Thursday, June 29, 2017

Pitts Special S-1C, N5191: Incident occurred June 28, 2017 at Redding Municipal Airport (KRDD), Shasta County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Sacramento, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N5191

Aircraft on landing, gear collapsed.

Date: 28-JUN-17
Time: 17:22:00Z
Regis#: N5191
Aircraft Make: PITTS
Aircraft Model: SPECIAL S1C
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: REDDING
State: CALIFORNIA

Cessna 172R Skyhawk, registered to SkyDance Aviation LLC and operated by Epix Services LLC, N2460A : Accident occurred June 28, 2017 at Emporia-Greensville Regional Airport (KEMV), Virginia

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Richmond, Virginia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N2460A

Location: Emporia, VA
Accident Number: ERA17CA216
Date & Time: 06/28/2017, 1245 EDT
Registration: N2460A
Aircraft: CESSNA 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Abnormal runway contact
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

The student pilot reported that the flight was his first solo cross-country, and the arrival and departure at his first airport was non-eventful. About 8 miles from the second airport, he listened to the airport's automatic weather observation system, which reported that the wind was coming from 020° at 5 knots. He entered the left traffic pattern for runway 34, and while on the downwind leg abeam the end of the runway, he reduced engine power to idle and lowered the wing flaps to 10°. He then turned onto a left base leg and maintained 70 knots, and lowered the wing flaps to 30° on final approach, maintaining an airspeed "between 50 and 54 knots". At the runway numbers he began to pull back on the control wheel to initiate the landing flare. The nose of the airplane then abruptly pitched up and to the left, which he believed felt like a gust of wind. He tried to correct by releasing back pressure on the control wheel, and using rudder and ailerons to move back to the right, but the airplane was still left of the runway centerline. Subsequently, the airplane bounced hard numerous times, the propeller struck the runway, and then departed the runway to the left. During the runway excursion, the nose landing gear collapsed and the airplane skid across a taxiway, eventually stopping in the grass. The fuselage and firewall were substantially damaged.

The student pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Review of the Pilot's Operating Handbook Indicated that airspeed for a normal landing should have been 60-70 knots with the wing flaps down. 

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 56, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/19/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:   64 hours (Total, all aircraft), 43 hours (Total, this make and model), 24 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 24 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N2460A
Model/Series: 172 R
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2000
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 17280932
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/05/2017, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2299 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 8033.6 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C91A installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-L2A
Registered Owner: SKYDANCE AVIATION LLC
Rated Power: 160 hp
Operator: EPIX SERVICES LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Does Business As: Epix Aviation
Operator Designator Code: 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: EMV, 127 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1235 EDT
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 230°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.22 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 8°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: PLYMOUTH, NC (PMZ)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Emporia, VA (EMV)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1207 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: EMPORIA-GREENSVILLE RGNL (EMV)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 126 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 34
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5010 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  36.686944, -77.482778 (est)

Lockwood Aircam, N965RS: Incident occurred June 22, 2017 at William T. Piper Memorial Airport (KLHV), Lock Haven, Clinton County, Pennsylvania

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

http://registry.faa.gov/N965RS

Aircraft on landing, sustained minor damage.

Date: 22-JUN-17
Time: 13:45:00Z
Regis#: N965RS
Aircraft Make: LOCKWOOD
Aircraft Model: AIRCAM
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: LOCK HAVEN
State: PENNSYLVANIA

Rans S-19, N812X: Incident occurred June 28, 2017 and incident occurred December 04, 2016 at Marshfield Municipal Airport (KGHG), Plymouth County, Massachusetts

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston, Massachusetts

http://registry.faa.gov/N812X

Aircraft landed and ground looped.

Date: 28-JUN-17
Time: 13:00:00Z
Regis#: N812X
Aircraft Make: RANS
Aircraft Model: S19
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MARSHFIELD
State: MASSACHUSETTS

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston, Massachusetts

Aircraft landed and ground looped.

Date: 04-DEC-16

Time: 15:15:00Z
Regis#: N812X
Aircraft Make: RANS
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MARSHFIELD
State: Massachusetts

Beech 58 Baron, JA-5304: Incident occurred June 29, 2017 at Nagasaki Airport, Japan



NAGASAKI – A Beech 58 Baron plane made a belly landing Thursday at Nagasaki airport due to mechanical trouble, causing a brief runway closure and the cancellation of over a dozen flights, the airport operator and the transport ministry said.

The three people aboard the aircraft were not injured. 

The accident occurred around 10:30 a.m. during a “touch-and-go” drill meant to practice landing and taking off again without making a full stop.

The trouble occurred following two successful attempts at the drill.

The airport regularly conducts training for small aircraft.

The plane was used in training by Sojo University’s Aerospace Systems Engineering Division in Kumamoto Prefecture.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp

Lancair IV-P, registered to and operated by MS Rochelle LLC, N366TF: Accident occurred June 01, 2017 at Oswego County Airport (KFZY), Fulton, New York

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this incident

Additional Participating Entities:

Airworthiness Certification Office; Atlanta, Georgia
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama
Lancair Owners and Builders Organization; Saint Louis, Missouri

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

 
http://registry.faa.gov/N366TF


Location: Fulton, NY
Incident Number: CEN17IA233
Date & Time: 06/01/2017, 1830 EDT
Registration: N366TF
Aircraft: SCHRODER DAVID LANCAIR IV P
Aircraft Damage: None
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 1, 2017, at 1830 eastern daylight time, a Lancair IV-P airplane, N366TF, lost engine power and conducted a forced landing at the Oswego County Airport (FZY), Fulton, New York. The pilot and flight instructor were not injured and the airplane sustained minor damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by MS Rochelle LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local flight, which departed from FZY at 1819

The purpose of the flight was to calibrate an Advanced Flight Systems Advanced Pro 3 angle of attack system, which included a series of zero g-force maneuvers. According to the flight instructor, during the first maneuver, he and the pilot noticed an engine overspeed, as well as a noticeable "bang" and a total loss of engine power. The pilot performed a forced landing at FZY without further incident. During the descent and landing, the propeller continued to windmill.

According to data downloaded from the onboard Electronics International MVP-50 engine monitor, engine start occurred at 1806. A normal engine runup occurred at 1816, including magneto and propeller governor checks. Takeoff with full engine power occurred at 1819 and the airplane climbed normally to 12,000 ft msl.

At 1829:29, the zero g-force maneuver occurred. Oil pressure indications, which had been normal until this time, decreased to 3 psi by 1829:32, followed by an engine overspeed of 3,140 rpm at 1829:34. From 1829:34 to 1830:10, engine rpm indications varied from zero to 2,700 rpm, and oil pressure indications varied from zero to 50 psi. At 18:29:38, the alternator charge indication dropped to zero.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The composite airplane was constructed from a kit with components manufactured by Lancair International, Inc. The airplane was equipped with a Continental Motors TSIO-550E engine (s/n 803138), an MT Propeller USA MTV-14-D constant-speed four-blade wood propeller (non-counterweighted), and a McCauley C290D3-K/T43 propeller governor. According to the engine's type certificate data sheet, maximum engine rpm was 2,700 rpm. The oil sump capacity was 12 quarts, with 6.5 quarts usable at a 14.5 degrees nose down attitude.

According to engine logbooks, a teardown inspection occurred on December 18, 2008, due to a propeller strike. On October 15, 2012, Barrett Precision Engines Inc. overhauled the engine, which included documented compliance with Continental Motors Service Bulletin 00-3, Counterweight Installation. On February 1, 2017, an entry was recorded to correct a rough running engine and a rising No. 3 cylinder exhaust gas temperature; which maintenance attributed to incorrect timing. On April 7, 2017, the No. 3 cylinder was replaced, due to a fractured bolt on the intake rocker shaft.

ENGINE EXAMINATION

Examination of the engine revealed the crankcase was breached in several places and the camshaft drive gear was displaced away from the crankshaft drive gear. Extensive internal damage was noted to the interior of the crankcase and cylinder skirts, due to connecting rod contact. Both magnetos were dislodged from their respective mounts. One of the two rear crankshaft counterweights (6th order) was separated from the crankshaft, and the Nos. 1 and 4 connecting rods were fractured.

The oil tube from the sump to the oil pump was compromised and thermal discoloration and oil starvation distress were noted on the Nos 2, 3, 4, and 6 connecting rods and bearings. The oil sump contained significant metal fragments, including four counterweight pin retaining snap rings, four counterweight pin retainer plates and two 6th order counterweight connecting pins. After separating the engine case, a 6th order counterweight connecting pin was found lodged in the crankcase between cylinders Nos. 4 and 6 and an impression in the No. 1 connecting rod matched the shape of a 6th order counterweight connecting pin.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

On November 15, 2015, a Lancair IV-P accident occurred that involved the same model engine, propeller, and propeller governor as this incident. The sequence of events for the accident (NTSB# CEN16LA043) involved a practice emergency descent with a 0.5 g-force load factor, which led to an engine oil pressure drop, engine overspeed, and total loss of power. The investigation concluded that a duel magneto failure occurred due to an engine overspeed/surge inducing shock loads on the gear train. During this investigation, several Lancair pilots who had competed in the Reno Air Races stated that low G maneuvering would often result in a transient drop in engine oil pressure and an engine surge and/or overspeed.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) small airplane standards staff, an angle of attack system calibration procedure which requires zero g-force flight is not approved for installation on certified aircraft.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 36, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/29/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/10/1997
Flight Time:  1204 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1 hours (Total, this make and model), 1140 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 12 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: SCHRODER DAVID
Registration: N366TF
Model/Series: LANCAIR IV P NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2000
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental; Normal
Serial Number: LIV-388
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/16/2016, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1146.57 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: TSIO-550 SER
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 360 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFZY, 475 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1854 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 111°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 300°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.97 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C / 4°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: FULTON, NY (FZY)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: FULTON, NY (FZY)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1815 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: OSWEGO COUNTY (FZY)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 475 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 33
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5196 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing:  Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: None
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  43.350833, -76.388056 (est)

NTSB Identification: CEN17IA233
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Incident occurred Thursday, June 01, 2017 in Fulton, NY
Aircraft: SCHRODER DAVID LANCAIR IV P, registration: N366TF
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators used data provided by various sources and may not have traveled in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft incident report.

On June 1, 2017, at 1830 eastern daylight time, an amateur built Lancair IV-P airplane, N366TF, lost engine power and was forced landed at the Oswego County Airport (FZY), Fulton, New York. The pilot and flight instructor were not injured and the airplane sustained minor damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by MS Rochelle LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local flight, which departed from FZY at 1819.

The purpose of the flight was to calibrate an angle of attack indicator, which required a series of zero G maneuvers. During the first maneuver, the flight instructor and pilot noticed the engine overspeed, as well as a noticeable "bang". Following a total loss of power, a forced landing was performed at FZY without further incident. Post flight examination revealed engine damage which included two fractured connecting rods. The engine was retained for follow on examination

Beech B23 Musketeer, N4023T: Accident occurred June 28, 2017 near Odell Williamson Municipal Airport (60J), Ocean Isle Beach, Brunswick County, North Carolina

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


NTSB Identification: ERA17LA215
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 28, 2017 in Ocean Isle Beach, NC
Aircraft: BEECH B23, registration: N4023T
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 28, 2017, about 1910 eastern daylight time, a privately owned and operated Beech B23, N4023T, was substantially damaged when it impacted trees and terrain during a forced landing in Ocean Isle Beach, North Carolina. The private pilot received minor injuries, the passenger, who was a student pilot, was seriously injured. The flight departed Odell Williamson Municipal Airport (60J), Ocean Isle Beach, North Carolina about 1908, and was destined for Stag Air Park (7NC1), Burgaw, North Carolina. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the passenger, during the previous flight from 7NC1 to 60J while in cruise flight about 3,000 ft mean sea level (msl), the pilot moved the engine mixture control from a partially leaned setting to full rich, just after the passenger noticed that the exhaust gas temperature gauge was indicating "a little high." As the mixture control was moved, the engine developed a "very noticeable vibration" which then worsened. The pilot increased the throttle setting to the "low to mid 2000" rpm range, after which the engine vibration stopped. The engine operated normally for the remainder of the flight.

After landing at 60J, the pilot added about 15 gallons of fuel to the left fuel tank (the tank he had used for the duration of the inbound flight) and about 5 gallons to the right fuel tank. The passenger recalled the pilot commenting about utilizing the right fuel tank for the return flight, but he did not recall whether he moved the fuel selector. The pilot then taxied the airplane to the airport restaurant area where they ate dinner. Before departing the parking area, the pilot removed the engine cowls to examine the engine compartment for any loose wires or other indications of what may have caused the vibration, but found nothing unusual. The pilot then checked the oil quantity, and performed a walkaround inspection of the airplane using his checklist, as he had done prior to the previous flight.

According to the pilot, the engine started normally and he allowed it to idle for a few minutes to warm up. He performed an engine run-up with no issues noted. The engine performed normally during the takeoff, which the pilot described as a "ground effect takeoff" and during the initial climb. When the airplane reached an altitude of about 500 feet msl, the pilot noticed the airplane was not climbing as expected, and the engine rpm had reduced to less than 2000. As he started a "slow bank" left turn back toward the airport, the airplane would no longer climb. He then checked the carburetor temperature gauge which read about 58 degrees, and checked the throttle friction which was satisfactory. He considered switching fuel tanks, but chose not to because the engine was developing some power, and he was concerned that switching tanks might cause a total power loss. Once the pilot realized that the airplane would not reach the runway, he prepared for a forced landing into a wooded area. During landing the left wing struck a tree and the airplane rolled inverted.

An initial examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administrator (FAA) inspector revealed that fuselage came to rest inverted and the right wing was separated from the fuselage at the root. A section of the left wing was separated about mid span, and the nose section forward of the windscreen was crushed in the aft and upward direction. The empennage was crushed and bent toward the right, aft of the baggage compartment door. The vertical and horizontal stabilizers, rudder and elevators were separated from the empennage.

The propeller blades both had minor scratches and nicks but were otherwise undamaged. The engine was rotated by hand at the propeller and produced thumb compression on all four cylinders. The Nos. 3 and 4 sparkplugs were black and sooty. Both magnetos were dislodged. The starter Bendix was in the engaged position. The fuel primer was in the closed position. The throttle control was about 1/4 inch out from the full position, and the mixture control was in the full rich position; however, impact damage was noted to the instrument panel in the area of the controls. The carburetor heat control was in the off position. Both fuel filler caps were found secure with their seals intact.

According to FAA records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued January 28, 2015. According to the pilot's logbook he had accrued 215 hours of total flight experience; he estimated 40 hours of which were in the same make and model as the accident airplane.

The airplane was retained for further examination.









OCEAN ISLE BEACH, NC (WECT) - Two people were hospitalized after a small plane crashed in Ocean Isle Beach on Wednesday evening.

The pilot and passenger were both taken to Grand Strand Medical Center in Myrtle Beach, SC, according to a state highway patrol officer on the scene.

Law enforcement stayed at the scene overnight and the Federal Aviation Administration will begin investigating the crash on Thursday.

A statement from the FAA Wednesday night said the plane was a Beechcraft Musketeer BE23.

"(The) aircraft crashed into the woods after departure from the Odell Williamson Municipal Airport, Ocean Isle Beach, NC, at 7:10 p.m.," the statement read. "The FAA will investigate."   

A resident close to the crash said the plane went down near a community called The Retreat at Ocean Isle Beach.

"Everyone in the neighborhood heard the crash," said the woman, who preferred to remain anonymous. "Then two large fire trucks showed up, ambulances and other emergency personnel."

One resident said he pulled into his driveway just minutes after the crash and saw a man covered in blood. The resident said that man appeared to be OK but the other victim was still in the marsh area where the plane crashed and appeared to be in more serious condition.

http://www.wect.com

Van's RV-7, owned and operated by the pilot, N731RV: Fatal accident occurred June 27, 2017 in Arlington, Arizona

William Edgar Harber

William Edgar Harber died in his beloved Van's RV-7 in Arizona on June 27th, 2017. 

Harber will be best remembered for his activities and contributions in the U.S. Army (February 1962 - February 1966), Corporate Pilot for Celanese Corporate (1964 - 1966), Pilot for Delta Airlines (1966 - 1997). Bill had a love and passion for airplanes. He flew airplanes since the age of 14 and said on many occasions, "all I've ever wanted to do my whole life is fly airplanes."


He served as a pilot for many companies including over 30 years with Delta Airlines where he retired as a captain. You could always find him at the Denton Municipal Airport working on his airplanes and talking with his friends and fellow pilots.  He was a family man who would do anything and everything for the ones he loved.


Buckeye Municipal Airport Coordinator John McMahon.

“The entire city mourns the loss of John,” said Mayor Jackie Meck. “John was a very special man who loved his family, his faith and always saw the very best in people. The city of Buckeye has lost a family member and we will miss him greatly.” 

McMahon started with Buckeye in 2012 as a Skilled Maintenance Worker in the Public Works Department. In October of 2013, he became the city’s Airport Coordinator and managed the day to day operations of the airport which included ensuring the airport met both FAA and ADOT regulations, facilities maintenance, working with tenants, managing fuel needs and many other duties. McMahon was the sole employee at the airport.


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona



Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N731RV

Location: Arlington, AZ
Accident Number: WPR17FA134
Date & Time: 06/27/2017, 0849 MST
Registration: N731RV
Aircraft: JORDAN JOHN RV7
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Birdstrike
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 27, 2017, about 0849 mountain standard time, a Vans RV-7, N731RV, was destroyed when it impacted terrain about 10 miles southwest of Arlington, Arizona. The airline transport pilot and the pilot-rated passenger sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight, which originated from Buckeye Municipal Airport (BXK), Buckeye, Arizona, about 0835.

After family members of the pilot became concerned when he did not arrive at his intended destination, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an alert notice (ALNOT) for the airplane. The wreckage was found by local law enforcement in the Gila Mountains at 1810.

Review of radar data revealed a primary target correlated with the accident airplane about 2.5 miles southeast of BXK at 2,200 ft mean sea level (msl), heading southwest and climbing. At 0844, at 3,349 ft msl, the target turned west and continued to climb. About a minute later, the target had climbed to about 6,700 ft msl and completed a 360° right turn. The target then continued southwest, and at 0847, made a left 180° turn to the northeast at 7,600 ft msl. The target continued along this heading before radar returns were lost at 0849; the last return was near the accident site.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 78, held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multi-engine land and single-engine sea. The pilot was issued a third-class FAA medical certificate on March 29, 2016, with a limitation that he must wear corrective lenses. On the application for that medical certificate, the pilot reported 22,510 total hours of flight experience, of which 10 hours were in the previous six months. The pilot also held a flight instructor certificate for multi-engine airplane, flight engineer certificate for turbojet-powered and reciprocating-engine-powered airplanes, and a mechanic certificate with airframe and powerplant ratings.

The passenger held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. He was issued a FAA third-class airman medical certificate on August 14, 2015, without limitations. On the application for that medical certificate, he reported flight experience that included 3.2 hours total and 3.2 hours in previous six months.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The RV-4 is a two-place, tandem-seat, low-wing amateur-built airplane with conventional landing gear powered by a 200-hp Lycoming O-320-A1A engine. The airplane was issued an FAA airworthiness certificate on November 4, 2013. The airplane maintenance records were not located during the investigation, and the airplane's maintenance history could not be determined.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 0853, the automated weather observation for BXK, located about 18 miles northeast of the accident site, reported wind from 140° at 10 knots, visibility 10 statute miles with no clouds, temperature 33°C, dew point 4°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.85 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane impacted rocky, desert terrain and was destroyed by impact forces. The wreckage was dispersed in a triangular pattern over an area that contained two north/south oriented gullies and exhibited impact damage consistent with an inverted, left-wing-down, nose-down attitude at the time of impact. The debris field was 264 ft long and 270 ft wide. The wreckage debris path was oriented on a magnetic heading about 77° from the first identified point of contact (FIPC) to the main wreckage. The FIPC was an area of disturbed ground about 10 inches wide and about 10 ft long that contained red lens fragments. At the end of the area of disturbed ground was the impact crater, measuring about 4 ft in diameter, containing the propeller assembly and engine. One of the propeller blades exhibited heavy gouging on the leading edge and chordwise scoring. The other blade displayed forward bending at the midsection, leading edge scoring and missing material at the tip. The main wreckage was found 146 ft from the FIPC and in the bottom of a 10-ft-deep gully. The main wreckage comprised the horizontal stabilizers and both elevators, cabin area structure, and both wings. The horizontal stabilizer and associated structure remained attached to the main wreckage by flight control cables and electrical wires. Flight control continuity was attained to the forward cabin area through control cables and impact-damaged control rods. The left aileron remained attached to the wing by its inboard attachment point. The right aileron separated from the wing and was found near the main wreckage. Both flaps remained attached to the wing and were in a position consistent with the retracted position at the time of impact. The right flap separated at its outboard attachment point and was bent upwards at its midsection. The leading edges of both wings separated, revealing the aft side surfaces of the fuel tanks. The leading edges of both wings displayed crush damage from the tip to the root. Both wing tips separated, and the attachment structure had impact damage. The right wing outboard section was bent downward. The forward side of the cabin floor area exhibited crush damage. The plexiglass canopy, vertical stabilizer, and rudder were located during the examination of the accident site on that day; they were located several days later about 1 mile northwest of the main wreckage.

During the examination of the recovered wreckage, specimens of biological matter were observed on the underside of the right horizontal stabilizer and upper rear bulkhead behind the pilot's seat position. Bird feathers were found in the cockpit under the passenger seat. Bone matter was found between the engine cylinders and on the oil cooler. The specimens were collected and sent for further identification and classification. Several components from the empennage, including the vertical stabilizer and horizontal stabilizer assemblies, were shipped to the NTSB materials lab for further examination. Examination of the airframe, engine, and system components revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunction that would have precluded normal operation.

The complete accident site, engine, and airframe examination reports are appended to this accident in the public docket.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Office of the Medical Examiner at Maricopa County, Phoenix, Arizona, completed an autopsy on the pilot and the passenger and concluded that the causes of death were multiple blunt force trauma and thermal injuries.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing on specimens from the pilot. The specimen used to test for volatiles tested positive for ethanol in muscle and lung, N-butanol and propanol in muscle. The test did not detect a presence of drugs in lung. Tests for carbon monoxide and cyanide were not performed.

The Federal Aviation Administration's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing on specimens from the passenger. The specimen used to test for volatiles tested positive for ethanol and propanol in muscle. The test did not detect a presence of drugs in muscle. Tests for carbon monoxide and cyanide were not performed.

TEST AND RESEARCH

The Feather Identification Lab, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, determined that biological matter in specimens sent to the lab contained five whole feathers and some downy feather material. All the whole feathers matched a single museum specimen of rock pigeon. Additionally, microscopic examination of the feather samples was consistent with rock pigeon.

On March 23, 2018, airframe components from the empennage were examined at the NTSB Materials Lab, in Washington, DC, and additional samples of biological matter were collected. These samples were extracted from a dented section underneath the horizontal stabilizer to the right of the tailcone, including a small whole feather that was found deep inside the bottom right side of the empennage. This feather and the additional empennage samples were also identified as rock pigeon based on whole feather comparisons and microscopic analysis. Additionally, the impact dent was consistent with the typical size of this bird species.

Components from the empennage, the vertical stabilizer and horizontal stabilizer assemblies were examined to determine the nature of fractured surfaces. All the fracture surfaces were consistent with overstress, and there were no indications of any preexisting damage such as cracks or corrosion. All the examined fracture surfaces of the spars, skins, stabilizers, and other components from the horizontal stabilizer, vertical stabilizer, and rudder assemblies exhibited features consistent with secondary fractures (such as ground impact). There were no clear indications that any of the components that fractured in overstress did so before ground impact or independently of the bird strike.

The complete Smithsonian Feather Lab report and NTSB Materials Lab report are appended to this accident in the public docket. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Engineer
Age: 78
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Unknown
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present:
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/29/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 22510 hours (Total, all aircraft)

Pilot-Rated Passenger Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 41, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Unknown
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present:
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/14/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 3.2 hours (Total, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: JORDAN JOHN
Registration: N731RV
Model/Series: RV7 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2004
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 70083
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-360-A1A
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBXK, 1021 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0815 MST
Direction from Accident Site: 44°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 140°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.85 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 33°C / 4°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: BUCKEYE, AZ (BXK)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: BUCKEYE, AZ (BXK)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0835 MST
Type of Airspace:  Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal

Latitude, Longitude:  33.229444, -112.900000 (est)

NTSB Identification: WPR17FA134
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, June 27, 2017 in Arlington, AZ
Aircraft: JORDAN JOHN RV7, registration: N731RV
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 27, 2017 about 0850 Mountain standard time, a Vans RV-7, N731RV, was destroyed when it impacted mountainous terrain near Arlington, Arizona. The pilot who was the registered owner of the airplane, and a pilot-rated passenger sustained fatal injuries. The flight was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91, as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight originated from Buckeye Municipal Airport, Buckeye, Arizona about 0835.

On June 27, 2017, at 1316, an Alert Notice (ALNOT) was issued for the airplane after family members of the pilot became concerned when he did not arrive at his intended destination. At 1810, the airplane wreckage was found by the sheriff's department in the Gila Mountains. 

There were no reported witnesses to the accident.

The airplane was recovered to a secure location for further examination.



William Edgar Harber died at the age of 78, born October 22, 1938 in Beaumont, TX to William V. Harber and Evelyn Phillips Harber, due to an airplane crash in his beloved RV-7 in Arizona on June 27, 2017. The Memorial Service will be held at Denton Bible Church on Wednesday, July 5 at 11 o'clock with a reception to follow at the church.

The deceased will be best remembered for his activities and contributions in the U.S. Army (February 1962 - February 1966), Corporate Pilot for Celanese Corporate (1964 - 1966), Pilot for Delta Airlines (1966 - 1997). Married to Janette Beauchamp Harber (1965 - 2007 when she went to be with the Lord Jesus).

Bill had a love and passion for airplanes. He flew airplanes since the age of 14 and said on many occasions, "all I've ever wanted to do my whole life is fly airplanes."

He served as a pilot for many companies including over 30 years with Delta Airlines where he retired as a captain. You could always find him at the Denton Municipal Airport working on his airplanes and talking with his friends and fellow pilots. He loved the Lord Jesus and was an active member at Denton Bible Church for over two decades, greeting people with a smile as an usher, faithfully studying the Bible in Sunday School, and constantly ministering to people in his day-to-day life, always eager to share the Gospel. He attended Bible Study Fellowship every year. He gave generously to many ministries and missionaries around the world. He was a family man who would do anything and everything for the ones he loved.

Bill is survived by his son James and his grandson Tristan, his grandson Ian and his wife Katie, his sister-in-law Renee Beauchamp Skeels and her daughters Sadie and Katherine Skeels.


Remembrances may be sent to Denton Bible Church. A donation may be made to the memorial fund of the additional deceased passenger, John McMahon




One of two people killed in the crash of a small airplane Tuesday in the Gila Bend Mountains has been identified as Buckeye city Airport Coordinator John McMahon.

“The entire city mourns the loss of John,” Mayor Jackie Meck said in a prepared statement. “John was a very special man who loved his family, his faith and always saw the very best in people. The city of Buckeye has lost a family member and we will miss him greatly.”

McMahon and another person, whom authorities had declined to name Wednesday, were in a two-passenger aircraft identified by the Federal Aviation Admission as a Vans RV-7. The aircraft took off from Buckeye Municipal Airport at about 8 a.m. Tuesday and was scheduled to return by 10 a.m.

The Arizona Search and Rescue Coordinators Association worked with the Maricopa Ccounty Sheriff's Office to look for the missing plane, according to Jesse Robinson, one of the coordinators.

"The whole operation took about two hours," Robinson said.

The wreckage was located just before 5 p.m. in a field 17 miles southwest of Buckeye. A Sheriff's Office helicopter was used to locate the downed plane in a field in the Gila Bend Mountains. 

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

A Buckeye city spokeswoman said McMahon's family members gave them permission to reveal his identity. A Maricopa County Sheriff's Office statement issued Wednesday morning said the deceased would be positively identified by the medical examiner.

McMahon started working for Buckeye's Public Works department in 2012 and became the city's airport coordinator in October 2013. He also earned his private pilot certification while working for the city of Buckeye, according to an online tribute posted on the city's website.


McMahon is survived by his wife and three children. His family has set up a memorial fund at Desert Schools Federal Credit Union.

BUCKEYE, AZ - A plane that took off from the Buckeye airport crashed in the Gila Bend Mountains on Tuesday, killing two occupants.

According to Ian Gregor, a public affairs manager with the FAA, a Vans RV-7 left Buckeye and was expected to return about 10 a.m. Tuesday. 

The City of Buckeye announced on Wednesday afternoon that John McMahon, the city's Airport Coordinator, passed away in the crash. The other person killed in the crash has not been identified. 

The aircraft was reported overdue and a search was conducted. Wreckage of the plane was located about 17 miles southwest of Buckeye before 5 p.m. Tuesday. 

The NTSB and FAA are investigating the cause of the crash. 

A memorial fund for John's family has been set up at Desert Schools Federal Credit Union. 

Account Name: Memorial Account for John McMahon
Routing: 122187238
Account Type: Savings
Account #: 00005068290001

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