Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Southend: Petition To Save The Air Show

A petition has been started to save the Southend Air Show after the council announced it was scrapping the annual event. 

The move will save £130,000 a year as the authority is forced to save further money in the face of less funding from central government.

But there has been strong criticism of the plans to cut the event which brings hundreds of thousands of people to the town over the weekend in May.

Simon John Ewing and Thomas Curtis both had the idea of starting a petition against the decision and are now joining forces to keep Southend Air Show going.

Simon told Heart: "There's a lot of anger and confusion because it is such a popular event. Hopefully Southend councillors will change their mind because this is part of the town's heritage.

"But with corporate sponsors it could still go ahead. Lots of local businesses such as hotels benefit from the influx of visitors so perhaps they should also contribute."

Thomas told Heart: "The Air Show brings a lot of joy to the town and it brings a lot of people to the town. It is a flagship event for Southend and if you take that away fewer people will come here.

"Once the air show is gone it is going to be unlikely to come back. Other air shows will take flights and it will be much more expensive to run it again in the future.

"We can't just raise it from the dead."

Southend Council Leader Nigel Holdcroft said: "We are now into the third year of the austerity measures and these financial decisions are becoming harder and harder to make.

"Some of the savings we are proposing won't be popular with residents but I would ask them to bear in mind that this crisis was not of our making."

You can find out more about the campaign to save Southend Air Show here

Source:   http://www.heart.co.uk

Piper PA-28-161 Warrior II, Stuart Flying LLC, N158EA: Accident occurred March 18, 2012 in Mexico, Missouri

NTSB Identification: CEN12FA188
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, March 18, 2012 in Mexico, MO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/12/2013
Aircraft: PIPER PA-28-161, registration: N158EA
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot and his wife were departing from a 2,600-foot, soft, grass strip with a quartering right tailwind. The grass height on the runway was between 6 and 10 inches high. The airplane departed about 1,900 feet down the runway, veered to the left, stalled, and collided with trees before it came to rest in a field. Interpolation of available takeoff performance revealed that the airplane would have needed about 2,312 feet of ground-roll distance for a successful takeoff from a paved, level, dry runway, with zero flaps, under the existing wind conditions. No mechanical deficiencies were found with the airplane or engine that would have precluded normal operation at the time of the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s failure to maintain airplane control during takeoff, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall and subsequent collision with trees. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s inadequate preflight performance planning before departing on the soft, grass field with a quartering tailwind.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On March 18, 2012, approximately 1150 central daylight time, a Piper PA-28-161, N158EA, sustained substantial damage when it collided with trees on takeoff from Feutz Airport (M088), a private airstrip, near Mexico, Missouri. The private pilot was fatally injured and the passenger was seriously injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Stuart Flying Service, LLC, Mexico, Missouri. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that originated at Mexico Memorial Airport (MYK), Mexico, Missouri, about 1115. The personal flight was conducted under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The manager of Mexico Memorial Airport stated the pilot arrived at 1030 on the morning of the accident and informed him that he and his wife were going out to “do maneuvers.” The pilot did not specifically say where they were going. The airport manager saw the pilot perform a preflight inspection of the airplane and then depart runway 18 around 1115. At that time, the manager stated the wind was blowing directly out of the south between 14 and 20 knots.

The airplane was later observed by a witness, who was the son of the individual, who owned Feutz Airport. The witness said that he just climbed into his tractor, which was located southwest of the airstrip, when he saw the accident airplane flying low over runway 26 towards him. The airplane then made a wide sweeping left hand turn and disappeared from his view. The witness did not recognize the airplane and figured the pilot was just making a low pass for fun. Several minutes later, the witness saw the airplane land on runway 26 and then taxi to the far end of the runway where he was located. The pilot parked the airplane, shut down the engine, and he and his passenger got out. At that time, the witness recognized the pilot and his wife, who were old friends that he had not seen in several years. The witness said they visited for about 20 minutes before he returned to his farm work around 1150. He did not see the airplane depart and last saw it facing south at the end of runway 08 performing, what he believed, was an engine run-up. Around 1250, when the witness was driving off the property, he saw the airplane wreckage located off the end of the runway and immediately called 911. The witness said both occupants were responsive and taken to the hospital. The pilot passed away the following day. The passenger was not interviewed due to the extent of her injuries.

There were no records that the pilot had obtained a weather briefing from an Automated Flight Service Station (AFSS) prior to the flight.

PILOT INFORMATION

The pilot, age 61, held a private pilot certificate for airplane single-engine land. His last Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Third Class medical was issued on May 21, 2010, without limitations. A review of his pilot logbook revealed that as of February 18, 2012, he had accrued a total of 152 hours, of which 45 hours were in a Piper PA-28-161 airplane.

AIRPLANE INFORMATION

The accident airplane was a Piper PA-28-161, which is a low wing single-engine, 4-seat airplane. It was equipped with a Lycoming 0-320-3DG engine and Sensenich fixed-pitch, two-bladed propeller. A review of the maintenance logbooks revealed that the airplane’s last annual inspection was conducted on February 6, 2012, at total aircraft time of 13,788.0 hours. At the time of the accident, the airplane had accrued a total of 13,827.7 aircraft hours.

The airplane had flown a total of .5 hours from the time it took off to the time of the accident.

A postaccident calculation of the airplane’s weight and balance at the time of the accident revealed it was under gross weight and within the center of gravity envelope limitations.

Interpolation of the Piper PA-28-161 Normal Short Field Ground Roll Distance - No Obstacle performance chart,revealed the airplane would have needed approximately 2,312-feet of ground-roll distance on a paved, level and dry runway, with zero flaps. This chart also incorporated the existing tailwind and crosswind components that existed at the time of the accident.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

Weather at Columbia Regional Airport (COU), Columbia, Missouri, approximately 20 miles southwest of the accident site, at 1154, reported wind from 190 degrees at 16 knots gusting to 23 knots, visibility 10 miles, scattered clouds at 3,600 feet, temperature 25 degrees Celsius, dewpoint 16 degrees Celsius, with an altimeter setting of 29.99 inches of HG. Remarks included a peak wind of 28 knots at 1128 from 190 degrees.

The density altitude was calculated to be approximately 2,421 feet.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

Feutz Airport is a privately owned grass airstrip that was a 2,600-foot-long and 100-foot-wide runway oriented approximately 08/26 at an elevation of 890 feet msl. The runway surface was soft and the grass was measured between 6 to 10-inches-high. The runway was level and a cluster of 20 to 50-foot-tall trees were located along the far left side of the approach end of runway 26.

A walk of the runway revealed that the airplane landing gear made clear depression marks in the grass during both landing and takeoff. A measurement of the depression marks from where the airplane departed on runway 08 to where the main landing gear lifted off was approximately 1,900 feet. The distance between the end of the take off depression marks to the cluster of trees was approximately 686 feet.

WRECKAGE INFORMATION

An on-scene examination of the airplane wreckage was conducted on March 19, 2012, under the supervision of the NTSB Investigator-in-Charge. The airplane came to rest on a heading of 063 degrees magnetic at an approximate elevation of 878 feet mean sea level (msl), approximately 294 feet from the end of the runway. All major components of the airplane were located at the wreckage site.

The airplane collided with trees before coming to rest on its left side and both wings separated from the fuselage at the wing root. The main wreckage, which included the fuselage, vertical stabilizer/rudder, and both horizontal stabilator, came to rest approximately 75 feet forward of the wings. Both wings sustained leading edge impact damage; however, the left wing fuel tank was not breached and was filled with fuel. The right wing fuel tank was breached and was empty.

Examination of the airplane revealed the flap handle was in the fully retracted position. Flight control continuity was established for the rudder and both stabilator from the cockpit to the flight control surface. The right aileron control cable was separated and the left aileron balance cable was separated at the left aileron bell crank. These cables exhibited broomstrawed cables, consistent with overload failure. The elevator trim was positioned 1-degree nose down.

The engine was attached to the firewall and the two-bladed propeller remained attached to the engine. Both propeller blades exhibited some leading edge polishing and chordwise scratching. The spinner exhibited rotational twisting.

The propeller was manually rotated and compression and valve train continuity were established to each cylinder. Both magnetos remained attached to the engine and only the left magneto's harness was damaged. Spark was produced for the right magneto leads when the engine was rotated. The left magneto was removed from the engine and the harness was removed from the magneto. The magneto was rotated by hand and spark was produced at each tower.

The main fuel line from the carburetor to the engine was broken from impact and the carburetor inlet fuel screen was not recovered. The carburetor was removed and no fuel was found in the bowl. The carburetor linkage position was consistent with the throttle being full open and the mixture full rich.

The fuel selector in the cockpit was set to the left wing tank position.
The fuel pump was removed from the engine and fuel pumped from the unit when manually rotated.

The gascolator was removed from the firewall. Fuel was in the bowl and absent of water and debris. The fuel screen was also absent of debris.
The top and bottom spark plugs were removed and exhibited a normal wear pattern, except for the #2 cylinder top and bottom plugs, which were oil soaked.

The oil suction screen was removed and was absent of debris.

No mechanical deficiencies were observed with either the engine or airplane that would have precluded normal operation at the time of the accident.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Toxicological testing was conducted by the FAA's Accident Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The results of the testing were positive for Acetaminophen (21.48 ug/nl) in the urine and Diphenhydramine in the urine and blood.

An autopsy was conducted by the Office of the Medical Examiner, Columbia Missouri, on March 19, 2012. The cause of death was determined to be from "Multiple blunt force injuries. Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease may have contributed to his death."

 


"A man and his wife flew their own small single engine plane. This is the footage of when that plane crashed in Audrain County shortly after takeoff from a corn field. The man was killed on impact. The woman survived but I do not know her current condition. The plane settled in a neighboring yard, it's wings sheared off from a low tree line. Missouri Highway patrol was on the scene."

http://abc17news.com/news.php?id=5594

Kolb Mark III (built by William A. Johnston Jr.), Gregory A. Everett (rgd. owner & pilot), N9144E, Accident occurred October 05, 2011 in Versailles, Missouri

NTSB Identification: CEN12LA008 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 05, 2011 in Versailles, MO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/26/2012
Aircraft: JOHNSTON WILLIAM ALFRED JR KOLB MARK III, registration: N9144E
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot stated that the accident occurred on his sixth flight in the airplane. The engine run-up for the accident flight was normal, and just after takeoff, the engine over-temperature warning light illuminated. He banked the airplane to return to the airstrip. He said he decreased the engine power to keep the temperatures down but then had to increase engine power and pitch in order to clear trees along the flight path. The engine subsequently stopped producing power. The landing gear was ripped off during the forced landing in a field and the pilot was dragged across the terrain while still in the sling-type seat, which resulted in the pilot sustaining serious back injuries. 

After purchasing the airplane, the pilot installed a new engine, a ballistic recovery chute, a new fuel tank, and new fuel lines. However, he stated that he had continuing problems with high engine temperatures and a high static engine rpm. In response to these problems, the pilot replaced the static jets in both carburetors, tuned and synchronized both carburetors, and replaced the heat probes. He also installed an engine information system. 

A postaccident examination of the engine and airplane revealed that both carburetors were not adjusted properly, thus restricting fuel flow; improper fuel jets were installed, which produced a richer fuel/air mixture; and the coolant water temperature probe was in the wrong location, which would have prevented accurate temperature sensing. In addition, the positions of the air deflectors, the ballistic recovery chute, and the oil injection reservoir may have affected the amount of cooling air to the engine. No evidence of internal damage was noted to the pistons and cylinders. The engine demonstrated the ability to run normally during postaccident testing. Although the exact cause of the loss of engine power was not determined, it is likely that a combination of the modifications that were made to the airplane and engine that resulted in the loss of engine power.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A loss of engine power due to adjustments and modifications that the pilot made to the engine and airplane.

On October 5, 2011, at 1730 central daylight time, an amateur-built Johnston Kolb Mark III, N9144E, collided with the terrain during an off airport forced landing following a loss of engine power on takeoff from a private airstrip in Versailles, Missouri. The student pilot was seriously injured. The airplane that was registered to and operated by the pilot sustained substantial damage. The personal flight was operating under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot stated the accident occurred on his sixth flight in the airplane. The engine run-up was normal so he decided to fly it around the traffic pattern at the private airstrip. He stated that just after takeoff, as he was over a wooded area, the over temperature warning light illuminated. He banked to return to the airstrip and decreased the power to about 1,190 rpm in order to keep the engine temperatures down. However, he subsequently increased the engine power and pitch attitude in order to clear the trees along the flightpath. The airplane was over a bean field when the engine subsequently stopped producing power. The pilot stated that the landing gear was ripped off when he landed the airplane in the field. He was drug across the terrain while still in the sling type seat which resulted in the serious back injuries that he sustained. 

The pilot purchased the already built airplane in May 2010. After purchasing the airplane he installed a new engine, a ballistic recovery chute, a new fuel tank, and new fuel lines. He stated he took the airplane to the Kolb factory to have it inspected.

He stated that he was having problems with the number 2 cylinder exhaust gas temperature (EGT) running hot. He was also having problems with the number 1 cylinder head temperatures and the static run rpm. He stated that the maximum allowable rpm was 6,200 and he was achieving 6,280 rpm. He was advised by the repair station where he purchased the engine that the static jets could have been the problem so he replaced both of them. 

The pilot also installed an engine information system (EIS). He stated that the engine operated within parameters during a ground run-up. During takeoff on the first flight after installing the EIS, the number 2 cylinder EGT indicated high. He once again contacted the repair station and was told that the carburetors might need to be tuned and synced, which he did. He stated he flew the airplane again and encountered the same problem, so he replaced the heat probes and the engine information system (EIS). 

Due to the extent of the pilot’s injuries he was unable to complete the NTSB Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident /Incident Report.

A postaccident examination of the engine revealed:

Both the magneto side (MAG) and the power takeoff side (PTO) carburetor piston slides were not adjusted properly and were found to be protruding past the carburetor body. This would result in the jet needles being in too low of a position, restricting fuel flow resulting in a higher EGT. 

The main jet on both carburetors was a number 170 which would produce a richer mixture instead of the normal 165 jet. 

The fuel filter was located between the fuel pump and fuel tank instead of between the fuel pump and the carburetors as specified in the Rotax installation manual.

Small air deflectors were attached to the radiators to direct airflow into them for additional cooling. The left hand radiator was partially blocked by the oil injection tank. The ballistic recovery chute was mounted directly in front of the engine. It is unknown how these items affected airflow to the engine. 

The coolant water temperature probe was mounted in the outlet socket after the thermostat instead of being mounted in the center of the cylinder head as recommended. This location would prevent the probe from sensing the proper coolant temperature. 

The injection oil tank was approximately half full of oil. 

The pistons and cylinders did not show evidence of damage or lack of lubrication.

With the propeller blades removed, due to damage, the propeller hub was reinstalled so the engine could to be test run. Both magneto switches were turned on. While spraying raw fuel into the intake of both carburetors the engine started and ran for a few seconds until the fuel was removed. The engine was started a second time and it ran for approximately 10 seconds before the fuel source was removed.

 


"This was a close call for the man in Versailles, MO who liked to take casual flights in his ultralight. It went down in a bean field about a mile off the road in rural Morgan County. This was an ominous, quiet, scene. All I had was the light on my camera to see. FAA regulation has strict guidelines on interrupting the scene on something like this so it was a big no no to cross the tape but still, I was able to get close enough for these great shots."

Riverton Regional (KRIW), Wyoming: Safety improvements at major power line west of airport now in place

 
A total of 12 marker balls have been strung on Rocky Mountain Power’s 230K volt line west of Riverton Regional Airport to warn pilots of the power line. The power poles are also outfitted with solar-powered lights.
 (Photo Credit:  Ernie Over)

The red lights on the power poles as seen from Highway 26 warn pilots of the power line’s location at night.
 (Photo Credit:  Ernie Over)

By Ernie Over, managing editor, county10.com 

(Riverton, Wyo.) – Drivers on  Highway 26 west of Riverton may have noticed a new feature on the landscape recently, that of a dozen red marker balls on Rocky Mountain Power’s high voltage electric lines that cross over the highway. Seven of the power poles there also topped with new dual red lights.

“It’s something that I’ve been working on for three years now,” said Riverton Public Works Director Bill Urbigkit. “It’s part of our Capital Improvement Plan to lower the west end of the runway (at Riverton Regional Airport) in 2015.”

Two years ago, that portion of Paradise Valley Road at the west end of the airport property was lowered, also in planning for the major runway reconstruction project.

“We looked at many options for dealing with the power lines and poles, since they’ll now be in the airspace restriction once the runway is lowered. We looked at relocating the power line, which would’ve been hugely expensive, or lowering the power lines, which was not a good option either,” Urbigkit said. “In consultation with the Federal Aviation Administration and Rocky Mountain Power, it was decided to put lights on the poles and marker balls on the power lines as the best option.”

That brought up another set of complications. The area where the transmission line passes through is in the service area of High Plains Power, and a new power line would’ve been required to provide current for the lights.”Rocky Mountain Power officials finally suggested the lights be powered with solar panels, and they were,” he said.

Rocky Mountain Power spokesperson Margaret Oler said the power company was happy to work with the city to make the safety improvements. “The work was finished in mid-December,” she said. “The solar lights are not the flashing kind, they burn steady.” Oler said the transmission line carries 230,000 volts of electricity and is a segment of a statewide system that provides electricity around Wyoming. “This particular segment runs from the Riverton substation to the Thermopolis substation,” she said.

Urbigkit said the project was originally budgeted around $500,000, but that it was accomplished for about $100,000. Under the airport Capital Improvement Plan, the FAA pays 95 percent of the cost, the state kicks in three percent and city’s responsibility is two percent, Urbigkit said. The city paid Rocky Mountain Power for the materials and labor to install the safety improvements.

Urbigkit said two lights were installed on each power pole, for redundancy for safety’s sake.

Story and Photos:   http://county10.com

Riverton Regional Airport:  http://www.flyriverton.com

J-3 Cubs to highlight Sebring U.S. Sport Aviation Expo - January 17-20

SEBRING -- Opening day of the ninth annual U.S. Sport Aviation Expo will showcase the arrival of several J-3 Cubs from throughout the southeastern United States to celebrate the 75th anniversary of this iconic general aviation aircraft. 

 "We're excited to help Piper Aircraft celebrate the 75th anniversary of the J-3 Cub, and we're delighted to welcome Cub pilots from throughout the southeastern United States to join us at the Expo," said Jana Filip, expo director.

Visiting Cubs will arrive Thursday morning and be marshaled to a special parking area on the Sebring Regional Airport Ramp to allow the Cubs to park together and to make it easier for visitors to the expo to see the aircraft up close.

Visiting Cub pilots will receive free admission for the day, access to the Exhibitor Hospitality tent and a thank-you gift for participating in the expo. A group memento photo will be taken once all arriving Cubs are assembled.

Larry Robinson, executive director of the Florida Cub Flyers, will lead a group of Cubs arriving from the Okeechobee Airport.

The J-3 Cub is perhaps the most recognized airplane ever produced in America. Nearly 15,000 J-3s were produced between 1937 and 1947, first by the Taylor Aircraft Co. and later by Piper Aircraft, the predecessor of the current world-class Piper Aircraft headquartered in Vero Beach.

Story and Photo:   http://www2.highlandstoday.com

Plant-powered planes show promise

Green' biofuels are increasingly being used by airline owners to reduce harmful emissions. But are they really a viable solution for powering every craft in the skies?

January 15, 2013
By Jon Stewart 

To the eye, there was nothing remarkable about the aging Falcon 20 jet as it took off from Ottawa International airport in Canada at the end of October in 2012. But the twin-engined, 10-seater plane was in the process of making aviation history.

After a short flight that saw it climb to 30,000 ft (9,000m) over the capital city, the plane touched back down at the airport to secure its world first.

"Today, I flew the world’s first 100% biofuel flight," said pilot Tim Leslie on landing the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) craft. "It is truly inspiring to take this step towards an eco-friendly future."

Unlike conventional aircraft which burn kerosene – a polluting fossil fuel - Leslie’s plane was powered by fuel derived from rapeseed oil. However, it could equally have been powered by one of a number of biofuels made from algae, flax, coconut husks or even from used cooking-oil.

These kinds of fuels are considered to be eco-friendly and “green” because the plants from which they are derived absorb CO2 from the atmosphere as they grow and release it when they burn, with no net addition of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. As a result, they are viewed by many as one of the main ways the aviation industry can reduce its carbon footprint.

That’s important when you realize that aviation currently accounts for around 2% of all greenhouse gas emissions, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, although the effects are disproportionate to other types of pollution.

“In terms of climate impact it’s somewhat higher than that,” says Steven Barrett, assistant professor of astronautics and aeronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and the director of the Laboratory for Aviation and the Environment. “Estimates vary from 5 to 10%, because of the altitude at which aircraft fly. Emissions from planes have a different impact than they would on the ground.”

For example, the contrails from a jet – those white streaks you sometimes see trailing a plane – are known to cause high-altitude cirrus clouds, which compound global warming.

Dropping in

It is generally agreed, that these effects will only get worse if nothing is done because air travel is growing….quickly.  In fact, between now and 2030, the number of passengers and number of fights is likely to more than double, according to the UN International Civil Aviation Organization
 
Airline manufacturers and carriers are all too well aware of these effects and are working to try to mitigate them.

“We feel it’s our responsibility to deal with our segment in a very aggressive way,” Dr John Tracy, chief technology officer (CTO) at Boeing, recently told me. “Probably 75% of the research and development dollars we invest in the commercial airplane side goes towards improving our environmental footprint.”

Long term,  new aircraft shapes could help, while even further into the future are the prospects of electric, hydrogen or even solar powered aircraft. However, these kinds of development are years – even decades – away. In the short term biofuels are looked on as a potential savior as most commercial passenger jets can use them with little to no modification, and because they seem to offer significant benefits.

For example, newly released figures collected by a plane trailing the Canadian Falcon 20 suggested that there was a 50% reduction in aerosol emissions compared to conventional fuel. Previous studies with the rapeseed fuel also show that there is a 25% reduction in particles and up to 49% reduction in soot – or black carbon - emissions compared to conventional fuel. Additionally, the NRC research also claims to show increased engine efficiency.

Read more here:   http://www.bbc.com

Meriden, Connecticut: Model airplane business is taking off

 
Dave Zajac / Record-Journal 
Meriden model airplane business is taking off Todd Syssa, owner of Syssa Aircraft Performance in Meriden, holds and Extra 300, his favorite aircraft to fly when not manufacturing engine parts at the business located on North Colony Road. The plane weighs in at 11 1/2 pounds and can reach a speed of 65 miles per hour.

MERIDEN — The aircraft engines being produced at Syssa Aircraft Performance on North Colony Road will end up in planes all over the world, but the only local passenger on those planes is a stuffed “Beaker” doll based on the Muppets’ character. 

 Syssa Aircraft produces model airplane engines and was started by hobbyist Todd Syssa, who occasionally pilots some of his airplanes at the Hub. One of the planes he’s building has the Beaker doll in the cockpit.

Recently, the company got a contract to do work for the military.

“But I can’t really talk about it,” Syssa said.

Model planes of different sizes sit on shelves and partition walls at the North Colony Road shop. Blocks of aircraft-grade aluminum are piled in bins waiting to be transformed into parts that will end up in engines destined for customers in Florida, Ohio or Texas, the biggest markets for remote-controlled airplanes, according to Syssa.

Aircraft engines and other parts the company makes require precision to degrees much smaller than a human hair, Syssa said.

Other than the carburetors, the small engines are all produced in America, which is a selling point for many customers, according to Syssa, a city resident.

“It makes a big difference,” he said.

Joe Acosta, owner of Build Right Fly Right in Wallingford, said he’s known Syssa for many years and helped him get started on developing the engine about six years ago. Acosta told Syssa that there would be a market for good quality, American-made engines that are comparable in price to engines made in China or Japan.

“If the entire package is substantially better than the Chinese can produce, then you can do it,” Acosta said. “There has to be a reason when you’re asking people to spend extra dollars.”

Acosta said thus far, the strategy has worked for Syssa.

“Last year I sold more of his engines than any other,” Acosta said.

Acosta worked for 40 years in the aerospace industry, and said Syssa exhibits a common tendency for engineers looking for ways to improve a product.

“They’re never happy,” Acosta said. “He wants to change it every week.”

When flying at the hub, Syssa uses a small training airplane since his larger airplanes are louder.

“It would get people’s attention,” he said.

In his shop, there are models of civilian planes along with a World War II Tigercat F7F, a hefty twin-engine plane that he’s working on.

Syssa’s favorite is an acrobatic plane modeled on an Extra 300, able to hang in the air nose-up and go about 65 miles per hour. The 11 ½-pound plane is powered by one of Syssa’s engines.

Hobbyists buy airplane frames and can engines from a number of companies that fit their plane’s configuration. Syssa engines are sold through shops and online.

Sean Moore, Greater Meriden Chamber of Commerce director, called the shop “awesome” and a blend of “technology and fun.”

While there are still large manufacturers in the city, Moore said small businesses like Syssa’s are in the majority.

“The bulk of it does come from smaller shops just like (Syssa’s),” he said.

Story and Photo:  http://www.myrecordjournal.com
 


Model airplane engine company in Meriden powers worldwide hobby 

 MERIDEN - The aircraft engines being produced at Syssa Aircraft Performance on North Colony Road will end up in planes all over the world, but the only local passenger on those planes is a stuffed “Beaker” doll based on the Muppets character.

Syssa Aircraft produces model airplane engines and was started by hobbyist Todd Syssa who occasionally pilots some of his own airplanes at the Hub. One of the plane’s he’s building is big enough to hold the Beakerdoll in the cockpit.

Recently, the company got a contract to do work for the military.

“But I can’t really talk about it,” Syssa said.

Model planes of different sizes sit on shelves and partition walls at the North Colony Road shop. Unworked blocks of aircraft-grade aluminum are piled in bins waiting to get transformed into parts that will end up in engines destined for customers in Florida, Ohio or Texas, the biggest markets for remote-controlled airplanes according to Syssa.

Aircraft engines and other parts the company makes require precision to degrees that are much smaller than a human hair, Syssa said.

Other than the carburetors, the 30 cc engines are all produced in America which is a selling point for many customers, according to Syssa.

Joe Acosta, owner of Build Right Fly Right in Wallingford, said he’s known Syssa for many years and helped him get started on developing the engine about six years ago. Acosta told Syssa that there would be a market for good quality, American-made engines that are comparable in price to engines made in China or Japan.

“If the entire package is substantially better than the Chinese can produce, then you can do it,” Acosta said. “There has to be a reason when you’re asking people to spend extra dollars.”

Acosta said thus far, the strategy has worked for Syssa.

“Last year I sold more of his engines than any other,” Acosta said.


Story:  http://www.myrecordjournal.com