definitively determine which of the two men was at the controls when the crash occurred.

When the investigation was complete, personal effects recovered from the wreckage were returned to the families. Melanie received Cory’s wallet and his laptop.

“Everything smelled burnt,” Melanie recalled.

Stephanie received Tyler’s wedding ring and his digital camera.

Amazingly, the memory card inside the camera was still intact and held five pictures—three shots of the Statue of Liberty, taken as Cory and Tyler flew past it minutes before the crash, and the two family pictures taken at the Top of the Rock the day before the accident.

Stephanie printed the family pictures and presented them as a gift to Melanie.

“It was crazy to see those pictures,” Melanie said. “I don’t think I remembered them until I saw them.”

Together Melanie and Stephanie sued Cirrus Design in 2011 for product liability. After testimony that lasted two months, the jury deliberated only three hours and returned a verdict in favor of the plane’s manufacturer.

“It took a two-month toll on my life,” Melanie said.

But the trial process educated Melanie.

“If I knew then what I know now about planes,” she told me, “I don’t think there would have been a plane.

“It hasn’t been easy the last 10 years,” Melanie said.

That is an unimaginable understatement.

Before Cory died, Melanie dealt with thyroid cancer. In 2013, she battled breast cancer.

“They caught it early,” Melanie said. “I’m a clean bill of health right now. We’ve had a lot go on. But we have a really great family support, and it just makes it a little bit easier to get through things.”

Keeping His Memory Alive

Melanie and Stephanie still keep in touch. It was more frequent before, but now it’s usually once a year for the Cory Lidle Thanksgiving Tournament, a youth baseball event in West Covina. Proceeds go to scholarship funds in the names of Cory Lidle and Tyler Stanger, as well as the Make-A-Wish Foundation and City of Hope charities.

Stephanie attends every year with her and Tyler’s two children — their daughter, Ashlund, and their son, Powell, the baby that Stephanie was carrying and Melanie so worried about when they learned of the plane crash.

“Looks just like his father,” Melanie said smiling.

Melanie, Brandyn and Christopher were at Yankee Stadium in September for a game between the Yankees and Dodgers. Christopher no longer plays baseball. He’s focused now on soccer and volleyball. But they still enjoy going to the ballpark.

“Major League Baseball has been a big part of our lives,” Melanie said. “They’ve taken really good care of us.”

Melanie said they feel closest to the Yankees — Cory’s last team — and the Phillies and A’s, the two teams with which he spent the most time.

The Yankees invited Melanie and Christopher to throw out the ceremonial first pitch on Opening Day 2007 in New York. Jason Giambi joined them on the field. Giambi, also from West Covina, was a teammate of Cory’s in both high school and the majors.
Inside the Yankees’ clubhouse, Cory’s locker was left empty for the season, his No. 30 plate hanging above it. Melanie never went inside to see it.

Christopher sat next to his mom for more than an hour while we discussed the events of 10 years ago. He was quiet, but listened intently. He told me he doesn’t remember much about his father’s playing days.

But the Lidles are fortunate to have plenty of video from Cory’s library. Christopher used to watch them more when he was younger, less so now. But only because he’s a busy teenager, Melanie said, than any other reason.

Their favorite is a highlight video Cory’s agent put together for teams in preparation for his free agency. In addition to strikeouts and other game action, there are some personal moments. One of them has Cory talking about one of his hobbies, poker. Then-3-year-old Christopher is sitting on his dad’s lap talking and playing.

“That’s a really hard video for me to look at without crying,” Melanie says.

‘I Always Feel People Feel Sorry For Us’ 

Melanie told me she doesn’t do public speaking very well, and she hasn’t told her story very much, either. During our conversations, both on the phone and in person, Melanie held it together better than I did.

I fought the urge to cry many times.

“I always feel people feel sorry for us,” Melanie told me. “I don’t want that.”

I was probably guilty of that for sure. Cory’s death stuck with me, and Melanie and Christopher are people I just had to meet. I did it so I could tell a little of their story. But I also did it so I could just know they were OK.

And for the most part they are. But there are still those times when Melanie doesn’t believe it actually happened.

“Even to this day, sometimes I think: Is this a dream? Am I going to wake up?

“I’ve known Cory more than half my life. For him not to be a part of me every day, it’s still not realistic. It’s still not reality for me.”

Cory is buried not far from their home in West Covina. “That’s the view he would have wanted,” Melanie said to me.

They will pay another visit Tuesday. Ten years now.

“To me, Cory’s always with us,” Melanie said. “I don’t think he’d want us to mourn and be upset — actually I know that for a fact. I know he wouldn’t want that. Cory’s put us in a comfortable lifestyle. We get to do a lot that we like to do and have fun, and I know that’s exactly how he’d want us to be. That’s how Cory lived.”

Story and photo gallery:   http://newyork.cbslocal.com
 
NTSB Identification: DCA07MA003
The docket is stored in the Docket Management System (DMS). Please contact Records Management Division
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 11, 2006 in Manhattan, NYC, NY
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/27/2007
Aircraft: Cirrus Design Corp. SR-20, registration: N929CD
Injuries: 2 Fatal, 1 Serious, 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators traveled in support of this investigation and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The Safety Board's full brief is available at http://dms.ntsb.gov


On October 11, 2006, about 1442 eastern daylight time, a Cirrus Design SR20, N929CD, operated as a personal flight, crashed into an apartment building in Manhattan, New York City, while attempting to maneuver above the East River. The two pilots on board the airplane, a certificated private pilot who was the owner of the airplane and a passenger who was a certificated commercial pilot with a flight instructor certificate, were killed. One person on the ground sustained serious injuries, two people on the ground sustained minor injuries, and the airplane was destroyed by impact forces and postcrash fire. The flight was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91, and no flight plan was filed. Marginal visual flight rules (MVFR) conditions prevailed at the time of the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilots' inadequate planning, judgment, and airmanship in the performance of a 180ยบ turn maneuver inside of a limited turning space.

The accident airplane departed Teterboro Airport (TEB), Teterboro, New Jersey, about 1429 and was cleared for a visual flight rules (VFR) departure. According to air traffic control (ATC) transcripts, the pilots acknowledged that they were to stay out of the New York class B airspace. After takeoff, the accident airplane turned southeast and climbed to an altitude of about 600 to 800 feet. When the flight reached the western shore of the Hudson River, it turned to the south, remaining over the river, then descended to 500 feet. The flight continued southbound over the Hudson River until abeam of the southern tip of Manhattan, at which point, the flight turned southwest bound. Radar data from John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), Jamaica, New York; Newark International Airport (EWR), Newark, New Jersey; and Westchester County Airport (HPN), White Plains, New York, indicated that the accident airplane's altitude varied from 500 to 700 feet for the remainder of the flight.

About 1436, the airplane flew around the Statue of Liberty then headed to the northeast, at which point, it proceeded to fly over the East River. About 1 mile north of the Queensboro Bridge, the airplane made a left turn to reverse its course. Radar contact was lost about 1442. The airplane impacted a 520-foot tall apartment building at 524 East 72nd Street, 333 feet above street level. 

The Safety Board's full brief is available at http://dms.ntsb.gov