Wednesday, March 25, 2020

Loss of Engine Power (Total): Aeronca 7AC Champ, N65HM; fatal accident occurred August 24, 2018 near Cranland Airport (28M), Hanson, Plymouth County, Massachusetts

Chief Warrant Officer 3 (CW3) Scott, ‘Scotty,’ Landis of Hanson, Massachusetts.

Overview of Accident Site.
Federal Aviation Administration

Another view of the accident site. 
Federal Aviation Administration

View of Tachometer Time.
Federal Aviation Administration

View of Carburetor Heat Control.
Federal Aviation Administration

Aft View of Wreckage after Recovery.

View of Carburetor and Air Box.

View of engine and propeller.


Cranland Airport (28M) and surrounding area.




The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.


Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston, Massachusetts

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N65HM


Location: Hanson, MA
Accident Number: ERA18FA230
Date & Time: 08/24/2018, 1535 EDT
Registration: N65HM
Aircraft: Aeronca 7AC
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 24, 2018, around 1535 eastern daylight time, an Aeronca 7AC Champion, N65HM, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from Cranland Airport (28M), Hanson, Massachusetts. The commercial pilot was fatally injured and the passenger was seriously injured. The airplane was privately owned and was being operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight, which was originating at the time of the accident.

A review of airport security video showed the airplane about 100 ft above ground level as it passed the departure end of the runway during takeoff. The airplane was not climbing and began to bank to the left; the left turn continued as the airplane descended behind trees and impacted terrain. The video also indicated that the airplane operated at idle engine power on the ground for about 7 minutes before beginning the takeoff roll.

First responders reported that the airplane came to rest in a nose-down, near-vertical position and that they had to move the airplane in order to perform rescue operations. The passenger stated to a first responder that the airplane "stalled." 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 33, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/10/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/19/2016
Flight Time:  195 hours (Total, all aircraft), 4 hours (Total, this make and model), 116 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 4.5 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 4.5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for rotorcraft-helicopter, instrument helicopter, and private pilot privileges for airplane single-engine land and sea. The pilot was issued a first-class FAA medical certificate on October 10, 2017, with no limitations. According to the pilot's logbook, he had accumulated 195.7 hours of civilian flight experience, of which 4 hours were in the accident airplane in the previous 3 years.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Aeronca
Registration: N65HM
Model/Series: 7AC No Series
Aircraft Category:Airplane 
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 7AC-3708
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/01/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1320 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 110 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1631.4 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental Motors Inc.
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: C90-12F
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 95 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1946. It was equipped with a Continental Motors Inc. C90 series, 90-horsepower engine that drove a fixed-pitch propeller. According to airplane maintenance logbooks, an annual inspection was completed on October 1, 2017, at a total time of 1,521.4 hours and a tachometer time of 3,215.1 hours. Following the accident, the tachometer indicated 3,325.1 hours.

The airplane was flown the day before the accident by the owner's son and the accident pilot. The owner's son reported that there were no anomalies with the airplane during their flight, which lasted about an hour. He stated that he usually applied carburetor heat while operating the engine at idle power on the ground because of the "carburetor icing possibilities."

The engine operating instructions stated that, during the pretakeoff ground test (engine run-up), the carburetor heat control should be moved "to full HOT position, and observe decrease in engine speed if air heater and control are operating properly. [Then] return control to full COLD position." The instructions noted, "under some conditions, ice may form in the carburetor during ground test. It must be eliminated before takeoff." 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PYM, 149 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1552 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 145°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 210°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: 
Altimeter Setting: 30.2 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 12°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point:Hanson, MA (28M) 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Hanson, MA (28M)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1535 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

The 1552 recorded weather observation at Plymouth Municipal Airport (PYM), Plymouth, Massachusetts, about 8 miles southeast of the accident location, included wind from 210° at 9 knots, 10 miles visibility, clear skies, temperature 27°C, dew point 12°C; and an altimeter setting of 30.20 inches of mercury.

The carburetor icing probability chart from FAA Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB): CE-09-35 Carburetor Icing Prevention, showed a probability of serious icing at glide power at the temperature and dew point reported at the time of the accident.

Airport Information

Airport: Cranland (28M)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 71 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 18
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 1760 ft / 60 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Cranland Airport was a public, nontower-controlled airport located 3 miles southeast of Hanson, Massachusetts. The airport was equipped with an asphalt runway designated as 18/36, which was 1,760 ft long by 60 ft wide. The airport elevation was 71 ft above mean sea level (msl); the airport was surrounded by cranberry bogs, ponds, and wooded terrain.

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 42.022500, -70.835278 

The airplane impacted a bog 470 ft east of the departure end of runway 18. The main wreckage was located at an elevation of 59 ft msl. All components of the airplane were located in the vicinity of the wreckage.

The nose section was impact crushed aft. Flight control continuity was confirmed from the flight controls in the cockpit to all flight control surfaces. The carburetor heat control was in the OFF position. The leading edges of the right and left wings were impact crushed along the entire span of each wing. A fuel sample was taken from both fuel tanks and the samples tested negative for water contamination. The empennage and aft flight control surfaces remained intact and attached to the fuselage. The airplane was not equipped with a stall warning system or angle of attack indicator.

The engine remained attached to the airframe and the propeller remained attached to the engine. One propeller blade was bent slightly aft and the other blade remained straight. Engine crankshaft continuity was confirmed from the propeller flange to the accessory section. All cylinders remained attached to the crankcase and thumb compression and suction was observed on all cylinders when the propeller was rotated through the entire range of motion. The rocker box covers were removed and no anomalies were noted with the valve springs and rocker arms. Valvetrain continuity was confirmed when the propeller was rotated by hand.

The carburetor hot air inlet was impact crushed aft. Carburetor heat control continuity was confirmed from the airbox to the cockpit, and the control was cut to facilitate further examination. The control could not be moved as a result of impact damage. The carburetor was removed and disassembled. The gasket was examined with no anomalies noted. The float assembly remained intact with no anomalies noted. The butterfly valve and fuel pump operated when the throttle arm was moved by hand. The needle and seat remained in place. The carburetor bowl was examined and contained brownish fluid similar to the water in the bog; the fluid smelled similar to 100LL aviation fuel.

The left and right magnetos were removed. hen each magneto was rotated by hand, spark was observed on all towers. The top spark plugs were removed. The spark plugs were in "normal" condition when compared to the Champion Check a Plug Chart, with the exception of the No. 2 top spark plug, which exhibited "normal-worn out" condition. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Office of the Medical Examiner, Boston, Massachusetts, performed an autopsy on the pilot. The autopsy report indicated that the cause of death was multiple blunt force injuries.

Toxicology testing of the pilot was performed at the FAA Forensic Sciences Laboratory. Fluid and tissue specimens tested negative for ethanol. Ketamine, norketamine, midazolam, lorazepam, and morphine were all detected in the blood and liver. In addition, fentanyl was detected in the blood. All detected medications were consistent with emergency medical treatment after the accident.

Tests And Research

An exemplar airplane with a Continental Motors Inc. C90 engine was started and the fuel selector was moved to the OFF position. The engine operated for 31 seconds before the engine lost total power without sputtering.

The airplane was restarted and operated at idle power for about 5 minutes. After that time, the engine was shut down and condensation was noted on the carburetor and intake of the engine. At the time of the test, the ambient temperature was 28°C and the dew point was 15°C, which showed a probability of serious icing at glide power on the Carburetor Icing Probability Chart. 

Additional Information

FAA Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (CE-09-35) – Carburetor Icing Prevention, stated that:

…pilots should be aware that carburetor icing doesn't just occur in freezing conditions, it can occur at temperatures well above freezing temperatures when there is visible moisture or high humidity. Icing can occur in the carburetor at temperatures above freezing because vaporization of fuel, combined with the expansion of air as it flows through the carburetor, (Venturi Effect) causes sudden cooling, sometimes by a significant amount within a fraction of a second. Carburetor ice can be detected by a drop in rpm in fixed pitch propeller airplanes and a drop in manifold pressure in constant speed propeller airplanes. In both types, usually there will be a roughness in engine operation.








Piper PA-34-200 Seneca, N43034: Incident occurred March 24, 2020 at Boca Raton Airport (KBCT), Palm Beach County, Florida -and- Incident occurred April 09, 2016 at Treasure Coast International Airport (KFPR), St. Lucie County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

March 24, 2020:  Aircraft land hard damaging both propellers. 

A S Flight Academy LLC

http://registry.faa.gov/N43034

Date: 24-MAR-20
Time: 02:00:00Z
Regis#: N43034
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA34
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: BOCA RATON
State: FLORIDA

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

April 09, 2016:  Aircraft on takeoff, cowling separated from fuselage.

Date: 09-APR-16
Time: 15:01:00Z
Regis#: N43034
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA34
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
City: FORT PIERCE
State: Florida

Hard Landing: Van's RV-6, N475AH; accident occurred June 27, 2019 at Monument Valley Airport (UT25), San Juan County, Utah

View of damage to the right wing. 
Federal Aviation Administration


Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N475AH 

Location: Monument Valley, UT
Accident Number: GAA19CA374
Date & Time: 06/27/2019, 1142 MDT
Registration: N475AH
Aircraft: Vans RV 6
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event:Hard landing 
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot in the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that during landing, the airplane bounced hard. He applied full power and aborted the landing. He recalled that, "I must have allowed the front end to come up too high and I believe it stalled and veered left." The airplane's left wing struck the ground, followed by the right wing striking the ground.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings.

The pilot reported that weather at the accident site, at the time of the accident was about 85°F, the wind was light and variable, and that the density altitude was about 8,500ft.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 60, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/12/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/20/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 446.3 hours (Total, all aircraft), 216.4 hours (Total, this make and model), 355.4 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 47.9 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 26.1 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3.7 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Vans
Registration: N475AH
Model/Series: RV 6 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1992
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 20475
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/01/2019, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1600 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-360
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 180
Operator:On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPGA, 4310 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 60 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0353 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 265°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots / 15 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 200°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / -2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Moriarty, NM (0E0)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Moriarty, NM (0E0)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1000 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Monument Valley (UT25)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 5192 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 16
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4000 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Go Around; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 37.016667, -110.200556 (est)

North American Navion, N8927H: Incident occurred March 24, 2020 in Stuart, Martin County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Aircraft lost engine power and landed in a field.

https://registry.faa.gov/N8927H

Date: 24-MAR-20
Time: 19:21:00Z
Regis#: N8927H
Aircraft Make: NORTH AMERICAN
Aircraft Model: NAVION
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: STUART
State: FLORIDA

Roll Over: Robinson R44 II, N124LA; accident occurred July 16, 2019 in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa

View of damage to main and tail rotor systems, empennage and fuselage.



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines, Iowa

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N124LA


Location: Council Bluff, IA
Accident Number: GAA19CA428
Date & Time: 07/16/2019, 1750 CDT
Registration: N124LA
Aircraft: Robinson R44
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Roll over
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural 

The helicopter pilot reported that, while lifting off from a landing deck on top of an industrial truck, the right rear skid hooked into an opening on the deck. The helicopter dynamically rolled right and impacted the ground.

The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the main and tail rotor systems, fuselage, and empennage.

The helicopter pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 63, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/22/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/01/2019
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 26000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1700 hours (Total, this make and model), 25500 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 250 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 125 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Robinson
Registration: N124LA
Model/Series: R44 II
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2008
Amateur Built:No 
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 12199
Landing Gear Type: Skid;
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/01/2019, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-540-AE1A5
Registered Owner: Rotors Llc
Rated Power: 245 hp
Operator: Rotors Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light:Day 
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCBF, 1253 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2235 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 337°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 20°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.86 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 22°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Council Bluff, IA
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Council Bluff, IA
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1800 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries:1 Minor 
Latitude, Longitude: 41.234444, -95.746389 (est)

Maule MT-7-235, N899ZZ: Fatal accident occurred March 23, 2020 in Atlantic Ocean near Swansboro, North Carolina

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N899ZZ

Location: Swansboro, NC
Accident Number: ERA20LA134
Date & Time: 03/23/2020, 2103 EDT
Registration: N899ZZ
Aircraft: Maule MT-7
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 23, 2020, at 2103 eastern daylight time, a Maule MT-7-235 airplane, N899ZZ, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident in the Atlantic Ocean near Swansboro, North Carolina. The pilot and the passenger were presumed fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate for single-engine airplanes with an instrument rating. According to fuel receipts and the manager of the Orangeburg Municipal Airport (OGB), Orangeburg, South Carolina, the airplane and pilot were based at the OGB airport, and at 1820 the pilot added about 40 gallons of 100-low lead fuel to the accident airplane.

Preliminary radar data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the pilot departed OGB at 1835, and subsequently landed at Mount Pleasant Regional Airport-Faison Field (LRO), Mount Pleasant, South Carolina at 1905. The pilot then filed an instrument flight rules flight plan and departed to Michael J. Smith Field Airport (MRH), Beaufort, North Carolina, at 1950. The pilot was in contact with air traffic control (ATC) after he departed LRO and radar data showed that the airplane climbed to 5,000 ft mean sea level (msl) and proceeded directly on course to MRH shortly after takeoff.

The route of flight was primarily over the Atlantic Ocean, and the course and altitude showed little deviation until about 2102, when the flight track showed a right turn to the southeast. The airplane continued in a rapidly descending right turning spiral until radar contact was lost. The last radar point at 2103:31 showed the airplane flying at 108 knots groundspeed, headed 131°, at 925 ft msl at latitude 34.43809891°, longitude -77.05209351°.

Review of preliminary ATC communications provided by the Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, Cherry Point, North Carolina, revealed that the pilot's communications were routine until radar contact was lost. About 2048, the pilot checked in with Cherry Point ATC at 5,000 ft, reported he had the weather at MRH and requested the RNAV 26 instrument approach procedure. The pilot was told to expect the RNAV approach, and about 2050, the pilot was instructed to fly direct to CIGOR, which was a GPS waypoint on the RNAV 26 approach. The pilot acknowledged the instructions and no further communications were received from the pilot; ATC attempted to reach the pilot several times after radar contact was lost, but no response was received.

According to the U.S. Coast Guard mission's coordinator, small debris fragments from the airplane were located at 2335, about 1.55 nm southeast of the last radar point at a position of latitude 34.416924°, longitude -77.034092° (see figure 1). The pilot and passenger were not located.

Figure 1: The airplane's final 3-minutes of flight track data (red line) and location of debris (white arrows show the airplane's direction of travel).

According to FAA airman records, the pilot completed the FAA basic medical certification on April 15, 2019. The pilot's most recent third-class FAA medical certificate was issued on September 7, 2016, where the pilot reported he had accumulated 179 hours of total flight time.

According to FAA airworthiness records, the 4-seat, single-engine, high-wing airplane was powered by a Lycoming IO-540-W1A5 235-horsepower engine. The most recent annual inspection was completed on August 29, 2019.

The 2058 recorded weather observation at MRH (the pilots destination), located about 25 miles northeast of the airplane's last known position, included an overcast ceiling at 1,800 ft above ground level (agl), visibility 10 statute miles, wind 240° at 6 knots, temperature was 16° C, and dew point was 13° C.

According to the flight crew of the U.S. Coast Guard aircraft that supported the search and rescue, about 2345 near the debris, they observed an overcast ceiling of 1,400 ft, visibility 10 miles, wind 290° at 10 knots, and a wave height of 4 ft.

As of this publication, no major components of the airplane have been located. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Maule
Registration: N899ZZ
Model/Series: MT-7 235
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:No 
Operator: Carolina Training & Safety LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Night/Dark
Observation Facility, Elevation: NJM, 21 ft msl
Observation Time: 2057 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 13°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 220°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 1700 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Mount Pleasant, SC (LRO)
Destination: Beaufort, NC (MRH)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: Unknown
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  34.416944, -77.034167

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

This is a graphic of the combined search patterns conducted by Coast Guard assets March 24th, 2020, during a search for two missing persons after their aircraft was reported to have gone down 13 miles southeast of Bogue Inlet, North Carolina. Coast Guard watchstanders were initially notified of the incident by Air Traffic Control Cherry Point, who reported that an aircraft had dropped from their radar. 


EMERALD ISLE — A public affairs officer at the United States Coast Guard 5th District office in Portsmouth, Virginia, said Wednesday morning that searchers identified a debris field they believe is from a Maule MT-7-235 aircraft that crashed in the ocean with two people onboard Monday night.

Petty Officer Shannon Kearney said the debris field and crash site are 13 miles south of Bogue Inlet, off Emerald Isle.

She said the Coast Guard’s search and rescue effort, suspended late Tuesday, will resume if any new information warrants it.

Petty Officer Kearney said the airplane took off from Orangeburg, South Carolina, bound for Beaufort. She did not know when the plane left South Carolina or when it was expected to land in Beaufort.

The people onboard the plane have not been identified.

Coast Guard Sector North Carolina watchstanders were initially notified by Air Traffic Control Cherry Point that an aircraft reportedly dropped from its radar Monday at about 11 p.m.

The Coast Guard said crews yesterday searched a combined 676.3 square miles over air, sea and land.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating 

(Previous report)

EMERALD ISLE — The U.S. Coast Guard announced about 9:15 p.m. Tuesday it had suspended its search for two missing people involved in a reported Maule M-7-235 crash in the ocean about 12 miles from Bogue Inlet.

Coast Guard Sector North Carolina watchstanders were initially notified by Air Traffic Control Cherry Point that an aircraft reportedly dropped from their radar Monday at about 11 p.m.

The Coast Guard said crews searched a combined 676.3 square miles over air, sea and land.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating the cause of the accident, and the search has been suspended pending the development of new information.

(Previous report)

EMERALD ISLE — Crews from the U.S. Coast Guard are searching for survivors of a Monday evening plane crash near Emerald Isle.

According to the Tuesday morning release, a Maule M-7-235 reportedly crashed southeast of Bogue Inlet, near Emerald Isle around 11 p.m. Two people were reportedly on board.

The release from the Coast Guard states watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector North Carolina command center received a call from air traffic control at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point after the Cessna dropped off radar 12 miles southeast of Bogue Inlet at approximately 11 p.m. Monday.

The Coast Guard launched an MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter from Marine Corps Air Station Elizabeth City, a C-130 Hercules aircraft from Air Station Elizabeth City, a 45-foot Response Boat — Medium from Coast Guard Station Emerald Isle and Coast Guard Fast Response Cutter Nathan Bruckenthal.

Around 2 p.m. Tuesday, officials said they were “still searching.”

Emerald Isle Town Manager Matt Zapp said the Coast Guard was in charge of all search and rescue efforts related to the crash.

“None of our team are involved,” he said. “It was well off the coast, 12 miles, so it’s a Coast Guard issue.”

Original article ➤ https://www.carolinacoastonline.com



EMERALD ISLE, Carteret County — The Coast Guard has suspended its search for two missing people involved in a Maule MT-7-235 airplane crash near Bogue Inlet.

Coast Guard Sector North Carolina watchstanders were initially notified of the incident by Air Traffic Control Cherry Point that an aircraft reportedly dropped from their radar on Monday evening.

Coast Guard personnel say they searched a combined total of 676.3 square miles over air, sea, and land.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating the cause of the incident, and the search has been suspended pending the development of new information.

Previous Story:

Coast Guard crews are searching for survivors after a Maule MT-7-235 airplane crashed southeast of Bogue Inlet, near Emerald Isle, North Carolina, late Monday evening.

Watchstanders at the Coast Guard Sector North Carolina command center received a call from Air Traffic Control Cherry Point at approximately 11:00 p.m. that an aircraft had dropped from their radar 12 miles southeast of Bogue Inlet. The aircraft had two people onboard, according to officials.

Officials say the plane was traveling to Beaufort from Orangeburg, South Carolina. As of Tuesday afternoon, the Coast Guard says this is a search and rescue effort, not a search and recovery.

“Six hundred and seventy-six square miles have been searched unsuccessfully, unfortunately," explains Petty Officer 2nd Class Jeffrey McConnell. "But, we still have the helicopter and the Nathan Bruckenthal are still on scene continuing the search for survivors at this point.”

McConnell says there is no information on the names of the two people who were aboard the plane or the flying conditions at the time of the crash.

The Coast Guard has launched crews onboard the following assets to search:
  • an MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter from Air Station Elizabeth City,
  • a C-130 Hercules aircraft from Air Station Elizabeth City,
  • a 45-foot Response Boat — Medium from Station Emerald Isle,
  • Coast Guard Fast Response Cutter Nathan Bruckenthal.
Original article can be found here ➤ https://wcti12.com

Loss of Control on Ground: Comp Air 7 SLX, N12ZT; accident occurred July 20, 2019 at Jefferson City Memorial Airport (KJEF), Callaway County, Missouri

View of damaged right-wing lift strut and empennage. 
 Federal Aviation Administration






Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Kansas City, Missouri

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N12ZT



Location: Jefferson City, MO
Accident Number: GAA19CA443
Date & Time: 07/20/2019, 1030 CDT
Registration: N12ZT
Aircraft: VALLDEJULI JOHN A AEROCOMP
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane reported that, during a touch and go landing, shortly after touchdown, the airplane veered left. He added power and the airplane pitched up, so "cut the power" and corrected with right aileron, but the airplane landed hard on the grass field next to the runway, struck runway lights and nosed over. The pilot added that the airplane was trimmed for landing.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right-wing lift strut and empennage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observation station located 14 nautical miles north of the accident airport reported that: about 30 minutes before the accident, the wind was 190° at 12 knots, and about 30 minutes after the accident, the wind was 220° at 11 knots The pilot reported that the wind was 030° at 10 to 15 knots, gusting up to 20 knots. The airplane touched down on runway 12.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 59, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/24/2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 09/16/2018
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 3031 hours (Total, all aircraft), 35 hours (Total, this make and model), 3031 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: VALLDEJULI JOHN A
Registration: N12ZT
Model/Series: AEROCOMP 7
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1999
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 98-175
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 5
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/15/2018, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 5200 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 310 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Walter
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 601-D
Registered Owner: Comp Air Wings Llc
Rated Power: 657 hp
Operator: Comp Air Wings Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCOU, 898 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 14 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1454 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 348°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 12 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 190°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.92 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 23°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Jefferson City, MO (JEF)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Jefferson City, MO (JEF)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1000 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: Jefferson City Memorial (JEF)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 549 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 12
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 6000 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Touch and Go

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 38.591111, -92.156111 (est)